Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida Allierat#r
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MfSS WARD SPEAKS
Miss Barbara Ward, world-famous economist, speak's Wednesday morning in Florida Gym at a campus campuswide
wide campuswide Religion-In-Life Week Convocation. Miss Ward received a standing ovation at the end of her
speech. (Photo by Nick Arroyo)

Ward Stresses'City of Man

By ARLENE CAPLAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Praise is fine if you dont
inhale, Lady Jackson said in
answer to the standing ovation she
received after Dr. Reitzs intro introduction
duction introduction as one of the most in influential
fluential influential women in the world today
at yesterdays Religion-In-Life
convocation in the Florida Gym.
Barbara Ward, known to her
readers as Lady Jackson, is for former
mer former foreign affairs editor of The
Economist and a frequent contri contributor
butor contributor to the Sunday Magazine of
the New York Times. She is noted
as a distinguished author, lectur lecturer
er lecturer and commentator on contem contemporary
porary contemporary economic, political and
cultural problems.
Man became armed before he
became wise, Lady Jackson told
UF students and faculty in her
opening remarks regarding The
City Os Man, the title of her
speech.
We are on a spaceship, she
said. It is more comfortable than
that of the spacetwins, but just as
vulnerable the spaceship,
earth, is between us and annihila annihilation,
tion, annihilation, she said. Communicating
the daylights out of practically
everything is a threat because it
causes indirection and offers no
clue about lethal things.
The only way this journey will not
end in final disaster, Miss Ward
explained, will be with the reali realization
zation realization of three things of the es essence
sence essence of a peaceful domestic so society.
ciety. society. These principles orthings
of the essence are regulation of
power (the law), acceptance of the
idea of arbitration, and a consen consensus
sus consensus of limits on great debates
(dialogue).
Miss Ward said of todays em embryonic
bryonic embryonic uncertainty, The seed
does not look like the harvest. The
stumbling hominid was laughed at
by apes. The weakness of innova innovation,
tion, innovation, she emphasized, must not
discourage you. A wall looks solid
until it falls down.
The obstacles of National Or Order,

Vol. 58, No. 80

der, Order, Miss Ward continued, are
based on a disproportion between
power, wealth and dialogues. She
explained this disproportion has
resulted in the need for mediating
institutions between the major po powers,
wers, powers, namely the U. S., Russia and
possibly China.
The competition for the weaker
states between the powers is the
cause of war, Miss Ward said.
She noted that war; the source of
an imperial imbalance, could be
lessened through the U. N. by the
development of an international
trusteeship for weaker states (cit (citing
ing (citing Southeast Asia as one of these
states) to provide security and
prevent rivalry.
Another alternative is the fed federation
eration federation of federations, a phase
Miss Ward said follows that of the
nation-state.
War, defined by Miss Ward,
is taking those disputes that can cannot
not cannot be solved by meditation into
our own hands.
She spoke of modernization and
the startling rate of growth in the
North Atlantic whose national in income
come income is 75 per cent of the entire
world. The United States added
more in national income than all
of those nations to the south of us,
she said.
These things, Miss Ward said,
have created unrest before and
they will continue to create unrest.
The essence of the issues is the
inability of aspiration and know knowledge,
ledge, knowledge, to exist in the throes of
T
Koshler Named
L. J. Koshler will serve as dir director
ector director of UF Food Service until
a permanent replacement is found
for Guy Welborn, who resigned
last Friday.
Koshler was assistant director
of Food Service under Welborn.
It came as a bit of a shock
to us, Koshler said of Welborns
resignation.

University of Florida

civilization which boils down to
the bloody rich vs. the bloody
poor, Miss Ward says.
The paradoxical world, the two
dialogues of democracy and com communism.
munism. communism. and the common stock
of the Jews, Greeks and Christ Christians
ians Christians should result in a unified
humanity, she emphasized.
We have a possibility of a con conversation
versation conversation (between the Russians
and the Americans) because of the
common root, she explained.
The answer to Can we build a
city of man? can be found in
humanity. Our essential contri contribution
bution contribution will be in the Brotherhood
of Man. Meet him in your neigh neighborhood,
borhood, neighborhood, she urged. Recognize
man wherever you meet him.
We should rise above being
murmerings of our own selves.
The'self, the egoism of man himself
should change, she explained.
Then, Miss Ward concluded,
we can speak the dialogue of
humanity.

Council Emphasizes Autonomy

By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Near the end of an exciting, but tiring Legis Legislative
lative Legislative Council meeting, George Blaha, secretary
of legislative affairs, rose from his seat to
philosophize a bit.
The council laughed when Dick Thompson,
SG vice-president, said he couldnt philosophize,
but must stick to the issues.
Blaha retorted to the chuckling council, Ive
tolerated you-all for the whole year. Then be
went into some serious business.
I cant do this, but I would like someone to
ask for a rider to the Lyceum Council request
saying that only students can control the ac activities
tivities activities put on by the Lyceum Council,
Blaha was prompted to make this request
by many complaints from Lyceum Council mem members
bers members about the new Public Functions Manager
of the Florida Union.
According to Lyceum members, Mrs. Eleanor

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Council Party
Lines Vanish

By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Where were the party lines at Tuesday nights Legislative Council
meeting?
Party leaders were against the passage of a special request for
funds for the Gainesville Tutorial Program. More than 100 Florida
students participated in the program aimed at helping underprivileged
children in the Gainesville area.
The council, after heated debate, gave the program $385.50 for
instructional materials, standardized tests and transportation.

After the request was made by
Bing Michael, chairman of the
budget and finance committee, the
debate began. George Blaha, sec secretary
retary secretary of legislative affairs,
started the fireworks.
I think wed be giving more
money to people off-campus than
on campus, Blaha complained re referring
ferring referring to the student tutorial
service at the UF.
Mike Malaghan, secretary of the
interior, talked about the merits of
the program which include building
good relationships with the towns townspeople
people townspeople and giving students a chance
to help other people.
The money will be spent byUF
students, Malaghan answered
Blaha.
There are precedents for this
activity, Malaghan explained.
Other student activities get
money for off-campus activities.
Judy Marx, head of the tutorial
program, explained the suctions of

i
%_
Marx

affairs and on tours of museums,
and other areas the children sel seldom
dom seldom visit.
This is not a chartered organi organization,
zation, organization, criticized Skip Haviser,
minority party floor leader. We
spent a lot of time with the live livestock
stock livestock committee to make it a
legally chartered group. The ac activities
tivities activities are fine activities, although
they parallel the Headstart ac activities.
tivities. activities.
The Federal Government spent
(See Council, Page 3)

the program. UF
students not only
tutor under underprivileged
privileged underprivileged child children
ren children in school
areas in which
they are defici defici-11
-11 defici-11 Si
ent, but they take
them to cultural

Roberts, the new manager, has beey trying to
take away the power of the students.
Bruce Flower, house and stage manager of
Lyceum Council, stood up to explain the un unusual
usual unusual request.
Ive been on Lyceum Council for a year
and a half. Everything has run well until this
position wasiilled. As I understand it, shes
been hired to help with bookings, sell tickets
and give advice not take over.
She wanted usherettes. I told her she could
have them in the Florida Auditorium, but that
we could handle our own performances. We never
have any trouble with usherettes in the gym,
only in the auditorium.
We get the money to underwrite the perfor performances
mances performances from the students and students should
handle the money, Flower concluded.
Mrs. Roberts has a staff to handle the ticket
sales, Flower explained. But Leg Council
will still set the prices. She just works for us,
he emphasized.

Robison

Candidate
Weathers
Operation
Tom Smith, Decision Party
candidate for Clerk of the Honor
Court, underwent surgery to cor correct
rect correct a bleeding ulcer at J. Hillis
Miller Health Center at 3 a.m.
Wednesday.
Smiths condition last night was
described as good by a hospital

' '
Smith

several stomach nerves, and this
will reduce the flow of hydrochlor hydrochloric
ic hydrochloric acid to the stomach.
The operation also enlarged a
stomach valve, which will enable
food to pass through the stomach
more quickly, Smith said.
Mr. and Mrs. Smith said their
son was resting comfortably,
but did not know how soon he would
be able to get out of bed.
We dont know when Tom will
(See Smith, Page 3)

Block

official, and his
parents Mr. and
Mrs. Henry
Smith of Tampa,
said he was do doing
ing doing very well.
Smith said the
surgery severed



Page 2

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Jan. 27, 1966

-of

International
MARKET HOPE ... Foreign Secretary Michael Stewart said Tuesday
Britain was ready and willing to negotiate for entry into the European
Common Market, provided the right conditions could be obtained.
Stewart said the very success of the seven-member European Free
Trade Area (EFTA) which Britain leads, and the Common Market,
was. causing an economic division which was of much concern to the
British government.
CONG FOILED . Troops of the U. S. Armys Ist Cavalry Division
used jeep-mounted radar today to foil a Communist ambush attempt
along North-South Highway 1, South Viet Nams Highway of Death.
The Navy disclosed three heavy bombardments of Viet Cong positions
Tuesday. A military spokesman said 100 guerrillas tried to stage the
ambush on Highway 1 near An Duong, 300 miles northeast of Saigon
and 50 miles north of the coastal city of Qui Nhon.
TOMB OF ICE . Cause of the crash of an
Air India jetliner may never he determined and
115 of its 117 victims will lie undisturbed un under
der under deep snows of Mont Blanc for months to
come, and perhaps forever, French officials
said Tuesday. Faced with snowstorms and near
100-mile-an-hour winds Tuesday, mountain
rescuers abandoned attempts to recover the
bodies of all but two persons killed in the crash
Monday of the giant Boeing 707.
National
LATIN TERROR . Secretary of State Dean Rusk said Wednesday
a recent Communist conclave in Cuba signaled a stepup of terror and
subversive activity on the Latin American continent. Rusk told the
House Foreign Affairs Committee many of the Latin American dele delegates
gates delegates to the Communist-sponsored tri-continental meeting in Havana
left with bags stuffed with money to stimulate subversion in their
home countries.
REPEAL FADES . After two days, President Johnsons right
to work repeal bill doesnt seem to have a prayer of a chance in the
1966 Senate. Senate Democratic Leader Mike Mansfield probably will
drop after today his effort to bring up the House-passed bill during
the Senates special two-hour morning period when the move is not
subject to debate. The bill, blocked by Dirksen last fall, would repeal
section 14-B of the Taft-Hartley Act.
WASTED AID . Secretary of State Dean
Rusk conceded Tuesday that some U u S. aid
to South Viet Nam has been stolen. Rusk and
aid administrator David E. Bell also said Viet
Cong officials South Vietnamese and U. S.
personnel may be sharing in profits from black
market and other illegal operations based on
the U. S. assistance program. They said major
efforts are underway to halt diversion of aid
funds.
Florida
F.S.U. LAW . Dean Mason Ladd said Tuesday staffing was nearly
complete for the first year of instruction at Florida State Universitys
law school which opens its doors to students this fall. Ladd, who doesnt
formally take over as head of the new school until July 1, said two
professors had agreed to accept teaching posts and a third was expected
to accept while he was in the state capital.
NIXES NEW ROUTE . Opponents of routing the cross-Florida
barge canal through the Oklawaha River were given a final chance
Tuesday to voice their objections, but their arguments appeared to
be futile. Secretary of State Tom Adams seemed to sum up the feelings
of officials who attended the public hearing when he reminded opponents
the canal route has been known since 1942 and I cant understand
why you did not speak out years ago.

Florida Ailifator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements, and
to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical or erroneous insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(lj one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of ihc University of Florida and Is
published five times weekly except during May, June-, and July when It Is published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class
matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

Scandal Rocks Miami;
Cheating Ring Exposed

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (UPI)
University of Miami officials ques questioned
tioned questioned students today hoping to
learn how many freshmen cheated
on exams which were stolen be before
fore before test time and sold for as
much as S4O a copy.
If it is determined that cheat cheating
ing cheating was widespread the tests will
have to be regiven, ArminGropp,
the universitys vice president for
academic studies, said.
The school revealed Tuesday
that copies of exams, one for a
course attended by more than 2,100
students were stolen from a pro professors
fessors professors desk. Two students have
confessed to buying copies.
The cribbing incident was one
of several being investigated at
colleges which recently held winter
exams. But none apparently were
of the proportion of last years
winter cheating scandal which led
to the resignation of 109 cadets
from the Air Force Academy in
Colorado.
At Rhode Island University, of officials
ficials officials said students obtained
copies or mimeograph stencils of
two examinations by rummaging
through trash barrels. But this
Off And On
At Wolfie's
The lights literally went out in
Ramada Inn and Wolfies Restau Restaurant
rant Restaurant yesterday afternoon, but all
was expected to be back to normal
this morning.
Utilities were cut off at 3 p.m.
for a three-hour period, but ser service
vice service had been restored shortly
after 6 p.m.
The Gainesville Sun reported
yesterday in front-page headlines
that Ramada Inn Owners File for
Bankruptcy. According to the As Associated
sociated Associated Press story, a bankruptcy
petition had been filed in federal
court by a Miami company owning
banks in Dania and Lake Worth and
property in Cocoa Beach and
Gainesville.
Early reports rumored that the
Wingreen Corp., which has the
franchise to the restaurant and
167-room motel, had gone into
bankruptcy and receivership.
Charlatans Out
The Charlatan goes on sale today
in front of the Florida Bookstore
and the Gator Sport Shop, accord according
ing according to Bill Killeen, Charlatan edi editor
tor editor and publisher.
Killeen and Company have re recently
cently recently weathered a court trial in
Tallahassee and are now attempt attempting
ing attempting to expand sales on all southern
campuses. This issue is a special
one, entitled The Best of Pod.
{irregulars Os 1
Fine Quality!
Towels Bedspreads
Carpet Ends
Sport Duck*Blankets
jThrow Rugs*Carpets*Sheets |
! HENDERSONS i
MILL STORE
Only 1 Hour From UF
FISH AND SHOP
, U.S. 19, Crystal River

became known before testing, and
the exams were changed.
At the University of Maine, about
100 of 700 students taking an
introductory psychology exam fin finished
ished finished the two-hour test in 30 min minutes,
utes, minutes, turning in perfect or near
perfect papers. But officials said
students apparently memorized
crib files based on previous
tests.
An investigation underway at
Monmouth College in New Jersey

End Seen Imminent I
In U.S. Bomb Lull I

WASHINGTON (UPI) Resump Resumption
tion Resumption of U. S. air attacks on North
Viet Nam appeared imminent yes yesterday.
terday. yesterday.
The prospect of a presidential
order to resume the attacks came
after disclosure that the North
Vietnamese have used the 34-day
lull in the bombing to undertake
an unprecedented buildup of rebel
forces in the South.
The bombing pause was dis discussed
cussed discussed at a 2 1/2 hour meeting
Tuesday night between President
Johnson and congressional lead leaders.
ers. leaders. Johnson gave the lawmakers
a grim report on the failure of
his peace offensive and the in increasing
creasing increasing danger to U. S. forces.
The White House said no final
decision id been reached late
Tuesday night. But congressmen
came aw. y from the meeting con convinced
vinced convinced a presidential order to re resume
sume resume the air attacks was inev inevitable.
itable. inevitable.
They said only the timing ap appeared
peared appeared to be in doubt. The pause
in air attacks was begun Christ Christmas
mas Christmas Eve and accompanied by an
intense effort to mobilize inter international
national international diplomatic pressurefor an
armistice.
Johnson had hoped it would per persuade
suade persuade Hanoi and the Viet Cong
guerrillas to come to the con conference
ference conference table or at least engage
in a reciprocal downgrading of
military efforts.
Instead, it was learned, there
was substantial evidence of a heavy
increase in the flow of supplies
and troops from North Viet Nam
into the South during the bombing
lull.

GET AWAY FROM
:: IT ALL . FOLLOW
I THE "GOOD EATING"
I CROWD TO THE
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* BAKING FRESH EVERY 15 MINUTES
* FRESH SALADS 1
*FREE PRIVATE BANQUET ROOM_
I Special DiscountTo|
I All Students And I


more closely paralleled that taj
ing place here. Monmouth official
said they were checking repJ
that copies of final exams we]
stolen and sold to students. 1
spokesman said it was not y,
known if the rumors are sut
stantiated.
Dr. William R. Butler, the Uni
versity of Miamis vice preside!
of student affairs, said the ac
ministration was still on the oj
timistic side about the numben
students involved-

The evidence, based on aeria!
photographs and reports from re!
fugees, was being weighed by the!
administration. It indicated!
among other things, that true!
traffic was now traveling by day-1
light to depots in the souther!
part of North Viet Nam and Laos!
Until the bombing stopped sue!
traffic was able to move only aJ
night. I
, It also showed that military!
infiltration from North to South!
Viet Nam has been kept up and!
that the Communists were taking!
advantage of the pause to repair!
bridges, roads and communi-|
cations facilities damaged in the!
raids.
r m6derW I
Shoe Repair Shopl
I HEELS ATTACHED 1
I 5 MINS. I
I SOLES ATTACHED '
I 15 MINS.
I At 2 Locations I
I CAROLYN PLAZA |
I FR 6-0315 |
1 And |
I 101 N. Main St. I
I Opp. Ist Nat'l Bank I
| FR 6-5211 |



Investigation Called For

Council Protests Electrical Rates

By Fran Snider
Alligator Staff Writer
Students pay for Qver half the
electricity used in UF class classrooms,
rooms, classrooms, Legislative Council
member David Vosloh claimed at
Tuesday nights meeting.
Vosloh presented, and the coun council
cil council passed, a
solution author-B'. (
izing a five-manHff
corn mitt tM to in-Bf
vestigate
trical rates at the^^^HE 1 JjWlp
The issue arose
after people in the married vil villages
lages villages started complaining about
their electrical bills. In Diamond

7^3olls**-
jAwml
STOCK TAKING CLEARANCE
NOW YOU CAN SAVE 25% 30% ON ODD LOTS, BROKEN
SIZES & COLOR RANGES, AND MANUFACTURER'S DIS DISCO
CO DISCO NTI NUED STYLES---
MEN'S KUPPENHEIMER SUITS
Were $1 1 5-$ 125 NOW SB9-$99.90
MEN'S STYLEMART SUITS
Were S6O NOW $44.90
MEN'S FAMOUS-NAME SPORTCOATS
Were S3O-SBO NOW $24.90-$59.90
MEN'S DACRON & COTTON PANTS
Were $5.98-$6.98 NOW $2.99
MEN'S LONG-SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS
Were $4-$8.95 NOW 99 MENS SHOP STREET FLOOR
REVLON INTIMATE SPRAY COLOGNE, SPECIAL $2
SAMSONITE JETPAK
Was $25 NOW $19.95
FITTED cosmetic bags
Were $2-$4 NOW $1.49
FLOOR
CASHMERE SWEATERS
Were $lB NOW $9.99-
MISSES', WOMEN'S & JUNIOR DRESSES
Were $9-S4O NOW 1/2 PRICE
UNTRIMMED COATS
Were $25-SB9 NOW $ 1 6.50-$59.50
WOMEN/SWEAR-2nd FLOOR
EVELYN PEARSON, BARBIZON, ARTEMIS
AND OTHER ROBES
Were $5-S4O NOW $1 .99- $16.99
famous-name nylon tricot slips
and petticoats
Were $3-sl3 NOW $1.99-$7.99
famous-name nylon tricot
<> OTHER PANTIES AND PETTIPANTS
& Weresl.so-$5 N0W996-$2.99
i mftFRIE SHOP 2nd FLOOR
WifanZ-
W 22 E. Univ. Ave.

village, some of the bills ran
as high as $59 in September.
This is only one dollar less than
the rent on the apartments.
Vosloh charged that the utility
rate set up by the Department
of Plants and Grounds is exces excessively
sively excessively high. The UF pays .75
cents per KWH for their elec electricity.
tricity. electricity.
The difference of 1.75 cents per
KWH is charged as miscellan miscellaneous.
eous. miscellaneous.
Why is this rate so high?
Vosloh questioned. He said the
Florida Power and Light Co. said
they would sell the electricity
for 1.59 cents per KWH.
An executive at the Florida Pow Power

er Power and Light Co. said the UF
is the largest local user of elec electricity.
tricity. electricity. The lowest rate cate category
gory category they have is the .75 cents
per KWH.
Vosloh asked permission to take
the matter to UF President J.
Wayne Reitz. He plans to ask
Re|tz to establish a five-man com committee
mittee committee to investigate the excess
charges.
Maureen Collins, Leg Council
representative from the School of
Journalism, asked that the resol resolution
ution resolution specifically request there be
three students on the committee.
SG Treasurer Steve Cheeseman
explained that SG will pay for the
electricity used on the handball and

tennis courts. He estimated this
would cost about $250 a month at
the current rates.
Cheeseman stated he was fully
in support of this proposal.
The resolution, as finally pass passed
ed passed by the council, reads:
Resolved that the Leg Council
in the interests of the students
of this campus, specifically, the
residents of the four married vil villages
lages villages and the fraternities and sor sororities
orities sororities who are forced to pur purchase
chase purchase their electricity and water
from the university, does hereby
request that an investigation into
the utility rate structure charged
by the Plants and Grounds Div Division
ision Division of the UF be instigated by
a five-man committee authorized
with investigative powers and ap appointed
pointed appointed by Pres. Reitz. It is
also requested that three student
members be appointed to this com committee;
mittee; committee; two from married vil villages
lages villages and one from a fraternity
or sorority effected.
SMITH
(From Page 1)
be able to get out of the hospital,
either, Mrs. Smith said. It all
depends on how fast he recovers.
Smiths parents said he prob probably
ably probably would not be able to actively
campaign, but did not think he
would drop out of the race.
Tom is still under anesthetic
from the operation, so we havent
talked to him, Mrs. Smith said
yesterday afternoon, but were
sure hell stay in the race.
Both the Smiths said there was
no reason at present why their son
should not oe able to serve as
Clerk, i f he should win.
It will take him a few weeks
to get back on his feet, Henry
Smith said, but we expect him
to be almost fully recovered by
election time.
As of yesterday evening, Smith
had received six pints of O nega negative
tive negative blood. Decision Party mem members
bers members said they planned to replace
the blood Smith had used and to
supply more should he need it.
Smith, 19, suffered from sto stomach
mach stomach ulcers for three years, his
father said.
This operation is expected to
permanently curtail pain from the
ulcer, he said.
His campaign manager, Tom
Carnes, said that, since Smith
couldnt stomp the dorms for him himself,
self, himself, other students would.

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W BALANCE FRONT WHEELS
(a sl4 value!) ALIGN FRONT END
GOOD THURS., FRIDAY & SATURDAY
'
AT GAINESVILLE'S
ALACHUA FIRESTONE
Service Center
615 N. Main St.
ONE BLOCK N. OF CITIZEN'S BANK
7 a.m.-6 p.m., Mon. Thru Sat. Tel. 372-3010

Thursday, Jan. 27, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

I Party
Lines
1 Vanish j
(From Page 1)
$50,000 on the Headstart Program
in the Gainesville area, but the
project was ruined by local offici officials
als officials of the program.
This is out of the realm of SG.
We have no business in this. This
has operated in the past from the
secretary of the interiors office officelet
let officelet it stay there. This is not a
student activity. It has no business
here at all.
The thing that bothers me is
the idea of a completely colored
program, complained Bud Robi Robison,
son, Robison, Leg Council member. He
asked Miss Marx if the child of a
foreign student at the UF could
participate in the program.
She assured him the child was
eligible.
Then I dont think we should be
limited by the action of former
Leg Councils, Robison respond responded.
ed. responded. We shouldnt let them limit
us.
SG President Bruce Culpepper
explained, We started talking a about
bout about this last spring. At first we
talked about giving SBOO into some
nebulous fund for a tutorial pro program,
gram, program, but we then decided to have
the people involved show us a de definite
finite definite need.
Theres a very simple solution
to that problem, added Michael.
Just have them hand in an item itemized
ized itemized list of expenses to the SG
Treasurer not to exceed $112.
An amendment to delete the
sll2 was defeated.
After the previous question was
called, the council voted to end
debate. This required a two-thirds
majority and SG Vice President
Dick Thompson commented he was
unable to tell a two-thirds major majority
ity majority by voice and requested a hand
count.
A voice majority seemed obvious
when the actual special request was
voted upon, yet Sam Block, major majority
ity majority party floor leader, asked for a
hand vote.
In a last ditch effort, Haviser
asked if there was a quorum %f
Leg Council members present.
There was and the Tutorial Service
was given $385.50.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florid! Alligator, Thursday, Jan. 27, 1966

escalated
values
Two, four, six, eight, lets go on and escalate.
Those words sound somewhat appropriate in lieu
of the current state of affairs in Viet Nam. Es Escalate
calate Escalate has left the world of the unused words and,
like disestablishmentarianism, antidisestablishmen antidisestablishmentarianism,
tarianism, antidisestablishmentarianism, and supercalifragilisticexpialadocious,
has entered the world of common day expression.
Everywhere things are being escalated. In Viet
Nam, its the war; at home, its the draft calls; on
the highway, its traffic deaths; the taxes, prices, etc.
Everywhere, everything seems to be escalating.
The world of automation is rapidly approaching a
reality. Time speeds by much faster than in the old
days. The cool, blase fifties have been replaced by
the frantic sixties. Let us hope there shall be the
sensible seventies.
And mankind marches on. Technologically, the pace
proceeds at a rate almost incapable of compre comprehension.
hension. comprehension. Science invents and creates new labor laborsaving
saving laborsaving devices faster than the non-scientific journa journalist
list journalist can report them. The pace is frightening, and
yet it continues to accelerate.
And, in perspective, it seems that the vision of
the future as comprehended by George Orwell and
Aldous Huxley is quickly becoming more and more
feasible. The creator of the once wildly unrealistic
Buck Rogers comic strip now sits in stunned silence
as the fantasies of his pen have turned into realities.
Jules Vernes wildest dreams have come true,
H. G. Wells has only to await the coming of the
Food of the Gods, and Dick Traceys magnetic
space coupes are probably only mere years away.
Even James Bond, 007 himself, cannot be taken too
un-seriously, since much of his spy, anti spy apparati
exists already. Any day now, you may expect a
Chinese-backed putsch on Fort Knox. After all, the
laser-beam is a reality, as are jet-propelled flight
suits for army combat men.
Only last week a nuclear mishap almost occurred
at Mayport Naval Base in Florida, and the same day
U. S. lost a nuclear weapon somewhere off Spain.
All Emilio Largos and Ernst Blofelds take heed.
Perhaps we are finally catching up with our ima imaginations
ginations imaginations in this day of escalated everythings. Per Perhaps,
haps, Perhaps, just perhaps, we are even surpassing those
imaginations, which in part results in the frenetic
nature of our society and the tangled nerve-endings
that keep psychiatrists in a booming business. For,
like it or not, some of the less adaptable persons
are ill-suited to the realities (if they are) of the
modern day.
Bring a backwoods boy from the mountains of
western North Carolina or eastern West Virginia
out into the world of today and he would be as lost
as the proverbial puritan in Babylon.
Things are being invented at such a fantastic pace
that the U. S. Patent Department has surrendered
any attempt to artfully discriminate between the
newfangled devices. Often repetition of patented
articles occurs.
The courts and, indeed, the Constitution have not
kept pace with the times. Always 20 to 30 years
behind the rest of society, the courts have them themselves
selves themselves accelerated their pace, especially since the
landmark Brown vs. Topeka case in 1954, yet re retardation
tardation retardation is still evident.
For, one thing is evident. Though times may change,
values change more slowly.
Perhaps this is good, since some solid ground is
necessary in a society which is becoming as shifting
and variable as that of ours.
Here is the rub. Old values spawned and nourished
in the olden days have been shattered by modern day
technology. The frug has replaced Harry James, and
even Elvis is almost passe. People are searching for
a new value system and have to find one.
The old values seem to many somewhat out-of-date.
Religious dogma, economic philosophy and sex stan standards
dards standards have been questioned, often found lacking and
have been partially discarded. No where have new,
substantive values arisen to take their place. Hugh
Heffners attempt to reconstruct sexual morals to
meet the modern times and a playboys world,
agnosticism and unitarianism is advancing while the
old Protestant religious stand still or grow only
minimally.
Thus, it is that the current Religion-In-Life Week
i on campus should afford students who are tossed in
the maze of modern times to seek out and perhaps
find and solidify values which can be employed to add
substance to the James Bond world in which we live.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Editor Benny Cason
Managing editor Ron Spencer
! Executive editor Drex Dobson
Assistant managing editor Fran Snider
Sports editor Andy Moor
Editor-of-this-issue R n Spencer

The Florida Alligator
'A Modify Ia 0 Pww. Pfctt AiA
"I'm Ronald Reagan Welcome To 'Death Valley Days'"
speaking out out(Editors
(Editors out(Editors Note: The following column, presented under the Speak Speaking
ing Speaking Out heading, was written by Rev. Thaxton Springfield of the
University Methodist Church, in relation to the current Religion-In-
Life Week on campus, and is entitled Called To Be Human.

quick glance at the theme for this years Religion-In-Life evokes
some interesting responses. Who is calling whom? What is the nature
of the call? How do I know it if and when I hear it?
These are some of the responses I feel when I look at the theme.
But most intriguing of all of my responses to it is: What else can a
man be called to be except to be called to be human?
One could rather naively dismiss the whole jnailer by simply
saying: I really cant be called to be anyting except a human being,
and let the thing drop with that. But it appears that such is not the
case at all. Men are being called to be other than human. And it would
seem that some men are being compelled to be other than human.
To be a human, at least in part, means to be a decision-maker.
But it means more than this; it means to be able to weigh the conse consequences
quences consequences of alternative decisions; it means to be willing and able to
assume the responsibilities of the decisions made. It means communi communication,
cation, communication, and communication means community, and community means
more than one. No man is or can be an island unto himself.
I understand, therefore, that the University Religious Association
understands that modern man in general and present day students in
particular are being called to be something other than decision decisionmakers
makers decisionmakers with willingness and ability to assume responsibility for their
decisions and are being called to surrender their individual identity
into a blob of uninformity and conformity and thus there is a need
to reaffirm the calling to be human.
There are some grounds for believing that man is being called to
live on two levels. To over-simplify, but to get it before us, let us
call the two levels the private and the public. There is considerable
evidence that many have come to feel that private behavior has no
public consequence. That what one does in his private life is in fact
no concern of anyone else. And although few would oppose responsible
freedom in the matter of private life, none could deny the wisdom of
Karl Jaspars observation: The man who cannot live in peace with
his neighbor the mischief maker, or secret ill wisher or slanderer or
liar, the adulterer or undutiful son or negligent parent, or lawbreaker
by his conduct, which even behind locked doors is never wholly pri private
vate private keeps peace from the world. He does in miniature, what on a
large scale makes mankind destroy itself. Nothing that man is and does
is quite without political significance. (The Future of Mankind, pg. 24)
Admittedly, it is not easy to be human in a age of punch cards
automation, outer space travel and ceaseless war. It is not easy to
see oneself or another as a subject, when too often we are seen as
objects. It is not easy to feel as a person when too often we are treated
as a thing. But people are more than objects and more than things,
even in a world where the computer seems to be God.
The focus of this weeks emphasis in Religion-In-Life Week seems
to me to be an effort to call our attention to this fact in the hope that
we may take new courage to respond to the call to be human.

from the
basement
By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Suring political campaigns, a lot of political
- static is generated about Student Government
being run for the STUDENTS at the UF. Somehow
this interest in the students welfare appears to be
lost after the campaign is over. The high id eals
belonging to the political candidates disappear down
the drain as party issues take precedence over
students benefit.
Tuesday night, at the Legislative Council meeting,
party lines vanished as Leg Council members served
the student body at the UF in a manner that cannot be
commended highly enough. The student body repre representatives
sentatives representatives talked about issues and protected the
students interest in a meeting that ran twice the
usual amount of time and covered the campus from
end to end.
If I had attended every Leg Council meeting since
the beginning of SG at the UF, I would venture to say
that this was the best meeting ever held. But my
experience at covering Leg Council meetings for
The Alligator has only extended over the past year.
And during the past year I have never seen a finer
meeting.
Dick Thompson, vice-president of the student body,
could have easily muttered an I told you so, under
his breath as the Leg Council entered a discussion
of the usurpation of student authority by a new em employee
ployee employee of the Florida Union. The council was dis discussing
cussing discussing the position of Public Functions Manager
recently established by William Rion, Florida Union
Director. Thompson has questioned this positions
power for several months. Leg Council, rather than
passing a special request for funds to sponsor the
Peter Nero Concert on March 18, took a far differ different
ent different path. They passed the request alright. But they
specifically said the funds must be handled by
STUDENTS, not by the Public Functions Manager.
David Vosloh brought a long over-waited issue
before Leg Council when he complained of the ex exorbitant
orbitant exorbitant prices being charged students for electricity
by the Plants and Grounds Department of the UF.
The true party split when discussion arose-on
funds to the Tutorial Program in the Secretary of
the Interiors office. Both party leaders were ve vehemently
hemently vehemently against the proposal to give funds to tutor
under-priviledged children in the Gainesville area,
yet the council chose to give them every penny they
asked for in their budget request.
The most impressive thing about the meeting was
the refusal of council members to conform to the
rules of the hierarchy. There seems to be an un unwritten
written unwritten law in Leg Council that the party leaders
must be followed. This gives the council a rather
blind man effect. Party leaders have, in the past,
carried an unfair amount of power with their bloc
voting techniques.
As Bud Robison, Leg Council member, put it,
There is no reason we have to do what past coun councils
cils councils did. I dont think we should let the past limit
ug. Robison is right and the council agreed Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday night as they passed funds for a tutorial program
that last years council had voted down.
People werent afraid to say anthing Tuesday night.
Names were rightfully called and people were pegged
for what they were. Skip Haviser, minority floor
leader and one of the bad men on the tutorial
program question, argued against a power coalition
of the Vice-President of the, Student Body and the
Secretary of Legislative Affairs picking the winner
for a Leg Council trophy honoring a member for
service to the student body. Haviser claimed the
trophy would turn into a political reward and since
the Secretary of Legislative Affairs is picked by
the winning party, the conclusions he drew seemed
correct.
In the past, Leg Council meetings have been
somewhat interesting examples of a slightly dis disinterested
interested disinterested group of people. It is very hard to meet
every other Tuesday night and discuss seemingly
petty issues for an endless amount of time. No one
could question the difficulty in keeping enthusiasm
going for the students attending the Leg Council
meetings. Yet, the students have attended -rtf&etings.
There has always been a quorum present and issues
have been discussed, although too few people parti participated.
cipated. participated. In fact, the same peoples hands went up to
question and to state opinions almost consistently.
Tuesday night, no one could say enough. The
interest and enthusiasm of the members was, as
SG President Bruce Culpepper described it, Just
magnificent. The meeting was run well, few people
spoke out of turn and those who did, did so out of
an enthusiasm that cannot be criticized. The men
and women at the meeting conducted themselves in
the interest of the student body never seen before on
probably any college car pus.
Congratulations for a job well done to those leaving
the council in a few weeks, and keep up the good work,
those who will remain as servants of the student body.
Work, like people on Leg Council accomplish, often
goes unnoticed. If Leg Council members would take
as active an interest as they did Tuesday night at
every council meeting, the campus would not only
notice, but heap blessings on their excellence.



Opinion Against Food Service

By BRUCE MATZA
Alligator Staff Writer
(Editors Note: What do UF
tudents think of Food Service?
lere. in an on-the-street poll
aken last week by The Alligator,
irior to the announcement of the
esignation of Foodservice Direc Direcor
or Direcor Gay Welborn, are random com comnents
nents comnents made in campus snack bars
t nd cafeterias.)

Last Sunday, I Eric Smith, sec secratary
ratary secratary of mens affairs, conducted
i survey on UF Food Service. We
covered the major food outlets on
campus collecting some of the stu student
dent student opinion which prevailed. The
question asked was, What do you
think of Food Service . What is
your opinion of the food, service
and facilities? The answers are
as follows:

(Graham, Area)
RICHARD CRISSAN, lUC:The
workers are real nice, but the
prices going up 10? on all specials
makes it no cheaper than off offcampus.
campus. offcampus. A charcoal grill would
make meat less greasy.
BETTY WINTER, 3AS: The
staff is on the ball . theyre
good, helpful and cooperative.
DAVE VEZZETTI, 4AR: The
coffee isnt bad for instant, but the
rest of the menu ...
DIANE JOHNSON, 3AR: Gra Graham
ham Graham is the best snack bar on
campus.
(Tolbert Area)
BILL MUNDY, 2UC: Sanitation
conditions have improved since the
beginning of the year but still have
far to go.

La Fa ce Urges Student
A I d For Kelly Camp

Ron LaFace, 4LW, head of the
Kelly Go-Team on campus, has
urged all interested students to
participate in the governorship
campaign of Sen. Scott Kelly of
Lakeland.
It is the duty of the students
as well as the faculty to protect
and promote their university by
supporting the candidate of their
choice, LaFace said. We feel
that Kelly has the most to olfer
and we are behind him 100 per
cent.
LaFace said that a number of
student leadfers have joined the
Kelly team, including Bruce Cul Culpepper,
pepper, Culpepper, SG president; Bruce Star Starting,
ting, Starting, Florida Blue Key president;
Chip Block, Blue Key speakers
bureau chairman and Oz Howe,
Law Review editor.
Others of the team include Ed Edward
ward Edward Kay and Dennis McGillicuddy,
former Law Review editors;

I Announces. j£eto ££>tore
9 FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE
9 OPEN 9:30 a.m.
9 CLOSE 6:00 p m.
M EVERY DAY
OPEN FRI. NITE
9 TIL 9 in \ K-Hr/

JIM SHUMP, 2UC: They need
to increase wages for better help.
DON RUPERT, lUC: If Food
Service is a non-profit organiza organization,
tion, organization, where are the profits going?
(Rawlings)
NANCY DAULTON, lUC: The
help down there are idiots and food
is tasteless. They need another re register
gister register on the food line and someone
capable of running it.
(Hume)
ERNIE LENT, lUC: Ive found
hair in my food, and the quality of
the meals is not tops.
JOHN WOENIARK, lUC: Prices
are too high for what is being serv served
ed served and most of the glasses are
dirty.
JIM HICKS, 2UC: I eat at Hume
only because it is close by.
KAREN DECKER, lUC: The
snack bar (Graham Area) is
greasy.
SHARON McKINNEY, lUC: The
food lacks variety, its the same
basic food week after week.
DAVID MILLER, 3AR:Humeis
average for a Food Service outlet.
The portions arent very big in
relation to price. The silverware
and glasses are constantly dirty.
(Jennings)
DILL AIERT, 2UC: They lack
variety and serve too small a por portion.
tion. portion. Id rather eat at Robbies or
the Gold Coast ... I dont like the
quality of the meat that Food Ser Service
vice Service has.
(Broward)
SAM BLOCK, 3JM: The ham hamburgers
burgers hamburgers are skimpy and Broward
is never clean when I eat here.
The tables are always slopped up.

Bud Robison, Gator Growl chair chairman
man chairman and Wilson Atkinson, Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming chairman.
UF Prof Named
Dr. James R. Anderson, chair chairman
man chairman of the Department of Geo Geography
graphy Geography at the UF has been elected
to a two-year term as president
of the Southern Division of the
Association of American Geo Geographers.
graphers. Geographers.
Anderson, who joined the UF
faculty in 1960, is author of num numerous
erous numerous articles on agricultural geo geography
graphy geography and resource use.
A graduate of Indiana University
with a Ph.D. from the University
of Maryland, Dr. Anderson was
formerly with the Research Ser Service
vice Service Division of the U. S. Depart Department
ment Department of Agriculture.

man on the STREET poll

MARALYN WARNER, 2UC: I
eat at Food Service only because
of the location. The tables and
floors are filthy and they offer poor
selections and lack variety. The
salads are dried out and the cokes
are watered down. Down in Bro Broward
ward Broward the special order line is too
slow. The supervisors are okay
when you consider the conditions
they work with.
(Hub)
ROSEMARY GEARY: Theyput
out too much pastry and it gets
stale. I dont like having to wait in
the food line all day for coffee.
DOROTHY GOODMAN: Em Employees
ployees Employees should be more courteous
to students and they should have
more people working to clean off
the tables. I have often found dirty
silverware and plates.
DON WILKINS: The service
is slow and undermanned. You
never get your moneys worth on
french fries and theres too much
ice in the cokes. The employees
talk to each other and dont pay
any attention to the students.
DON MALONE: The line is tob
slow at lunch and they dont clean
the tables fast enough. The french
fries are too skimpy a portion for
the price.

f 1| f wl Bl /W ~ j
j| ILmt 1 0
ml l
11 m %\l gi y
Mu m Jk 11 I Jmmm/W E 1
B||p 1
bHI
Ibh|<
She's head over wheels slacks, jeans and 1
, mon in trim WALK SHORTS with \
for the man in trim,
FARAH MANUFACTURING CO., INC. EL PASO, TEXAS

(Editors Note: Matza comments
here on problems he encountered
in conducting this poll.)
It was interesting to note the few
stumbling blocks we fell upon dur during
ing during this poll.
At Hume we were told by the
manager that Mr. Welborn pre prefers
fers prefers that no one talk to students
or take polls about Food Service
without his permission and advance
notice.

Jerry Lee Lewis
leads the I
WUWU Star Spectacular I
A "moose LODGE
NE 16th Ave I
(SAT., JAN. 29, AT 8 P.M.) I
Sponsored By Moose Charities I
Donation $2.00 At The Door I

Thursday, Jan. 27, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

At Graham we were told that we
could talk to students but that any
opinion expressed by employees
about food service must come
from the desk of Mr. Welborn.
mins'

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Jan. 27, 1966

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
HEAVY 12x15 BIGBLOW CAR CARPET,
PET, CARPET, originally $325. Lavender
and blue dapple, loup-pile con construction,
struction, construction, damaged in one corner,
$75. MOTOROLA STEREO por portable
table portable record player. Two years
old,* new diamond needle, black
and beige, SIOO. 21* RCA black
and white TV, three years old,
tube 6 mo. old, remote control.
$l5O. 372-9708. (A-79-st-c).
FARM EQUIPMENT 1 Flexo
3 point hitch Ford Harrow, $385.
1 attachment. Two 16 bottom
plows with colters and 3 point lift,
$l5O. 1-set wheel weights, front
and rear for Ford Dexter Tractor,
$l5O. Phone 376-5826 or see at
Linda Ann Court, south Hwy. 441.
(A-74-tf-nc).
MUST SELL 1964 MODEL UNDER UNDERWOOD
WOOD UNDERWOOD office-type electric type typewriter.
writer. typewriter. Like new. $325 or best
offer. Call 462-1154. (A-79-ts-c).
ROBERTS 770 TAPEJjLECORDER
and matching speakefssso value
going for S4OO. ask for
Bob. (A-75-ts-c).
ALUMINUM ONE-MAN CAMPING
TRAILER. One owner. All equip equipped.
ped. equipped. Plenty of storage. $l5O. 512
SE 17th St. 378-1269 after 6. (A (A---
--- (A---
HOME LITE C-5 CHAINSAW. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent mechanical condition. SSO.
*SB TR-3. Extras, fast, like new,
excellent mechanical condition.
$650. Call 372-9888. (A-79-3t-p).
MUST SELL 1959 VW, excellent
condition, 4 new nylon tires, sun sunroof,
roof, sunroof, low mileage. 378-2226.
Afternoon only. (A-78-ts-c).
64 ZANELA motorcycle. 125 cc.
$l5O. Call Kip at 8-4272. (A-68-
ts-c).
2 BEDROOM 1958 Hinslee 10x47
trailer and tool shed. $1,955. Lo Located
cated Located at Town and Country Park,
lot W-l. Ph. 378-2768. (A-76-
lOt-c),
1963 YAMAHA 125 cc motorcycle.
Has electric starter, turn signals,
plus other accessories. A-l con condition.
dition. condition. Must sell! S2OO. Will throw
crash helmet and face shield with
deal. Call 372-6450 after 6 p.m.
Home all day on weekends. (A (A---
--- (A---
URGENT. MUST SELL TODAY.
Vespa 125 cc. Excellent condition.
Must see to appreciate. Call 378-
4579 or see at 324-B NE 11th St.
(A-80-lt-c).
for rent
TWO BEDROOM FURNISHED apt.
319 NW Ist. St., downtown. $65 per
month. Mr. Kaplan, 372-0481. (B (B---69-ts-c).
--69-ts-c). (B---69-ts-c).

*' wpi him-
1:00 3:04 5:08,

for rent
SPARKLING MODERN 2 bedroom
furnished apt. Delux kitchen, air
conditioning, carport and utility.
Extras. SIOO. 376-0894. (B-78-
4t-c).
NICE FURNISHED 2 room garage
apartment. Suitable for 1 or 2.
Quiet neighborhood. Call 376-1730.
After 1 p.m. (B-72-ts-c).
2 BEDROOM BRICK DUPLEX.
New, very clean. Immediate oc occupancy.
cupancy. occupancy. 10 min. from campus.
Quiet neighborly atmosphere.
SBS mo. 376-0342. (B-79-ts-c).
NEW 4 BEDROOM furnished apt.
1 block from campus. Corner of
SW 12th St. and SW 3rd Ave.
Central heat and air conditioning.
$2lO monthly. Ideal study set-up.
372-3576 day, 372-4692 home. (B (B---76-ts-c).
--76-ts-c). (B---76-ts-c).
NEED 3rd MALE ROOMMATE for
2 bedroom A.C. apartment. Large,
close to campus. 921 SW 6th Ave.,
Ph. 378-4176. (B-79-10t-c).
MMtototoMtototontotonatoatototoa.mtototo
ONE BEDROOM efficiency apt.,
furnished. All utilities supplied
except gas. 320 NW 3rd St. Call
Mr. Kaplan, 372-0481.(B-78-tf-c).
LARGE DIVIDED ROOM, 12x22,
private entrance and shower, uti utilities
lities utilities and linens included. Ph. 372-
3191 or 372-8903. (B-Ti-Zi-c).
2 BEDROOM furnished apt. Air
conditioned. 2 blocks from campus.
Married couples only. 378-1027.
(B-75-ts-c).
MALE ROOMMATE.Share modern
10x50* trailer with 7AG student.
$45, including utilities. 372-5248
between 12-1, 5-8; Campus Ext.
2991. (B-78-st-c).
TRAILER. 2 bedroom, very good
condition and rent. Quiet on its
own lot in a residential neighbor neighborhood.
hood. neighborhood. Call in evening 6-8033. (B (B---
--- (B---
TENANT FAILED OUT ALREADY!
New luxury 1 bedroom apt.,
stylishly furnished, central heat
and air conditioning, paved park parking,
ing, parking, enclosed patio. 420 SE Bth
St. 372-3576 or 372-7294. (B-80-
3t-c).
FURNISHED TRAILER. 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, bath and dinette. In Mic Micanopy
anopy Micanopy near lake with fishing
privileges. $65 monthly. Prefer
couples. Call 376-5826. (B-80-
3t-c).
FRONT CORNER SINGLE ROOM.
Also double to share. Male stu students,
dents, students, UF employees. Kitchen,
study room. 231 SE 2nd St. (B (B---
--- (B---

wanted
FEMALE TO SHARE attractive
2 bedroom apt., 1 block from Ti Tigert
gert Tigert Hall. $45 monthly. Ph. 372-
5732 after 5. (C-79-3t-c).
FEMALE TO SHARE attractive
apt. in Colonial Manor, 1/2 block
from campus. $57.50 monthly.
Available Feb. 1. Call 8-4745.
(C-80-3t-c).
VILLAGE PARK. Need 3rd room roommate.
mate. roommate. Private room. Ideal living
conditions. See at 1001 SW 16th
Ave. Apt. 110 after 12. (C-80-
2t-p).
FEMALE WANTED as fourth
roommate in Univ. Gardens Apts.,
central heat and air conditioning.
$41.25 monthly. Call* 378-3147.
(C-80-lt-c).
MALE ROOMMATE TO SHARE
2 bedroom 2nd floor apt. $32.50
per mo. each. 17 SW 24th St. Call
372-9651. (C-77-st-p).
f
help wanted
I ...
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW avail available
able available for employment for this tri trimester
mester trimester for student assistants in
room 108 of the Fla. Union. (E (E---79-st-c).
--79-st-c). (E---79-st-c).
GIRL FRIDAY, approx. 20 hrs.
per week, for light office duties
in Gainesvilles newest auto ser service
vice service center. Call 2-3010. 8-6.
(E-80-ts-c).
GRADUATE STUDENT, student
wives, or men and women with
college degree to participate in
research project. $1.25 per hour.
Phone Mrs. Williams, 2-2955.
Evenings or weekends. (E-80-
mini
" ll A ilrii
'AjA / BaBBBESS&Z9
-9 sm
TWO SIZZLING HITS
BRiGiTTe
M BdRDOT
AGENT
\3B-24-36
|H (The Warm-
Blooded Spy)
--PLUS--
That cp vo

STARTS FRIDAY-FIRST MIN gjg
mPr v ~SITUAIiON Bti
t&J HOKLESS-f1
M BUT NOT SERIOUS]' f
wmSr' S
GAINESVILLE HE'
I KIUA Y *T. 20-2400 HAWTHORNE ROAD
TRY TO OPEN THE SITUATION HOPELESS* JAIL IN"
THE SPORTSMANS CYCLE CENTER AND WIN A PASS
FOR THIS FIRST AREA SHOWING.

help wanted
FEMALE. Room and board in ex exchange
change exchange for child sitting evenings.
Room can be seen, arrangements
made, at 1037 NE 23rd Blvd. be between
tween between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. (E-80-
3t-c).
10 STUDENTS NEEDED to assist
taking inventory. Tuesday, Feb. 1,
8 a.m. Contact Mrs. Pearl Bar Barber
ber Barber at J. M. Fields Store, Thurs Thursday
day Thursday or Friday afternoon. (E-80-
2t-c).
REGISTERED NURSE for pedia pediatricians
tricians pediatricians office. State experience,
references, and permanence.
Write Box 12427, Univ. Station.
(C-74-ts-c).
autos
62 DELUXE VW Station Wagon.
Good tires, radio, heater. Will
reduce price $lO per day until
sold. 215-D Flavet in, after 5.
(G-75-10t-c).
AUGUST 1965 FIAT 600 D, 7,000
mi., Pirelli W.W. tires. Can fi finance,
nance, finance, $1,045. See Steve, 405 NE
sth Ave., Apt. 5. (G-79-3t-c).
64 MG MIDGET. All extras, low
mileage. Student must sell. $1350.
372-3251. 1045 NE 13th Place.
(G-78-ts-c).
62 PLYMOUTH FURY conver convertible.
tible. convertible. Air conditioned, power
steering, radio, automatic trans transmission.
mission. transmission. Call 8-1669 after 5 p.m.
(G-79-st-c).
Definitions
for Today
CUCKOLD:
Husband of an unfaithful
wife.
magnificent
CUCKOLD:
A very funny movie!
Claudio Ugo
CARDINALE TOGNAZZI
MMB|| 1 *3*5:05
gglls

autos
65 COMET, 4-door, automatic
transmission, padded dash, white
sidewalls, radio, heater. $l5O and
take up payments 563.29. Call
378-4809. (G-77-st-c).
1959 STUDEBAKER LARK 6
station wagon. Good mechanical
condition. S2OO. May be seen at
3117 NW 6th St. or Ph. 372-7427.
(G-80-2t-c).
Sacrifice -- 1965 AUSTIN HEALEY
MK HI. Like new, only 8,000 miles.
Still under factory warranty.
$2,595. After 5, 629-4411. Ocala,
Fla. (G-76-4t-c).
1956 DESOTO. Excellent condition.
Clean radio, heater, air condition conditioner,
er, conditioner, power steering and brakes,
good tires. S3OO. 10-12 a.m. or
4-6 p.m. 372-3753. (G-80-lt-p).
1961 TRIUMPH TR-3. 28,000
miles. Radio, heater, luggage rack,
top, tonneau cover. Like new. 378-
4571 or 378-4653. (G-80-3t-c).
NO tv THRU THURSDAY I
Ip? >CrJ BtHINO THE HEMUNEsSI
THC MOST A DOIT
Mix TOO WILI fVII
TS^lSttisKtSSrdolidl
Tetaphone 378-2434 [
SHOWING AT
1:10,3:20,5:25
7:30 and 9:40
A Wild, Wacky Chase!
WKnnKiaK m



Beal estate
BB BEST TO YOU FROM DOB DOBaB.
aB. DOBaB. Personal and complete real
'..Bte and insurance service. TOM
MBsON AGENCY, 2908 NW 13th
(372-1473. (I-72-ts-c).
1 bath CCB house.
BBort and large storage area.
lot with shrubs and
1706 NE 7th Terr., 376-
Wm. (i-75-iot-c).

REE FREE FREE
I PARKING ON IST FEDERAL LOT
BILLS BARBER SHOP
(Across From Florida Theatre)
228 West University Avenue
I TIRED OF CAMPUS RUSH-RUSH TREATMENT?
J COME SEE US FOR BACK-HOME TREATMENT
Bee Whats ew
I The Browse Shop
nCIENTARTS OF CENTRAL ASIA... Tamara Talbot
HE MILL ON THE FLOSS George Eliot
HE GREEN BERETS Robin Moore
lIFE AT THE TOP John Braine
HE SOUTHPAW Mark Harris
HE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING.. .J.R. R. Tolkien
RICTIONARY OF ARCHITECTURE Henry Saylor
I TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
Autobiography of malcolm x.
KENNEDY Theodore Sorensen
Wgm Z - T %.
HE OXFORD HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE
...Samuel Morrison
I Campus Shop & Bookstore
I We now have a
I left-wing, right wing
and middle wing
to accomodate
every taste.

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

lost-found
LOST Yellow gold charm brace bracelet
let bracelet at Larrys Wonder House. Great
sentimental value. Reward. Raw Rawlings,
lings, Rawlings, 372-3621, rm. 130. (L-76-
st-c).
services
RUBYS ALTERATIONS. 1238 SW
3rd Ave. 376-8506. (M-80-lt-c).

services
i
i
horse haven riding school.
Group and private instruction.
Hunt, seat and jumping. Excellent
pasture for your horse. Call 376-
0367 or 376-3494. Look for sign
6 miles west on Newberry Road
opposite store. (M-75-lt-c).
. C
UNITED RENT-ALLS. We rent
most anything. Roll-away beds,
trucks, all tools, party equipment.
Call us for all your needs. 376-
2835, 625 NW Bth Ave. (M-75-
ts-c).
EXPERT TAILORING BY Mrs.
Dora Manookian. Alterations of all
kinds on mens and womens cloth clothing.
ing. clothing. 35 yrs. experience. Prices
reasonable. Call 376-1794. 1824
NW Ist. Ave. (M-72-10t-c).
LIMITED MEMBERSHIP now
available in Triangle Flying
Club. Learn to fly at worlds
lowest cost. Ph. 372-3563 or
372-3353. (M-78-3t-c).
XEROX COPIES
1-19 Copies, luy ea. 20&
Over, 9 Cojjies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
cm
"A free steak dinner is
just one of a whole page
full of goodies you can
get with the back cover
coupons."

I ROBBIES
The Best In Steaks
I Q l^andwiches
pT.V &
11718 W. University Ave. I
[OnTHe^Gok^Coa^t^J

c am pus
o I <3 n d a r*
HM MM BUHMMMM mUMmM

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION LECTURE: Today, 3:40 p.m.,
Rm. 18 Matherly. Arthur Upgren: The Outcome of Our Exper Experimental
imental Experimental Economics.
DEPT. OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Today, 8 p.m., FU Aud. 210.
Dr. Gloria Marshall: African Studies. Faculty and students
invited.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: Today, 5 p.m.,
4th floor, Library. Prayer meeting.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Today, 5:15 p.m., FU
Aud. Faculty and students invited.
CITRUS CLUB: Today, 7:30 p.m., 105 McCarty. Dr. H. J.
Reitz: The Citrus Industry of Japan.
VETERANS COMMITTEE FOR THE GI BILL: Today, 8 p.m.,
FU. All veterans who have served more than 180 consecutive
days in any branch of the Armed Services since Jan., 1955, will
be affected by this legislation.
CIRCLE K: Today, 8 p.m., FU 212. Meeting with program.
JEWELRY CLASS: Today, 7:30 p.m., Craft Shop.
FORUMS COMMITTEE OF THE FLORIDA UNION BOARD:
Today, 7:30 p.m., FU 116. All students interested in joining the
committee are urged to attend this second meeting of the trimester.
PAINTING FOR FUN: Today, 7:30 p.m., FU Oak Room. Block
printing and Mixed media.
CERAMICS CLASS: Today, 9:30 a.m., FU Craft Shop.
STUDENT PUBLIC RELATIONS ORGANIZATION: Today, 7:30
p.m., Rm 225 Stadium. Smoker for students interested in Public
Relations.
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELLORS: Today, FU 200. Interviews
for girls interested in summer camp counsellor jobs.
DELTA SIGMA PI: Today, 7 p.m., Johnson Lounge, FU.
Winter Smoker: Guest speaker, Mr. A. A. Anderson, Prof, of
Marketing. All male business students invited. Refreshments will
be served.
ALPHA KAPPA PSI, PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS FRATERNITY:
Today, 7 p.m., Medical Center H-611. Pledge initiation will be
held, the speaker will be a Burlington Industries representative.
MENSA: Friday, 7:30 p.m. at the Medical Center, M-321.
Dr. Frederick R. King will speak on Modern Concepts of Be Behavior
havior Behavior Mechanisms.
PERSIAN CLUB: Friday, 8 p.m., FU Aud. Will hold the annual
beauty contest. Students and faculty members are invited.
FLORIDA UNION DANCE: Friday, 8 p.m. "until 12 p.m. FU
Socia Room. Music will be provided by the Playboys Band and
admission for students is free with an ID card. The dance is
sponsored by the FU Board Dance Committee.
MOVIE: Friday, 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. MSB Aud., The Trojan
Horse.
MOVIE: Saturday, 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., MSB Aud., The
Brass Bottle.
CHILDRENS MOVIE: Saturday, 2 p.m., MSB Aud., An
Alligator Named Daisy.

New Testament Initiates
Student Lecture Series

'* By BILL WEIMER
Alligator Staff Writer
Can the New Testament, as we
have it today, be trusted to re reflect
flect reflect accurately the events and
message of the life and teaching
of Jesus Christ?
Does not the validity of the
Christian religion rest upon the
N. T. texts? Have they been
subject to change through repeated
copying? Are they merely re reflections
flections reflections of the faith of mis misguided
guided misguided followers? What evidence
do we have to determine a satis satisfactory
factory satisfactory answer?
These questions will be exam examined
ined examined in the first of a three-talk
series by Bob Letsinger, a grad graduate
uate graduate of Emory University and Ful Fuller
ler Fuller Theological Seminary.
The talk Friday evening at 7 p.m.
entitled Are the New Testament
Documents Accurate? will be in

Thursday, Jan. 27, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Johnson Lounge of the Florida
Union. Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship is sponsoring the talk,
which will include a question and
answer period. Refreshments will
be served.
Christian Experience: Gen Genuine
uine Genuine of Psychological and Is
God Really Dead? are the other
talks to be given on Feb. 11 and
25 by Letsinger.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellow Fellowship
ship Fellowship is an interdenominational stu student
dent student group with about 400 chapters
on American campuses.
Finance Prof
Speaks Tonight
Dr. Arthur Upgren, visiting pro professor
fessor professor of finance, will address the
UF faculty seminar Thursday at
3:30 p.m. in Room 18 of Matherly
Hall.
His topic will be The Outcomes
of Our Experimental Economics,
1962-1965. The public is invited.
Upgren, director of the Bureau
of Economic Studies and Bigelow
professor of economics at Macal Macalester
ester Macalester College, St. Paul, Minn.,
is author of several articles on
economics.
He has served as economic con consultant
sultant consultant for the Minneapolis Star-
Tribune; J. M. DainandCo., Minn Minneapolis;
eapolis; Minneapolis; First National Banks of
St. Paul and Minneapolis, and the
government of Manitoba, Canada.
Upgren served as chief of the
National Economics Division,
Bureau of Foreign and Domestic
Commerce, Department of Com Commerce,
merce, Commerce, in 1941-42.

Page 7



-^lMoorEl
SPOR TS EDITOR
They said things couldnt get worse for theUF swimming team.
But they have.
On the eve of its trip to North Carolina for three meets in as
many days, Captain Charlie King has come down with a sore
throat and All-America Tom Dioguardi has wrenched his arm.
The new mishaps make Floridas top four swimmers ailing
for the toughest road trip of the season. Backstroker Blanchard
Tual has a bad foot and medleyman and butterflyer Ray White Whitehouse
house Whitehouse is still recovering from mononucleosis.
All this could not have happened at a worse time. The swim swimmers
mers swimmers have a 3-3 record and will have to pull some miracle work
to come off the trip with a winning record.
Today, the Gators meet East Carolina at Greenville, then travel
to Chapel Hill to meet North Carolina. Saturday they meet the
nationally-ranked Wolfpack of North Carolina State at Raleigh.
East Carolina has a good swimming squad, according to Coach
Bill Harlan. It has just entered the NCAA major college division
after being highly successful in the small college ranks. ECC was
small college champion three years ago. Now 3-2, ECCs only
losses came at the hands of the Wolfpack.
They have better swimmers than last year when we beat them
58-36 in Gainesville, Harlan said. Well have to push hard in
all events to win.
Harlan said that Dioguardi will swim the butterfly in the medly
relay in lieu of the 50-yard freestyle.
We hope Dioguardi can carry us to victory there, Harlan
said. We have him there because you have to position your
swimmers against what the opponent has.
Tom has been under heat treatment Wednesday and I think
hell be ready to go, Harlan said.
Against North Carolina Friday, Harlan says the Gators have
a fighting chance, but njot much of one.
The Tar Heels dropped two meets early in the season to Army
and Navy and since then have won six straight.
UNC was a power last year and vanquished the Gators in a
Gainesville meet with ease. The Tar Heels have lost some of
their good swimmers from last year, but look tough in light of
Floridas problems.
We will shave before the ECC meet, said Harlan. Some Sometimes
times Sometimes this psyches up the team for a good performance.
As for Captain King, Harlan said, Charlie had a sore throat
and fever Tuesday night, but his temperature was back to normal
yesterday and I hope he can make it.
Saturday against N.C. State could be one of the dreariest days
in UF swimming history.
The Wolfpack has one of the nations best five teams, according
to Harlan, and is unbeaten in seven matches.
To give one an idea of how good N. C. State is, Harlan ob observed,
served, observed, it is playing Florida State Thursday, and will probably
lose only one event. FSU drowned the Gators earlier, 70-25.
The Wolfpack has yet to be pushed in a meet this year and
beat an excellent Maryland team badly. It hurts to say it, but the
Gators havent got a chance in this one.
A road trip such as this can ruin a swimming team, especially
one in the condition of the Gators. But, maybe -- just maybe
theyll be able to win two out of three and still look respectable.
If they can, theyll at least have a fighting chance for a winning
season. If not, it could turn into a nightmare.
Still, Florida should win the SEC title in March, but even this
is no sure thing.
To top things all off, the cold spell which moved in this week
has forced the Gators to swim in 40 degree weather. But, things
could be worse. The heating system for the pool might have
broken down. Os course, no one would have to worry about this
with an indoor pool.

Fencers Foil
Opponents In
Atlanta Meet
The UF fencing club defeated
Georgia Tech, Clemson and Van Vanderbilt
derbilt Vanderbilt this past weekend in At Atlanta
lanta Atlanta in a four-way meet.
Florida state foil champion,
team captain, Jose Sasek humbled
Techs number one fencer, James
Vaugh, 5-0.
Following Sasek in number of
bouts won was Larry Groover.
His agressiveness and speed with
the foil virtually shattered the
bladework of the other teams.
Richard* Aasness, Rick Leonard
and Jeff Schaefer also contributed
to another UF victory.
The final scores for the meet
were: UF-10, Clemson-6, UF-12,
Vanderbilt-4 and UF-9, Georgia
Tech-7.
Delts Win Bowling
Delta Tau Delta took first place
in Orange League bowling with a
1765-1568 victory over Kappa Sig Sigma
ma Sigma last night.
Jay Walton was high man for the
Delts with a 224 game. The team
averaged 186 in the second game.

For
Privacy
And
Atmosphere
On
That
Special
Pate...
Visit
Carmanellas
7 days a week, 11 to 9
706 W. University Ave.

SEC Bosses Meet Today

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (UPl)De (UPl)Delegates
legates (UPl)Delegates to the 34th annual meeting
of the Southeastern Conference
which begins today were having a
bit of trouble arriving as a snow
storm blanketed much of the South Southeast.
east. Southeast.
Air travel was, at best, chan chancey
cey chancey and there was some ques question
tion question whether all the expected guests
would be able to make it to Wed Wednesdays
nesdays Wednesdays football banquet of Bir Birminghams

The Florida Alligator

Thursday, Jan. 27, 1966 SPORTS

Dayton Rank Soars;
I Bama Rips Bulldogs
By UPI WIRES
At nearly seven-feet tall, Daytons' Henry Finkel still has figured
out away to go unnoticed on defense, he merely scores a bucketfull
of points.
Finkel proved offensive credentials Tuesday night by netting 28
points and leading the Flyers to an 85-57 victory over Loyola of
Los Angeles. The Flyers, who are now 14-3, face their stiffest
test of the season Saturday by taking on the fifth-ranked St. Josephs
Hawks.
In other games Tuesday night, Ron Williams scored 24 points to
power West Virginia to a 90-79 triumph over Pittsburgh and Wally
Anderzunas netted 27 to lead Creighton to a 104-90 victory over
LaSalle.
Elsewhere, Villanova whipped St. Peters 94- / *-6, Alabama ripped
Mississippi State 71-63, Western Michigan downed Northern Illinois
108-88 and the game between lowa State and Drake at Ames was
postponed.

I io am to 6 pm I
i closed 111 KitilKi 11klnAJ I
I MONDAYS I
I iMVk National Hero" I
jjgIIHIPKIS I
PIE rc ED ears I
I DECOR INCENSE I
I CANDLES NOVELTIES I
I* Touch him...ugh! HUMOR IMPORTS I
I Watch him shake! GS UNGE E I
I HOHO hint! Close In For The Way Out I
I tBAXAAR I
I FREE FILM WITH EACH PROCESSING! 1511 N.W. SIXTH STREET I
PHONE 372-1226 |

minghams Birminghams Monday Morning Quar Quarterback
terback Quarterback Club.
John McKay, head football coach
at the University of Southern Cal California,
ifornia, California, was the scheduled prin principal
cipal principal speaker for the banquet.
A series of workshops Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, the annual conference ban banquet
quet banquet Thursday night and the of official
ficial official meeting Friday make up
the agenda.
But the key item of business
will be the selection of a new
commissioner to replace Bernie

Moore who has served 18 year:
and who is already a year pas
the mandatory retirement age o
70. r u
There appears to be only on<
candidate for the jobA. M.(Ton M.(Tonto)
to) M.(Tonto) Coleman, assistant athleti
director at Georgia Tech whicl
withdrew from the SEC two year;
ago.
There could be one hitch ii
Colemans selection, although the
hitch is expected to be overcome.
Coleman, now 50, wants a six sixyear
year sixyear contract and the right to re retire
tire retire with a pension when he be becomes
comes becomes 65. Present SEC rules
call for four-year contracts and
10 years service prior to a pen pension.
sion. pension.
The decision must be reached
by the presidents of the member
schools. Ten are expected to
vote Friday. The conference pres presently
ently presently has 11 members but Tulane
withdraws in June and has not
voted on conference matters since
making this announcement last
winter.
Coleman has been reluctant to
talk about his chances of becoming
commissioner. He has pointed
out that only the school presi presidents
dents presidents know how they might vote.
There may be a move to turn
the matter over to a committee
for further study as was done
last year when Moore was due
to retire.
Other matters before the con conference
ference conference include a proposed re revision
vision revision of the present 140 limit
on football and basketball grants grantsin-aid,
in-aid, grantsin-aid, the annual effort of several
independents to join the SEC, and
a pending roundrobin football
schedule which was supposed to
go into effect in 1970 but which
now apparently will be delayed until
at least 1972.

Page 8