Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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More Qualify
Student Party candidates Jim Harrison (left) and Doug Gillis quali qualified
fied qualified yesterday for Honor Court Chancellor and Clerk positions in
the upcoming SG elections. (See story page 7).

Decisions Darlson
In Race For Treasurer

By YVETTE CARDOZO
Alligator Staff Writer
Law student John Darlson said
today he will run for the SG treas treasure
ure treasure rs spot on the Decision Party
ticket.
Darlson, who served as assistant
finance chairman of last falls
Homecoming, has served as spe special
cial special assistant to the Treasurer in
1964 as a member of the Florida
Union Board for Student Activities.
He worked as a reporter for
Dun and Bradstreet, Inc., a finance
and credit analyst, and is a Florida
Notary Public. He is also state
associated with the campus High
for Governor drive.
The treasurers office is bas basically
ically basically not a bookkeeping device for
student government, but rather is
responsible for the formulation of
fiscal policy. If I am elected, I
would like to see maximum use of
student organization funds in order
fllat the students may obtain the
ost from student government,
flprlson said.

Darlson, of Phi Delta Theta
social fraternity, has served two
terms as president of his frater fraternity
nity fraternity and was also a member of
its finance committee. He has
served on the Florida Blue Key
Speakers Bureau and holds a UF
Bachelor of Arts degree with ma majors
jors majors in English and political sci-.
ence.
Pick Up Tickets
Tickets for the Barbara Ward
discussion Tuesday in McCarty
Auditorium are available free at
the Florida Union ticket office.
Tickets for all luncheons are
also available at $1.50 each.

National Conference Brings Top Visitors To UF

A City College of New York
psychologist familiar with the
problems of Harlem youth and the
founder-director of Duquesne Uni Universitys
versitys Universitys Institute of Man are
featured speakers at the UF this
week during the sixth annual Per Personality
sonality Personality Theory and Counseling
Practice Conference.
Dr. Kenneth B. Clark, professor
of psychology at CCNY and direc director
tor director of the Northside Center for
Child Development in New York,
and Dr. Adrian Van Kaam, a native
of the Hague, Holland, who has
lectured at leading universities
throughout the world, head the list
of visitors on the program at the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center.
Dr. Clark will discuss Social
Power and Social Change at 8:20
p.m. on Thursday, and The Ghe Ghetto
tto Ghetto A Problem of Social Path Pathology
ology Pathology at 9 a.m. on Friday.
Dr. Van Kaam will speak on

Vol. 58, No. 76

Religion Week Starts;
'Called To Be Human

By CHERYL KURIT
Alligator Staff Writer
Called to Be Human is the
1966 theme of Religion-in-Life
Week with emphasis on informal
discussion between the speakers
and students, according to Ron
Lanier, chairman for this years
program.
Distinguished speakers from all
walks of life keynote the weeks
activities.
Student Party
Names Top
Lyceum Slate
Anita Willis and Joel Mont Montgomery
gomery Montgomery head the list of Student
Party candidates for Lyceum
Council positions, it was an announced
nounced announced last night.

Miss Willis
and Montgomery
were commend commended
ed commended by Buddy
Jacobs, Student
Party presiden presidential
tial presidential aspirant, for
their excellent
work in the past
and abilities to

take on the responsibilities that
Lyceum presentations and work
require.

MONTGOMERY

is a professors assistant in the
English Department.
She has served her sorority,
Delta Gamma, as historian and
activities chairman.
(See LYCEUM, Page 2)

Evolution of Cultural Values and
Motivation at 8 p.m. on Friday
and on personality growth at 11
a.m. on Saturday.
Both men are successful
authors. Dr. Clark is well known
for his book, Prejudice and Your


UNESCO Consultant Here

A UNESCO consultant to the Min Ministry
istry Ministry of Education in Israel and
graduate professor in psychology
at Adelphi and New York Univer Universities
sities Universities will be a speaker Friday
morning at the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center auditorium.
Dr. Haim G. Ginott will discuss
the problems of counseling Israeli
children in a cross cultural context
at the sixth annual Personality
Theory and Counseling Practice
Conference.

The Florida
Alligatir

4gr* *ur
j!iIII!I!|K| --%.
Br
WILLIS

Miss Willis
lias been Lyce Lyceum
um Lyceum associate
member for one
and a half years,
assistant Lyce Lyceum
um Lyceum ticket sales
manager, ticket
sales manager
last season and

University of Florida

Religion-in-Life week actually
began Wednesday night with the
appearence of The Rev. John Ma Maguire
guire Maguire at the Bent Card Coffee
House.
Rev. Maguire, a native of Ala Alabama,
bama, Alabama, is presently serving as
Assistant Professor of Religion
at Wesleyan University. He was
one of the original freedom rid riders,
ers, riders, and was imprisoned briefly
in May, 1961, for challenging se segregated
gregated segregated terminal facilities in
Montgomery.
Since May, 1962, Rev. Maguire
has been a member of the
Connecticut Advisory Committee
to the U.S. Commission on Civil
Rights.
Rev. Maguire was the first
Chairman of the interfaith, inter interracial
racial interracial Connecticut Committee on
Race and Religion, and is a con consultant
sultant consultant to the States Race and
Kr
WML/
.. ....... - .?.

Child," wnile ur. Van Kaam's
Religion and Personality has
been a best seller for the past
two years.
Dr. Clark is past president of
the Society for the Psychological
Study of Social Issues, a division

Author of two widely-acclaimed
books, Group Psychotherapy With
Children, and Between Parent
and Child, Ginott has conducted
workshops in child and group psy psychotherapy
chotherapy psychotherapy and in parent guidance
in the United States, Europe and
Israel.
Dr. Theodore Landsman, pro professor
fessor professor in the Department of Per Personnel
sonnel Personnel Services in the UF College
of Education, is chairman of the
conference.

Friday, January 21, 1966

Religion Action Commission.
The official opening of Religion Religionin-Life
in-Life Religionin-Life Week, Sunday, brings as a
guest speaker, The Reverend
James M. Gustafson, professor of
Christian Ethics at Yale Univer Universitys
sitys Universitys Divinity School.
Rev. Gustafson spent the aca academic
demic academic year 1959-60 studying on a
Guggenheim Fellowship at Lund
University, Sweden. He has served
as visiting Professor at The Har Harvard
vard Harvard Divinity School. Also, Rev.
Gustafson served as Assistant
Director of a study sponsored by
the American Association of Theo Theological
logical Theological Schools and the Carnegie
Corporation. The return visit of
Lady Jackson, Barbara Ward, as
one of the major speakers for the
1966 Religion-in-Life Week pro program,
gram, program, is just one stop on her
frequent lectures in various parts
of the world, including leading
American colleges and univer universities.
sities. universities.
author, lecturer and commentator
on contemporary economic, polit political
ical political and cultural problems. She was
formerly foreign affairs editor of
The Economist of London and is
(See RELIGION, Page 2)
Freedom Taps
Alan Levin
By AMI SAPERSTEIN
Alligator Staff Writer
Past Freedom Party Chairman
Alan Levin, 4AS, was selected
Freedom Party candidate for stu student
dent student body president. He was se selected
lected selected at the partys convention
Wednesday night in the Florida
Union.
Levin said he is running on a
positive program to change this
campus by radical tactics and
radical proposals.
Thus far he is the only Freedom
Party candidate for the top SG
positions.
(See FREEDOM, Page 7)

of the American Psychological
Association, and is also a research
psychologist for the Carnegie Cor Corporation.
poration. Corporation.
Dr. Van Kaam has conducted
studies into the psychology of per personality
sonality personality and education of girls
aged 17-25 who work in the offices
and mills of Holland and has re received
ceived received training in psychotherapy
at the University of Chicago and
the Alfred Adler Institute.
The Personality Theory Confer Conference
ence Conference will be co-sponsored by the
Universitys Departments of Per Personnel
sonnel Personnel Services, Psychology and
Religion and the Division of Con Continuing
tinuing Continuing Education.
Counselors, teachers, physi physicians,
cians, physicians, psychiatrists, psycholo psychologists,
gists, psychologists, Clergymen and others in interested
terested interested in the relationship of
personality theory to counseling
practice are invited to participate
in the three-day program.



i. The Florida Alligator. Friday. Jan. 21, 1966

Page 2

International
t S -
A-BOMB LOST . The U. S. Air Force confirmed today that the
852 bomber which crashed Monday after colliding with a tanker plane
was carrying at least one unarmed nuclear weapon. The SAC bomber
which was engaged in a refueling operation off the coast of Spain and
suffered an accident with a KCI3S tanker was carrying unarmed
nuclear armament/ 16th Air Force announcement said.
GANDHI VISIT . Indias newly elected prime minister Mrs.
Indira Gandhi Thursday accepted an invitation by President Johnson
to visit the United States* No date for the visit was set. Mrs. Gandhi,
a slight 48-year-old widow who was chosen Wednesday to lead the
worlds most populous democracy, said the timing of the visit would
be decided after a cabinet has been formed and sworn in.
KILL G.I.S . Viet Cong guerrillas
appeared to single out American troops for
targets today at the start of the scheduled
Lunar New Year truce period. Apparently the
Communists considered the Americans ex excluded
cluded excluded from the conditions of the temporary
cease-fire Reports received in Saigon indi indicated
cated indicated the Viet Cong had stopped shooting at
everyone else
MISTAKEN VIEW* . President Johnson today said Norm Viet
Nam was holding up peace in Southeast Asia because of the mistaken
view* that the United States might abandon her Allies, yield to pres pressure
sure pressure and get out of the war. Johnson, speaking at ceremonies honoring
former President Harry S. Truman, added a major section to his
prepared text dealing with his current peace offensive in Southeast
tsia.
4-YEAR TERM . President Johnson urged Congress to approve
jl constitutional amendment to lengthen the terms of members of the
House of Representatives from two to four years. The President also
renewed his plea for another amendment to the Constitution to abolish
the Electoral College and provide a direct vote by states for president
and vice president. Both amendments will go to the judiciary commit committees
tees committees of the House and Senate.
KING DENIED . The Rev; Martin Luther King Jr. was twice
denied a place to live in a West Side slum area, the Chicago Daily
News said Thursday. Its fantastic but two landlords denied King
a chance to live here, the Daily News quoted an unidentified spokes spokesman
man spokesman for the Coordinating Council of Community Organization as
saying. CCCO is a major Chicago civil rights organization. We asked
to rent a three-bedroom flat, but they wouldnt rent to us because they
didnt want King on the premises.
Florida
DEATH DOLLARS . The state patrol
reported Thursday the economic loss from
highway accidents and deaths in Florida dur during
ing during 1965 was a records33l,Boo,oooand warned
the toll could go even higher this year. Last
year was the deadliest year yet on our high highways,said
ways,said highways,said Patrol Commander H. N. Kirk Kirkman.
man. Kirkman. 1966 can go either way. The patrol
estimated economic loss at $200,000 for each
traffic fatality, which takes into account all
costs connected with the accidents plus medical
and burial expenses and loss of the victim's
earning power.
BILLY RUNS . Congressman D. R. Billy Matthews of Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville said today that his 13-year seniority and membership on the
important House Appropriations Committee will be the key issue in
his campaign for reelection against his good friend Congressman
Don Fuqua of Altha. This will be the most gentlemanly campaign
ever waged in Florida, said the 58-year-old Matthews in formally
announcing his candidacy at a news conference in Tallahassee.
i i,
regulate
to rertM or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION S GUARANTEED, though desired ponton will be given whenever possible.
T1 Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments ot payment for any advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
TW Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Not' !s for correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is .ia official student newspaper of the University of Florida and is
five times weekly except during May, June, and July when It is published s mi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class
matter at the United States Post Office at GalngsvlUe^^

regarded as one of the most in influential
fluential influential writers in England.
Dr. Louis Levitsky, Rabbi of
Oheb Shalom Congragation in South
Orange, New Jersey, rounds out the
schedule of the four major speak speakers
ers speakers for Religion-in-Life Week.
Former president of the Rabbi Rabbinical
nical Rabbinical Assembly of America and
past trustee of the Jewish Theo Theological
logical Theological Seminary, Dr. Levitsky,
attended Harvard and Columbia
Universities and the Jewish Theo Theological
logical Theological Seminary of America.
Dr. Levitsky has served as spe special
cial special lecturer in religion at Newark
College of Engineering, and special
lecturer on Judaism at Douglas
College, and at Rutgers University.
Robert Short, author of the
unique best seller The Gospel
According To Peanuts, will pre present
sent present a slide lecture at the Bent
Card Coffee House Tuesday.
Experiences in a variety of
media brought Short to an increas increasing
ing increasing awareness of the possibilities
of the arts as a means of commun communicating
icating communicating religious truths. When he
became responsible for a morning
devotional television series, he be began
gan began using Peanuts cartoons as a
type of modern-day parable. Later,
because of many requests, these
brief segments were expanded into
Lyceum****'
From Page 1
Montgomery, an independent,
has been Homecoming Independent
Chairman, International Student
Orientation Director and Florida
Union Board Director.
He has served on the Lyceum
Council for one and a half years
as Lyceum Co-manager and is now
working as a trouble shooter for
the Council.
Buttons Show
yt
Protest Over
Barge Canal
(See Picture, Page 1)
David Peterson, 7 AS, is jofcr*,
with other students, faculty in a unique protest
movement. This Sunday a row rowin
in rowin will be staged to help gather
public support to Save the Okla Oklawaha
waha Oklawaha River. The river and wild wildlife
life wildlife are currently condemned to be
destroyed unless the cross-state
barge canal is re-routed.
The boat-a-cade will begin at
9:00 a.m. at Orange Springs, 30
miles south of Gainesville.
Dr. Frank Philpott, UF instruc instructor,
tor, instructor, and others will have boats
available for .hose that cant afford
to rent canoes. Picnicking facili facilities
ties facilities are available as well as a fish fishing
ing fishing contest.
Students and faculty who can pro provide
vide provide rides or need them are asked
to contact Mrs. J. Wayne Conner,
372-6958.

DR. THOMAS HANNA
SATURDAY, JAN. 22 1826 W. UNiVE RS 1 E I

Religion
From page I

a full-length program and present presented
ed presented in person for church, club, and
student groups.
Dr. Thomas Hanna appears Sat Saturday
urday Saturday at the Bent Card. His re repertoire
pertoire repertoire consists primarily of
American, British, French, and
German folk songs. Also, he will
sing songs of his own composition
in folk-idiom.
Dr. Hanna has sung folk songs
professionally in Texas, Chicago,
and Europe. For five years he
lived in Europe and has traveled
through eastern Europe and'
Russia, collecting European folk
songs.
A graduate of Texas Christian
University, and The University of
Chicago, he plays both guitar and
five-string banjo.
Students and faculty-are invited
to attend all sessions of Religion Religionin-Life
in-Life Religionin-Life Week, and according toUF
President J. Wayne Reitz, Test
our own thinking, challenge theirs,
and thus to use oyr University
experience to the fullest.

gkol. Sanders SPECIE
.Ts SHRIMP DINNER n
jV includes french I I I A 1
TjC-flTyj 'J FRIES, COLE SLAW ti or 5 I
HOT SAUCE & HUSH L J
jbE PUPPIES !
-AVAILABLE AT- ** I
JJLIMi W
c^T n<;fv 214 NW 13th St. 376-6472 j
X 207 NE 16th Ave. 378-2959 1
OFFER GOOD FRIDAY ONLY J|
ENGAG FM ENT AND WEDDING RINGS
THE STORE FOR
STUDENT
charge '£g
21 1 W. University Ave ACC ^J S W
372-8658 WELCOME

Fidelity Union!
Life I
THE COLLEGE PUN I
Exclusively For I
THE COLLEGE MAN I
...Guaranteed By A I
BILLION Dollar Co. I
... Payments deferred I
'til earnings increase I
Campus Representatives I
Mel Ward Geo. Corl I
Dan Sapp
376-1208



I ACCOUNTANTS, CHEMISTS, ChEs, MEs, PHYSICISTS ,m*f, I


$ JbHHK|pP^ : : ;
S *\- H
H
I I
s i
llllli
I l
I B
fl
mzmm
I jBB Von only know I
I 888 the half of it. I
Our business no longer hangs by a fiber cellulosic or otherwise. Far from it. Were fl
researching, producing and marketing a rich range of products chemicals, plastics, I
I paints and coatings, forest products, petroleum and natural gas products, as well as a B
full family of man-made fibers all over the world.
I Celanese sales growth, its hefty interests in chemicals and its hugely expanded foreign B
I operations have already moved it into a big new class, said a CHEMICAL WEEK* B
B special report. B
During the 10 years prior to 1964, sales more than quadrupled, chalking up a growth fl
rate more than six times that of all U. S. manufacturing industries. And the trend is fl
stronger than ever, with corporate sales for 1965 estimated at 23% higher than last B
I years record of $7Ol million. B
I What does this mean to you? I
I Since our future expansion depends on our continued ability to develop top-notch I
people, it is, after all, in our best interest to bring you along as fast as you can take it, I
I and give you all the support you need in your technical specialty or in management. fl
I LETS MAKE A DATE. Give our college representative a chance to fill you in on I
I more of the specifics. He will be on your campus within the next week or two- arrange I
through your Placement Office to see him. II you miss our visit, drop a card indicating I
I your major and work interest to: Supervisor of University Recruitment, Celanese I
Corporation, 522 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10036. I
I CELANESE I
I CHEMICALS FIBERS PLASTICS COATINGS PETROLEUM FOREST PRODUCTS I
An Equal Opportunity Employer I
I "August 22, 1964, Special Report on Celanese Corporation of America. Reprints available. fl
gill .3 .. ~ ' IB|
| ITS ELEMENTARY ;I
I B~fl fl The Most Student-Minded Businessmen!
|ii ML MLW ADVERTISE IN THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR |

BSS2EBIBB
HBOBaHBn

MONTHLY INTERNATIONAL
PARTY: Today, 8 p.m., Bryan
Lounge. Party for all interested
students sponsored by the Persian
Club. Refreshments and dancing.
UofF CHESS CLUB: Today, 7
p.m., FU 215.
PHYSICS COLLOQIUM: Today,
4 p.m., Bless Auditorium, Dr. O.
Dubois, Statistical Mechanics.
RIL WEEK: LUNCHEON-DIS LUNCHEON-DISCUSSION:
CUSSION: LUNCHEON-DISCUSSION: Today, 12:10 p.m., SSC
Blue Room, $1.50. Dr. John Ma Maguire,
guire, Maguire, Reflections on the Death
of God Philosophies. Open to all;
for reservations phone Ext. 2219.
COFFEE COLLOQIUM: Today,
3:30 p.m., FU Johnson Lounge,
Dr. John Maguire, Freedom or
Fire: The Racial Revolution.
DISCUSSION: Today, 9 p.m., The
Bent Card, Dr. John Maguire,
The Death of God.
SWIMMING: Today, 3 p.m.,
Univ. Pool, UF freshmen vs. Dade
County Junior College. 4 p.m., UF
Varsity vs. Georgia Institute of
Technology. t
HUME-RAWLINGS SOCIAL:
Today, 8-12 p.m., Rawlings Rec
Room. The Playboys Band will
play.
FESTIVAL BAND CONCERTS:
THE NEW YORK BRASS QUINTET:
Today, 4 p.m., Univ. Auditorium,
Robert Hagel, trumpeter. (Band
clinic at 2 p.m.,) FLORIDA STATE
SYMPHONIC BAND: Today, 8:15
p.m., Univ. Auditorium, Dr. Man Manley
ley Manley Whitcomb conducting.
6TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE:
Personality Theory and Counsel Counseling
ing Counseling Practice: Today, all day and
night, MSB Aud. Theme: Trans Transcending
cending Transcending Cultur?. and Value Differ Differences.
ences. Differences.
MOVIE: Sat., Jan. 22, MSB
Auditorium. Double Feature: 6 and
9:30 p.m. The Lists of Adrian
Messenger, 7:45 and 11 p.m.
Diamond Head.
SWIMMING: Sat., Jan. 22, 1:30
p.m., Univ. Pool, UF vs. Pine
Crest Preparatory School.
CHILDREN'S MOVIE: Sat., Jan.
22, 2 p.m., MSB Auditorium, Ala Alakazam
kazam Alakazam the Great.

r CARAVAN 21 DAY
FIRST CLASS THROUGHOUT PERSONALLY ESCORTED I
I ALL EXPENSE INCL THEATER, FOLKLORE, NIGHT LIFE |
I Based on lowest ever 21 Day Jet Excursion Fares. Save over $2OOl l

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I OrAlli PLUS MOROCCO
I Lisbon, Estoril, Fatima, Coimbra, Sala-
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-1 Torre-1 molinos, Gibraltar, Seville
J PLUS in Morocco, Tangier, Fez, rrno
1 Casablanca, Rabat and Meknes. fr. f0?O
f THE 11 COUNTRY GRAND TOUR
I An amazingly complete, tour of England,
I Holland, Belgium. Luxembourg, Germany,
1 Switzerland, Liechtenstein, on*r\
| Austria, Italy, Monaco, Franca, fr.
I THE I COUNTRY GRAND TOUR
with VIENNA
I Off-the-beaten-track, plus highlights, in
1 England, Holland, Germany,
I Austria, Italy, Monaco, Switzer- onrvo
I land and France. fr. f/Vo
I SCANDINAVIA
I The best of Norway, Sweden and Denmark
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FREE mutinied Brochuce, Write or Rhone:
vfn\\\\ WOLD |
IV\V\ / )/) TRAVEL I
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Friday, Jan. 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

IRELAND A GREAT BRITAIN
Three leisurely weeks among the moors I
and mountains, green fields and great I
cities, castles and theatres of
Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scot- M1 n
land, Wales and England. fr. full; |
DEPARTURES-Snvwral wewkJy, I
from New York, Jan, to Dec.
LOW PRICES INCLUDE
1. Travel in Europe by r ustom built I
AIR CONDITIONED motorcoach, I
First Class Rail and local steamers. I
2. First Class and Deluxe Hotels, with I
Private Bath throughout every Tour. I
3. Roundtrip 21 Day Jet Excursion Fare. I
4. Almost all meals. I
5. Complete Sightseeiag
. All Tips and Taxes.
7. All Transfers.
8. A host of Special Features and Eve- I
ning Entertainment.
9. Greet Pmfmmul Twmt Diftrllfft

FESTIVAL BAND CONCERTS:
UNIV. OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
SYMPHONIC BAND: Sat., Jan. 22,
11 a.m., Univ. Auditorium, William
Moody conduting. INTERCOLLE INTERCOLLEGIATE
GIATE INTERCOLLEGIATE READING BAND: Sat.,
Jan. 22, 2 p.m., University Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.
GAINESVILLE TUTORIAL
PROGRAM SOCIAL: Sun., Jan.
23, 3 p.m., FU Social Room, Conn
Galloway, folk singer.
LYCEUM COUNCIL PRESEN PRESENTATION:
TATION: PRESENTATION: Sun., Jan. 23, 4 p.m.,
University Auditorium, National
Ballet of Washington. All tickets
sold. Cancellations will be made
available at door. Please return
extra tickets to Florida Union.
UNITED CHURCH: Sun. Jan. 23,
9:30 a.m., Florida Union.
UNITARIAN CHURCH: Sun.,
Jan. 23, 10 a.m., Florida Union.
RELIGION-IN-LIFE WEEK:
SERMON: Sun., Jan. 23, 8:45 and
11 a.m., University Methodist
Church, Dr. James Gustafson,
Lawful or Helpful. KEYNOTE
ADDRESS: Sun., Jan. 23, 8:15p.m.,
University Auditorium, Dr. James
Gustafson, The Moral Conditions
Necessary for Human Commun Community.
ity. Community.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCI ASSOCIATION:
ATION: ASSOCIATION: Sun., Jan. 23, 6 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Center, Social.
Everyone welcome. Refreshments.
CORRECTION: Duplicate
Bridge Tournaments. Rm. 215, FU.
Sunday afternoons 2 p.m. Change
to I:3op.m.Same days, same room.
UNIVERSITY GALLERY: Now
through Feb. 2, The Pearsall Col Collection
lection Collection of Indian Artifacts.
ME NS A: For students who re received
ceived received letter with May crossed out.
Call Mike Sipe at 84950 for details.
PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE PREDENTAL
DENTAL PREDENTAL STUDENTS: Today thru
Feb. 4, Rm. 111, Anderson Hall.
Registration with the Pre-Profes Pre-Professional
sional Pre-Professional Counseling office. Be sure
to bring the full names of all your
instructors and the course and
section numbers.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Jan. 21, 1966

ALLIGATOR
EDITORIALS

religion
three main topics on campus, as everywhere,
are politics, sex and religion. Politics, especially
during this particular season, are usually discussed
with a great deal of vim and even vehemence.
Whether its campus, state or national, the topic of
politics is debated in classes and caucused over
coffee.
And sex . well, that age-old subject is can candidly
didly candidly and constantly discussed, from the males
studying more than their books in the library, to
coeds in the dorms while painting their toes.
But what of the third member of the big three
religion?
Religion is discussed in several classrooms on
campus, in relation to the subject being taught. And
the University Religious Association, along with the
denominational centers boarding the campus do a
good job of presenting views, including interesting
speakers and refreshments.
But the typical student? Hardly.
There seems to be a mild social taboo connected
with anyone who takes religion seriously, whether
in a positive or negative way. Sometimes, even the
religious groups seem hesitant to push religion,
afraid that they might offend someones sensibilities.
Is there a stigma associated with intelligent dis discussion
cussion discussion of religion? Who has suddenly decided that
it was not intellectually respectable to talk about
faith, whether it be in a god or yourself?
Religion, in the general sense, and religions in
the specific have been historically a vital motivating
force on human behavior from the personal to the
international levels.
Whether one believes in God or not deeply affects
the makeup of his personality. This is true in the
case of the individual whose convictions are sincere
as well as one who is merely asserting his indepen independence
dence independence from his family.
We have come to college to learn. But we learn
only through being exposed to new ideas. Unfor Unfortunately,
tunately, Unfortunately, too few people are mature enough to listen
to new ideas about their religious faith.
Political beliefs are developed in much the same
way as religious ones; and there is just as much
emotion involved; but nobody hesitates about politics.
* The Florida Alligator, 1965
load divided
3jffrom indications as to how the anti-poverty war
is to be pressed, given in President Johnsons
State of the Union message, relieving Sargeant
Shriver of the Peace Corps load is coming just in
time.
Shriver will need all his talents and energies
as director of the Office of Economic Opportunity
and in heading other phases of the anti-poverty
program.
In selecting Assistant Secretary of State Jack
Hood Vaughn to take over the Peace Corps, the
President appears to have picked the best possible
man.
Vaughns great familiarity with Latin America,
where so much Peace Corps activity is centered,
his disposition to get out and mingle with the com common
mon common people, which earned him the sobriquet of the
peasant ambassador in Panama, mark him as a
fitting successor to Shriver.
St. Petersburg Times
\' !v!v/!v. v!v!v!v, vXv!v, v!vivivlv!*X*/'|*v'v' v '** '*' Xv!v!v!v!v!v! !v
. EDITORIAL STAFF
Editor Benny Cason
Managing editor Ron Spencer
Executive editor Drex Dobson
Assistant managing editor Fran Snider
Sports editor Andy Moor
Associate editors 7T Bruce Dudley
Yvette Cardozo, Kay Huffmaster
Gary Corseri, Jane Solomon
Copy editors . Bill Martinez, Sharon Robinson
Wire editor Steve Hull
Staff writers Eunice Tall
Brad Sawtell, Bob Menaker, Dick Dennis
Bill Spates, Kathie Keim, Susan Froemke
Justine Hartman, Gary Martin, Norma Bell
Jeff Denkewalter, Arlene Caplan, Ami Saperstein
Cartoonists Ralph Knudsen, Don Wright
Editor-of-this-issue Kay Huffmaster

The Florida Alligator
A h Ou Pmot PIU TklUi
"C Aftv*
"The Phenomena Are Restless Lately"
Earl Barkers
International
""" Politics
Its ast weeks have witnessed the sight of high U. S. government
IP officials scampering to and fro across the globe, appearing
in scattered foreign capitals, in a massive peace offensive.
The phenomenon was billed as being conducted directly by
President Lyndon Johnson from the Texas White House and later
from Washington. The officials, including the Secretary of State
and the Vice President, contacted many of our allies and not notso-allies
so-allies notso-allies in an attempt to sell them the U. S. point of view on
Viet Nam and persuade them to bring diplomatic pressure on
North Viet Nam, Red China and Russia to seek peace negotiations
or, at least, to reduce hostilities. It was almost reminiscent of a
Senate majority leader attempting to pass a particularly contro controversial
versial controversial bill through a hostile committee.
Some indications of North Vietnamese willingness to seek peace
were evident during the weeks preceding the offensive, especially
the alleged offer of negotiations delivered through two Italian
professors and the Italian President of the United Nations Gen General
eral General Assembly, Amintore Fanfani. When such offers as this have
been announced publicly, however, the North Vietnamese have
hastened to deny them. The offensive was designed to demonstrate
U. S. sincerity in its offer of unconditional negotiations. To date,
there has been no concrete favorable response to U. S. efforts,
in fact, Communist public announcements have, if anything, become
more virulently anti-American.
There are several possible explanations for the hesitancy. In
the first place, the Communist states look upon secret diplomacy
as being the only sincere diplomacy. They discount any offers
made with public fanfare being propaganda. The statements of
Chinese and Russian officials that the offensive is merely the
justification for increased U. S. involvement is, thus, under understandable
standable understandable and consistent with their previous activities. United
States bombing in Cambodia and Laos tends to support their
belief.
Second, it is not in the interest of China and Russia to seek
peace in Viet Nam at this time. China considers the presence of
United States troops close to her borders a threat to her security.
She also recognizes the fact that as long as the U. S. is so fully
occupied in Indochina, it will be distracted from problems in other
areas of the world, especially Africa. Russia has begun diplomatic
moves to detach some of the U.S. allies along her Southern border.
United States involvement in Viet Nam renders this task easier
also.
If there are to be any peace talks then, they will have to be with
North Viet Nam, arranged between that country and the United
States. In its position, however, North Viet Nam finds it difficult
to begin such discussions in the full light of public notice. If it
were to attempt to do so, China, if not also Russia, would immedi immediately
ately immediately attempt to dissuade her from her course. The only realistic
path, then, is that of totally secret conversations with the North
Vietnamese.
Some discussions of the type suggested have been reported.
Their failing lies in the very fact that they have been reported
and discussed in the world press.
The United States will not receive any assurances of peace
from Southeast Asia until it returns to the traditional diplomatic
forms and relegates the fanfare and hoopla of internal American
politics to internal American politics.

thinking
out loud fef
>
By JIM MOORHEAD
]j| robably the loudest belcher you ever knew was
the roommate you had during your freshman or
sophomore year. They have away of appearing at
this particular time in almost everyones Us e
The second loudest belcher you ever knew, prob probably,
ably, probably, was either your favorite uncle or a friend of
your fathers who had away of showing up on random
occasions when he was inevitably appreciated by
everyone except your mother, and who no doubt
possessed his remarkable talent for gastronomical
sound effects because of a long indulged craving for
carbonated beverages during early morning hours
when most people barely have their breakfast di digested.
gested. digested.
Visits from this childhood hero reached their high
point as you sat around the living room or kitchen,
hugging your knees and tensely watching him doWfi a
Nehi strawberry or some other bellywash, hardly
able to await the instant when he would suddenly, with
no warning whatsoever, flap open his mouth and emit
a sound unlike anything else you ever heard or even
imagined. The inhuman strains of this unique vocal
phenomenon were always complemented, if your eyes
were quick enough to catch it, by the sight of the
tongue over which the weird sound waves had passed.
Its grotesque color added immeasurably to the flavor
of the moment, and the briefest of glimpses would
reveal it to be either strawberry red, grape purple,
lemon yellow or perhaps simply orange, giving the
tongue a jaundiced look which it would not lose until
lunchtime.
It was a glorious instant, the second when that
belch burst like a gunshot into the middle of the
conversation, and you would topple from your perch
with surprise and delight, forgetting to unloose your
knees and leaving yourself impossibly balanced for
coping with the spasms of laughter that immediately
followed.
Your father would be appropriately amused, but
your mother would suck in her breath, then laugh
rather nervously, chide the guilty party (because she
was fearful for your manners) and leave the room
for fear an encore was soon to follow. Anticipating
exactly the same thing, you would stay right where
you were, great expectations again cocked in place,
because you knew from previous enjoyments that this
greatest of all belchers was good f ,r another one
even a couple if you or your father succeeded, over
your mothers objections, in forcing a second bottle
on him.
As soon as he left, you would straightaway make
for the nearest bottle of soda pop you could lay your
hands on, race to a closeby point of seclusion (the
garage was always good because of the reverberation
possibilities), drink your absolutely verboten, pre prelunchtime
lunchtime prelunchtime drink, and then practice.
Inhaling to the very bottom of your britches, you
would lock all that air inside for just a second, set
your throat gears just so, then let go for all you
were worth. You would stand there straining until
your stomach ached and your swallower felt as
though someone had been running a pencil up and
down it, but you would never come close to duplicating
the wonderful sounds shaped by the great master
just departed.
Later, at school, you would deride the playground
smart-alecks who, although they were the champion
belchers among all your contemporaries and the envy
of everyone except girls and teachers, couldnt hold a
candle to the grownup performance you had only
recently witnessed.
By the time you reach the collegiate level, the
minor explosions that burst forth from deep within a
roommates cavernous throat not to mention the
various other noises roommates are so famous for
making go unappreciated by you; are considered
obnoxious even. You tell your friends, but by no
means in bragging fashion, that nobody can belch,
or whatever, like .your roommate and they in turn
inform you that, no, they most assuredly have the
all-time champ sharing their closet. Unconvinced,
you return to your room, seat yourself at the desk,
pick up your heaviest textbook and wait, poised, for
the moment when roomie will jar the lampshades
with a guttural roar that will send the textbook flying
toward the source of this audible trauma.
And your domestic life will be quite miserable
until the end of the term.
And then one day, after the belching roommate stage
of your life has relievingly come to a close, you will
realize that roomie was but a former playground
smart-aleck from somewhere else, and you further
realize that you will see his like again someday --
when he will be the adored object of your little
boys eye.

The Alligator accepts all letters
to the editor. Due to space limit
ations, however, we are unable to
print letters exceeding 250 words.



jH'eirfer
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Recent events have shown that
there is great cause for concern
about the political integrity of many
of Americas elected officials.
Indeed, the American people as a
whole already reflect that concern
in their skepticism toward what
the government says. The word of
the government today is, like its
currency, simply not considered to
be as good as gold. After in ingesting
gesting ingesting large doses of McNamara
optimism concerning Viet Nam,
phony casualty figures, misinfor misinformation
mation misinformation about whether we have en engaged
gaged engaged in direct contacts with the
North Vietnamese communists,
and numerous absurd cover stor stories,
ies, stories, such as for the U-2 incident
and the Bay of Pigs invasion, it
is not surprising that the American
people have got ten the fee ling that

LETTER:
tutoring
Editor:
Recently I phoned the Student Government Tutoring Society to
offer my services as a tutor in MS 205 and 20G. I found that
although I had been in the 98th and 97th percentile, respectively,
in these subjects, although I have 30 hours of mathematics
(including 6 hours this trimester) with a 3.5 average, although
I have tutored mathematics previously, although I have a 3.0
overall average, although there is a shortage of tutors, my
services were refused because in any one trimester I did not
have a 3.5 average.
Gentlemen, in view of the need for tutors. I would suggest that
someone with these qualifications would at least do until they
found a more qualified person, at least these qualifications should
warrant an interview.
The Tutoring Society is a good idea and perhaps it would be
. abie to do a more efficient job with a full staff if it were removed
from Student Government, which has. in many students minds,
never in its history done anything well.
Name Withheld
7T\ SOUTHERN
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Barry Diamond

they do not always receive the truth
from their government. It is this
very trend that so greatly worried
the late U.N. Ambassador Adlai
Stevenson in the years before his
death.
Paralleling the peoples discom discomfort
fort discomfort over lies and misinformation
from their government is their
concern over the governments
attempts to manage the news. In
these complex and critical times,
where accurate and up to date in information
formation information is vital if logical opin opinions
ions opinions are to be formulated by our
citizens, it is unfortunate that
the President has in many in instances
stances instances has chosen to abandon
old fashioned American candor and
honesty in favor of the enemys
tactics of news management and
secrecy. Likewise, his attitude to toward

ward toward dissent from his policies, as
expressed in the case of Senator
Fulbright, is unfortunate, and be befits
fits befits neither Senator Fulbrights
high position nor past American
tradition. Policies, so goes this
tradition, are and always should
be open to debate. This tradition
is what makes Pres. Johnsons
attempts at a forced consensus so
ironic. He seeks to limit both the
information necessary for proper
debate and much of the debate it itself,
self, itself, in the interests of a con-~
sensus that, if arrived at, can
only be agreed upon by the free
discussion of issues.
(Part Two shall deal with the
way in which certain politicians
get elected, and what they do in
office after they get there;.

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LADIES MENS
Dresses 24 95 12.50 Slacks 12.95 6.50 I
14.95 7.50 I
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17.98 8.99 Sweaters 14.95 7.50 I
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Shirts 5.98 3.00 I
Blouses 4.95 2.00 500 2.50 I
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SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 AM
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 AM
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TRAINING UNION 6:30 PM
EVENING WORSHIP 7:45 PM
..

Friday, Jan. 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,
4 a

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Jan. 21, 19GG

Mm y
' IHLS, M mb! .:iIESHSSIHHSSSi
Im J k
MMMMM H SSSSSSB gp.
V? : $ MHHHM| A BB| a
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: b H IB b IV fra
'' '^'PSpsS R j^tor ~-""" J d "£-*
~ ~* ,^ Dr. Hartmann
Dr. Frederick H. Hartmann speaks out on the United States obli obligations
gations obligations in Viet Nam.
Election Set,
Malaghan Says

Spring elections will be held
Thursday, Feb. 10, according to
Secretary of Interior Mike Mala Malaghan.
ghan. Malaghan.
The campus-wide offices open
and their respective fees are:
President of the Student Body and
Chancellor of Honor Court ($8);
Vice President, Secretary-Treas Secretary-Treasurer,
urer, Secretary-Treasurer, Clerk of the Honor Court,
President of Lyceum Council, and
Vice-President of Lyceum Council
($7); Three members of the Board
of Student Publications ($6); and
four members of Lyceum Council
($5).
In addition, 18 Honor Court jus justice
tice justice positions are open in the fol following
lowing following colleges: Agriculture (1),
Architecture (1), Arts and Sciences

UF Mensa Soon
To Be Largest

By NORMA BELL
*'i Alligator Staff Writer
The UF Mensa chapter is rap rapidly
idly rapidly becoming the largest campus
group in the country. Mensa is an
organization for anyone who is in
the top two per cent in intellegence
in the population.
Since its formations here last
October the group membership has
increased to over 80.
If things continue as they have,
we should reach a membership to total
tal total of 150 this trimester, says
Mike Sipe, the local secretary.
Over 600 UF students have been
contacted about their eligibility.
The only qualification for member membership
ship membership is a score of 98 percent
or better on an intelligence test.
Previously Mensa has relied on
popular response to mass com communication
munication communication publicity. However,
they have started contacting these
people who are eligible to join.
Sipe believes this will increase the
organizations membership.
Sipe said that the university has
been responsible for the increase
in membership. He credits this to
the fact that the university has
given their organization the scores
of the people who are eligible to
join.
If this method was used by other
chapters the worldwide member member
member ADS
s REBCH I J
jlpEOPlt rl
(tv*
SB upiv. ti\ 21 32 / g

(1), Business Administration (1),
Education (1), Engineering(l), For Forestry
estry Forestry (1), Health and Related Ser Services
vices Services (1), Journalism (1), Law (1),
Medicine (1), Nursing (1), Phar Pharmacy
macy Pharmacy (1), Physical ation (1),
Freshman Class < 2). Sophomore
Class (2).
Legislative Council members
will be elected from the following
schools and colleges: Agriculture
(1) Architecture (1), Arts and Sci Sciences
ences Sciences (4), Business Administration
(2) Education (3), Engineering(3),
Forestry (1), Health Related Ser Services
vices Services (1), Journalism (1), Nursing
(1), Physical Education (1), Phar Pharmacy
macy Pharmacy (1), Law (2), Medicine (1),
Freshman Class (8) and Sophomore
Class (9).

ship would expand rapidly, con continued
tinued continued Sipe.
The UF mensa officers are Ed Edwin
win Edwin Stewart, president; Carl
Hayes, vice-president; Mike Sipe,
secretary; and Gretchen Laird;
treasurer.
Any interested person may con contact
tact contact Sipe at 8-4950.
The group meets each day from
11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Hub. Sipe
said that Mensas purpose is to fill
a void for many intelligent people
sometimes cut off from other good
minds; besides being a possibility
for many new friendships, it pro provides
vides provides members with a receptive,
but critical audience in which to
try out new ideas.

Effective April Ist
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THE SAME SAVING APPLIES FROM ALL U.S. CITIES. And you'll have
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Amsterdam 331 10.80 Berlin 376 26.30 only weekends and
Brussels 331 10.80 nice 378 26.50 certain peak summer
BARCELONA 350 16.40 VIENNA 395 32,30 periods excluded.
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OSLO 360 19.80 BELGRADE 429 64.30 ~j
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Weve Got Obligations, Hartman

By JUSTINE HARTMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
While skeptical about the ne necessity
cessity necessity of our initial commitment
in Viet Nam, Professor Frederick
H. Hartmann, Director of the UF
International Relations Institute,
believes it is not now a question
of simple withdrawal.
Once committed there, weve
got an obligation, he said yes yesterday.
terday. yesterday.
We hold a beachhead on the
flank of an enormous expanding
power all by ourselves. We
must decide whether we really
want to hold such a beachhead,
or obtain an agreement with China
which would deny the areji mili militarily
tarily militarily to both, he stated.
Americas physical isolation,
coupled with generalizations in
foreign policy account for many
mistakes in U. S. international
relations, Hartmann believes.
Our generalizations are abstract
and emotional in their coloring,
often incorporating moralizing
tones, he added. When we for formulate
mulate formulate our policy according to
this type generalization, it is not
operative, he said.
Hartmann attributes these ab abstract
stract abstract formulas in part to the fact
that the U. S. is physically ab abstracted
stracted abstracted from the continental
mainland.
The American commitment to
defend freedom is a prime ex example
ample example of policy generalizations,
according to Hartmann. He be believes
lieves believes the U. S. must necessarily
be against the automatic proposi proposition
tion proposition that the United States is ob obligated
ligated obligated to shed blood simply by"
reason that freedom is being sac sacrificed
rificed sacrificed somewhere.
The course of history has been
a series of violent eruptions. If the
proposition had always been ap applied,
plied, applied, the U. S. would have been
continually involved in wars, said
Hartmann.
Our national interests must
dictate our actions, Hartmann
said. He feels Americas initial
involvement in South Viet Nam
PATRONIZE
GATOR
ADVERTISERS
THEYRE A
i GOOD GROUP

was not concurrent with U. S.
national interests. The circum circumstances
stances circumstances were not quite as obvious
regarding the necessity of our
commitment in South Viet Nam as
in Korea, said Hartmann. The
Korean situation was a case of
flagrant aggression and unavoid unavoidable.
able. unavoidable.
Whether the freedom of the South
Vietnamese is in danger is not the
question the U. S. should ask,
Hartmann asserts. The real mat matter
ter matter at stake, he feels, is the prac practical
tical practical significance of maintaining
independence in South Viet Nam.
He feels the real questions are
whether the independence of South
Viet Nam is of crucial importance
to the national interests of the U.S.
and, in regard to the overwhelming
costs, is it worth it?
Ideally, the U. S. should be
promoting friction between the
U.S.S.R. and Communist China,
said Hartmann. The U.S.S.R. is
our worst enemy as far as striking
power, while China is the worst
in terms of name-calling. The
damage the latter could do is fairly
restricted to Asia, he said.
Hartmann said U. S. denial of
recognition to Red China in the
United Nations is futile and that it
will ultimately have to recognize
them. We are now facing a power powerful
ful powerful China, the most significant
single factor in the Far East, which
is bound to dominate Asia, he
contends. We are not accustomed
to dealing with a China of this
nature, he said.
The main question Hartmann
asks in respect to Red China is,
To what extent is it useful for
the U. S., and at what geographi geographical
cal geographical locations, to attempt to re restrain
strain restrain the natural expansion of
China? The normal existence of

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South Viet Nam is in the shj
of China.
Os the five powers concerne
Russia, India, Japan, Indont
and the U. S. the U. s. ha<
least reason to be concerne
terms of geographical proxi
and immediate livelihood,
Hartmann.
If Chinese expansion is su
threat, why is this threat
across the hemisphere and
next door, he questions. i
situation were crucial, the o
powers would do something a
it, he stated. Hartmann citec
inertia of India, who has Chii
her frontier, as an example.
Hartmann is questioning
utility of the pattern which s
Viet Nam represents ultima
our ideal of defense. He f
there must, of crucial neces
be a compromise between neut
ity, or pre-war abstention,
total involvement every wher
is mandatory that we use
crimination rather than ua
philosophy of automatic com
ment, he concluded.
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Gator Variety Band Festival Bound

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The University of Florida Gator
Variety Band has been selected as
one of six college stage bands to
perform at the Mobile Jazz Festi Festival,
val, Festival, April 2 and 3.
At the Festival, the largesband
finest collegiate music event in the
nation, the Variety Band will be
competing with the other bands for
the title of Outstanding Band at
the Festival. The winning band
will appear at A1 Hirts Club in
New Orleans and at the Newport
Jazz Festival. The band will be
seen on several nationally broad broadcast
cast broadcast television shows, including
the A1 Hirt Show, the Arthur God Godfrey

frey Godfrey Show, and the Tonight Show.
The 1966 Mobile Jazz Festival
sponsored by Spring Hill College
will be carried to all fifty states
by the American Broadcasting
Company radio network. The
broadcast is also being cleared for
presentation to college and univer university
sity university radio stations, the Armed
Forces Network and Radio Free
Europe.
A record album will be produced
and distributed in this country and
overseas, featuring the talented
students. Recording companies
will be present, looking for talent talented
ed talented musicians and vocalists for

their labels.
The Mobile Jazz Festival has
been planned and will be conducted
with the assistance of some of the
most talented people in the music
business. National Advisory Board
of the Jazz Festival includes men
like Dave Brubeck, Pete Fountain,
Jerry Gray, Skitch Henderson, A1
Hirt, Henry Mancini, Dan Morgen Morgenstern,
stern, Morgenstern, Peter Nero, Ward Swingle
and Cal Tjader.
For this year's Festival, judges
will include Leonard Feather;
Jerry Gray, Bandleader and
Arranger; John Hammond, Direct Director
or Director of Talent AcquisitionColum-

Friday, Jan. 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

bia Records; Skitch Henderson,
NBC Television Music Director;
Dan Morgenstern, Down Beat Ed Editor;
itor; Editor; George Wein, Musician and
Newport Festival Promoter; and
Father George Wiskirchen, Veter Veteran
an Veteran Educator and Jazz Judge.
The Gator Variety Band is a
regularly scheduled member of the
University of Florida band pro program,
gram, program, and is co-sponsored by the
Department of Music and Student
Government. It is directed by Ro Robert
bert Robert E. Foster, Assistant Direct Director
or Director of Bands. Membership is select selected
ed selected by audition and is open to any
qualified student in the University.

Freedom
(From Page 1)
Wayne Fulton, lUC, was elected
1966 chairman of Freedom Party.
Removal of all restrictions on
the type of speaker or the speak speakers
ers speakers contest allowed by the uni university,
versity, university, free and non-dis non-discriminatory
criminatory non-discriminatory use of all university
facilities now available to the
public by any organization ~
whether on or off campuss, and a
100 per cent humor magazine were
adopted by the convention body as
party planks.
The convention also voted to
force all political parties to make
public the amounts and sources
of their campaign funds, to require
removal of ideological and dis discriminatory
criminatory discriminatory restrictions on on oncampus
campus oncampus organizations or their
members, and to require the uni university
versity university to request a students per permission
mission permission before sending out
sonal or academic records.
Freedom Party candidates for
Legislative Council include Janet
Parenteau, 3AS, Larry Glazer,
3EG, and Ross Ashley, 2UC.
Other Freedom Party candidates
are still eligible to qualify today.
Student Picks
Top Slate
For Court
Jim Harrison, Phi Beta Kappa
law senior, and Doug Gillis, Leg Legislative
islative Legislative Council leader, qualified
yesterday for., the Honor Court
positions for Student Party.
Harrison is the current nation national
al national chairman of the American Law
Student Associations committee
on Professional Responsibility. He
recently turned down the Honor
Courts chief defense council pos position
ition position to run for Chancellor.
Harrison, an independent, has
served for three trimesters on the
honor court and is a member of
the Honor Court Bar Association.
Running for the clerks seat, Gil Gillis
lis Gillis has served as representative
to the legislative branch of the
Student Government from Mur Murphree
phree Murphree Area. He is also currently
serving as a research assistant
in the College of Business Admin Administration
istration Administration as well as holding sever several
al several leadership positions in his fra fraternity,
ternity, fraternity, Kappa Alpha Order.
He has held administrative posts
in orientation and homecoming
programs. The sophomore is also
a member of the Honor Courts
Speakers Bureau.
A native of Jacksonville, Har Harrison
rison Harrison is a member of the UFs
law review editorial board and has
been selected to serve as the
American Law Student Association
representative to the Eighth Ju Judicial
dicial Judicial Circuit Bar Association on
a pilot project. Harrison is mar married
ried married and has two children. He lives
in Corry Village.

Page 7



HH III! I j
IJ Mhelds
tssa I

fl' >y. v;
BBBBH i
HEAT
THERMOMETER
Jfcr'l
Brightly
Chrome plated.

NON-STICK
SPATULA
Jh*l
A big aid in
oooldng.
2 STEAK
KNIVES
2 tor *1
Stainless steel edges.
PAN
2 far *1
Your choice of
5 colors.
TOUT TOP
TRAY
2 far $ 1
Holds your
toiletries.

Latex Foam Rubber
PLACE MATS
410r $ 1
Comp. VmHm Sf c Mch
12" x 18", in solids,
prints, pastel and deep deeptone
tone deeptone colors.

CHARGE IT!

FABULOUS DOLLAR SPECTACULAR I
i AND CLEARANCE SALE I


LIFTER
2 far *|
Convenient,
easy to use.

GADGET SALE
) SI KBS
CHOICE wm FOR 177 i
S£^^ ( 3
W' : . .. ... .... ..

OVER BOOR
HANGALL
2far*l
6 hooks.
Chromed steel.
MAGIC DRESS
HANGER
2 far $ 1
Folds; in vinyl case.

;v.
Bleached Muslin
PILLOW CASES
4fr $ l
temp. Valu* 39c Mch
Imported cotton muslin
pillow cases, 42" x- 36".
Save now I

SAVER
2 far *1
Chrome-plated
steel.

CUP SET SET-2
-2 SET-2 far *1
Easy-to-dean plastic.
Tjuuuuuurmiirnnn
RECIPE TRAYS
2far $ l
Assorted designs.

HOLDER
2 *1
Gold-tone steel.

TILE TRIVET
2 far *1
Ornamental
4 GRAPEFRUIT
SPOONS
2 sets *1
Stainless steel
& bamboo.

2-Pc. Provincial Print
ROCKER SETS
$ 2
Cmm*. Volam 1.9*
Shredded,, polyurethane
foam, in gold, brown,
green prints.

QUALITY the only true measure
of value guaranteed ALWAYS
DISCOUNTS that give you Instant cacti
savings guaranteed EVERY DAY

" INDOOR
DRYER
2 $ 1
Folds flat
for storage.

ICE TONGS
2 far *1
Two rosewood
handles.
ffiffivSwiWJwfriSik tQBi i l vs8
* WAUL
CAN OPENER
2 far *1
Complete with
bracket.

Zippered
TOSS PIUOWS
*1
Cm. Volm 1.91
i Cotton corduroy covered.
, Zippered or with center
button.

SALT AND
PEPPER
2 far
Easy-flow
ceramic caps.

IMVOR
POURER
2 far *1
Chrome-plated
steel.
DRAWI WARD
MAT
2 far $ 1
Sturdy; 14" x 20".

CUTTMC
BOARD
2 far M
Selected hardwood.

BOX
2 tor *1
Two-compartment
box.
SAFETY
BATH MAT'
2 far *1
Choice of colors.

Polyfoam
BED PILLOWS
2 for
CMtp. Vatu* 2.49 Mdi
Resilient, odorless polyure polyurethane
thane polyurethane foam filled pillows
... jumbo size!

OPEN DAILY
99

TIMER
2 far $ 1
Walnut-finish wood

I
SINK BOnOM
MAT
2 Protects your dishes.
£ Ssk 'Ws XSS9|^^.
UTILITY
MAT
2 $ 1
Ideal for
entrance hall.

Ippr
Vinyl Fitted
Mattress Covers
2hr J 1
Cwnp. Voiut $1 **
Sanitized virgin vinyl- '
white. Twin and foil sizer.

SUNDAYS:
NOON to 7

MIXIH6
SPOONS
2**l
4-pc. hardwood at
SCISSORS
2 far *|
Sturdy;
magnetic ftp.
SCOOPS
Isetsl
Stainless steel
scoops.
MUM. tOP
TABLE MAT
2 fa $ l
Aluminum top,
rubber bottom.
ir
STOVE MAT
2 fa $ 1
Choice of
decorator colors.



USE OUR "INSTANT CASH" GREOII
SAVE 20V TO 40',

IRONMG vfin UUMMVUftT
S 2 " f yowl Values 1.49 '*7
tsKan, hand, pie poppa. I
ilisaMniHiiii o.tlMaMoaaovpuujpea) h. ,nf<( uih ihuhbu
ALUMINUM FOIL Durable; complete with cover. BASKET Tissue box, gloss, waste basket. INDOOR DRYER
4(i c_ S. 4S CHI AIT WASTE BASKET Wicker type. Noiseless, rustproof. eowt Mmtt *wm luuiin C
1 tUn Decorative exterior. Carry-Handles. F COVERED UTILITY Mil, HANDLE nl, , jT k * J
ROILS |st< Ni Cl 2 MAH STEM* CAN ltq.. pail wi* vlipov* cov. N~t, handy .et. 4fcv.h MB
of household aluminum Unbreakable polyethylene. 6. MW MAIMH AM) DRAW TUT J. 3-HtCI COVERED CJUU STUB 16-ft. drying area Ribbed
foil to keep leftovers fresh. Corrybondle folded Grooved fo< fool draining. Coke plate, covor and pedevtol pkutic covered dowels. Foldi.
(araMKflMlric
WASTEBASKET BtEW MASTER ||li| .|||jlL..vS!js I KWIK ROVER METAI TABIE
3Jt tr HI lllf IEI2SU | 4 yd? 1 s 3
I ^^l
| apiiiip Mil, PiM 1| I
~ ~A U <# \ /?| M __Jv t| jgffi
SHOEBOX* 1 HB Ad&SttP
Sturdy, seif-stacking 5 | ltftr f r m A?
Keeps sHoes organized. YUM l|B Nlfl UISITA uWW # Colgato
ump. vohM 49c oadi - js*T HAIR SPRAY TOOTH PASTE
CLOTHES TREE While China 3 Stainless Steel r JS'^ 6 large double hooks. CUPS & SAUCERS MIXING BOWLS SSSSL. ** B
68" toll. Chrome- .. a A
plated Steel. 51 Comp. Value y Camp. p. i SSZSSSUS3!
Comp. Value 5.98 if I 49c cadi VBtuc 2.9 11 )
W for * Adjustable Stool Exponds 27" to 4s". Screws f6r | J
Ass /I Lovely white china cups and Rust-resistant stainless steel mounting included. Easy installation. //
NN. saucers with gold band. mixing bowl set. CLOSET RODS 4l"-71" expanding rod. 2 for )S

Vou don't need cash to save .
CHARGE IT!

GAINESVILLE
FIELDS PLAZA (On Hwy. 441 Next to Pantry Pride)

OPEN DAILY SUNDAYS:
OTO O NOON to 7

pr r ''l
|l
till ii lilllii miillil



Page 10

The Florida Alligator, Friday. Jan. 21, 1966

Igator classifieds|

for sale
TWO 80cc YAMAHA Trailmasters.
Less than 100 miles, like new.
$250 each. 378-2032. (A-74-lt-c).
1962 TRIUMPH Bonneville 650,
very good condition. Will guaran guarantee.
tee. guarantee. $650 or SIOO down, $33.73per
month (which includes tax, tag,
title, and insurance). THE CYCLE
SHOP. 324 NW Bth Ave., 378-3660.
(A-76-3t-c).
HONOR APPLE CONCESSION for
sale by owner. Inquire at 233-T
Flavet HI, 5:30-6:30 p.m. (A (A---76-lt-c).
--76-lt-c). (A---76-lt-c).
REMINGTON 30-06 AUTOMATIC.
4x scope, $150; M-l carbine, S6O.
Ph. 372-6178. (A-76-3t-c).
MINOLTA 2-1/4; free Weston me meter
ter meter ans strobe. Perfect, S6O. 372-
6178. (A-76-3t-c).
FREE KITTEN. 3-1/2 mos. old,
male, black and white. Call 372-
8603 after 5. (A-76-lt-c).
2 BEDROOM 1958 Hinslee 10 x47
trailer and tool shed. $1,955. Lo Located
cated Located at Town and Country Park,
lot W-l. Ph. 378-2768. (A-76-
lOt-c).
1965 125 cc KAWASAKI motor motorcycle.
cycle. motorcycle. Electric start, turn signals,
4200 miles. Excellent condition.
$350. Call 376-9142, rm. 319,
Fred. (A-73-3t-p).
1965 HONDA SUPER HAWK 350 cc.
Great summer fun. Cruise at 75
mph. With windshield. Excellent
condition. $550. Marvin, 6-9205.
(A-74-3t-c).
1963 YAMAHA 125 cc motorcycle.
A-l condition, has electric start starter,
er, starter, turn signals, plus other acces accessories.
sories. accessories. Will sell for $225 or best
offer. Call 372-6450. (A-74-3t-c).
FARM EQUIPMENT 1 Flexo
3 point hitch Ford Harrow, $385.
1 attachment. Two 16 bottom
plows with colters and 3 point lift,
$l5O. 1-set wheel weights, front
and rear for Ford Dexter Tractor,
$l5O. Phone 376-5826 or see at
Linda Ann Court, south Hwy. 441.
(A-74-tf-nc).
TV ANTENNA. Picks up channels
2,4, 5, 12. S4O Call after 2.
372-5012. (A-74-3t-c).
CUSHMAN EAGLE motor scooter.
Sacrifice. A-l condition. Must see,
must sell, $125. Ask cor Lee.
376-9234. (A-72-st-c).
MUST SELL 1959 2-bedroom
trailer, 10x41', air conditioned,
open cabana, built-in washer. Call
2-1868. (A-70-ts-c).
FOR RENTORSALE. Used trailer,
10*x55\ 2 bedrooms. Lot in park
available. Pinehurst Trailer Park.
Lot 27, or call 372-7073. (A-68-
st-c).
*64 ZANELA motorcycle. 125 cc.
$l5O. Call Kip at 8-4272. (A-68-
ts-c).
SPUDNUT. Cinnamon rolls, turn turnover
over turnover pie and 33 delicious varieties.
Donuts for those who want the very
best. Open til midnight. 1017 W.
Univ. (A-67-10t-c).
1965 VESPA 90cc. $75 and take
over payments. Call 372-7167. (A (A---73-st-c).
--73-st-c). (A---73-st-c).
1965 VESPA 150 cc. 600 mi. In Includes
cludes Includes cover. Cost $450, will sell
for $350. Call 372-7572. (A-72-
st-c).

for sale
ROBERTS 770 TAPE RECORDER
and matching speakers. $550 value
going for S4OO. 8-4624. ask for
Bob. (A-75-ts-c).
FOR SALE OR RENT. 3 bedroom,
central heat and air. NW section.
Small down payment and assume
mortgage. 378-2445 after 5:30.
(A-75-3t-c).
1965 125 cc KAWASAKI motor motorcycle.
cycle. motorcycle. Electric start, turn signals,
4,200 miles. Excellent condition.
$350. Call 376-9142, rm. 391.
Fred. (A-73-3t-p).
1965 BRIDGESTONE motorcycle.
50cc, 1500 original miles, ex excellent
cellent excellent running condition, 200
mpg. Call Harry Van Meter, 372-
9303. (A-73-st-c).
VOICE OF MUSIC portable Stereo
Hi-Fi. Must sell, immediately.
Excellent condition. Very reason reasonable.
able. reasonable. Call Nancy at 378-3003. (A (A---72-st-c).
--72-st-c). (A---72-st-c).
for rent
10x47* 2 BEDROOM TRAILER for
rent. $65 monthly. Located at Town
and Country Trailer Park, lot W-l.
Ph. 378-2768. (B-76-10t-c).
ROOM IN PRIVATE HOME, quiet
place to study for a graduate stu student.
dent. student. 2124 NW 7th Place. Phone
376-7660. (B-70-3t-p).
FURNISHED ROOM in private
home with kitchen privileges if
desired. Ph. 372-3770 after sp.m.
(B-76-3t-c).
NEW 4 BEDROOM furnished apt.
1 block from campus. Corner of
SW 12th St. and SW 3rd Ave.
Central heat and air conditioning.
$2lO monthly. Ideal study set-up.
372-3576 day, 372-4692 home. (B (B---76-ts-c).
--76-ts-c). (B---76-ts-c).
2 NEAT ATTRACTIVE bed-setting
rooms. Across street from
campus, single or double. Call
8-1719 or come by 1924 NW Ist
Ave. after 5:30 any day of the week.
(B-74-st-c).
mE!C Modern 3 bedroom house.
Kitchen facilities. S3O a month
each, plus utilities. 1102 NE 19th
Place, 376-9671. (B-76-3t-c).

- SIRTC SAT & SUN
SAT, at 1:00 2:30 Only
L * fl

for rent
ROOM IN PRIVATE HOME for
lady, share bath. 1533 NW 45th
Ave. Phone 6-6017. (B-74 r 3t-nc).
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM apt.
for rent. $35 a month. Immediate
occupancy. Phone 6-6461. (B-74-
st-c).
NICE FURNISHED 2 room garage
apartment. Suitable for 1 or 2.
Quiet neighborhood. Call 376-1730
after 1 p.m. (B-72-ts-c).
TWO BEDROOM FURNISHED apt.
319 NW Ist St., downtown. $65 per
month. Mr. Kaplan, 372-0481. (B (B---69-ts-c).
--69-ts-c). (B---69-ts-c).
CLOSE TO ALL CAMPUS require requirements.
ments. requirements. 2 rooms, furnished, ground
floor, warm, comfortable. Reason Reasonably
ably Reasonably priced. Men Only. 376-6494.
(B-72-st-c).
NEED 3rd MALE ROOMMATE for
2 bedroom A.C. apartment. Large,
close to campus. 921 SW 6th Ave.
Phone 378-4176. (B-67-10t-c).
2 BEDROOM furnished apt. Air
conditioned. 2 blocks from campus.
Married couples only. 378-1027.
(B-75-ts-c).
FOR RENT one-bedroom cottage
for 2. Air conditioning, brand new
heater. Located at 428 NW 12th
Terr. Drop by or call 372-5652.
Available immediately. (B-75-
3t-c).
ROOMMATE to share modern 2-
bedroom apt. with two Law students
in new Village Park. SSO monthly,
plus electricity. 378-4447. (B-75-
2t-c).
ONE MALE ROOMMATE to share
large air conditioned t apt. One
block from the Law School. $33 a
month. Call 376-7083. (B-73-3t-c).
wzxm
\V Biq Cay
1 Rod Steiger
| The J
\\ Pawnbroker l
£: 1:00-3:00-5:00

| for rent
APT. FOR RENT. One bedroom,
living room, kitchen and dining
room, private bath. Near campus
and parking space. Call 376-5043.
(B-73-ts-c).
ONE BEDROOM COTTAGE, Lake
Winnott. Lake privileges. S3O per
month. 23 miles from Gainesville.
372-0481. (B-67-ts-c).
autos
1959 FIAT. Engine completely
overhauled, new brakes. Depen Dependable
dable Dependable economical transportation.
$235 or best offer. Ph. 378-3194.
(G-75-2t-c).

zztfWiMnWr
I 2400 Hawthorne Rood Rt. 20 Phone FR 6-SOll l
ISlarls lonite* 3 M
VINCE EDWARDS OHMART g/fb \
in a deadly m SnpMiL
hpitv m
^oFsiirMf
THE kCVOH BEHIND THE HEADLINES! |
Crazed Cycle Maniacs
-£\t Assaulting and Killing
F< THRIUS! |
l
4
Look TODAY for the Gainesville Drive-In Theatre
Motorcycle and win a pass for the Exclusive First
Area Showing of "MOTORPSYCHO." The first 100
cars will receive a beautiful tie pinand, also, you
may be the winner of a ride in a SUZUKI during a
whole day!

autos
EXCEPTIONAL BUY. Must sell
RAMBLER 6. Standard transmis transmission,
sion, transmission, good condition. $260. See
110 NW 9th Terr, after 6 p.m.
(G-76-2t-p).
Sacrifice 1965 AUSTIN HEALEY
MK HI. Like new, only 8,000 miles.
Still under factory warranty.
$2,595. After 5, 629-4411. Ocala,
Fla. (G-76-4t-c).
1958 CHEVY STATION WAGON.
Good second car. $225. Ph. 372-
1654. (G-76-3t-c).
1960 FORD, 2-door sedan. 292 V-8
engine, standard transmission, su superb
perb superb condition, SSOO. 466-3300.
(G-74-st-c).



IGATOR CLASSIFIEDS |

autos
>62 DELUX VW STATION WAGON.
Good tires, radio, heater. Will
reduce price $lO per day until
sold. 215-D Flavet 111, after 5.
(G-75-10t-c).
1951 FORD. Tires almost new,
good mechanical condition. SIOO.
Call Mike, 684-7779, Interlachen,
Fla., after 5 p.m. (G-75-st-p).
1959 OLDS, Dynamic 88, 2-door
sedan. 51,000 actual miles, origi original
nal original owner. Radio, heater, automa automatic
tic automatic transmission, like-new con condition.
dition. condition. SSOO. See at 4517 SE Ist
Place. Call 376-8900.(G-74-3t-c).
52 MGTD. Reconditioned com completely,
pletely, completely, mechanically and physi physically.
cally. physically. Going abroad, must sell.
Call 372-9363, Dave Reiman, leave
word. (G-74-st-c).

JAMES COBURN
GAGS, GIRLS, GUNS
SHOWING TODAY aiflibi:-
AT 1:10 3:12 5:14
TONIGHT :
AT 9:22 O NLYI A
noiusmv /
KOI) TAYLOR
IHMN'OTIHSTIIKII
1^
I GO NAKED- I
I Shelly Jane IN THE WORLD
Winters Fonda | Gna Lollobrigida j
f A SATURDAY ONLY 1
I T 1 Blood Chilling Hits In Color!
I (THIRD TERRIFYING HIT r |
I palace b II
I I\jv VINCENT PRICE DEBRA PAGET 11
| I aL F Ho" rrT FYI NG~HI T j |
Irf NO ONE WILL Bt ADMITTED WHILE f J | I
I\\ the coffin is being opened l 1 Pi fI|JI lis 8
|V^niin^Don]^Com^Alone|

autos
-
1960 ENGLISH FORD. Good con condition.
dition. condition. Owner leaving town, must
sell immediately. S2OO. Please
contact Rose-Marie at 2-3950. (G (G---75-lt-c).
--75-lt-c). (G---75-lt-c).
wanted
REGISTERED NURSE for pedia pediatricians
tricians pediatricians office. State experience,
references, and permanence.
Write Box 12427, Univ. Station.
(C-74-ts-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE with car to
share new 1 bedroom apt. Pool
and air conditioning. Butler Gar Garden
den Garden Apts., SW 16th Ave. Apt. 960.
(C-74-3t-c).
ONE MALE ROOMMATE to share
air-conditioned two bedroom apt.
with 3 others at Village Park.
Call 376-3352. (C-73-st-c).

wanted
IF YOU NEED extra money and
have Saturdays available, write to
Fuller Brush Co. a 1028 Clear Clearwater
water Clearwater Dr., in Daytona Beach with
name and address and phone at
which you can be reached. Average
earnings: $1.75 $2.50 per hour.
(C-67-10t-c).
EXPERIENCED BASS GUITARIST
seeking to join established group
only. Joe, rm. 11, 372-9497. (C (C---76-lt-p).
--76-lt-p). (C---76-lt-p).
DESIRE RIDE TO DAYTONA after
12 noon, Friday. Will share gas.
Please call 376-6848.(C-76-lt-c).
RIDERS TO ATLANTA. Leave
Friday at 1 p.m. Return Sunday
night to Gainesville. Call 378-
4069. (C-76-lt-nc),
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share furnished apt. Close to
campus. S3O a month plus utilities.
Call 8-3132. (C-74-st-p).
real estate
3 BEDROOM AND DEN. 1-1/2
baths, fenced yard, lots of trees,
central heat, good neighborhood
for pets and children. SI,OOO down,
$146 monthly for 20 months then
S9O monthly or $2,100 down and
S9O monthly, payment includes
taxes and insurance; or I will deal
with reliable Univ. type. 376-0347.
(1-75-stc).

|GAINtSVIuT^LUXUR^THEATRE
Doors Open Daily P.M.
Cont show An Dav s,art 1 p M
[ Tatophow 378-2434 [
STARTS TODAY!
FEATURES AT 1:10 3:20 5:25 7:30 9:40
IhAYUY S,a,,,nq DEAN DOROTHY ROIJUY NTVIII r
WILIS JDNB-PRMINE-MiflDWMl Bi^-uiiD^-iima-ia^

real estate
EXCEPTIONAL BUY. lOor 20 acre
tracts, 10-1/2 miles W. of Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. Ideal for investment or com comfortable
fortable comfortable living. School buses and
paved state road to town, trailers
allowed. If you like country living
this is it. David T. Harvy, Realtor,
3500 W. Univ. Ave. Ph. 378-2222.
If no answer, 376-8701. (1-72-
st-c).
3 BEDROOM, 1 bath CCB house.
Carport and large storage area.
Attractive lot with shrubs and
trees. 1706 NE 7th Terr., 376-
1096. (I-75-10t-c).
3BDR, 1-1/2 baths, CCB, fenced
back yard, built in kitchen plus
refrigerator. SBOO.OO and take over
payments of less thansloo/month.
2831 NE 13th St. in Highland Court
Manor. Call FR2-3811 after 6p.m.
or Univ. Ext. 2832, 8-5. (1-67-
tf-nc).
THE BEST TO YOU FROM DOB DOBSON.
SON. DOBSON. Personal and complete real
estate and insurance service. TOM
DOBSON AGENCY, 2908 NW 13th
St., 372-1473. (I-72-ts-c).
lost-found
FOUND One contact lens at State
Theatre during The Pawn Pawnbroker.
broker. Pawnbroker. Call Bill Henderson at
the State Theatre. (L-73-st-nc).
LOST Gold Bulova watch. Around
Norman Field. Call 6-1755. (L (L---73-3t-c).
--73-3t-c). (L---73-3t-c).

Friday, Jan. 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

[ lost-found
LOST Brown leather wallet with
IDs of Robert K. Wilcox. Keep
money, but please return wallet
to 328 SW 34 St. (L-74-st-nc).
FOUND Set of General Motors
car keys on Merrill Yarbrough,
Inc. key holder. Outside of Gym.
Ph. 372-9496 or contact Hal Noyes,
rm. 2053 Hume. (L-76-lt-p).
LOST Yellow gold charm brace bracelet
let bracelet at Larrys Wonder House. Great
sentimental value. Reward. Raw Rawlings,
lings, Rawlings, 372-3621, rm. 130. (L-76-
st-c).
services
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Call
Mrs. Lyons. 376-7160 any time.
Am on approved Graduate List and
have passed Medical Terminology
Course. (M-74-ts-c).
TENA WELCOMES YOU students
back and wants you to know she is
still at Miladys Beauty Salon, 517
W. Univ. Ave. Her specialty is
frosting for average length hair.
$lO. Limited time, by appointment
only. 376-3802. (M-72-2t-c).
IRONING IN MY HOME. Call 376-
4086. (M-72-st-c).
NOW OPENING. Teddy Bear Nur Nursery.
sery. Nursery. 3 departments. Compete in infant
fant infant department. Planned program
for children over 3. Central heating
and air conditioned. Phone 6-0917.
1214-1/2 NW 4th St.(M-70-10t-c).
STUDENTS!!! Knitting classes be begin
gin begin Feb. 3. Registration fee SI.OO.
Call and make your reservation
now. Class number will be limited.
Ann and Joannes Knitting Corner.
Ph. 378-3000. (M-72-st-c).
EXPERT TAILORING by Mrs.
Dora Manookian. Alterations of all
kinds on mens and womens cloth clothing.
ing. clothing. 35 yrs. experience. Prices
reasonable. Call 376-1794. 1824
NW Ist. Ave. (M-72-10t-c).
UNITED RENT-ALLS. We rent
most anything. Roll-away beds,
trucks, all tools, party equipment.
Call us for all your needs. 376-
2835, 625 NW Bth Ave. (M-75-
ts-c).
HORSE HAVEN RIDING SCHOOL.
Group and private instruction.
Hunt, seat and jumping. Excellent
pasture for your horse. Call 376-
0367 or 376-3494. Look for sign
6 miles west on Newberry Road
opposite store. (M-75-lt-c).
ALTERATIONS AND SEWING.
Reasonable. Day and evening.
Flavet 111, 246-B. (M-76-lt-c).
helpwanted
WOMAN TO DO IRONING and light
housework one day per week (Fri (Friday).
day). (Friday). Call Judy Barber, after 5:30,
at 376-9969. (E-75-tf-nc).
t |

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Jan. 21, 1966

Grills Sizzle, Crosses Burn,
s Tempers Boil In City

By BRAD SAWTELL
Alligator Staff Writer
Linnel L. Lincey and Robert
Mims were allegedly attacked in
Macs Waffle Shop on December
24 at 3:15 a.m. Lincey, a power powerfully
fully powerfully built young Negro member
of CORE and the NAACP, said that
the incident was just one of a num number
ber number of incidents involving violence
to Negroes at the Waffle Shop.
Lincey said that at 3:15 a.m. on
December 24 he and three other
Negro youths walked into Macs
Waffle Shop, sat down at the coun counter
ter counter and ordered four cups of coffee.
He said that there were three white
customers in the shop at the time
as well as one grill man and a white
and a colored waitress.
Lincey said that one of the three
white men got up and walked be behind
hind behind the group of Negroes and
counted One, two, three, four
niggers! According to Lincey the
white man then walked out the front
door. A few minutes later, the man
returned with seven men coming
in the front door, each man weigh weighing

It Isnt Going
To Stop Us...
By ARLENE CAPLAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Judy Harman was listening to her record player when she heard
what she described as a minor explosion. Running to her window,
she watched the flaming six by four plywood cross burn in her
front yard. Miss Harman, a UF student who lives at 120 N.W.
Ninth Avenue with four other girls, is active in the civil rights
movement.
Last Saturday, the day of the cross burning, Judy had partici participated
pated participated in a demonstration on St. Marys bridge on the Georgia-
Florida border. The protest was against Georgias action in the
controversial Julian Bond issue. Other demonstrations she has
been involved in regard U.S.policy in Viet Nam, racial incidents,
and issues in Gainesville. Currently she and three of her room roommates
mates roommates are picketing Macs Waffle Shop.
When asked what her first reaction to the cross was, she
replied, I was scared. I woke up one of my roommates and then
immediately called the police. After Itold them what had happened
they only seemed interested in our address. It took them eight
minutes to show up, she said bitterly. By thenl had carried
the cross into the house and one of the two cops kicked it. She
continued to say she felt the officers were non-committal and
not really concerned at all.
Jan Parenteau, another resident of the house, arrived home
after the police had left. When Judy told me I was terrified,
she said, anxiety in her voice. The police, the F. B. 1., newsmen
and our friends had all been told but no one could believe it had
actually happened. Even though we were terrified, Id like to say
that this isnt going to stop us from picketing or protesting now
or in the future, said Miss Parenteau.
The question of who is responsible for the cross burning evokes
a lot of speculation. Possible suspects, according to Judy Har Harman,
man, Harman, are the Ku Klux Klan, pranksters and local red-necks.
I dont really think that it was the Klan, said Miss Harman,
though Im not sure. The cross wasnt constructed well enough.
It didnt have much fuel because it only burnt a few minutes, so
it probably wasnt the Klan. I doubt seriously if it was just a
prank, she conjectured. Its probably the red necks that are
responsible.
Bonni Greenspan, another roommate, says she was surprised
rather than frightened by this episode. Actually, from what the
guys around Macs have been saying, she continued, the local
people dont like us and are probably the ones that burnt the
cross.
She went on to say what the local people dislike was the entire
way of life of those involved in civil rights. Integrated parties,
picket lines, and the beat appearance of these dissenters and
advocates of freedom are what Miss Greenspan feels are the
reasons behind local prejudice.
Although Im a little worried about the whole thing, I really
think that everyone should know about this and see whats really
happening. The .police really dont do any good, she said.
George Purdue, a camera man for Jacksonvilles Channel 4,
Wayne Farris of Miami, and many newspapers have supposedly
taken an interest in this incident. The police may have the power
to enforce the law but Miss Greenspan feels that publicity is just
what the movement needs.

ing weighing about 210 pounds, and seven
men coming in the back door, each
weighing about 210 pounds.
The white men allegedly walked
up behind the four Negroes and
* 'll
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W
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WALKER

asked Isnt it time you Niggers
left? Lincey said he told the man
it was as soon as they had finished
their coffee. At this moment the
lights went off and Lincey was
punched in the stomach as he stood
up.
I threw my cup of coffee in that
mans face and then hit this other
white man coming for me, said
Lincey. Two of the colored boys
had run out the front door and I
had just reached the door myself
when I heard the other fellow with
me scream Oh, Lord! or some something
thing something like that, like they were try trying
ing trying to kill him. I ran back in and
I helped him out the door. When
we got outside I could see the side
of his neck was scalded. They must
have thrown boiling water or hot
grease on him.
Lincey said that he and Mims
were picked up by a police car a
few blocks away and taken to
Alachua General Hospital. After
Mims neck had been treated,
Linceys hand was treated for cuts.
Lincey said he didnt know how he
got the cuts but that he imagined
he was hit with a glass or some something.
thing. something. The police then took them
to the Gainesville Police Station.
According to Lincey, after the
police had kept them waiting a
couple of hours, they told us to
forget it and go home. I said that
we would go home, maybe, but that
were not about to forget it.
Lincey stated that Mims, in
addition to the scalding, had ap apparently
parently apparently been kicked around the
head and face.
Lincey is one of the CORE and
NAACP picketers who have been
protesting Brutality at the Waffle
Sliog.
Billy L. Walker, nig"ht manager
of the Waffle Shop, described the
incident that occurred on Dec. 24
as just a few licks passed. You
cant tell what it was dark and
aIL
Walker sard that there were
about 20 people in the Waffle

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THE PICKETERS
i Picketers protest alleged brutality.
s
Assault And Battery Charges Filed

Assault and battery charges have
been filed against two white men in
the Dec. 24 Waffle Shopjncident.
J. L. Reynolds and Gilbert S. Reed
have been named as defendents in
the case.

JBf
W ;!
. A. s
THE HAND
Linceys hand, alleged to have been burned in brawl.

Shop when these four Negro boys
came in acting like they were
trying to take the place over. You
could tell theyd been drinking.
After the boys sat down and
ordered coffee, Walker said he
went into the back room to call
the police to forestall any pos possible
sible possible trouble.* The night manager
said that the phone was dead and
as he stepped back into the front
room the lights went off.
Walker said he then jumped
in the car and ran down to find a
policeman. The policeman was
found and brought back to the
Waffle Shop, but the scuffle was
over by that time. The manager
said that a cup of coffee had been
thrown and several cups were
broken but that this brutally
beaten and boiling hot water story
is untrue Thats just an untrue
statement.

The office of Judge John Connell
yesterday reported that warrants
for the arrest of these two men
were sent out Jan. 11.
The case will come before Judge
Ira J. Carter and the Court of

Walker admitted that one Negro
had a scalded neck and that Lincey
had some cuts on the back of his
hand. Now where he got them, I
just dont know.
Walker said that Lincey had a
sock over his hand when he entered
the shop that night and that the cuts
didnt look like anything that hap happened
pened happened in the past five minutes.
I know that one very well, that
Lincey. Anytime anything happens
he is the leader of it.
The man who on the surface has
the most to do with the affairs of
the Waffle Shop in reality has
practically the least to do with
running it. The man is Edward
Hill, and he owns the lease on the
controversial establishment.
Hill said that although he has the
lease on the shop he turns over
most of the actual operation to
Billy L. Walker, the night manager.

Records at an unspecified date. The
warrants were certified to the
Court of Records on Jan. 11.
Assault and battery in the state
of Florida is a misdemeanor.



Ijquoit Tafr

Wffl K'
Pit 11 a hlh Mtmtimi

By GARY S. CORSERI
Alligator Staff Writer
utler Waugh. Frank Taylor and M. S.
kpatrick are three UF instructors
sently beguiling time sitting upon an
they hope will hatch a peacock. These
e, nominated by Dr. Stanley West, Head
UF Libraries, approved by the Board of
lent Publications, will be the faculty
isers of the new Florida Review, ex exted
ted exted to be published in the Fall of 1966.
The conception is simple, explains
Waugh. We want to deprovincialize
university. The Review will help give
university status and recognition.
This will not be anything like the
nge Peel, Old or New, says Kirk Kirkrick.
rick. Kirkrick. We envision a highly sophisti sophistied
ed sophistied review on t e order of the Suwanee
riew or the Kenyon Quarterly.
'he Florida Review will encompass in
slim 100 pages all aspects of the Hu Hulities.
lities. Hulities. Essays on art, music, theater
l be welcome. Some emphasis will be
ced upon the literary. Fiction and non nonion
ion nonion works will be published.
Vaugh says support has come from
lexpected areas. The idea of the Re Re
Re

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Poetry Corner

Decisions,
Evolutionary
By WARREN D. PATTERSON
Down from up among the leaves
Os books I found in twilight
Stacks of all that man believes,
I see again the skylight
Heaven, in a frame of trees
From which the earths suspended.
These are silent urgencies
From which I've not descended.
Some, are bound to challenge all
To rise above his brother!
Those with leaves that never fall
Would have us lift each other.
Here I stand; on hands and knees
A thing of heavens shore--
Something contemplating trees,
Thinking, Ive done this before!

view was enthusiastically received by the
Schools of Medicine, Engineering and Busi Business
ness Business Administration, which have pledged
financial support. These people, says
Waugh, have an admirable point of view.
They believe that what is good for the
University will be good for them. They may
not know much about putting out a literary
review, but they know theyd like the school
to have one.
You know, says Kirkpatrick, we want
to put out the biggest and best magazine we
can. Our only standard is excellence. Stu Students
dents Students at Florida will have no edge over
outside contributors. If Sally Jones submits
a poem, it may be shell be competing with
Allen Tate or Judson Jerome. In other
words, Sally had better be writing some
pretty good poetry before she thinks of
submitting it here.
The Florida Review will pay according
to standard Review rates: ten dollars for
a page of prose; fifty cents for a line of
poetry.
Weve got a hell of a lot of work to do
to get the Review off the ground, says
Kirkpatrick. Were looking for an editor

Resume Du Mai
By MARTIN CURRY
P
There, within a thin green light,
a far field of golden corn
shimmers gently in the wind.
Hovering above:
the screeching crows.
The earth seems moist and warm
and along the wide fertile lands
stand stacks of bright fragrant hay.
Perched atop:
the slow-eyed crows.
Farther still, green light gathers
mist-like and the tall corn rustles,
rasping softly in the soft Southwind.
Crows screech and swirl,
whirling in the wind,
gathering against the blurring sun
until the air hums with feathered might.
With light gone, dark comes everywhere:
beating black wings
in the thick green air.

Caplan Cools If,
Collecting Experience

By ARLENE CAPLAN
Alligator Staff Writer
How I had wound up where I had
wound up, why I was doing what I
had not planned on doing, I could
not say. I had, I am sure, no idea
whatsoever. I was in New York and
it was cold. And there was every everything
thing everything to do and see and yet one
could do and see almost nothing
because a guy named Quill had
called a strike which eight million
city dwellers, and one tourist in
particular, were finding just a bit
exasperating.
And so I walked to an inter intersection
section intersection and did not see streets.
I saw frustrated policemen direct directing
ing directing traffic that would not, because
it could not, move. And there were
taxis filled with despairing people
watching meters clicking away
money they were not earning be because
cause because progress was not in New
York. While standing on the corner
that might be called waiting and
wondering I became bored with
waiting and tired of wondering.
Somehow, with determination or
luck or some other intangible ob'-
scurity, I found myself somewhere
that did not look like anywhere else.

right now. Anyone interested ought to sub submit
mit submit a portfolio to Frank, Butler or me
within the week. Wed prefer to have a
sophomore or junior to lend continuity.
The reason past Reviews have folded,
says Frank Taylor, a novelist teaching at
the UF these past two years, is partly
because of lack of funds and partly because
of lack of continuity. With this Review,
we expect to have both.
The cost of publishing the Florida Re Review
view Review will amount to some SIO,OOO a year;
of this, student contributions amount to
some SSOO. The Review will be nationally
distributed, copies being sent to college
libraries throughout the nation. It will sell
for $1.25 a copy. Hopefully, UF students
will be able to purchase the Review at
cost for sl.
The Advisory Board is elected for a
three-year term. The editor of the Review
is responsible for its contents; but the
Advisory Board may prevent the Reviews
going to press. Kirkpatrick says this would
be an extreme and unlikely recourse.
After all, he explains, weve got a lot
of work and we wont succeed very well
obstructing publication. Were looking for forward

I was on the corner of Bleekerand
MacDougal and there were people
that didnt care about transpor transportation,,
tation,, transportation,, or clicking meters or even
progress. And there were pawn pawnshops
shops pawnshops and suede shops and book
shops and shop shops, and in front
of each shop was a door which
opened, if one wanted to try. And I
had no plans that couldnt be al altered
tered altered so I began opening shop
doors. And with each doorknob I
paid for things that have little
practical value.
I wound up in stores that I could
never find again, probably, and
bought things that Ill use once in
awhile, maybe ... It really didnt
matter then or even now, actually.
As a matter of fact when my
wallet was filled with only re receipts
ceipts receipts and small change and it was
becoming dark and raining cold I
didnt even care that there was
probably no way back to where I
was supposed to be. But why should
I feel Im really supposed to be
anywhere?
When I realized I was wasting
time thinking about things I
shouldnt like where I should be
and what if anything was meaning meaningful
ful meaningful I decided to go to some
anywhere and try to arrive at some
anything that at least vaguely re resembled
sembled resembled a logical conclusion. But
that seemed purposeless so I found
a place where I could see nothing
in particular that consisted of
everything.
It was a long haul up those seven
flights of stairs but the view from
the roof watching 23 pigeons
made it worthwhile. I saw the top
of a church and the pigeons amble
around the steeple. And there was
a cloud around the Empire State
Building.
I dont know how long I watched
the pigeons but if it hadnt gotten
so cold I probably would have
stayed longer.
But it was cold so I decided to
return to the Village Culture
if it can be called that.
While heading in no particular
direction I met someone who offer offered
ed offered to help me carry my burdensome
bundles. And after walking for an
eternal instant I found out that he,
whoever he was, was an aspiring
artist that frequently went up on
LSD to enhance creativity.

Friday, Jan. 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

ward forward to cooperating and working with the
student editor.
The vastness of our conception ought to
be considered, notes Waugh. Should a
student from Gainesville have the same
qualifications for a job as one from Kenyon
or Sewanee, the student from Gainesville
will lose out essentially because those other
schools have earned a name for themselves
with their reviews.
Waugh, assistant editor of the Southern
Folklore Quarterly, a 31-year-old, strug struggling
gling struggling young professor with five kids, is
with the English department. Kirkpatrick,
who teaches imaginative Writing, is a mem member
ber member of the C-3 department. Taylor is a
C-5 instructor.
Lighting his pipe, Taylor turns leisurely
to Waugh, Youre rather good at this,
Butler. How would you sum up the concep conception
tion conception of the Review?
Reflecting but a moment, looking from
Taylor to Kirkpatrick to Taylor, Waugh,
smiling within himself, sums it up: In
this Review we want to sound the creative
mainstream of American Intellectual Life
immersed, but not sunk, in the Space Age.

I asked to see his works.
His meager room in the Bowery
, was a gallery. There were etch etchings
ings etchings and impressions of intangible
moods and portraits of non-entities
and the atmosphere, to me, was
amber.
Clocks continued to mark the
passing of time and Quill had a
heart attack and registration was
yesterday but what really mat mattered?
tered? mattered?
My life was like a stream of
consciousness bit, and as the hours
on the neon lit bank signs changed
I continued to collect experience.
After all, experience and time
seemed to be the only realities I
could perceive.
And soon it was only eight hours
before the rumbling registration
in Gainesville would be over, un unless
less unless of course I could find five
dollars with which to late register.
But I had to return to a pragmatic
society and so I gathered my be belongings,
longings, belongings, hoping I had retained all
my memories, and checked in at
J. F. K.
The inevitable journey to
Gainesville was painfully educa educational.
tional. educational. There was infinite exper experience
ience experience to be categorized and people
to talk to and a trimesters sche schedule
dule schedule to be made out. There were
clouds and rivers to appreciate
and courses to be chosen and a
checkbook that somehow had to
be balanced.
There were three hours in which
to register when I finally sauntered
to Tigerts basement and suddenly
I transformed, by necessity, into a
student, and an almost practical
one at that.
And here it is two weeks since
N. Y. I have schedules to keep,
obligations to meet and a budget
to adhere to.
How I wound up here, why I am
doing what I seem to have planned
to do, I cannot say.
I am in Gainesville and it is
routine. And there are things to
do and clocks that forbid their
being done, because a so-called
rationality calls the plays for the
almost 17,000 enrolled students,
and especially one in particular
who finds the whole bit thought thoughtprovoking
provoking thoughtprovoking .

Page 13



Its Travel Time Again.
Cagers Tackle Georgia

By ANDY MOOR
F L Alligator Staff Writer
Florida's Southeastern Confer Conference
ence Conference basketball hopes go squarely
on tin* lliu* tomorrow aftornoon
wlion tin* Gators tako on Georgia
before a regional television audi audience
ence audience at 3 p.rn,._
The Gators have a 2-1 record in
SFC play and must win tomorrow
to stay withligstriklng distance of
unbeaten Kentucky.
Coach Norm Sloan has once again
revised his starting lineup for tin*
game, Inserting Gary McElroy in
the lineup in place of Jeff Ramsey.

-Moor-EI
SPOH TS EDITOR
If exjw'rlence brings improvement, Floridas 1966 tennis team
will be better than that of 1965.
This is the opinion of Coach Hill Potter, who has five of six
regulars returning from last years squad which finished 9-9.
We have five lettermen returning, Potter said, but they
will have to show improvement for us to do much better than
last year.
Potter has lined up a 34-match schedule which will have the
team playing matches at almost a one-a-day rate for a two-week
period.
Weve got a lot of tough matches in those 34, Potter ob observed,
served, observed, and its going to be tough to be up for all of them.
Potter explained that the schedule is so large this year because
many northern teams are traveling South this spring and wanted
to have a match here.
Were taking on such teams as Notre Dame, Northwestern
and North C arolina, Potter said. We havent played any of
these schools in a long time.
In addition, matches with Penn, Amherst and other eastern
schools remain on the docket.
Were playing more good teams this year than last, Potter
said, but were building and the experience will be good for all.
Hick Chare and Steve Gardner are the top returnees from
the 1965 squad. They played No. 1 and 2, respectively, a year ago,
and have been elected co-captains for 1966.
Other returning lettermen from last year are Bill Belote,
Hill Perrin and Ron Flck. All three were regulars and won their
share of matches.
According to Potter, junior Fick has improved a great deal
over the year.
Fick has shown steady progress since his freshman year,
Potter said. He had one of the best records on the squad
S. .' .. ...
last year while playing No. 6.
Fick has' leon the surprise of the early practice sessions,
beating Gardner on one occasion.
Challenging for spots on the squad are junior college transfers
Russ Burr, l)tck Overmeyer and Nick Nicollettl along with John
Shipley, up from tlu> freshman team.
At least one of these boys will break into the top six, Potter
said. IT they all show real well, they might push one or two of
the lettermen back."
Hun comes hen* after two years at Mia mi-Dade Junior College,
while Overmeyer played Ids tennis at Him ward .1. C. Nicollettl
attended Kemper, Mo.. Junior College.
Potter is disappointed at the loss of 1965s top two freshman
players due to academic problems.
I ann\ 1 ebos and Mike Mttson were our top treshmen last
year and both dropped out of school because of academics.
Potter said.
Potter said he expected both to make the varsity this year and
their loss has affected Ins plans.
The tennis mentor sees no leadership problems and leels
Chace and Gardner can make up for the loss of Captain Vic Stone.
Both Gardner and Chaco are fine students and leaders m
every respect. Potter said. "I feel confident they can do a
good job."
All else aside, the racqueteers have a good chance at bettering
their tilth place finish in tin* SFC last \ear.
It experience pays oft and Fick continues to improve, a winning
season is probable.
/ ,WNNMKiNBBM
V>/ fienfvs. Romans.
m Jwv c.ouni.pymen..

McElroy gains a starting berth
as a result of his fine play against
Florida State Tuesday. The Clear Clearwater
water Clearwater sophomore scored 15 points
and picked off eight rebounds in
that affair.
Sloan's decision to start McEl McElroy
roy McElroy gives the Gators three sopho sophomores
mores sophomores In the starting lineup to go
along with juniors Gary Keller and
Skip Higley. Harry Winkler and
Dave Miller are the other sophs.
Georgia, considered a lowlife in
the SEC race in pre-season pols,
has had its ups and downs thus
far.

Por instance, the Bulldogs came
within an eyelash of beating unbeat unbeaten
en unbeaten and second ranked Kentucky,
losing in two overtimes, 69-65.
Thursday new coach Ken Rose Rosemaonds
maonds Rosemaonds charges were clobbered
by Georgia Tech, 89-56 on the home
court. They had previously beaten
the Yellow Jackets in Atlanta by
13 points.
The Bulldogs now own a 7-6
overall log, but are 2-3 in the
conference. The Gators are 9-4
overall and 2-1 in the SEC.
Ted Williams
Voted Into
Hall Os Fame
BOSTON (UPI) The nations
baseball writers today elected
their biggest critic, retired slug-
ger Ted Williams, to baseballs
Hall of Fame.
Williams, 47, was an over overwhelming
whelming overwhelming choice for enshrinement
at Cooperstown, N. Y., in results
of the biennial balloting announced
by officials of the Baseball Writers
Association of America. He was
named on 226 of 302 ballots qast
by veteran scribes, 93.3 well over
the 75 per cent he needed for
selection.
Charles Red Ruffing, the
former American League pitcher,
finished second in the balloting,
with 208 votes, 16 short of the
total he needed to win a berth
in the Cooperstown baseball
shrine.
The Williams selection ended
weeks of speculation on whether
his countless disputes witti the
#
baseball writers and his frequent
public and private insults of the
scribes would delay or even pre prevent
vent prevent his election to the hall of
fame.
Roy Campanella, the one-time
Brooklyn Dodger catcher whose
career was cut short by an auto automobile
mobile automobile accident, received 197
votes or almost 10 per cent short
of election.
Joe Medwick was fourth with
187 votes. Newcomer Foil Boud Boudreau,
reau, Boudreau, originator of Hie Williams
shift, was fifth in tin* balloting
with 115 votes while retired Chi Chicago
cago Chicago White Sox Manager A1 Lope/,
had 109 voles and Fiios (Country)
Slaughter finished seventh with
100 votes, or 33 jier cent o! (he
balloting.

I 1 Apostolic Church
(in' siinCA\ Aft.ec

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A Study Theology
£*£u
AIWA open for
# PPAVt'.P fwH?|
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The Florida Alligator]

Friday. Jan. 21, 1966 SPORTS

Indoor Track, Swim
Meets Top Weekend
The varsity swim meet with Georgia Tech and the first indoor track
meet in UF history highlight the weekend in sports.
The varsity meets a new look Georgia Tech team under new
head coach Jack Nelson at 4 p.m. today following a freshman meet
with Miami-Dade Junior College.
A new experiment in track has been originated by Coach Jimmy
Carnes. Carnes had Florida Gym roped off for a Saturday night
at 8 p.m. meet between the varsity, freshmen and Florida Track
Club, a club composed mostly of transfers who are ineligible this
yt? 3.T
The course will be 11-laps to the mile and all the standard indoor
events will be run including the 60-yard dash, 60-yard high hurdles,
mile, two miles, 600- and 1000-yard runs and the indoor shot.
We wanted to run a meet like this to see how it comes off, Carnes
said. Well have to see how response goes. If its may try
it again.
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Page 14



Kentucky Faces Rough Road Tests

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
ATLANTA (UPI) Unbeaten,
id-ranked Kentucky is making
big splash on the national basket basketill
ill basketill scene, but the Wildcats have
lot of hard work ahead before

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shooting for an unprecedented fifth
NCAA crown.
To get into the NCAA playoffs
in March, the Wildcats first must
win the Southeastern Conference
title, and there are a number of

contenders just itching for a chance
to upset them.
Kentucky, 12-0 overall, leads
the SEC with a 3-0 mark but there
are five teams which have only
one league loss and the Wildcats
must play four of them on the road.
In the weeks ahead, Kentucky
must visit sth-ranked Vanderbilt,
14-2, 5-1, a team the Wildcats
beat at home last week 96-83,
and Mississippi State, 7-5, 3-1,
and has home-and-away games
with Auburn, 10-3, 3-1, and Ala Alabama,
bama, Alabama, 8-4, 1-1.
The Wildcats play five of their
next six games in the comforting
confines of their home coliseum,
the lone road game in that span
at Vanderbilt Feb. 2, but must
play five of its last seven games
away.

St. Joes, Bradley Upset

(By UPI Wires)
The Georgia Bulldogs discover discovered
ed discovered to their embarrassment and
dismay what happens when a hive
of Yellow Jackets becomes a aroused.
roused. aroused. Somebody gets stung.
On Dec. 9, Georgia knocked off
archrival Georgia Tech 76-65.
Georgia coach Ken Rosemond was
quoted shortly thereafter as crow crowing,
ing, crowing, Well, thats one. Well sweep
i
the other two. That made Tech
coach Whack Hydier and his hive
of Yellow Jackets angry. Very
angry. Especially since Georgia
teams in football and basketball
have been rolling over Tech out outfits

The situation for Vanderbilt,
which has only 10 games re remaining,
maining, remaining, isnt any better since,
following the game with Kentucky,
the Commodores also must travel
to five of the final seven games.
All of which adds up to a dark
horse status for Mississippi State
and 23-year-old coach Joe Dan
Gold. State doesnt lose very often
at home and thats where the Bull Bulldogs,
dogs, Bulldogs, who upset Tennessee in
double overtime in their last out outing,
ing, outing, will be playing their next five
conference games.
That brings us around to Ten Tennessee,
nessee, Tennessee, the team once rated as
the most likely to battle defending
champion Vanderbilt for the cage
crown. Tennessee, still one of the
top defensive units in the nation,
lost all of a three-game confer-

fits outfits for the past two seasons.
The youthful Yellow Jackets,
with revenge in their eyes, battled
the taller, more experienced Bull Bulldogs
dogs Bulldogs all the way Wednesday night
and emerged with an 89-56 vic victory.
tory. victory.
Hyder left his first team in until
the final minute and Georgia Tech
continued to fast break and apply
a full-court press on the Bulldogs
throughout, even during the final
minutes with the game out of
reach. Mercy-Georgia Tech style.
Sonny Dove scored 28 points
and hauled down 24 rebounds to
pace St. Johns to an 82-72 upset

EDDIE 4^
Sears w
ALLIGATOR COLUMNIST
Its that time of year again.
The snow is falling on the ground; the birds are snug in new
homes around the equator; the Great Society is marching on, and
the UF basketball team thinks it can beat the Boston Celtics.
So who says the Gators can't beat Kentucky, Vanderbilt, UCLA,
Bradley and Tennessee in the same night?
Look folks; let's face facts. Florida has a shot at the South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference crown. Granted it's an outside far outside
shot, but it is possible.
But, to listen to people talk and to read the glowing columns
about the basketball team ugch. Talking is about as effective
as throwing marshmallows at a herd of thundering elephants.
Florida hasnt played a really good team since losing to Ken Kentucky.
tucky. Kentucky. But, here comes the real test and its not a turkey talk talking
ing talking situation. Its a do situation.
Let's start with tomorrow afternoons Georgia game. The im improved
proved improved Bulldogs took Kentucky into double overtime before losing.
The Gators if they play like they can will win by ten.
Then the fun starts. Auburn (there), Mississippi State (there),
Ole Miss (in the Rebels barn), Tennessee (there) and Kentucky
(there) fill out the road trip.
If Florida can win five of the six games it will be out of the con conference
ference conference race. Unfortunately thats the truth. The Gators must win
all six games. And that is going to be a rather sticky problem.
But, again this is a do situation. Not a yak, yak, yak and raise
the flag sort of thing.
On Sloans Criticism
Norman Sloan has been criticized for his substitution through
the first nine or ten games.
What was he supposed to do?
Sloan experimented with his lineup from the third through tenth
games after his original starters simply didn't produce.
He finally his the jackpot. His Big 5 contains two new faces
sharpshooters Dave Miller and Harry Winkler. His first two
subs are new, too Gary McElroy and Mike Rollyson. By the way,
they are all sophomores.
Sloan was looking for a combination that would couple well with
his inside big men. Gary Keller and Jeff Ramsey. He found it.
Sloan is smart. The Gators have 13games left, all against SEC
tekms. He was experimenting with his substitution through non nonconference
conference nonconference teams. It wasnt Sloans fault the Gators blew the
Kentucky game. They had an off day and so did Kentucky for
that fact.
One prediction: Next year is a favorite slogan with many people,
but look out for us next year, SEC.

Friday, Jan. 21, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

ence road trip and is now consi considered
dered considered out of the race.
Erratic Auburn is the mystery
team. The Tigers won seven
straight, lost three straight and
then won the next three. They are
paced by 6-foot-6 senior Lee
DeFore who leads the SEC in
scoring with a 23.8 average. Au Auburns
burns Auburns status will be cleared up
at the end of this month when the
Tigers visit Kentucky and Vander Vanderbilt
bilt Vanderbilt in a three-day period.
The Southeast is involved in
mid-term exams at present. There
are no games scheduled for to tonight
night tonight or Friday night. A light
slate Saturday finds Auburn vs.
Alabama at Montgomery, Florida
at Georgia, Georgia Tech at Ten Tennessee
nessee Tennessee and Villanova at Memphis
State.

of third-ranked St. Josephs.
Sixth-ranked Bradley fell to Cin Cincinnati
cinnati Cincinnati 85-69, while Detroits man manto-man
to-man manto-man defense bothered Villanova
to no end as the Titans won 101-94.
Southern Illinois, the nations
top-ranked small college, toppled
arch foe Evansville 79-65. George
McNeil led the Salukis with 20
points, surrendering high-point
honors to Evansvilles Larry
Humes, who scored 39.
Loyola of Los Angeles added
to Notre Dames basketball woes
with a 96-86 conquest. It was the
10th consecutive setback for the
Fighting Irish.

Page 15



Page 16

a The Florida Alligator, Friday, Jan. 21, 1966

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