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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Miami Mayor
... ;
Supports Reitz

By EUNICE I. TALL
Alligator Staff Writer
Gubernatorial candidate Robert
King High, in Gainesville Wednes Wednesday,
day, Wednesday, strongly backed UF President
J. Wayne Reitz in his struggle with
the State Cabinet over control of
funds to hire UF professor.
The Miami mayor supported Dr.
Reitz in a luncheon address to Phi
Alpha Delta legal fraternity at the
University Inn.
This is the second time in the
past three months that Dr. Reitz
has had to protest the university
systems dependence upcn the
governor and the cabinet for dis dispensation
pensation dispensation of what amounts to rou routine
tine routine operating funds, High said.
High said Dr. Reitz, as a con conscientious
scientious conscientious man, would have to
protest many times again.
Religion Week
Will Feature
Two Speakers
The UF will observe its annual
Religion in Life Week Jan. 19-
26, featuring Dr. James Gustaf Gustafson
son Gustafson and Barbara Ward.
Dr. Gustafson will present the
keynote address in University Aud Auditorium
itorium Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. on Jan. 23.
He will speak on The Moral
Conditions Necessary for Human
Community.
Miss Ward will discuss Can
We Build the City of Man? at
the 11 a.m. convocation Jan. 26
in Florida Gymnasium. All Univ University
ersity University classes will be dismissed
for Miss Wards talk.
Other activities scheduled in
conjunction with the religious week
include discussions by Dr. John
Maguire and Dr; Louis Levitsky.
Dr. Gustafson is chairman of the
Department of Religious Studies
Yale University and Miss Ward
is currently a visiting lecturer
at Harvard. Dr. Maguire, a native
of Jacksonville, is an assistant
professor at Wesleyan University
while Dr. Levitsky serves as an
instructor at Rutgers University.
Dr. Maguire will speak at 8
p.m. on Jan. 19 at the Bent Card;
12:10 p.m. on Jan. 20 at the Bap Baptist
tist Baptist Stident Union; 12:10 p.m. on
Jan. 21 in the Blue Room of the
Student Service Center and later
that day in Johnson Lounge of
Florida Union (3:30 p.m.) and at
the Bent Card (9 p.m.).
See RELIGION, Page 3

Science Grant Lifts UF Into Prominence

(NOTE: This is the second of an eight part senes
on the effect on the UF of a $4 million science grant.)
By 808 WILCOX
Alligator Staff Writer /
A massive $4.2 million Science Foundation grant
awarded the UF this summer has recently lifted
Florida into national prominence among American
universities.
But the acclaim didnt come overnight.
How did the UF originally start on the road to
scientific excellence? The answer begins with the
growing number of students seeking entry to the UF
each year.
As this number began to swell in the late 1950s
the 'UF was faced with a serious question. If the
university did not expand proportionately with the
population, students would suffer.
The solution was a large step. The UF would have
to limit enrollees by making stronger entrance
requirements and at the same time .upgrade the*
university to make up for the cut-back.
So quantity was sacrificed for quality and the UF

The money is there; its the
allocation of the money that is
the problem, he emphasized.
There is simply no cure except
to pass legislation or amend the
constitution if thats necessary,
the 41-year-old mayor said, to
invest the Board of Regents and
the educators with control over
their funds.
High did not suggest that the
cabinets action in this instance
was political in motivation.
But I do suggest that so long
as the present scheme of things
endures there is always that pos possibility.
sibility. possibility.
Arriving by private plane at the
Gainesville Airport at 11:30 a.m.
the mayor was rushed to the Uni University
versity University Inn for his speaking en engagement.
gagement. engagement.
Minutes before the buffet buffetluncheon
luncheon buffetluncheon meeting he relaxed in one
of the motel rooms, glanced at his
speech and conversed socially with
a handful of backers.
He reclined on one of the beds
and took out a short cigar.
We must get the politicians
out of politics and surely, get them
put of education.
Politicians are a vanishing
species, unfit to survive.
High, who has been stressing
educational platforms in his cam campaign,
paign, campaign, feels that student support
is vital.
We must raise in Florida a
new breed of men and women to
create a new kind of politics for
the future, he stated.
Mayor of Miami for the fifth
consecutive tern?, High predicted
that politics would be stormy and
calamitous for office seekers.
We are beset with a series of
crises. Crises in education, taxes,
traffic, reapportionment and
others.
Dyal Names
Court Staff
*
Jake Dyal, new chancellor of the
Honor Court appointed his staff
Tuesday.
Harry Meshaw, 4LW was nam nammd
md nammd attorney general. His asis asistant
tant asistant will be Jerry Bennent, 3LW.
The chief investigator for the pro prosecution
secution prosecution will Dick Herrick, 3LW.
The chief defense council Will
be Harvey Ziegler, 4LW. His
assistant will be Dan Carlton,
4LW. Wilson Crump, 3LW, will
be chief investigator for the de defense.
fense. defense.

Vol. 58, No. 70 University of Florida Thursday, January 13, 1966

*p jS
HIGH ARRIVES
Miami Robert King High is greeted at Gainesville airport by Charles Holcomb, left, president
ofPhi Alpha Delta and Martin Schwarts, area-coordinator for the High for governor campaign.

BY PUBLICATIONS BOARD
Weimer Plan Vetoed

By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Staff Writer
The Board of Student Publica Publications
tions Publications yesterday vetoed Journalism
School Director Rae O. Weimers
proposal to transfer control of
The Alligator to the school.
Moments later, the board passed
a resolution to leave the door open
for further discussion of the mat matter.
ter. matter.
Weimers proposal was voted
down 4-0, with one abstention,
while the second motion was
adopted by a 3-2 vote.
Student members Drex Dobson
and David West voted against the
latter proposal. The third student
slot on the board was vacated fol following
lowing following the December graduation
of Peggy Blanchard.
Five reasons were given by
Weimer for wanting The Alli Alligator:
gator: Alligator:
Publication of The Alligator
under supervision of the school
would make it an educational ex experience
perience experience for students.
# It would serve as a laboratory
for news-editorial and advertising
students in the school,

UFs Big
Breakthrough
began to toughen up its undergraduate program in an
assort to turn put better Drepared graduates*
Because of this the UFs undergraduate reputa reputation
tion reputation grew.
A strong undergraduate program calls for a
strengthening of the graduate schools. This is done
through research work.
Research is the key to a universitys excellence
and is the deciding factor in national academic
ranking. In selecting Florida as a scientific Center
of Excellence,* the National Science Foundation
pointed to the universitys continued growth and

Tlie Florida
' t
Alligatir

# There is a trend toward jour journalism
nalism journalism schools taking responsibi responsibility
lity responsibility and supervision of campus
newspapers.
# It would produce a milch more
professional newspaper.
# The burden of publishing a
daily newspaper as an extra-cur extra-curricular
ricular extra-curricular activity would be removed
from the relatively few students
involved.
Discussion on the subject cen centered
tered centered around debate between West
and John V. Webb, chairman of the
board and also a faculty member of
the School of Journalism.
Webb explained the school wants
no part of The Alligator unless it
has control over all phases of its
publication, including editorial
policy.
The board chairman said the
school doesnt want to take the
responsibility for publication with without
out without authority to control it.
West said the editorial page be belongs
longs belongs to the students and should
be theirs alone.
The former Alligator editor said
he would not be averse to weighing

progress in graduate research and undergraduate,
training.
In less than a decade Florida has almost tripled
its overall expenditures for research. In 1955 the
university was spending roughly $6 million annually
on its varied research projects. The figure has now
jumped to an estimated $17.2 million
Florida is now a major research facility in the
National Aeronautics and Space Administrations
plans and is making recognizable gains in
fields such as random vibration studies, laser
ignition problems, liquid propellant mixtures and
electrical circuit work used in rockets and boosters.
Says UF Vice President of Academic Affairs
Robert B. Mautz, A professor working on research
with his students is just as effective a teacher as a
professor who presents a formal course.*
Once the graduate program is strengthened, the
university will be led to its most prominent measure
of greatness the quality of its graduates and the
knowledge contributed by its staff and students.
See GRANT, Page 9

advice of faculty members if he
were again editor.
But, weighing advice is one
thing; absolute control is quite
another, West maintained.
West contended further that the
student editor should be the boss,
regardless.
Webb contended this would, in
effect, make the editor the boss
of his peers, assuming the paper
went under the school.
West moved that the chairman
report to Weimer that the board
was unable to accept the proposal
as outlined in the memorandum.
Dobson seconded.
The motion was passed 4-0 with
Law Librajaan Betty Taylor ab abstaining.
staining. abstaining.
Dr. H, B. Clark moved that the
board register its favor in moving
publication of The Alligator to the
Journalism school if student par participation
ticipation participation in its control can be
formulated to the satisfaction of
the board and the school.
Clark said his motion was made,
so as not to close the door on
negotiations with the school. It
was adopted 3-2.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Jan. 13, 1966

WOR LO .jMESESH
International
SNEAK ATTACK ... A grenade planted by Viet Cong terrorists
outside an enlisted mens club in Da Nang exploded late Tuesday,
injuring three Americans. A military spokesman said the grenade
was placed in a paper bag about 50 yards from the Take Ten club.
It exploded when one of the soldiers kicked it. Only one of the service servicemen
men servicemen was seriously injured. The other two were returned to duty
after treatment.
PRESS DUSTED . President Sukarno Tuesday charged that the
American press falsely portrayed him as a weak leader presiding
over a crumbling nation and angrily ordered the explusion of all U. S.
newsmen from Indonesia. Sukarnos surprise announcement came in
an emotional attack on American news magazines during ceremonies
at his Merdeka Palace installing Indonesias new ambassador to Syria.
It pains my heart when other countries try to meddle in our internal
affairs, he said.
500 DIE . The heaviest rainfall in the 401-year history of this
city of the sun pounded Rio Wednesday threatening new tragedy
in a disaster that may already have taken 500 lives. Massive mud and
rock slides, caifsed by a downpour which had drenched the city with 14
inches of rain since Monday, swept away houses, killing people by the
scores. The fire department reported that houses were still coming
down at a rate of 30 an hour.,Hospitals were attending an estimated
1,000 injured persons.
IMMORTAL BURIED . India Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday gave Prime Minister Lai Bahadur Shastri
a hero's farewell. A vast multitude shouted
you are immortal as his body disappeared
in the flames of a Hindu funeral pyre on the
banks of the sacred Jumna River. In death the
61-year-old statesman received not only the
tears of his 480 million countrymen but the
acclaim that would have been his in life for at
least reaching a temporary accord with Pakis Pakistan
tan Pakistan at the Tashkent peace conference.
National
CUT-BACKS OPPOSED . Chairman L. Mendel Rivers of the
House Armed Services Committee, accusing the Pentagon of not
cooperating with Congress, ordered investigations of three recent
cut-back actions by Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara. The
South Carolina Democrat also directed a subcommittee to start hearings
immediately on military research and development programs. The
Congress and the Department of Defense must act as partners in the
matter of national security, Rivers said.
BOYCOTT PLANNED . Civil rights leaders urged a boycott of
~Negro schools to dramatize a protest against alleged voter registra registration
tion registration discrimination. An attempt to recruit demonstrators sparked a
student riot at one school Tuesday. Go back to your neighborhoods
and spread the word there will be no school Wednesday. That will be
Freedom Day in Birmingham, Hosea Williams, an aide to Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr., told a rally of about 300 Negroes.
Florida
NEW LAWS ... A state commission which
has given itself one year to rewrite the Florida
Constitution met Wednesday to start hearing
ideas on how to do it. The Florida Constitutional
Commission met in an organizational session
Tuesday and heard a talk by Gov. Haydonums.
He had some thoughts on what should be done.
Chesterfield Smith of Bartow, the chairman of
the commission, named eight subcommittees
during Tuesday's session to study various
major areas of the Constitution. Burns stressed
reapportionment to the commission.
TEACHERS WANTED . The Cabinet approved a $33,300 school
teacher recruiting program Wednesday and laid down strict rules
about purchasing and leasing electronic computers. School Supt.
Floyd T. Christian urged fellow Cabinet members to approve the
school teacher program because he said Floridas public schools
were short 350 teachers at the start of the school year. We can no
longer afford to be 350 teachers short at the start of a school year,
Christian said.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements anc
to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
MO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement Involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and Is
pObllshHl five tiroes weekly except during May, June, and July when It Is published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator is entered as second class
.

LBJ Stresses Peace
Domestic Revisions

By MERRIMAN SMITH
WAS HING TON t, V PD-- President
Johnson warned the American peo people
ple people Wednesday that the Vietnamese
war could go on for years if the
Communists continue to ignore
peace proposals, and urged a tax
revision to help pay for it.
JOHNSON
New Office
Established
For Publicity
The secretary of organizations
office of student government has
established a new office to help
publicize UF organizations activ activities.
ities. activities.
Roger Brown was appointed dir director
ector director of publicity by Andy Hall,
secretary of organizations. He
has served as assistant secretary
of organizations and was on the
public relations committee of the
Florida Union Board.
In a letter, sent out to campus
organizations, Brown explained,
the purpose of the bureau will
be to fill the existing promotional
vacuum by offering a complete for format
mat format of publicity.
Any organization that wants an
activity publicized has been asked
to contact the bureau of publicity.
The publicity will include Alligator
articles and announcements over
the radio.

Klan Oath Vows :
Kill All Atheists

WASHINGTON, D. C. (UPI)
Members of a Mississippi KuKlux
Klan group were ordered to phy physically
sically physically destroy if necessary any
atheists or traitor in the com community,
munity, community, a Congressional investi investigation
gation investigation disclosed today.
The instructions were given to
the White Knights of the KKK in
a March 1, 1964, directive to local
units of the militant white sup supre
re supre mist organization.
The White Knights were
described by one lawmaker as
the meanest bunch yet. The
directive and other literature* of
the White Knights came to light
as a House Committee on Un-
American Activities investigation
swung its spotlight on operations
of the Klan in Mississippi.
The directive, labeled an ex executive
ecutive executive lecture, told Klansmen
that an atheist or a traitor in
the community usually could be
destroyed by social or economic
pressures.
If they continued to resist,
the directive went on, they must
be physically destroyed before they
can damage our Christian civil civilization
ization civilization further to destroy us.
It said:
-the principal purpose of pro propaganda
paganda propaganda was to convey the impres impression
sion impression to the public that were
all good and that those who oppose

We will stay until aggression
has stopped, he told a joint ses session
sion session of Congress in a State of the
Union message that announced a
$112.8 billion budget to cover the
mounting costs of the war and the
expansion of his Great Society
proposals.
The President once again asked
the Communists to come to the
negotiating table and promised that
even if they do not, he would try
not to escalate the war.
We will strive to limit con conflict,
flict, conflict, for we wish neither increas increased
ed increased destruction nor increased dan danger,
ger, danger, he said.
The President outlined the steps
he has taken in his peace offensive,
but solemnly declared: So far
we have received no response to
prove either success or failure.
Therefore, he said, Let me be
absolutely clear: The days may
become months, and the months
may become years, but we will
stay as long as aggression com commands
mands commands us to battle.
Despite this, however, he asked

Humor Prevails

NEW YORK (UPI) Cold
hearted? Not now. Its a small
town now.
New York has learned some something,
thing, something, courtesy of the transit
strike, that it seemingly never
knew before: how to be friendly.
People have learned how to walk
- and enjoy it. And how to talk
and be civil about it. Downright
neighborly is the way people are
who are thrown together
ask strangers in the pooling of
rides in private cars and taxis.
Even taxi drivers are refrain refraining
ing refraining from screaming imprecations,
maledictions, execrations, and
other bad cesses that taxi drivers
hereabouts usually are wont to
wish on other drivers who cut
them off in traffic.
And the city dwellers have man managed,
aged, managed, without thinking about it,
to maintain an astonishing amount
of good humor during the 13 days

us, or criticize us, or attempt to
interfere with our activities in any
way are all bad and are dangerous
enemies of the community, vve
must always keep tne puDiiconom
side. As long as they are on our
side, we can just about do any anything
thing anything to our enemies with im impunity.
punity. impunity.

Hahn To Speak Here

Dr. Theodore F. Hahn, a scholar
on the history of medicine, will
speak on John Gorrie: Science
and Suffering Friday at the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center.
His talk, third in the College of
Medicines 1965-66 History and
Philosophy of Medicine Lecture
Series, will begin at 12:10 p.m.
in the Medical Sciences Building
Auditorium. It is open to the pub public.
lic. public.
The lecture on John Gorrie con concerns
cerns concerns a pioneer Florida physician
who, in his desire to treat sub subtropical
tropical subtropical fevers and malaria in hot
weather, invented the first artifi artificial
cial artificial ice machine in 1850.
Hahn practiced medicine in
DeLand from 1934 to 1963 and for
the last five years has donated the
John Gorrie Award to a graduating

Congress in a nighttime address
that was televised in color to the
nation to march ahead on the do domestic
mestic domestic front.
Johnson sought a series of major
measures. They included making
the murder or intimidation of civil
workers a federal crime; attacks
on air pollution; rebuilding com completely
pletely completely entire central and slum
areas of cities; creation of a de department
partment department of transportation to hand handle
le handle the nations traffic needs; and
strike legislation that could affect
such disputes as the New York
transit tie-up.
A tax increase is not necessary
at this time to finance these pro proposals,
posals, proposals, the President said, in instead,
stead, instead, he asked for tnree tax
revisions that would bring the
government an estimated $4.3 bil billion
lion billion in fiscal 1967, which starts
July 1. In the message to Con Congress,
gress, Congress, Johnson;
-Asked temporary restoration of
the excise tax cuts on automobiles
and telephone calls that went into
effect only Jan. 1.

of deprivation of bus and subway
service. Even Mayor John V. Lind Lindsay
say Lindsay who has a right to sing the
blues has kept his humor intact.
On his morning walk to work,
striding along somewhere in the
deeps of Broadway, he was over overtaken
taken overtaken by a motor scooter carrying
a young couple. As the scooter
puttered alongside, the Mayor
looked at the driver, and said:
Strikebreaker.
Dick Brown, who has lived here
since birth more than half a cen century
tury century ago and who now thumbs a
ride to work each morning to
Manhattan from his home 10 miles
away in Forest Hills, has these
thoughts:
This crisis has made people
so doggone friendly. Its the atti attitude
tude attitude of the people this city has
a big heart when it has to. The
community is closer together now
than it ever has been even closer
than the day after Pearl Harbor.
You dont find arguments on
the streets so much. Taxi drivers
are nice. Everybody is patient.
People in the cars who are per perfect
fect perfect strangers are friendly and
chatty, talking about everything
- not just the strike.
The Mayor figures hes saving
time walking the 70 blocks from
his hotel to city hall in the morn mornings.
ings. mornings. Tuesday morning, walking
arm-in-arm with Sugar Ray Robin Robinson,
son, Robinson, the former boxing champ,
Lindsay made the trip in 54 min minutes.
utes. minutes.

senior of the University of Flor Floridas
idas Floridas Coliege oi Medicine who
shows promise of becoming a prac practitioner
titioner practitioner of the highest type. He is
now public health director of the
Rutherford-Polk District of North
Carolina.
Hahn, author of 17 articles and
books on medicine, medical his history
tory history and philosophy, including On
the Fox Glove, Syphilis in
Shakespeare, The Death of
Stonewall Jackson, and One
Little Gleam: The Diary of an
Intern.
He is a fellow in the American
College of Physicians and the A American
merican American College of Cardiology,
past president of the Volusia
County Medical Society and the
Florida Diabetes Society, and for former
mer former chief of staff of the West
Volusia Memorial Hospital.



Religion Week Prepared

Dr. Levitsky will appear at Hil Hillel
lel Hillel Foundation at 5:30 p.m. on
Jan. 24 and at University Audi Auditorium
torium Auditorium at 8:15 that evening with
the topic, The Time Is Now.
He also will lead discussions at
12:10 and 3:30 p.m. in the Student
Service Center and Johnson
Lounge, respectively.
Dr. Gustafson will present the
Jan. 23 sermons during 8:45 and
11-a-m. Services at University
Methodist Church and will lead
Jan. 24 discussions at 12:10 p.m.
and 3:30 p.m. in the Student Ser Service

Work With
ll
To Bring You Higher Quality At
Lower Prices
Patronize ALLIGATOR Advertisers

I. t _____ ___
After Christmas Clearance Sale
LADIES MEN
Dresses R eg $40.00 $20.00 1 / Coats -R eg $29.99-$15.00
18.95 9.50 \ It\
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. V :
l£9F£ atwt SlP|
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- H A I j HH
- * i

vice Service Center and Johnson Lounge
respectively.
In addition to her convocation
address, Miss Ward will speak
at 1 McCarty Auditorium at 8:15
p.m. on Jan. 25 following at 12:10
p.m. session earlier that day in
the Student Service Center Banquet
Room.
The Faculty Concert Series will
spotlight University organist
Willis Bodine with the choir of
First Presbyterian Church in a
special 8:15 program on Jan. 26
at the church.

More Work
Available
For Students
The Higher Education Act of 1965
has extended the eligibility of part parttime
time parttime student employment to those
in need of funds to pursue a course
of study at the UF.
Employment priority under the
College Work-Study Program is
given to students from low-income
families and then to others in need
of employment.
Students at the UF in need of
part-time work are requested to
check with Mrs. Kate Stechmiller
in the Financial Aid Office, Room
124, Tigert. All qualifying students
will be certified as eligible to be
employed under the program and
referred to potential employers
with existing vacancies.
Deadline Set
On Loans
Scholarship and loan application
deadline for the fall trimester is
March 1. All those seeking loans
and scholarships should apply be before
fore before this date.
Applications may be picked up
at the Information Desk in Tigert
Hall.

Hartmann Accepts
Naval College Chair

By JUSTINE HARTMAN
. Staff Writer
Professor Frederick H. Hart Hartmann,
mann, Hartmann, director of the Institute of
International Relations at UF, will
leave in June, 1966 to accept the
Chester W. Nimitz Chair of Inter International
national International Studies at the Naval War
College, Newport, Rhode Island.
Professor Hartmann brought
the field of international politics
to a level of distinction at this
University. stated Dr. Manning J.
Dauer, Chairman of the Dept, of
Political 1 Science.
We regret very much losing
the national and mvM
and internation international
al international stature of JHL-p jC
Professor Hart- Jfcjja
nize the great service he will ren render
der render in the position to which he is
moving. Professor Hartmann will
be occupying the /Senior chair in
s
international studies among the
various schools of the Navy. In
addition to lecturing, he will be
advisor to the commandant on

Thursday. Jan. 13, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

academic programs and general
Naval training programs in the
field of international studies.
Hartmann is the author of The
Relations of Nations, World in
Crisis, Germany Between East
and West, and numerous articles.
He received the award for out outstanding
standing outstanding teaching and research by
Florida Blue Key in 1963. In 1953
Hartmann held a Fulbright Re Research
search Research Professorship at the Uni University
versity University of Bonn, Germany, and
lectured at Stanford University in
Perlin at the Hochschule fur Po Politik.
litik. Politik. He has also held a Rocke Rockefeller
feller Rockefeller award.
Hartmann received his A. B.
degree from the University of
California and his Doctorate from
Princeton University. He has been
a member of the UF faculty since
1948.
Home S ludy
LETCHWORTH, England (UPI)
A course on how to entertain
in the home soon will be available
evenings in the grammer schools
here.

Page 3



Page 4

l, The Florida Alligator, Thursday. Jan. 13, 1966

Confetti
771 here has been a great dealaf
disturbance over the column
of Campus Confetti which appeared
in yesterdays Alligator. It is the
feeling of the editors that some
comment needs to be made about
the article and the political atti attitude
tude attitude of The Alligator in the coming
campaign.
The Alligator would like to clear
up any question about its leaning
toward one or another political
party. It has none. It is first
and foremost interested in pre presenting
senting presenting the truth, the whole truth,
with as little bias as possible.
It will seek in every way to achieve
this end. The Alligator feels that
the students should be provided
with as much information as neces necessary
sary necessary to be well informed on their
political choice. It is not afraid
to print what it feels to be correct
and unslanted news.
But it does appear that the word wording
ing wording yesterday was a bit exagger exaggerated.
ated. exaggerated. It is felt that the essential
facts were the truth, but that the
words chosen were somewhat out
of place. For this The Alligator
would like apologize.
The Alligator hopes that those
who read this and other Confetti
articles will realize that they arg
not the truth" provided by some
great all-knowing voice from the
darkness! They are merely an
attempt by -various members of the
editorial staff to present some in insight
sight insight into the vast scope of pol political
itical political process which exists here
on campus.
Campus Confetti will continue
as an editorial column in the paper,
but every effort will be made to
assure that the facts presented
are true and obtained from re reliable
liable reliable sources. The Alligator has
no stake in the approaching elec elections
tions elections other than providing the stud student
ent student body with adequate and authen authenticated
ticated authenticated information. But this it
will only be able to do if it is
provided with facts and interest by
both politicians and students on
campus.
EDITORIAL STAFF
4
Editor .... . . ............ Benny Cason
Managing editor Ron Spencer
Executive editor Drex Dobson
Assistant managing editor ...... Fran Snider
Sports editor . Andy Moor
Editor of this issue Bruce Dudley
Associate editors Yvette Cardozo,
Kay Huffmaster, Gary Corseri,
Jane Solomon
Copy editors . . . Bill Martines,
Carol Carey, Sharon Robinson
Wfte editor Steve Hull
Staff writers Eunice Tall.
BradSawtell, Bob Menaker, Dick Dennis,
Kathie Keim, Susan Froemke, Judy Miller
Gary Martin, Chet Sadowski. John McPhail
Cartoonists Ralph Knudsen, Don Wright

The
Florida Alligator

A Majority Is One Person Plus The Truth

" ; ; : :
"I Need Another Operation"
LETTERS:
Corseri cut
Re: Gary Corseris Cut Outs (Alligator, Dec. 6, 1965)
rfjjt r. Corseri states that there is something wrong with our
ill society because of our militant position in Viet Nam. He
also states that those who try to show the necessity for this
action are good, earnest people, he admits, but are given to
absurd rationalizations. As one of those poor souls, I would like
to state my belief on this issue and hope that he will show me
the fallacies he finds there.
First, the Communist philosophy has, from Marx to the present,
been one of violent expansionism and ideological intolerance.
Since the government of North Viet Nam and the Viet Cong are
Communist orientated, they sincerely believe that they must
spread Communism by the violent overthrow of oppressive govern governments
ments governments in wars of liberation.
Secondly, the new Communist states of Southeast Asia are
relatively young nations and are naturally stretching their muscles
and throwing their weight around (this is characteristic of all
young countries, even the United States in earlier years). This
fact merely reinforces the Communist ideology.
Therefore, these peoples will continue this expansion, bolster bolstered
ed bolstered by each real or imagined defeat of the West. This is inevitable,
considering the Communist character.
I will not delude myself into believing that we are protecting
the sovereignity of the people of South Viet Nam, and I will not
attempt to excuse American excesses. I say just this: We are in
a power struggle which can have only one winner. Communist
ideology and the actions of its believers make peaceful co coexistence
existence coexistence impossible.
Hal W. Noyes, 2UC
yea Sloan
Dear Editor:
Jam certainly glad to see that the gentlemen who wrote
yesterday's letter concerning Coach Sloan aje all medical
students, because they certainly do not know mudi about basket basketball.
ball. basketball.
While The Baron started in Saturdays game two two-year
regulars, two one-year regulars along with one of the best
sophomores in the country, all, except two, experienced players
of proven ability, Coach Sloan was faced with the problem of
picking his starting quintet from a group consisting of one
reliable starter, a few disappointing lettermen (including Paul
Morton, who has been known to make errant passes), and several
green sophomores.
While The Barons squad has hit 50 per cent from the field
this year. Sloans five have hit only 40 per cent and has nc
reliable outside threat. Sloan has searched in vain for a cohesive
starting combination so far this year! but if he should find one
you may see less player shuffling. Pm afraid that some dis disappointed
appointed disappointed fans are going to have to realize that this years Gators
are not National Championship material, probably not even SFC
Championship material. We shall get better tha we have been
but the loss of Brooks Henderson has really hurt this team
Gator fans are historically slow to forgive bad things and fast
to forget good ones. Every Gator team cannot go 18-7, like last
years edition. Lets let Coach Sloan. nochoke, run the Gators
Hes doing a good job. s
- Mike Segal, 3AS

letter from
Albert
by Barry Diamond
Dear Mama Gator,
*** hat a vacation! I still havent gotten over the
Ufl Sugar Bowl game. The team was really great
in the 4th quarter. My skin felt all tingly after that
first big touchdown. But when we lined up for a two
point conversion, it was as if the whole world had
become irrational, with everything opposite from
the way it should be. It was as if Joe Pyne had sworn
allegiance to Emily Post, as if the Robert Kennedys
had stopped having babies. Suddenly progress tests
began to make sense.
Fortunately, my senses soon returned to me. I
realized that poor Wayne Barfield, our kicker, must
have been stricken with a case of acute appendicitis
or something equally as severe. But after we tried
and failed three times with that two-point foolishness
I knew that I was wrong. It was COACH GRAVES
who must have been stricken with a case of acute
appendicitis, or something equally as severe. As he
left the stadium after the game, he was heard
mumbling the Budweiser jingle over and over again,
Its nice to see that many of the clothing merchants
in town greeted the returning students with sales,
enabling them to get quality merchandise at prices
they can more easily afford. I wish the restaurants
would adopt the same attitude on a permanent basis,
A 10% food discount for students in other college
towns in quite common. This benefits the restaurants
as well as the students, who tend to eat more food
more often under such circumstances. Such a dis discount
count discount here in Gainesville would bring food prices
more into line with food value, as well as with the
students budgets.
***********
Heres a new game that everyone can play. Its
called I Wonder Why? Heres how it goes,
I wonder why
- lines at the book store move so slowly?
- they dont drop language listening'labs al altogether?
together? altogether?
- the student depository doesnt stay open later
than 3:30 during the first week of each tri trimester?
mester? trimester?
- the Plaza of the Americas has looked so badly
for so long?
- ROTC is compulsory?
- C courses are so hard?
\ girls weekday night curfew isnt 11:00 p.m.?
- Governor Burns has been so quiet lately?
Get the idea? Play it yourself sometime.
I think the counselors and everyone else involved
with registration should be commended for the fine
manner in which registration for this trimester was
handled. Though they processed nearly 15,000 stu students,
dents, students, each with his own problem, they managed to
keep their sense of humor and helpful attitude all
through the registration period.
****** * *
Santa may not know it, but he made the campus
parking situation even worse by giving cars to many
UF students. The only way he could make up for it
would be to give each person a space to go with his
car. Instead of a space to call his own, each UF car
owner has a pretty new decal, which entitles him to
park in a grand total of ONE parking area on campus,
although the number of cars entitled to park in that
area invariably exceeds the number of spaces to be
found there. Except Yulee, of course, but Yulee is
off-limits to all but the 14 girls who own cars there.
They have loads of fun trying to fill the seventy-odd
spaces in their lot. And as long as Im on the subject
of parking, why dont the campus police allow cars
from the male living areas 15 minute parking
privileges in the girls dorms lots, so that the guy
from Murphree or Tolbert can once again pick up
a girl for lunch without fear of a traffic violation.
It seems ironic that, with the advent of a $1 parking
charge, the amount of parking to which the poor guy
is entitled is greatly diminished.
Ah, isnt that nice? The guy who delivers my dead
fish just came in, and told me that from now on I
would receive a 10 per cent discount. Thats great
news cause, as you know, pennies count a lot with
me. Will write again next week.
Love,
Albert
A word
to our readers
The Alligator accepts all letters
to the editor. Due to space limit"
ations, however, we are unable to
print letters exceeding 250 words.



- __
QBQqqqqq
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION: Today, 5:15 p.m., FU
Auditorium. Students and faculty invited.
PAINTING FOR FUN: Today, 7:30 p.m., FU Oak Room. Block
printing; $5.00 for 6 lessons.
WRUF-FM AUDITIONS: Today, 7:30 p.m., 4th floor Stadium Bldg.
Announcers wanted; no previous experience required.
PANHELLENIC LATE SIGN-UP: Today, 2-5p.m., FU Auditorium.
- -7- - ---
MORTAR BOARD: Today, 4:30 p.m., FU 114.
CIRCLE K CLUB: Today, 7 p.m., FU 212.
AMER. COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS SEMINAR: Today, 8 a.m.
5 p.m., Medical Center H-611.
SWIMMING: Today, 4 p.m., Univ. pool, UF vs. Georgia.
UF DAMES: Sun., Jan.-16, 3-5 p.m., University Womens Club,
Newberry Road. January Dames Open House Tea. Representatives
from each of the 11 colleges on campus will be there to talk about
their respectivedame group.
UF KARATE CLUB: Sat., Jan. 15, 9:30 a.m., Florida Gym floor.
New members welcome. Contact Don Collyer, 1420 W. Univ. Ave.
ENGINEERING DAMES: Sat., Jan. 15, 7 p.m., FU Social Room.
Covered dish supper.
PHILOSOPHY OF MEDICINE LECTURE: Fri., Jan. 14, 12:10
p.m., MSB Auditorium, Dr. Theodore Hahn, John Gorrie: Science
and Suffering.
UF CHESS CLUB: Fri., Jan. 14, 7 p.m., FU 215.
FACULTY CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES: Sun., Jan. 16, 4 p.m., MSB
Auditorium. Edward Troupin, violin; Carolyn Troupin, piano; Reid
Poole, French horn.
MOVIE: bat., Jan. 15, 7 and 9:30 p.m., MSB Auditorium, Mans
Favorite Sport.
DANCE: Fri., Jan. 14, 8 p.m., Catholic Student Center. Live
band, refreshments, all students invited free.
DUPLICATE BRIDGE TOURNAMENT: Sun., Jan. 16, 1:30 p.m.,
FU 215, 25 DANCE LESSONS: Mon., Jan. 17, FU Rendezvous. Beginners,
7:15 p.m., advance, 8:30 p.m. First lesson free. SIO.OO single,
$18.50 double for 10 lessons.
FU BOARD AWARDS BANQUET: Mon., Jan. 17, 6 p.m., Student
Service Center.
GAMMA BETA PHI BANQUET: Sun., Jan. 16, 7 p.m., Park Lane
Cafeteria.
SWIM FINS AND AQUA GATORS: Mon., Jan. 17, 7 p.m., 201
Fla. Gym. Interested persons invited.
BASKETBALL: Sat., Jan. 15, 2 p.m. Fla. Gym, UF vs. U. of Miss.
UNIVERSITY GALLERY: Now through Feb. 2, The Pearsall
Collection of Indian Artifacts.
COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS CONFERENCE: Today and Jan. 14,
Ramada Inn.
FLORIDA BLUE KEY: Today, 7 p.m., FU 324.
ALPHA KAPPA PSI: Today, 7:30 p.m., Med Center Ml 12. Organ Organizational
izational Organizational meeting professional business fraternity.
COLLEGIATE COUNCIL FOR THE U.N.: Today and Jan. 14,
10 a.m. -1 p.m., Hub Service Booth.
YOUNG REPUBLICAN CLUB: Today and Jan. 14, 9 a.m. 5 p.m.,
Hub Service Booth.
FLORIDA ALLIGATOR: Fri., Jan. 14, 3:30 p.m., FU Auditorium.
NEWELL ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY: Today, 8 p.m., McCarty
343. Teneral meeting.
B. B. HILLEL FOUNDATION: Fri., Jan. 14, 7:30 p.m., Hillel
foundation. URA Sabbath. Speakers: George Blaha (Pres. URA)
and Ron Lanier (Pres. Relig. in Life Week). Registration for Insti Institute
tute Institute of Judiac Studies any time up to Wed. 5 p.m. Will meet Wed.
eveningscall 2-2900.
FLA. CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: Today, sp.m.,4thfloor of library.
This is a prayer meeting.
FLA. CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP: Fri., Jan. 14, 7p.m., FU Johnson
Lounge. Meeting for organization of Spring activities.
FLORIDA PLAYERS: Today, 7:30 p.m., Norman Hall Auditorium.
Open house.
HEALTH RELATED DAMES: Today, 8 p.m., Home of Mrs. Hugh
C. Davis, 2609 NW 12th Ave. Speakers: Mr. & Mrs. Clyde Brannon.
Topic: Handwriting Analysis.
8.1.A.; today, 7 p.m., International Center. Discussion. Inter International
national International Week.
ISjlSf
One Week Only
Madeleine Lancaster
/ Add. e Wise
Gertrude Lackey
AGNESHAIR STYLISTS
16 NW 13th ST. JUST OFF PH.376-9922
CAMPUS

Language Testing-An Explanation

(EDITORS NOTE: There has
been some confusion about
changes in the UFs foreign
language testing system. Dr.
Robert .A. Bryan explains the
changes here.)
By DR. ROBERT A. BRYAN..
Assistant Graduate School Dean
Since the Graduate Faculty
voted 406 to 61 in the Septem September
ber September balloting to adopt the Edu Educational
cational Educational Testing Service (ETS)
Foreign Language Examination
in French, German and Russian,
a number of questions have
arisen concerning policies and
procedures affecting both the
new ETS examinations and the
old examinations administered
by the Department of Foreign
Languages.
First, the procedure for mak making
ing making application for the ETS
reading knowledge examina examinations
tions examinations which will be administered
on this campus beginning Jan.

War Danger Exists In
GermanyHartmann
The division of Germany has developed into a major source of
world tension and a grave danger of war exists in that European
country, according to the UFs Dr. Frederick H. Hartmann,
author of Germany Between East and West; The Reunification
Problem.
Hartmann, professor of political science at the University
recounts the origin and development of divided Germany, from
the conferences at Teheran and Potsdam to the Berlin Wall and
the post-Adenauer era.
Most Westerners approach the problem of a divided Germany
with a bias in favor of preserving the division, fearing what might
come of change, Hartmann relates. However, Germans are no
longer content with the thought that someday Germany will be
reunified simply because its division is, as Adenauer put it in
1955, contrary to human and divine law.
While Germany has declared that she does not mean to achieve
reunification by force of arms, but rather by a peaceful revision
of the territorial status quo, Hartmann predicts that a more active
policy toward the East may be expected.
Hartmann spent two separate years in Germany researching
his subject material and interviewing many of the major political
figures in the country. Among his other books are The Relations
of Nations, World in Crisis and Basic Documents in Inter International
national International Relations. He also serves as director of the Institute
of International Relations.
I See Whats ew I
The Browse Shop I
NOTHING PERSONAL Cuedon & Baldwin I
VVANDERER Sterling Hayden I
FROM SHAKESPEARE I
TO EXISTENTIALISM Walter Kaufman I
NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY Bernard Harvey I
FOLLOWING THE COLOR LINE Ray Baker I
NEGRO SELF CONCEPT Koaraceus I

TECHNICAL AND REFERENCE I
NUCLEAR & RADIO-CHEMISTRY..... Friedlander I
THE PRINCIPLES OF I
STATISTICAL MECHANICS Tolman I
GENERALIZED FUNCTIONS Gelfand I
Campos Shop & Bookstore I

22, 1966, is as Stu Students
dents Students will go to the Univer University
sity University Cashier, pay a fee of $6.25
and collect two receipts from
the Cashier.
Students will them give one
of the reciepts to Mrs. Anne
Swan in the Graduate Office
in Tigert .Hall, and receive a
ticket of admission to the exam examination.
ination. examination. The schedule for fee
payment and examination is
given below.
The examinations will be for forwarded
warded forwarded to ETS in Princeton for
grading and the results will be
received by the Graduate
School.
Second, the reading know knowledge
ledge knowledge examinations in Spanish
and the functional knowledge
examinations in all languages
will continue to be given on the
dates announced in the Grad Graduate
uate Graduate Catalog and in Deadline
Dates. The Department of
Foreign Languages will con continue
tinue continue to make and administer

Thursday, Jan. 13, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

these examinations and to re recommend
commend recommend passing grades to the
Graduate School.
Third, the option of making
a scholarly translation in a
secondary language remains
open to graduate students. How However,
ever, However, any student who fails
either an ETS reading know know,
, know, ledge examination or one ad administered
ministered administered by the Department of
Foreign Languages after the
December 1965 administration
of this examination will not
be permitted to make a schol scholarly
arly scholarly translation.
This policy was adopted by the
Graduate Council on September
30 under the recommendation of
a sub-committee of the Council
appointed to study the policies
regarding the use of the schol scholarly
arly scholarly translation option.
Finally, it is important to
remember that the failure rate
on the ETS examinations will
be set by the Graduate School
with the advice of the Univer University
sity University Examiner, who has the
responsibility for administer administering
ing administering these examinations.
The failure rate will not ex exceed
ceed exceed that established over the
past two years for all students
who took the reading knowledge
examinations administered by
the Department of Foreign Lan Languages.
guages. Languages.
WRUF Auditions
To Be Today
Announcer positions on WRUF-'
FM are now open. Auditions
will be today at 7:30 p.m. on the
fourth floor of the stadium.
Anyone interested in radio may
try out. No previous radio ex experience
perience experience is necessary.

m
JuAt Ajiml
Shipment of
Cottons
$15.95 $23. 95
CHERBERGf
-
'Bourn t Dollcje Stop'
ESTABLISHED 1931
\ y SQUARE
Store hours
9-5:30 Daily 2401 SW
Fridays 9to 9 13th St.

Page 5



<
, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Jan. 13, 1966

Page 6

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

o
for sale
L
TRAILER FOR SALE. 20x8\
Clean, comfortable, living space
for 1 or 2. Air conditioned, on lot.
378-3463. (A-69-3t-c).
MUST SACRIFICE. S6OO worth of
stereo components, highest fidel fidelety,
ety, fidelety, you must hear it, $250 or best
offer; 1965 19 Motorola TV in
new condition, cost $l6O SBS
or best offer. 378-3149. (A-69-
3t-c).
SPUDNUT. Cinnamon rolls, turn turnover
over turnover pie and 33 delicious varieties.
Donuts for those who want the very
best. Open 'til midnight. 1017
W. Univ. (A-67-10-c).
FLEETWOOD 3 bedroom trailer
10' x 57'. Call after 6 p.m.
2- (A-67-st-c).
TEVEIRSE CYCLE air conditioner conditionerheater.
heater. conditionerheater. Serves entire apartment.
Superior condition. Admiral
Royal, one year old. Half original
price. Going Army, Must Sell.
$195 cash. Fred Lane, 378-1046.
(A-67-st-c).
1965 HONDA SPORT 65. Less
than 1,000 miles. Will take S2O
fbr SIOO equity and take up pay payments.
ments. payments. Call 6-8085 after 6 p.m.
(A-67-st-c).
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER
for sale. $7.50 for box of 500
sheets. Call ext. 2832. (A-67-
tf-nc).
HELP 1965 YAMAHA 80cc
1200 miles. Perfect condition.
$3lO. 1965 SUZUKI 80cc 500
miles. $295. Call 378-2811. Quick.
(A-68-3t-p).
FOR RENT OR SALE, used trailer,
10*x55\ 2 bedrooms. Lot in park
available, Pinehurst Trailer Park.
Lot 27 or call 372-7073. (A-68-
3t-c).
TIRED OF WALKING? Afraid of a
scooter in the rain? 1959 covered
3- Post Ofice motor
scooter; Ideal for campus deliver deliveries
ies deliveries or transportation. $195. Call
2-6023 after 5:30. (A-68-s(t-c).
SMITH-CORONA portable type typewriter,
writer, typewriter, late model. Cal? evenings,
378-2735. (A-68-st-c).
1963 YAMAHA 125 cc motorcycle.
A-l condition. Has electric stal staler,
er, staler, turn signals, plus other acces accessories.
sories. accessories. Will sell for $250 or best
offer. Call 372-6450 after 6 p.m.
(A-67-3t-c).
I JAMES I0M) DOES IT EVERYWHERE!
mimai.mwHi-.
. BEHICOHBB
IWIHKRBUC
' r
12:30-2:44-4:58-7:12-9:26

l
for sale
BEST SCHWINN BICYCLE. Brand
new. License, lights, baskets. SSO.
2-9708 evenings. (A-68-3t-c).
FURNISHED HOUSE TRAILER for
sale. SSOO. For rent S6O. Bx3o
with 10x20' enclosed cabana. 378-
1132 after 5. (A-68-4t-c).
FENNELL'S BARGAIN CENTER.
All types used furniture and appli appliances.
ances. appliances. Household moving, reason reasonable
able reasonable rates. Phone 964-3231. U. S.
301 south. Starke, Fla. (A-68-
st-p).
'64 ZANELA motorcycle, 125 cc.
$l5O. Call Kip at 8-4272. (A-68-
ts-c).
1957 PLYMOUTH, good transpor transportation,
tation, transportation, 21 mpg, and radio sl2s.
Kodak movie camera with light
meter s2s. 35mm Fujica auto automatic
matic automatic with all equipment s3O.
A Ben Pearson coat s3s. Re Recurve
curve Recurve bow with arrows and all
equipment s3s. Call 8-1203
after 5. (A-70-3t-c).
1965 HONDA Super Hawk, 7,000
miles, excellent condition. Call
376-9372 Bill, Room 419. (A (A---70-3t-p).
--70-3t-p). (A---70-3t-p).
'57 FORD STATION WAGON. V-8,
automatic. Good transportation.
Contact Deepak, 328 NW 15th St.,
376-6086. (A-70-2t-p).
1957 TRIUMPH 650. Very good
mechanical condition, just over overhauled
hauled overhauled beginning of term. Mike
Wallace at 6-9142, rm. 308 Trus Trusler
ler Trusler Hall. (A-69-3t-p).
GRADUATING TO MILITARY.
Must sell. 3x5 bulletin board sl7.
Lamp sl3. Large 2-panel mural
- $lB. Other items. Fred Lane,
378-1046. (A-67-st-c).
1961 1600 SUPER PORSCHE, new
paint, low mileage, excellent con condition,
dition, condition, $2695; 1961 Ford Falcon,
4-door with deluxe trim, good
tires, low mileage, excellent run running
ning running condition, radio, heater, air
conditioner, $650; 10-speed
Schwinn Racing Bicycle, light lightweight
weight lightweight fenders and luggage rack
in spotless condition, SSO; Factory
Rebuilt VW Carburetor, never run
since rebuilt, for 1961-64 VW,
sls. For any of the above items,
call 372-0295 after 5 p.m. (A (A---69-3t-nc).
--69-3t-nc). (A---69-3t-nc).
MUST SELL 1959 2-bedroom
trailer, 10'xl4, air conditioned,
open cabana, built-in washer. Call
2-1868. (A-70-ts-c).
I I
I FIRST AREA RUN '1
I 135 SOHO jjLJ win iiftt y
H frizzell
| M I1 MINNIE RILL
PEARL MONROE
FARON DEL
rittt jomnht
M IMI f VEILS VRIGNT
\ r EASTMAN COLOR -a rzii I
1 f Plus The Antics Os
I!ARNOLD JTANfS
l HUNTZ HALL JIMMY DICKENS l
y LEO COWCEy J
I Plus 2nd Hit 1
bob LUCILLE
I MM.ndMUi I

-
for sale
1960 RENAULT DAUPHINE. Good
tires; motor perfect. 1-1/2 Karat
diamond engagement ring and band.
Call C. B. Gardnier at 6-8249,
9 to 5. (A-69-3t-c).
BUY DIAMONDS FROM LEADING
FIRM. Strictly wholesale price.
Registered appraisals. Telephone
372-5762 before 12 or after 5.
Ask for Mr. Tessler. (A-tlg-St-p)^
I
8 I
ISMI MIMAN
I SUSANNAH YORK # I
STANLEY BAKER
TKODNEMEL
I SANDS I^l
linmi-vmnii
I MICNML PARKS tfffW
/cbm tmrc Qgjjj

Qlll4 niviQ j
]rlTl3thStat23rdoad|
| Telephone 378-2434 | 1 A
] when is a BLEND as good as a BOND?|
j when youve got sexier gals... groovier gimmicks and lots more gall! ;
~ ~
Glr S ; - En er ur MomeXcSPlontest. Get All ContesT
Gainesville Independent.

for rent
PRIVATE HOME, quiet place to
study for a graduate student. 2124
NW 7th Place. Phone 376-7660.
(B-70-2t-p).-
WANTED ROOMMATE TO SHARE
apt. at Village Park. S4O. 378-
4276,- ask fr- John. (B-70-3t-c).
DO YOU DESIRE just a little more
than ghetto environment to achieve
that Masters or PhD degree? If
so, call 8-3048 for new 1-bedroom
apartment, furnished, only sllO
monthly, with extra hot water ap appliances,
pliances, appliances, heat accommodations.
3500 SW 25th Ave. (B-70-st-c).

I STARTS nwr-HKTBi^a|fe|
2* GAINESVILLE
FRIDAY KT. 20-2400 HAWTHOKHt HOW

for rent
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED To
share house with 3 others. 109
NE 3 St. 37^5g^(B-69-kp^
mwmm
STOTC



k
I for rent
ONE BEDROOM COTTAGE, Lake
I Winnott. Lake privileges. S3O per
I month. 23 miles from Gainesville.
372-0481. (B-67-ts-c).
TWO RESIDENTIAL HOMES for
[immediately pccupancy. 3 bed-
I rooms, bath and a half. $125 and
I $l3O. Couples or families only.
I Call Mr. Mason, c/o Ernest Tew
I Realty. 6-6461. (B-69-3t-c).
I WO BEDROOM furnished apt.
I 319 NW Ist St., downtown. $65
I per month. Mr. Kaplan, 372-0481.
I (B-69-ts-c).
MODERN EFFICIENCY APT.
Suitable for 1 or 2. $45 per month.
Phone 8-4619. (B-69-3t-c).
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED. Air
conditioned apt., 5 blocks from
campus. $42.50 per person. Call
John Shiplett, 2-9284 or see at
1517 NW sth Ave., Apt. 52. (B (B---69-3t-c).
--69-3t-c). (B---69-3t-c).
Shoe Repair Shop!
w c
I HEELS ATTACHED I
I 5 MINS. |
I SOLES ATTACHED I
I 15 MINS. |
I At 2 Locations I
1 CAROLYN PLAZA I
I FR 6-0315 I
I 101 N. Main St. I
I Opp. Ist Nat'l Bank I
I FR 6-5211 |

IN A 0077. SURVEY (the samplers were BONDed)!
ged said it was any anyip
ip anyip Secret that the
lable undercover
hese days is the
h, Italian and A A-I--^
-I- A-I--^
-^ In For The Way Out
tfl A A A 1511 NW Sixth St.
phone 372-1226
a I Q-p. *Trim Materials *Humor Decorations
ML:>U * -ioys

CLASSIFIEDS

for rent
1-1/2 EFFICIENCY APART APARTMENT.
MENT. APARTMENT. Air conditioned. Suitable
for 2 or 3. S2BO for second tri trimester.
mester. trimester. Call 376-8990. (B (B---67-3t-c).
--67-3t-c). (B---67-3t-c).
LARGE ONE BEDROOM APT. New
appliances, off-street parking,
nice furnishings. 805 NE 2nd St.
6-2323. (B-69-3t-c).
2 MALE ROOMMATES for a bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment in Village Park.
Contact Chuck Heller at 1001 SW
16th Ave. Apt. 20. (B-69-3t-p).
NEW HOUSE. Comfortable and
quiet. Private bath, corner room.
2 double windows, car necessary.
Girl only. Call 2-2982, 3919 NW
20th Terr. (B-69-3t-c).
Ft)R RENT: bo xlO trailer, 2bed 2bedroom,
room, 2bedroom, large living room. Partially
furnished. Call 6-0906 after 6 p.m.
(B-68-st-c).
CORNER ROOM FOR RENT.
Private entrance. Quiet home, off
parking, meals optional. 2-3118.
(B-68-4t-c).
-
NEED 3rd male roommate for 2
bedroom A.C. apartment. Large,
close to campus. 921 SW 6th Ave.
Phone 378-4176. (B-67-10-10t-c).
ROOMMATE TO SHARE efficiency
apt. Modern brick-bldg., air cond.
$l5O for trimester. 2026 W. Uni University.
versity. University. Apt. 14. Call 8-4426. (B (B---69-2t-p).
--69-2t-p). (B---69-2t-p).
personal
The BENT CARD Coffee House,
meeting place for students and
faculty, re-opens Friday and
Saturday nights, 9-1. Coffee and
entertainment. 1826 W. University.
(J-?0-2t-c).

wanted
ONE MALE STUDENT for apart apartment,
ment, apartment, 8 blocks from campus, with
pool and telephone. $34 a month.
Call 6-0806. (C-70-st-c).
ONE ROOMMATE to share 2BDR.
apt., pool and air cond. S4O mo.
Walking distance from campus.
1001 SW 16th Ave., Apt. 106. Move
in now or Feb. Ist. (C-70-3t-c).
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE to
share with two. S2B per mo. and
utilities. 1829 NW 2nd Ave. 372-
5247. (C-70-3t-c).
MALE ROOMMATE, 2-BRapart 2-BRapartment,
ment, 2-BRapartment, all utilities included, for
$37.50 a month. Call 8-3293. (C (C---70-ts-c).
--70-ts-c). (C---70-ts-c).
NEED male roommate urgently.
Will reduce rent sls. Only two
blocks from Campus. Call Gator
Groomer, 6-9346. (C-67-st-p).
IF YOU NEED extra money and
have Saturdays available, write to
Fuller Brush Co. at 1028 Clear Clearwater
water Clearwater Dr. in Daytona Beach with w
name and address and phone at
which you can be reached. Average
earning: $1.75-$2.50 per hour.(C hour.(C----67-10t-c).
---67-10t-c). hour.(C----67-10t-c).
NEED MALE ROOMMATE to share
A. C. apt. 1925 SW 14th Terr.
372-5996. (C-69-st-c).
RIDERS WANTED TO COCOA.
Leave every Friday, 5 p.m. Re Return
turn Return Sunday, 8 p.m. $6 round trip.
$3.50 one way. Call 372-6450 Mon Monday
day Monday thru Thursday after 6 p.m.
(C-67-3t-c).
COED ROOMMATE' WANTED for
winter trimester. Village Park.
2 bedroom apt. to share with 3
girls. S4O per month. Call 378-
40E9. (C-68-3t-c).
ROOMMATE TO SHARE clean,
modern air conditioned apartment.
Within walking distance of campus.
Call 378-1296. (C-68-3t-c).
real estate
OWNER SELLING 91 ACRES,
fenced, crossed fenced, modern
ranch home, permanent pasture.
Orange Heights Road. Close to
town. 372-0050. (I-67-st-c).
FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY.
3 bedroom house in quiet neigh neighborhood
borhood neighborhood near schools. lOO'xlOO*
lot with 23 beautiful trees. Assume
owners equity and take up payments
on 4-1/2% loan. 217 NW 34 Drive.
372-6777. (I-68-4t-c).

ROBBIE'S
Vi^for IThe 1 The Best In
MealV &^ fc<^fc Sandwiche s
1718 W. University Ave.
On The Gold Coast 1

real estate
3 BDR, 1-1/2 baths, CCB, fenced
back yard, built in kitchen plus
refrigerator. SBOO.OO and take over
payments of less thansloo/month.
2831 NE 13th St. in Highland Court
'Manor. Call FR 2-3811 after 6 p.m.
or Univ. Ext. 2832, 8-5. (1-67
tf-nc).
lost-found
LOST Brown wallet. Fla. Gym
at Kentucky game. If found, keep
money and return to George Mc-
Rae, 552 Murphree. 372-9135. (L (L---70-3t-p).
--70-3t-p). (L---70-3t-p).
LOST Male cat. Looks like a
Siamese, but has white feet. Wear Wearing
ing Wearing a blue collar. Contact Rich
Houk. 6-9129. Reward. (L-70-
2t-p),
FOUND A ring with a black stone
hear Engineering Building. Call
Laura Temple, room 229. 376-
9272. (L-68-3t-p).
LOST Sick Sealpoint Siamese,,
male. Needs vets care, answers
to Shenko. In NW section. Please
call 8-2551 with information. Re Reward.
ward. Reward. (L-68-3t-p).
services
HORSE HAVEN RIDING SCHOOL.
Group and private instruction. Hunt
seat and jumping. Call 376-3454.
Look for sign 6 miles west on New Newberry
berry Newberry Road opposite store. (M-70-
lt-c).
MY MAID would like to care for
one or two children in our home.
She is very competent and has
never missed a day of work. Avail Available
able Available 7:15 a.m. til 5 £>.m. week weekdays.
days. weekdays. Call 2-7160. (M-70-3t-p).
RAMES HAIR STYLIST, 319 W,
Univ. Ave. Celebrating our 4th
Anniversary. For month of Jan January
uary January we will give $35 Permanent
Wave (factory price) for sls. (M (M---70-st-c).
--70-st-c). (M---70-st-c).
NOW OPENING. Teddy Bear Nur Nursery.
sery. Nursery. 3 departments, complete in infant
fant infant department. Planned program
for children over 3. Central heating
.and air conditioned. Phone 6-0917.:
1214-1/2 NW 4th St.(M-70-10t-c).
GATOR ADS SELL
GATOR ADS SELL

Thursday, Jan. 13, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

autos
1962 VOLKSWAGEN, superb con condition,
dition, condition, radio, whitewalls, sunroof,
luggage rack. Make offer. Call R.
Kayfetz, 376-9124 after 6 p.m.
(G-70-st-c).
- +
1964 TE MPES T. Stick, radio,
white-wall tires, only 1,400 miles.
S3OO cash f or trade. Assume S4B
payment, 21-C Flavet 111 after
5 p,m. (G-70-3t-c).
1955 ~ PLYMOUTH. 6-cylinder,
standard shift and heater. Motor
completely redone. 3 new tires.
Good condition. 1954 Chevrolet,
6-cylinder, radio and heater. Good
tires, automatic transmission.
Mechanics in good shape. Motor
and transmission perfect. Call
378-4078 after 1:30. (G-70-3t-c).
63 PONTIAC CATALINA conver convertible.
tible. convertible. A on the floor. Excellent
condition. Must sell. Call Tim,
6-9793. (G-69-st-c).
SB FORD. 4 new tires, electric
fuel pump. $275. 378-3337. 2003
NE 7 St. Trade for cycle. (G (G---69-ts-c).
--69-ts-c). (G---69-ts-c).
1962 FORD convertible. Whole Wholesale
sale Wholesale price. Call Mrs. Louise
Hinton, Credit Union, ext. 2973.
(G-67-st-c).
1962 MG MIDGET. Clean and in
excellent condition. SBSO. Contact
B. W. Stalzer at Sigma Chi House
8-1112 or 2-9260. (G-68-ts-c).
VOLVO 1225, '63. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Low mileage, one owner,
big car comfort, sports car pre precision.
cision. precision. Call 372-5842 before 10
p.m. (G-68-st-c).
1963 CHEVROLET IMPALA. 2
door hardtop, automatic transmis transmission,
sion, transmission, white sidewalls, radio and
heater. SI4OO. Call 372-1117. (G (G---68-ts-c).
--68-ts-c). (G---68-ts-c).
1965 VOLKSWAGEN. Completely
new. Driven by owner only. Call
between 5:30-10 p.m. 378-2186.
(G-68-3t-c).
faelpwanftg
NEED REPRESENTATIVE in each
dorm. Distribute papers early
morning, collect evenings. St.
Petersburg Times. 372-4532. (E (E---70-st-p).
--70-st-p). (E---70-st-p).
COCKTAIL WAITRESS. Apply in
person, Harbor Lights.
daily. (E-69-st-c).
PART TIME HELP WANTED. Sell
advertising for weekly paper.
Apply Gainesville Independent. 18
SW 2nd St. (E-69-st-c).
NEED SINGING LEAD GUITAR
player and singing drummer to
join top notch band. Professional
equipment required. Ask for Bob,
8-4915. (E-69-2t-p).
PART-TIME DELIVERY BOY,
must have own car. See Alan at
Alans Cubana in Carolyn Plaza.
(E-68-4t-c).
i.
Last Day
To Order
Seminoles
Student Publications
Offices, Fla. Union

Page 7



Page 8

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Jan. 13, 1966

Dwarf Study
Gets Boost

A form of hereditary dwarfism
associated with many serious birth
defects will continue to be studied
at the UF under a renewed grant
of $31,329 from the National
Foundation-March of Dimes, Basil
OConnor, Foundation president
has announced.
The project is under the direc direction
tion direction of Dr. Andrew E. Lorincz,
associate professor of pediatrics.
Lorincz and his associates are
conducting parallel studies of the
human dwarfism disease called
Hurlers syndrome and an heredi hereditary
tary hereditary condition in cattle knows as
anorter dwarfism.
Although rare, Hurlers disease
has attracted much attention be because
cause because it can severely affect the
skeleton, eyes, blood and heart
vessels, liver, brain, and-because
it may provide answers to other
kinds of dwarfism, mental retard retardation
ation retardation and metabolic defects involv involving
ing involving connective tissue.
Holbrooks
Art Displayed
r
The UFs Department of Art
Teaching Gallery is presenting
a one-man show of Professor
Hollis Holbrooks paintings during
the month of January.
The display, which began Jan. 3
and continues through Jan. 28,
consists of a series of 12 oils
and 10 drawings.
The works were completed by
Holbrook last summer while he
worked under a research grant
from the UFs Graduate School.
Other paintings in the series were
shown last October at the Castango
Gallery in New York.
Holbrook has had 20 other one oneman
man oneman exhibits at colleges and
museums throughout the country.
His paintings have been circulated
by the American Federation of Art
and the United States State De Department.
partment. Department. Among collectors are
the University of Georgia Museum,
Richmond Library, Norfolk
Museum, William and Mary Col College
lege College and Walter Chrysler Jr.
The Teaching Gallery is open to
the public from 9 a.m. until noon
and 1:30 to 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
STUDY IN
SOUTHERN
FRANCE
An undergraduate
liberal arts year in
Aix-en Provence
French Language
& Literature
European Studies
Art & Art History
Mediterranean Studies
Classes in English and Frence,
satisfying American curriculum
requirements. Institute students
enrolled at the University of
Aix Marseille founded 1409.
Students live in French homes.
Tuition, trans Atlantic fares,
room board, about $1,950.
INSTITUTE FOR
AMERICAN AMERICANUNIVERSITIES
UNIVERSITIES AMERICANUNIVERSITIES
2 bix, rue du Bon-Pasteur
Aix- en Provenee, France

Dwarfism has long concerned
veterinarians and cattle raisers.
Intensive studies of the animal dis disease
ease disease by Lorincz group are con contributing
tributing contributing to a better understanding
of its counterpart in man.
However, they are paying more
attention now to direct study of
Hurler patients. In electron micro microscope
scope microscope studies of liver samples
taken from these patients, they
have found chemical abnormali abnormalities.
ties. abnormalities.
The aim of Lorincz research
is to unravel the nature of the basic
mistake in body chemistry and to
find out how this in turn injures
the bodys organs. Once these be become
come become known, there is a good pos possibility
sibility possibility that away may be found
to prevent or correct maldevelop maldevelopments
ments maldevelopments associated with Hurlers
disease.
The project is part of nationwide
March of Dimes research attack
on birth defects.

I the newest Detroit sound I
ns
1 comes from a combo 1
m ,i
I called 4*4*2 1
Sgggft 0 8888?
3888 r*T\ J s i
1 f t **, 4 f i /Mjl V, ...
TTTTfTiirnim i a.
S S
H Up-tempo all the way. With a 400-cube V-8 and 4-barrel carb to carry .||
p the lead. Heavy-duty front and rear suspension to smooth the beat. >
'£ Acoustically tuned twin pipes to modulate the sound. And red-line f
H tires to keep the whole score on track. Thats 4-4-2. Try about four bars ft
I today. Its your kind of music! LOOK TO OLDS FOR THE NEW! I
I OUT FRONT HH TORONADO NINETY-CMNT DELTA M DYNAMIC IETSTAR M CUTLASS F-M VISTA-CRUISER STARFIRE 4-4-2 8
I I OLDS MO BILE 1
...in a Rocket Action Car 7 c " T T t tc co w i t * act,oh * you a"** old,mor.le ,uauty dealer todyi
Il8 6 a|

Braswell Receives
In Engineering Department

Dr. Robert N. Braswell, resi resident
dent resident director of GENESYS, Grad Graduate
uate Graduate Engineering Education Sys System,
tem, System, at Daytona Beach, became
chairman of the UFs Department
of Industrial and Systems Engi Engineering
neering Engineering this week.
He will retain his duties as in interim
terim interim director of the Universitys
Daytona Beach, GENESYS facility
until a successor is appointed.
His new position will enable
Braswell to expand his unique com combination
bination combination of experience and ability
in the fields of engineering and
industry to better serve the entire
state, according to UF President
J. Wayne Reitz.
Dr. Braswells excellent work
at Daytona Beach GENESYS in
developing courses in operations
research and systems engineering
show him to be eminently qualified
to head the Universitys program
in this rapidly growing new field,
Engineering Dean Thomas L. Mar Martin
tin Martin said.
Braswell has headed the Daytona
Beach program since it was esta established
blished established in 1964. He came to the
UF from a position as chairman
of the Operations Research De Department
partment Department of Brevard Engineering

College. He is a former manager
of the Systems Engineering De Department
partment Department of Brown Engineering
Company, Inc., Cape Kennedy, and
has held positions with Brown En Engineering,
gineering, Engineering, Hughes Aircraft Com Company
pany Company and Southern Bell Telephone
Company.
He taught at the University of
Alabama where he received his
undergraduate and masters de degrees.
grees. degrees. He received his Ph.D.from
Oklahoma State University.
Braswell is national director of
programs for the American Insti Institute
tute Institute of Industrial Engineers. While
working for Brown Engineering
Company, he completed or man managed
aged managed the completion of over 200
operations research and systems
analysis projects which were con contracted
tracted contracted by the National Aeronau Aeronautics
tics Aeronautics and Space Administration and
the Army Ordinance Missile Com Command.
mand. Command. He is the author of 14 tech technical
nical technical papers.
According to Dean Martin, Bras Braswell
well Braswell is uniquely fitted to develop
the UFs growing graduate pro program
gram program in this vital new field.
Florida is one of very few uni universities
versities universities in the nation to offer sub subjects
jects subjects in industrial and systems

engineering. In 1964-65 only 32
PhJ). degrees were produced in
industrial engineering in the en entire
tire entire United States Martin said.
Irregulars Os
Fine Quality
Towels Bedspreads
Carpet Ends
Sport Duck*Blankets
First Quality
Throw Rugs*Carpets x bheets
HENDERSONS
MILL STORE
Only 1 Hour From UF
FISH AND SHOP
, U.S. 19, Crystal River



i tflunK' d-rM
HMh lyttL
* i.k?fcrf4
':.! : *Y jUWgts .& ->.J -< Aji tjfesto||||§§fo
ip P it! iili lliitlMiMi^HnHAJl
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.-; s^ '^9^^^HH^^^^^B|^^^H^^^HH|j^BKp|||p||ppp : j f -\ j <
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Photo above and right showprogress on new Florida Union, which is scheduled to be ready for occupancy
I by this fall trimester.

j DIETICIAN SAYS

No Magic To Food Fads

I Students should avoid being
prawn by the magical quality
pf health food fads and crash
piets, advises Mrs. Marjorie P.
[MacKenzie, dietician for the UF
[infirmary.
Health food fads are popular
kiiets which have no scientific
basis, explained Mrs. MacKenzie.
The recently popular Mayo Diet
is an example of a food fad. Ac According
cording According to the dietician, the popu popu|XE6X66pie§l
|XE6X66pie§l popu|XE6X66pie§l
1-19 Copies, Ivy eu 20&
Over, 9$
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Attention SENIOR A GRADUATE MEN Students-U.S. Citizens
MIKDINO NOMINAL FINANCIALJJIUJ TO COMRLETE TMKIR EDUCATION THIS
ACADEMIC YEAR AND THEN COMMENCE WORK COSIGNERS REQUIRED.
SMii Transcript and pull details op your elans and requirements to
STEVENS BROS. FOUNDATION, INC.
ElO4ll SNDICOTT BLDO., ST. RAUL 1, MINN. A NON-PROFIT CORE.
hhmmUNDERGRADS, CLIP AND SAVEm^mh

BOAC will
leave you alone
in Europe.

On a swinging BOAC Grand
Orbit student tour you can ex explore
plore explore the coast of Portugal,
gaze at the Rif Mountains of
Morocco, take an Adriatic
cruise, visit the Islands of Greece,
absorb culture in Spain, France,
Italy and England, find yourself
a Scandinavian viking, lift your
stein in Germany, Switzerland
and Austria, play roulette in
Monaco, and have plenty of
time to roam around on your
own. The whole package will
cost you $1921.30* round trip
from New York. And that in includes
cludes includes most meals, hotels and
everything else. (You can also
jet BOAC direct from Miami,
Boston, Chicago, Detroit, San
Francisco, or Honolulu. And
joirt the group in London.)
To be sure you get what you
pay for we hired some young
tour leaders from Oxford and
Cambridge and told them not to
bug you.
They were all for it.'
They said thats the only kind
of tour theyd be interested in

larity of this diet is based on the
magical combination of foods.
The diet stressed drinking fruit
juices and eating grapefruit while
fat is allowed in the diet. It is
assumed that eating grapefruit will
offset eating fat.
It is not an unusual way of
eating or a magical combination
of foods which causes a person to
lose weight, Mrs. MacKenzie
said.
The dietician, who has been at
the UF two years, advised students'
with diet problems to see a doctor.
A diet prescribed by a doctor
allows a person to lose weight
conservatively and still maintain
the necessary foods, she said.
On the other hand, a diet of
your own or a chain letter type
diet (food fad) allows you to lose
weight fast, but when you begin

leading anyway. And that they
werent above a little freedom
themselves while working their
way through college.
So thats the kind of deal
youll get on a BOAC student
tour of Europe this summer.
Clip the coupon for more
facts. And cut out for Europe.
Based on economy jet fare and double
or triple occupancy in hotels.
t^boac
AMD BOAC CUM AMD
Services operated for BOAC CUNARO by BOAC
British Overseas Airways
Corporation, Dept. BE-178.
I Box No. VC 10, New York, i
N.Y. 10011. MU 7-1600.
Please send me details on the
1966 Student Tour Program.
Name
| Address |
| Ci * |
State Zip Code
I 23,0 i

to eat normally again you tend to
gain weight hack faster than you
lost it, the blonde dietician said.
A proper diet, according to Mrs.
MacKenzie, allows a person to eat
the correct foods, yet limits the
amount to be eaten.
Good eating habits come with
maturity, Mrs. MacKenzie said.

Grant Promises Prominence

(From Page 1)
UF statistics attest to inis iormula of stronger
graduate programs building better undergraduates.
in 1956, 36 per cent of undergraduates entering
Florida's graduate curriculum ranked in the second
or upper quartile of scores on the Graduate Record
Examination.
Today the figure is 63 per cent and the number
of students entering UF graduate schools has risen
80 per cent in the last seven years.
UF research work brought a National Science
Foundation site-team here last year to begin an
extensive examination of work being aune. i*ot only
was the actual research surveyed but the adminis administrative
trative administrative climate overseeing the research was also
examined.
Most of all, the NSF was looking for an enthusias enthusiastic
tic enthusiastic administration to handle the grant. They didnt
want to allot over $4 million to a school if the work
stimulated by the grant would suddenly halt when the
aid ran out.
The examiners, however, were assured by Presi President
dent President J. Wayne Reitz and the Florida Legislature that
when the allotment ended in 1970 the matured work
in radiation, kinetic phenomena and microstructure
of matter would continue under state funds and UF
administration backing.
Committing the university administration to the
NSF program, Reitz cited a $4 million increase in
the science budget over the last two years as a
reflection of emphasis being placed in the areas of
science and engineering at the University of Florida.
He wiote, The university administration is com committed
mitted committed to continue the activities initiated or acceler accelerated
ated accelerated by the aid of the grant requested.
Similarly, the State Board of Control for Higher
Education in Florida issued a policy statement
assuring the UF, the board will support vigorously
the universitys request for additional funds to
maintain and augment the new level of excellence
achieved with the aid of grant funds.
A universitys staff is iated largely bythenumuer
of publications it turns\>ut. These are professional
journal reports on research done by faculty members
and graduate students, and simply writing a report
doesnt guarantee seeing it in print. v
In an article entitled Growth of Chemical Pub Publications

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS
SELL, RENT, FIND AND PASS ON THOSE LITTLE
PERSONAL MOTES TO SOMEONE DEAR. Ex. 2832

Thursday, Jan. 13, 1966, Hie Florida Alligator,

>
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lications Publications in the South, John R. Sampey and John
A. Southern, Furman University, point out that
Florida and four other universities enjoy un unchallenged
challenged unchallenged leadership of the Southeast in chemical
publications.
Specifically, Florida, ranking fifth with 1,003, Is
more tuan 250 publications ahead of its nearest
competitor, the University of Tennessee.
Still, another estimation of a universitys strength
is the total number of grants given it.
These grants, federal and otherwise, are awarded
to a university because of recognized work, and at
the UF have been almost totally for work by specific
professors on certain projects. This is distinguished
from the NSF grant which is to an institution rather
than a project.
Again, the chemistry department is a prime
example of the research growth at the UF which led
ta the $4.2 million allotment.
During the two-year period 1948-50, total-grants
and contracts awarded to UF chemistry work was
$54,000. Ten years later this figure has risen to
sl.l million and was estimated to be $1.5 million
as of 1964.
Prof. Alex G. Smith, astronomy department chair chairman,
man, chairman, gives an interpretation of these figures.
The more money you receive means the morei
productive research you have carried out and/
added Smith, the more grants youll attract in
the future.
Smitn's reflection seems to sum up one of the
basic reasons for the UFs recognition by the
National Science Foundation.
Research means an upgrading of graduate and
undergraduate capacity. It leads to national recog recognition
nition recognition which in turn means more money, and the
cvcle starts again.
Getting NSF to come to Florida was no easy matter.
It entailed the total accomplishment of four depart departments
ments departments and the hundreds of administrative man-hours
required to prepare a dictionary-sized proposal
to NSF.
Dr. Mautz sums up the effort.
The acquiring of this research money is a major
milestone in the history of the University. It is the
culmination of our total development in the science
area and represents significant national recognition
of our development.

Page 9



Page 10

>, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Jan. 13, 1966

-^Moor -^Moor'
' -^Moor' x" r o7**
SPORTS EDITOR
Recent comments students have been highly critical
of basketball coach Norm Sloan.
Sloan has been hit at for shuffling his players in and out of
the game like wild cards, and never giving any five a chance
to play together.
The people who are yelling loudest didnt say a word last
year when Sloan did the same thing. Possibly its because the
team had an 18-7 record.
In 1965, the UF coach used eight men in all 25 games. It was
a rare occasion, if it ever happened, that one player stayed in the
game for an entire half.
This plan of action was most successful because Sloan was
able to utilize his fine seniors, and gain game experience for
his younger players. Not only did it accomplish this objective,
but it kept the Gators fresh and helped them wear down other
teapis who werent deep enough to substitute.
This year Sloan has even more reason to use his whole squad.
> He has only two seniors on the squad (Paul Morton and Bob
Hoffmann) and needs all other varsity members to get game
experience, often in pressure situations.
If Sloan dicided not to substitute freely, sophomores like Mike
Rollyson, Dave Miller, Harry Winkler and Gary McElroy wouldnt
all gain this most vital experience.
Besides experience, Sloan realizes that he hasnt got horses
like Henderson, Tomlinson and Baxley this year and has to
adjust his game plans accordingly. To win, the Gators will have
to wear the opposition down and theres nobetter way to do it than
to substitute freely.
With a young team and a terrific lot of freshmen, Sloan has
to think about next year, too. You dont build athletic dynasties
thinking about the year in question only. Certainly Bear Bryant
didnt get where he is thinking that way.
Before criticising Sloan too much, let us see what he does
with the 1966 team. Sure, hes lost four games already, but even
last years squad dropped seven. This is not to say that the team
wont lose again, but itll win more than its share. Ill venture
that it wont finish worse than 15-10, and it could do as well as
19-6.
Falcons Do Well
The Atlanta Falcons sure look good after their first draft
and signings.
Not only did they land Tommy Nobis, the great Texas line linebacker,
backer, linebacker, but the Falcons were able to pluck what turned out to
be the two best senior quarterbacks away from every NFL
team and the AFL, too.
Their second draft choice was a who he? type. Randy
Johnson was a quarterback no one had ever heard of before the
holiday all-star games.
Here is a fellow who went to Texas A& I, which (for the
information of those who dont know it) is located in Kingsville,
Tex. He was Little All-America quarterback, but so were
George Bork at Northern Illinois and Don Miller at Delaware,
and where are they today?
But Johnson played in the Blue-Grey game and the Senior
Bowl and set passing records in each with 20 of 33 completions.
He looked as good on both occasions as Joe Namath in his
senior year.
Then, the Falcons signed Steve Sloan, Namaths understudy at
Alabama, who just happened to complete 66 per cent of his passes
this year with only three interceptions.
Sloan passed Nebraska right out of the Orange Bowl to complete
a glorious senior year. It would have been even more so if
the >NCaX computed its passing statistics as the pros do. If
it did, Sloan would have been the national passing leader.
The Falcons also have signed some good receivers with
Gator Charlie Casey at the top of the list.
They say it takes five years to build any kind of a pro team
from nothing, but Atlanta might be the franchise, which disproves
this time-tested theQry.
Duke Gets Scare This Time;
Squeaks By Ready Clemson
By LEONARD A. GRANATO
UPI Sports Writer
When the clock is running out, a basketball player sometimes has
to sacrifice form for results.
Consider Steve Vacendak of Duke, There he was Tuesday night,
off-balance with a mere four seconds left and the score tied. An
underhand flip toward the basket and the top-ranked Blue Devils
had an 87-85 victory over Clemson.
It was the climax of a good night for Vacendak. He wound up with
28 points to lead all scorers and in the process tallied five consecu consecutive
tive consecutive points to strengthen a tenuous Duke lead.
Clemson, down 45-33 at the half, staged two second-period rallies,
led by Garry Helms, who eventually tallied 24 points. But the Blue
Devils withstood the onslaught from their Atlantic Coast Conference
rivals.
Don Freeman and Rich Jones led Illinois to the top spot on the Big
Ten, standings, scoring 52 points between them in an 80-64 victory
ovet Wisconsin. The Badgers tried to stem the tide with slow-down
tactics, but Illini dead-eyes spoiled the plan.
Freeman hit 27 points, his season average, and Jobes added 25.
Wisconsin did not score during the last five minutes and 20 seconds
of the first half, and in the second half went seven minutes, 17
seconds without a point and eight minutes, 39 seconds without a
field goal.

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(THATS Your YEARBOOK.)



Gators Reduce Canes To Breeze

By 808 MENAKER
Alligator Staff Writer
Controlling the Dali from the
opening tip to the final seconds,
the Gator basketball team made
the Miami Hurricanes look like a
pick-up team, defeating them
111-66.
Substituting freely, Norm
Sloans Gators played at a hectic
pace through the opening minutes
of the game, building up a lead
that was never seriously chal challenged.
lenged. challenged.
Dave Miller and Harry Winkler
led the Gator offense in the first
half, scoring 17 and 10 points,
.respectively.
Jeff Ramsey started the scoring
off by tipping in a wavward shot.
Jj Mmf
TWO FOR JEFF
Gator center Jeff Ramsey throws
in two points in the 111-66 romp
over Miami Wednesday night. Hur Hurricane
ricane Hurricane forward Mike Whittman(l4)
makes a futile attempt to stop
Ramsey.

Georgia On Comeback

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
ATHENS, Ga. (UPI) The
University of Georgia, after 14
straight losing seasons, is on the
comeback trail in basketball.
That was the conclusion that
even the most doubtful must reach
after the Bulldogs forced 2nd 2ndranked
ranked 2ndranked unbeaten Kentucky into
double overtime Monday night be before
fore before losing 69-65.
Our Gurnet
1% A
\AvWI GtlUry
Oit DtlitacU*
JPv
wy
ftarmantlla's
I a.m.-7 p.m.
7 days a week
706 W. Univ.

Miller followed up by sinking a
foul shot and the Gators were off
to the races.
Winkler bombed in a 15-fdot
jump shot and Gary Keller tipped
in his own foul attempt. With the
score 7-0, it looked like the Hur Hurricanes
ricanes Hurricanes might have difficulty get getting
ting getting into the scoring column.
Miami center Don Patrican then
sunk an easy lay-up to break the
ice for the Canes.
At times the game looked more
than a free-for-all than a basket basketball
ball basketball game. The Gators tried what
can only be described as a five
o
Frosh Down
Chipola In
79-64 Tilt
The Baby Gator basketball team
extended its winning streak to eight
games last night defeating Chipola
Junior College 79-64.
The Baby Gators, led by Kurt
Feazel playing the point or quar quarterback
terback quarterback slot, were on top through throughout
out throughout the game. The Indians, always
regarded as one of the countrys
top junior college quintets, were
never a threat until mid-way
through the second half when they
pulled to within one point of the
Baby Gators, 52-51.
Center Neal Walk, a 6-11 Miami
Beach product, led the team with
a 27 point effort. Former Tampa
Hillsborough star Andy Owens
finished with 22 points and Feazel
netted 20. Guard Mickey Norlander
and forward Boyd Welsch finished
with 6 and 4 points respectively.
The Baby Gators put their un unblemished
blemished unblemished record up against fSt.
Petersburg Junior College Satur Saturday
day Saturday afternoon in the Florida Gym.
t

This is a new-look Georgia team.
The Bulldogs keep switching of offenses
fenses offenses and defenses. They have
basically the same material that
posted an 8-18 mark last season.
But they seem to have more hustle
and better control of the situation.
A great deal of credit must go
to their new head coach, slender,
35-year-old Ken Rosemond who
learned his basketball at North
Carolina. Rosemond has made it
amply clear that he plans to be
a winner at Georgia.
The Bulldogs, who play at Ala Alabama
bama Alabama Wednesday night, have a
5-4 record. But they were 5-2
before hosting 3rd-ranked Van Vanderbilt
derbilt Vanderbilt and Kentucky in a 50-hour
span and thats the best start
Georgia has enjoyed in basketball
since 1950.
We felt we had a chance to
upset Kentucky, Rosemond said
sadly after the game. We were
ready physically and pschologi pschologically.
cally. pschologically. I told the boys that a chance
like this comes along about once
in a lifetime.
The Bulldogs took the loss hard
but they tad no reason to be
ashamed.
Most oi the 11,000 fans who
crowded into the Coliseum for
the game "summed up their feel feeling

tbsnbi
card
c//ec kou.se
1826 W. University Ave.
open 9'til l fri. & sat. nights

man wedge to confuse Miamis
putting the ball into play.
Miller and Keller seemed to be
everywhere at once, leading the
jfl
W :
jji I
A CAKE'WALK
Baby Gator center Neal Walk
uses all his 83 inches to hook in
two oints against highly-rated
'Chip* .a Junior College Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday night. In a cakewalk, the UF
freshman remained undefeated,
79-64.

ing feeling at the end by chanting, damn
good team.
Georgia was down by 13 points
at halftime but battled back to
force the game into overtime on
a layup by Frank Harscher and
came heartbreakingly close to win winning
ning winning in the final seconds of the
first extra period.
That was when Lee Martin, the
Bulldogs senior floor leader, in intercepted
tercepted intercepted a Kentucky pass and
drove in for what appeared to be
the winning basket. Alas, the ball
rolled off and Kentucky had a re reprieve.
prieve. reprieve.
Kentucky coach Adolph Rupp,
who has been battling Georgia
teams since 1940, said this is
the best Georgia team hes seen.
They play a lot like St. Louis,
Rupp said. They really hold that
ball. They are one of the finest
ball handling teams weve seen
this year.
Rupp said Georgia was a lot
better than he had expected and
he had special words of praise
for Georgia senior Jerry Waller
who scored 23 points and grabbed
17 rebounds.
You are lucky to get out of a
game like that alive, said Rupp.
Even when you are 30 minutes
late.

Gators with 10 and 9 rebounds,
respectively, at the end of the
first half, with Florida on top with
a comfortable lead, 50-29.
The Gators kept up their first
half pace with Mike Rollyson and
Winkler continuing to shoot up a
storm against the hapless Hurri Hurricanes.
canes. Hurricanes.
Dave Miller, who fouled out
early in the second half, led the

Alt
Wif^
JX!fl| ft I t flf T<->''/'.
*$ six i?x M \ mM
THE BALL? WHO HAS THE BALL?
Well, its up in the air for the moment. The ball was about the only
thing up in the air Wednesday night. The game was settled early as
Florida out-Houdinied the Magic City crew, 111-66. Awaiting anxious anxiously
ly anxiously as the ball comes down are UFs David Miller, left, Miamis Rusty
Parker (20), UFs Jeff Ramsey and Miamis Don Patrician (33).
- -;. -rr .' j- --**- u ~ rr a
BBUCE
Dudleys-
ALLIGATOR COLUMNIST
The Florida basketball team has one of the most fierce com competitors
petitors competitors and one of the best defensive players in the history of
the Southeastern Conference.
As a floor leader and playmaker, his equal would be hard to
find, and his 6-2 frame has spelled the difference in many a
Gator victory.
However, this year his frame sets on the bence for every
game because Brooks Henderson has traded his Orange and Blue
basketball uniform for the garb and style of a Gator coach.
Id still enjoy playing, but I dont get as restless as if I was
21 or 23 instead of 28, Henderson reports. Ive got five years
of college and the service behind me, so Im not as restless as
I used to be.
However, I still think about playing. I guess there hasnt
been a game this year that I wouldnt have liket to play in. I
sure would have liked to have gotten in to that Kentucky game.
But I keep busy without playing. Being an assistant coach
and working with the freshman team takes a lot of time, and I
also do a lot of scouting and recruiting.
This way Im on the road quite a lot either scouting opponents
or watching high school games.
The captain of the 1964-65 Gator basketball team enjoys the
high school games, but he has no intentions of ever coaching high
school ball.
I only went into coaching because I had a chance to get into
college ball, and Ive never considered coaching high school.
Henderson reports that hes enjoying his first year as a coach,
but he doesnt see a bright season ahead for the Gators.
Weve got a lot of tough games coming up, and we just cant
be flat and win, he said. Were playing a lot of inexperienced
and they have to come through for us all the time if
were going tp win.
After the Ole Miss game here Saturday, the Gators go on the
road against FSU, Georgia, Auburn, Mississippi State, Mississippi,
Tennessee and Kentucky.
The only breather in the bunch is Mississippi and that isnt
going to be an easy game at the Oxford gym. I expect the FSU
game will be as bad as any of them, but there isnt £ team in the
SEC that isnt going to be tough.
1 This just makes it more important that we get a perfect
performance from our players each game. If we dont, well
lose.
This seems to be the story of Florida basketball this year in
a nutshell. In fact, the Gators might even need more than a
flawless performance to beat teams like Kentucky.
But if any strength can come from the coaching staff on the
bench, Henderson will be supplying more than his share.
The Florida athlete still has the desire to win that he demon demonstrated
strated demonstrated on the hardwoods last year. The desire that will make
him a producer of floor leaders, playmakers and defensive players
for Florida.
His products will have just a little bit of the Henderson touch.

Thursday. Jan. 13, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Gators with 23 points. Winkler
followed with 19, Rollyson had 16,
Keller 15, and Bob Hoffmann, 14.
Ramsey scored seven to match
his rebounds for the evenine.Gary
McElroy and Paul Morton finished
with four points eacn. td Mahoney
was low for the Gators with three
points, as everyone made the
scoring column.

Page 11



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