Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
.
; v i -v. c. }r...H l ,L-.-.i>. f .c-a-V'-; I I-ac
UpgffgS
jBBp 1 jifc
sKk. m^
FILLING EM OUT
Students had quite a time registering, filling out countless forms and
class cards, as Sister Mary Denise (left) and Sister John Joseph will
probably testify. The nuns are full-time students and live only a block
from campus in their convent near University Station post office.
(Court Uncovers!
| Cheating Ring j
Vj
By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
A small cheating ring in a University College Comprehensive
Course was uncovered in December by the Honor Court.
Five students appeared before the Court on charges of cheating
by trading answers on examinations. They were given a failing
grade in the course and received 15 penalty hours, which will
require them to attend an additional trimester inorder to graduate.
According to custom, names of the students will not be revealed.
Investigation that led to the charge lasted about a month, says
new Honor Court Chancellor Jake Dyal.
Dyal says the students were hot suspended for two reasons:
(1) this was the first offense for all concerned and (2) all five
pleaded guilty.
Name of the course, as well as names of the students, was
withheld to protect the individuals involved, Dyal says.
Some students, he said, if given the course title, might
easily be able to identify those people concerned with the cheating
charge. We customarily keep the identity of those appearing before
Honor Court strictly private.

Jake Dyal--New
Court Chancellor

Lucius Mahlon (.Jake) Dyal
Jr., a civil engineer turned
law student, is the new chan chancellor
cellor chancellor of the UF Honor Court.
The 28-year-oid senior re replace
place replace s Sid Stubbs, who
graduated in December.
Dyal, a well-traveled native
of Woodbine, Ga., received a
degree in civil engineering
from Auburn in 1959 (ranking
fourth in his class). Until he
entered UF Law School in
1964, he worked as engineer,
mainly on road construction
projects.
* I just wanted to be my
own boss, Dyal says, in
explaining his switch from
engineering to law.
Dyal brings to the office
four trimesters of experience
JAKE DYAL

on the Honor Court. Pre Previously,
viously, Previously, he has been attorney
general, chief prosecuting of officer
ficer officer and chief investigating
officer.
He also brings to the office
a strong belief in the honor
system. *-
I was impressed with the
honor system when I came to
Florida, Dyal says. At Au Auburn,
burn, Auburn, we had the proctor
system and I didn't like it.
The proctor system
actually encourages cheating,
I think. It presents a challenge
to students to cheat.
About the honor system,
Dyal says, If the students
want to make it work, it can.
By the time people come to
college, theyre mature
ehough to govern themselves
JUk an area such as this. Its
simply a matter of accepting
responsibility.
As Dyal sees it, the major
problem is convincing a stu student
dent student that reporting another
student for cheating is not
mere tattling, but is his
responsibility as a student.
The honor system is as
much a protection for the
student body as it is a penal
system.
At Auburn, Dyal was a mem member
ber member of Blue Key, editor of
the Auburn Engineer, a mem member
ber member of Chi Epsilon (civil
engineering honorary
(See DYAL, Page 5)

Tlie Florida
; . -if
Alligatir

Vol. 58, No. 67 University of Florida / Monday, January 10, 1966

Dean Brady Resigns

By DREX DOBSON
Alligator Staff Writer
UF Dean of Wolnen Marna V.
Brady will become an associate
professor in the department of lo logic
gic logic and half-time academic coun counselor
selor counselor in July, The Alligator learned
today.
She resigned her present post of
Dean of Women which she has held
since 1948, when the UF had only
some 400 women students.
Her successor has not been an announced.
nounced. announced.
Dr. Brady leaves for vaction in
May, and when she returns shell
be a member of the logic depart department.
ment. department.
I dont feel Im stepping down,
but only transferring to another job
where I can also help students,*
Miss Brady said.
She is teaching a course in logic
this trimester and taught a course
during the fall trimester.
The course affords students a
great deal in decision making and
critical thinking, she said. And
ever since I came to the UF, Ive
been counseling students. I think
Ill enjoy my work as much as I
have my present position.
When one is dean she does
about everything from academic to
quite personal counseling, Miss
Brady said. I think Ill be help helpful
ful helpful to freshmen,
I like to teach. A deans job
actually involves teaching and ob observing,
serving, observing, She said.
I feel I will certainly be around
and associated with students.
Miss Bradys transfer was an announced
nounced announced by Dean of Student Affairs
Lester Hale to the Student Person Personnel
nel Personnel Staff in November.
She has been an adviser to Mor Mortar
tar Mortar Board, WSA, and is on the Gov Governors
ernors Governors Commission for the Status
for Women, appointed by both ex-
Gov. Garris Bryant and Gov. Hay Haydon
don Haydon Burns.
A native of Cincinnati, Miss
Brady received her bachelors de degree
gree degree at University of Cincinnati
and her masters and doctors de degree
gree degree in guidance and personnel ad administration

l 1 £ mm
WLlw fl WL HI
Vtl MUtm m \ jr \
Jit
WAY DOWN YONDER...

...in New Urieans, as vivacious Tay Tanya, ueaa
majorette and choreographer, leads the Gator Band
in Sugar Bowls halftime show. Although the girls are

ministration administration at Columbia Univer University.
sity. University.
Dr. Hale last night said, We
regret very much that Dean Brady
has decided to teach and leave her
deans post.
Dean Brady, being the UFs
only full-time Dean of Women, has
done an outstanding job. We are
glad shes going to be on hand to
help the new Dean get organized.
I dont forsee any major vari variations
ations variations in the administration of the
Dean of Womens office, Hale, the
Dean of Student Affairs, said. I
have had many applications which

UF Enrollment Hits
New January High
By YVETTE CARDOZO
Alligator Staff Writer
As classes began this morning, 1,000 more students arranged books,
collected pens and made predictions about first-d&ymssignments than
at this time lret year.
Unofficial em*>llment figures as of Sunday night place the winter
trimester total at 14,954 students. Last January the figure was 13,820.
And these figures do not include the several hundred students ex expected
pected expected to sign up during late registration.
The fall trimester, enrollment figure was 16,138. But winter tri trimester
mester trimester figures are expected to drop about 1,000, according to the
registrar's office.
One indication of ever-growing UF enrollment is the January cutoff
of freshman applications for the 1966 fall trimester. X
With more than 6,200 freshman applications already received, the
UF had to stop accepting applications a full eight months before the
fall trimester begins.
This marks the fourth straight year the UF has been forced to hold
freshman enrollment to a specific total. The cutoff date this year is
nearly a month earlier than in 1965 and three months ahead of the

On Jhe Inside...
Orientation a preview lor
the fall ... 8.
Editorial Page 6,7.
Campus news Page 9-20.
World news Pages 3-5.
Andy Moor's sports Pages
21-28.

smiling, tew Gator fans wereat least until the fourtn
quarter. For details, see the sports pages.
is.

we are presently processing to se secure
cure secure a new dean."
Hale said Dean Bradys succes successor
sor successor would not be announced until
sometime in February when the
final decision is made.
Carolyn Watt, Mortar Board ed editor,
itor, editor, said "We regret very much
that Miss Brady is resigning her
deans post. She has been most
helpful in promoting leadership and
the spirit of coed education on the
UF campus.
"Her help has been most bene bene(See
(See bene(See BRADY, Page 5)

.1964 date.
UF Registrar Richard H. White Whitehead
head Whitehead said the limit of 2,800 fresh freshman
man freshman vacancies will be filled from
the 6,200 applications now on hand.
Only 45 per cent of those students
applying actually enroll, he said.
Last trimester, with an all-time
high enrollment of 16,874, the UF
was the 26th largest university lik.
the nation.
Next fall's total is expected to
hit 17,50 Q.



, The Florida Alligator. Monday, January 10, 196

Page 2

International
INCREASED SANCTIONS . Con.moc wealth Relations Secretary
Arte Bottomiey said Saturday iagixt Britain may well i impose
further sanctions on Rhodesia as a result of the commonwealth
conference opemng m Lagos Nigeria Tuesday. We hope to get others
to follow our iead 3on.oir.ley toid reporters. Asked what new sanc sanctions
tions sanctions the government had in mind, he said; We shall he announcing
these n due course.' Bottom ley will be accompanying Prime Minister
Harold Wilson to the conference.
. ........ ... a
ENVOY OPPOSES . Roving Ambassador w. Averell Harnmar
termed Communist Chinas charge trie U. S. had resumed bombing
m North Viet Nam dastardly.* I am utterly satisfied thic. was a
dastardly charge and it is unhappily typical of Communist tactics.
Hamm said on his departure lor Australia to continue President
Jotnsors peace offensive. Harnman said he had complete faith in
the V. S. denial of the Chinese allegation.
REDSDENYPRIEST ... Polands Communist
regime withdrew the passport of Stefan Car Cardinal
dinal Cardinal Wyszynski Sunday, bai~ring him from
travel abroad on charges his activities were
harmful to the state. The Polish primate
bluntly refused to reply to the charges and
publicly pledged to defend the high dignity
of man. The decisjojh, announced in a com communique
munique communique from Premier S. Jozef Cyrankie Cyrankiewiczs
wiczs Cyrankiewiczs office, plunged relations between the
Polish government and the Holy See to a
new low.
SUMMIT EN TROUBLE > . Premier Alexei Kosygin made a
desperate ilth hour attempt Sunday to prevent the. India-Pakistan
summit conference from foundering ox. the Kashrrir issue. Kosygin
shuttled back and forth between Indian. Premier lal Bahadur Shastri
and Panstar President Ayut Khan as a Pakistani spokesman hinted
the conference might break up without even a final communique.
The Tashkent sum mit was expected to end Monday. Kosygin, met twice
with for a total of three and a half hours and three times with
Ayub If or several hours. /
National
RACIAL PROTEST . Hundreds of taunting young Negroes blocked
a highway and threatened to run a police line Saturday before author authorities
ities authorities rleversed their stand and permitted a march into the dbwntown
area. l The march was to protest the slaying of a Negro cmT nghts
worker* Monday. Ttft H^ponstrators. most of them students from
predominantly Negro Tuskegee Institute, sat down on highway and
snarled traffic fox one hour and 10 minutes before police finally
agreed to let them proceed.
SHORTAGE STUDIED . Concerned fed federal
eral federal officials said Saturday they are planning
steps to ease manpower shortage strains on
the economy so the Viet Nam war effort wont
be hampered. Secretary of Labor W. Willard
Wirtz has decided to call union and manage management
ment management leaders from the steel, aerospace,
machinery and construction industries to con confer
fer confer enc es here to discuss the problem. The
Defence and Commerce departments are put putting
ting putting together an inventory of labor shortages.
Florida
WILL fjiOT RUN r ir T V State Atty. Gen. Earl Faircloth threw cold
water Fnpay on talk of a U. S. Senate race and formally announced"
he is a candidate this year for re-election. Faircloth did not commit
himself to serve out the full four year term in the cabinet office if
elected although he said this was his present plan. Leaving the door
open to step down cnould he decide to run for the seat being vacated
by U. ,S. Sen. George Smathers in 1968. he added, no one can look
into the seeds of the future to see what will grow.
WALK 'VEHICLE READY . The Gemini 8 spacecraft that *lll.
be used m a rendezvous and space walk mission was flown to the
launch site Saturday to be prepared for a launch expected in March.
The capsule was Govt, to the Gape from the McDonnell Aircraft Corp.
plant in St. Louis Mo. Geminis Titan 2 booster rocket was Gown
here earlier ih the week. During the voyage, astronaut Scott will walk
ir. space lor at least one complete swing around the globe using a
not gun to maneuver about the end of a 25-foot lifeline.

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Monday, January 10, 1966, The FloTida Alligator,

Page 3



~ The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 10, 1966

Page 4

As 89th Congress Convenes
Peace Mission Widespread

WASHINGTON (UPI) Pres President
ident President Johnson's Viet Nam peace
drive has started a worldwide chain
reaction of diplomatic contacts,
officials reported Saturday.
In the past two weeks top U. S.
envoys have visited more than a
score of capitals in Europe, Afri Africa,
ca, Africa, the Middle East and Far East
to explMn the U. S. position. As a
result, many of these countries
now Lave begun their own peace
.soundings, either directly with
Communist Viet Nam officials or
with intermediaries.
Assistant Secretary of §tate for
African Affairs G. Mennen Wil Williams,
liams, Williams, back from a trip to 14
African countries, told newsmen
after reporting to President John Johnson

OAS Ends Rebellion

SANTO DOMINGO (UPI) Re Rebellious
bellious Rebellious military leaders bowed
Saturday to strong pressure from
the United States and the Organi Organization
zation Organization of American States (OAS)
and returned the government radio
station they had seized Thursday.
The action averted the bloodshed
feared by many.
A group of troops from the 8,000
man Inter-American peace force
supervised the removal of the Do Dominican
minican Dominican troops. There was no in incident
cident incident though there had been fears
a mutiny against President Hector
Garcia-Godoy might turn into a
full-scale rebellion.
The military, angered because
Garcia-Godoy announced he would
send 34 military leaders into exile,
took over the radio and began
broadcasting statements denounc denouncing
ing denouncing his move. They said his deci decision

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son Johnson that half of them promised to
ask the Communists about pros prospects
pects prospects for peace.
The reaction I got was a
modestly optimistic one, Wil Williams
liams Williams said. I was tremendously
pleased that a number of them in indicated
dicated indicated they were going to go ahead
to make contact with one or more
of the parties on the other side in
order to bring about talks.
As one U. S. diplomat put it:
Many people are talking to many
people.
But where it would lead was
still highly uncertain. As far as
could be determined, none of the
behind-the-scenes contacts has yet
produced what the President could

sion decision would mean turning the
country over to the Communists.
Following a daylong series of
conferences involving American
and OAS officials, themilitary be began
gan began moving their troops away from
the radio station at 2 p.m. EST.
TTie day of intense diplomatic
activity involved Msgr. Emanuel
Clarizio, the papal nuncio, who
transmitted an urgent appeal from
Pope Paul VI to the Dominicans
to make all efforts possible to
save the peace and the country.
The three-man committee rep representing
resenting representing the OAS and the peace
force Friday issued a stern warn warning
ing warning to the mutinous army and air
force leaders, telling them further
efforts would be considered defi defiance
ance defiance 'Of OAS efforts to restore
peace.

consider a real step toward peace.
Publicly, Communist radios of
North Viet Nam and Red China
were blasting the U. S. initiative
as*a trick and a fake. They
accused Washington of talking
peace while planning a larger war.
Among the hardest of these Com Communist
munist Communist voices was the clandestine
Viet Cong radio heard in South
Viet Nam. It said that as long as
there are U. S. aggressors in South.
Viet Nam, there will be war. There
cannot be peace. If the U. S. im imperialists
perialists imperialists do not stop their ag aggressive
gressive aggressive war, do not abolish their
military bases in South Viet Nam,
and do not discontinue forever the
bombings of North Viet Nam, there
can never be peace negotiations.
The demand that the bombing of
North Viet Nam stop forever
was a theme of all the Communist
radios. Their point seemed to be
that a pause in the bombing was
not enough.
But until it sees some recipro reciprocal
cal reciprocal peace move, the United States
is in no position to talk about
forever. The bombing pause
passed its 16th day. There was
speculation but no confirmation confirmationthat
that confirmationthat it might extend through the
Vietnamese lunar new year cele celebrations
brations celebrations Jan. 20-23. The Viet Cong
radio has declared that Communist
forces will cease attacks in South
Viet Nam during those four days.

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Student Unrest Mounts
.... tJy UNITED TRESS INTERNa uuhal, -rr -rr§:
§: -rr§: Student unrest mounted Saturday as a teachers strike at St. S
£ jotms University headed toward its second week of disrupted S
:%> classes. ' x ;
a student council scheduled a campus rally during classes £
! Monday to dramatize its call for the immediate reinstatement of ;X
j* 31 professors fired before Christmas.
£ The dismissal of the teachers led to the calling of the strike |:j:
£ last Tuesday by the United Federation of College Teachers (UFCT). £
:£ For monthsj the union had been seeking a more liberalized ad- £
£ ministration and greater role for teachers in policy making at the $
£ university, one of the largest Roman Catholic schools in the world, X;
:':l: with a student enrollment of 13,125. Y '....
The students charged that substitutes for the fired and striking S
5: teachers are not qualified to teach or grade them properly. Their 3
£ concern was further increased because of fast approaching mid midv
v midv year examinations.
£ Throughout the strike, the union said the university adminis- ij:
£ tration has disputed the others claim as to the success of the ;£
: : : : walkout. x
£ The union claimed that 183 of the 651-member St. Johns v
£ faculty honored picket lines around the two campuses Friday, 3
£ The administration, however, claimed conditions at the Brooklyn $
£ and Jamaica campuses were about 75 per cent normal.
£ Saturday, the UFCT reiterated its conditions for ending the
strike, calling for hearings for the 31 fired professors before £
: : : : a mutually acceptable hearing body.

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Legislators Gird For Donnybrook

By FRANK ELEAZER
(UPI) With the second session
of the 89th Congress set to start
today, returning lawmakers were
girding Saturday for a ddnnybrook
over what balance to strike between
welfare and war spending.
Our main problems this year
will be budgetary, Democratic
leader Carl Albert of Oklahoma
told UPI, There wont be so much
legislation this year. Its not need needed.
ed. needed. The question will be how much
money to put into implementation
of the various programs we have
already enacted.

Republicans and some Demo Democrats
crats Democrats are sharp cut cutbacks
backs cutbacks or elimination of Great
Society health, education, and
anti-poverty programs launched in
the 89ths historic first session
which ended Oct. 23.
The GOP leadership line was
that many of these high priority
administration programs had been
ill-considered in the first place,
and that since their enactment, the
rising costs of the Viet Nam war
dictate stern new economies on the
home front.
Thats an excuse, not a rea reason,
son, reason, commented Albert. I think
we will be able to fund most if not
all of the programs wthpassedlast
year.
Opening of the session at noon
Monday will be marked by for formalities.
malities. formalities. The roU will be called.
A House-Senate committee will be
named to advise President John Johnson
son Johnson that the members are back in
town and ready for business.
Two new House members and
one Senator will be sworn into of office,
fice, office, filling vacancies caused by
death or resignation.

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In the House, 293 Democrats,
140 Republicans and 2 vacancies. J
In the Senate, 62 Democrats, > i
38 Republicans, no vacancies.
Traditionally, no real business <
is done before the President has
delivered his State of the Union 1
address. Johnson will deliver it at
9 p.m. EST Wednesday to a joint
session and a national television televisionradio
radio televisionradio audience.

U.S. Launches Viet Offensive

By RAY F. HERNDON
(UPI) American forces have
launched their largest offensive
operation of the Viet Nam war to
sweep clean the Communists Ho
Bo Forest stronghold 25 miles
north-northwest of Saigon, it was
disclosed Sunday/
More than 7,000 A.nerican
troops, aided by Aus* ,v*ans and
New Zealanders, converged on the
Viet Cong stronghold Saturday
morning in the wake of a strike by
giant 852 bombers and an artillery
barrage unprecedented in the his history
tory history of the Viet Nam war.
American military authorities at
a forward command post, 24 miles
northwest of Saigon, said at least
five U. S. Army helicopters were
riddled with machine gun fire as
elements of the Ist Infantry Divi Division
sion Division and the 173rd Airborne Bri Brigade

Strike Settlement Prospects Grim wmDyalmmi

Weary negotiators made a final
effort Sunday to end the citys

Bui uhe great debate over Viet
Nam which is expected to dominate
the session, is already underway.
Senate Republican Leader Ever Everett
ett Everett M. Dirksen of Illinois backed
away from published reports that
he had broken away from the Pres President
ident President on Viet Nam by demanding a
military victory as the precedent
to the negotiated peace sought by
Johnson.

gade Brigade were lifted into landing zones
both north and south of the forest.
Three of the damanged helicop helicopters
ters helicopters flew out under their own
power, however, according toMaj.
Gen. Jonathan N. Seaman, com commander
mander commander of the Ist division who has
overall control of the operation.
The remaining two choppers and
their crews were lifted out of the
operation area by huge H 37 heli helicopters.
copters. helicopters.
Most of the battalions thrown
into the offensive sweep 600 to
800 men in each battalion had
clashes with the Viet Cong.
The Australians briefly were
pinned down by more than 100
Communist troops who raked their
landing zone with fire from three
sides.
With artillery and air support,
however, the Australians managed

crippling transit strike before the
start cf another work week imposes
more chaos and hardship on New
Yorks harried millions. But pros prospects
pects prospects for a weekend settlement
remained dim.
Both the Transit Authority (TA)
and the Transport Workers Union
(TWU) agreed that settlement would
have to bt eached by 7 p.m. EST
Sunday in order to get the citys
thousands of subways and buses
back into full operation in time for
Monday mornings rush hour.
That, however, ,was about all
they agreed on.

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I have supported the President
completely, right up to this hour,
Dirksen told United Press Inter International.
national. International.
Senate Democratic Leader Mike
Mansfield of Montana meantime
cautioned against any revival ,of
the unconditional surrender
concept that he said helped prolong
World War n. Mansfield earlier
had delivered a gloomy report on

to overcome Viet Cong resistance
to their airborne landing. The man mangled
gled mangled bodies of at least six Viet
Cong were found when the Aussies
finally drove the Communists from
their defensive trenches and fox foxholes.
holes. foxholes.
U. S. and Australian casualties
were light througl\put the first day
of the operation, according to the
military command.
Well-informed military sources
said the operation was kept secre.'
from Americas South Vietnamese
allies for fear the offensive drive
would be comprised by an intelli intelligence
gence intelligence leak.
The operation began Saturday but
announcement of *t by U. S. mili military
tary military authorities was withheld until
Sunday morning for that reason.
The headquarters of the South
Vietnamese Armys 3rd Corps is

Confusing reports throughout the
weekend that a settlement was
imminent injected a false note
of optimism into the dispute.
The sudden euphoria began Sat Saturday
urday Saturday with a remark by Nathan
Feinsinger, head of a special
three-man mediation panel, that
there was a pretty good chance
of reaching a solution over the
weekend.
Thus as the hours ticked away
on the second weekend of the most
devastating transportation strike
in the citys history, mediators and
negotiators went about their busi business
ness business in an atmosphere of confusion.

Monday, January 10, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

the prospects either for victory or
for a negotiated peace in Viet Nam
in the near future,
Scores of House and Senate
members have personally taken a
look at the Viet Nam fighting since
t during the congressional recess.
Many returned with**hawjs-like
recommendations. A few came
back with dove sentiments.

known to be riddled with Viet Ceng
agents and for that reason word
of the operation was confined to
the allies involved. \
m§Bradywm
(From Page I)
ficial to us and all those she has
advised and counseled."
"Miss Brady has certainly built
Womens Student Association since
she was the first Dean of Women,
Kay Lundquist, WSA, president,
said. "Her work with us has cer certainly
tainly certainly improved the scope and in interest
terest interest of coed unity on the campus.
"We regret very much to learn
of her resignation and hope she will
continue her association with us."

(From Page 1)
fraternity) and Pi Mu Epsilon
(math honorary fraternity).
On the UF campus, Dyal
has been in the Campbell-
Thornal Moot Court
competition and a member of
Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity.
He also works as a law clerk
for local attorney James
Wershow and is commanding
officer of the local Army
Reserve financing unit.
Dyal lived in South America
for 13 years during his hischildhood.
childhood. hischildhood.

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 10, 1966

Page 6

tlie shufflers
great deal of reshuffling has occurred in Tigert
Hall during the past few months.
The resignation of Vice President Harry Philpott
early last trimester appeared to be the signal for
an administrative switch-about vaguely resembling
the childhood game of musical chairs. It has often
been difficult to be positive from day to day whose
name would appear on what door. Noted among the
changes were the appointments of Robert B. Mautz
to fill the position of Vice President and William
Cross, Advisor to Fraternities, as Acting Assistant
Dean of Men.
But any hope that the new year would bring to an
end the rearranging was destroyed before 1966 was
more than a few days old. It now appears that the
feminine members of the Administration have taken
up the game with Dean Marna Brady as the most
recent participant years as J)ean of Women,
the announcement of Dean Bradys resignation,
* acknowledged in todays Alligator, was met with
great surprise, disbelief, and a good deal of con consternation
sternation consternation among the young women on campus. Her
scheduled departure in June follows close on the
heels the resignation of Assistant Dean of Women
Marjorie Jackson at the close of'the fall trimester.
Dean Brady announced she is resigning to teach
here. Yet, it seems rather strange that a successful
administrator not contemplating retirement would
' launch a full-time teaching career after 17 years in
administrative position. The subject of Dean Bradys
resignation is one on which few Tigert officials are
willing to comment least for publication. Ru Rumor
mor Rumor and speculation lead one to ask if there is not
a real reason behind her action.
Whatever the reason, The Alligator wishes to
express its regrets that the campus administration
must lose a person who has contributed so much to
its successful functioning. As Dean of Women since
girls were first admitted to the campus in 1947,
Dean Bradv has gained the respect and admiration
of not oJdy female students, but many others who
have worked with her over the years.
It has not been disclosed who will replace Dean
Brady or if it will be a member of the present
Florida staff. Whoever the replacement, it will be
a difficult task to equal the energy and interest
which the present Dean has given her position.
Smathers
9*o weeks ago, George A. Smathers, Floridas
junior U. S. Senator, announced that he will not
seek reelection in 1968. Smathers, who has served
in both the House and the Senate, said that the poor
condition of his health forced him to step down.
Senator Smathers personal history is closely tied
with the UF. It was on this campus that George
Smathers got his first taste of victory. He was elected
President of the student body in 1937, after running
unopposed for that position. After he was graduated
from the University of Florida, Smathers practiced
law in Miami. In 1947 he ran successfully for the
House of Representatives. In 1950 he moved into the
upper chamber and became one of the youngest men
ever to be elected to 'he Senate from the state of
Florida.
George Smathers winning personality and hand handsome
some handsome appearance earned him such nicknames as
Gorgeous George and Smooch Smathers. How However,
ever, However, his outstanding integrity and forceful leader leadership
ship leadership earned him state-wide praise and nationwide
popularity.
The state of Florida and the nation will long re remember
member remember George Smathers as one of the ablest men
to serve in the United States Senate.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Editor Benny Cason
Managing editor Ron Spencer
Executive editor ... . Drex Dobson
Assistant managing editor Fran Snider
Sports editor Andy Moor
_Chief editorial writer Cathy Pierce
, Editor-in-exile Ed B^Tl> r
Associate editors Bruce i^udiey,
Yvette Cardozo, Kay Huff mas ter,
Gary Corseri, Jane s^omon
Copy editors Bill Mra inez
Carol Carey, Sharon Robinson
Wire editors 9 N^ i JI
* Lonnie Broym, Steve Hull
Staff Writers Br^ < Sa J t f 11,
Bob Menaker, Dick Dennis, Kathie Keim,
Susan Froemke, Judy Miller
Cartoonists Ralph Knudsen, Don Wright
i I I I I '.-.a 1 1 1

r rtie
Florida Alligator


"Mac The Knife"
*
Florida Politics
V .. i,
by Mike Garcia*
TMho will be the next Governor of Florida? This is probably the most
frequently asked question in the state of Florida today.
As the lineup now stands, only three men have formally announced
their candidacy. They are: Haydon Burns, the present Governor;
Scott Kelly, former state senator from Lakeland; and Robert King
High, recently re-elected Mayor of Miami. \
As the deadline for qualifying is February 15, it is doubtful that
another candidate will announce for the Democratic primary.
The Republicans, however, are increasing in strength around the
state and are expected to run a strong candidate for governor in the
November general election. The name of Congressman Edward Gurney
(R-Fla.) is in the forefront for the Republican blessing. Gurney, now
serving his fourth term in the House of Representatives, is a young,
dynamic Republican of the John Lindsay image.
The Republican candidate, Ufilike the three Democratic candidates,
%ill probably have no opposition for the nomination on the ticket.
Because of this factor, the Republican will not have to tire his organi organization
zation organization or his resources in a fight for a spot on the ticket. He will be
ready to give an all-out effort in November against Democratic
candidate, who polled the majority of votes in the May primaries.
NEVER BEFORE
r- -
Florida has never had a Republican governor and many people
would hotly dispute any argument that there is a possibility of electing
one. However, one must take into consideration that the Republican
party has never run a candidate with the appeal possessed by Rep.
Gurney. Also, the Florida Republican party has never had the organi organization
zation organization nor the resources that it now has.
A close examination of the voter registration rolls will indicate
an upsurge in the number of registered Republican voters. This fact
is mainly due to the increased number of retirees now making Florida
their home, who were registered Republicans; and when they moved
to Florida they subsequently registered according to their previous
affiliation.
POLITICAL EFFECT
The political effect of this increased number of voting Republicans
is evidenced by the election of two xvepublican congressmen: Ed
Gurney and William Cramer of Pinellas County.
Another significant fact is that these two areas are two of the
biggest population centers in Florida. It is clear the Republican
candidate in November will pose a definite threat to the continued
domination of state government by the Democratic party.
The situation with the three Democratic candidates is probably
the most interesting, however. Haydon Burns, elected in 1964 for a
two-year term, will again be a candidate for the governorship. Burns
defeated Robert King High in the 1964 runoff by a substantial margin.
Scott Kelly, who ran 2200 votes short of Highs total, will again try for
the governorship this year.

RON dp 1 1
I
Any man whose middle name is Strange is bound I
to claim the spotlight and become a contro- I
versial figure. For that reason alone, it is no wonde'r
that the present Secretary of Defense, R obert
Strange McNamara, the so-called Assistant P reS i. I
dent, has become the focal point of much controversy |
since being named defense chief by the late President I
John F. Kennedy. I
Despite what one may feel toward the 49-year old I
defense chief, it is nonetheless certain that I
McNamara has severely altered the position to I
which he ascended in 1961.
The mans integrity is virtually beyond reproach, 1
as best exemplified by his speech to the Senate I
Armed Services Committee in January, 1961, when I
up for approval to the post. McNamara told the
Senators he would place in trust the $1.5 million I
he had received for his Ford Motor Company I
stock, and then threw open his personal finances I
to scrutiny by any who wished to view them. The II
one-time President of Ford Motors then jumped 1
into the full-time task of renovating the Defense 1
Department, a place where civilians and military I
men meet and often clash headon. I
Since that time, McNamara has, first, altered I
the emphasis in military matters by focusing on a 1
buildup in conventional forces. He has repeatedly I
gone against the public will in calling for closing I
various military bases which, he felt, no longer I
merited their existence. With a seeming devil-may- 1
care attitude, the Pentagon chief first examined the I
existing system, tnen decided candidly to severely 1
limit the construction of new military bases, in I
some cases curtail construction already underway I
on existing bases, to cancel development of the |
medium range ballistic missile, to scrap much of I
the long-range bomber program in favor of the I
still-untested long-range missile and to retard the I
growth of Americas overkill potential our I
potential to decimate the Communists not only once, I
but perhaps several times. I
BARRYS REBUKE I
For this, McNamara received the rebuke of the 1
Republicans particularly that of Sen. Barry M, 1
Goldwater of Arizona, the GOP presidential candidate 1
in 1964 who made an anti-McNamara stand a prime
plank in his hapless atterppt to wfifest the presidency presidencyfrom
from presidencyfrom Lyndon Johnson.
Given the reins of executive leadership under
Kennedy, McNamara exercised* them to the fullest,
making him easily the most well-known Secretary
of Defense since the office came into existence.
Many contend that the versatile McNamara has far
outstripped the power of Secretary of State Dean
Rusk, who hac assumed the role of placid figurehead
in LBJs strange assortment of political helpers.
Whatever one thinks of McNamara personally,
however, most everyone must agree that the man Is
efficient almost mechanically so. He has been
likened to an automatic computer, virtually infallible
and in possession of a near-photographic memory.
In an age of growing depersonalization, McNamara
seems to be the perfect example of Computerized
Man.
COURAGEOUS JOUSTS
Yet, his jousts with big business interests have
been courageous and commendable. Few secretaries
would have had the nerve to make the politically politicallyunsavory
unsavory politicallyunsavory suggestions of trimming and cutting which
Mac The Knife has proposed. In a world
mired in a Cold War escalation of weaponology
and technology, Mac has been the man to call a
halt, to draw a line, to say Whoa, it is senseless
to continue. In this respect, he seems much like
the character Charles Manchester, tfib Secretary
of Defense and presidential candidate in Charles
D. Bailey and Fletcher Knebels best seller Con Convention.
vention. Convention.
Yet, McNamara has perhaps extended himself too
far as Assistant President. There is growing evidence
that he may perhaps have made several mis miscalculations
calculations miscalculations in his estimate of the Vietnamese
situation. Viet Nam could well go down as
McNamaras Folly, as a result, if the Presiden
himself is not saddled with the blame.
The computer mind has continued to run, but even
computers have their limits and all menarefallih e,
even McNamara.
MAC THE KNIFE
Due perhaps In part to the stinging campaign
oratory by Goldwater directed against McNamar
many Americans have the idea that all which g
wrong in Washington, especially all relating to or
affairs, can be safely linked to that no-gooder a
Knife.
This of course is far from me truth, ana
general the U. S. can be thankful that asJarsighte
a man as the Secretary currently mans his position.
If kept in his proper perspective, perhaps McNamara
- would be of even greater benefit to the na *



LETTERS:

refutes proliferation argument

Dear Mr-Editor:
In relation to your editorial
article Proliferation of
Wednesday the Bth of December,
I find myself compelled to com comment
ment comment on a few points mentioned in
your editorial.
First, let me quote you when
you said .since Nationalism
and Patriotism is more important
than world protection aqd world
order. This was your explanation
of why the have nots desire
to obtain the A bomb. Now tell
me please, world protection from
what? and what world order you
are talking about? Is that why
the UJS.A. obtained the A bomb,
to protect the Arabs, let us say,
against Communism, while
supporting the gangs of European
and American Zionists in terror terrorizing
izing terrorizing a million Arabs out of their
historic home land? You have
protected the Japanese people well,
you have placed a quarter of a
million civilians in a permanent
secure place, under the dust. I fear
not my enemy, but my friend.
Second, another clever statement
of yours and I quote The haves,
of course do not desire to see
the present have hots join the

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'

expanding Nuclear Club. .unless
coercion by the present club mem members
bers members is ysed against the have
nots the proliferation will con continue.
tinue. continue. The outlook is bleak. Where
in international law does it say
that these states which were first
in obtaining an x kind of weapon
have the right of absolute monopoly
or can deny that same kind of
weapon to others? Nowhere, Mr.
Editor, at least you should have
remembered that wnen tnat Italian
scientist gave you the first A
bomb. You can not be the judge
and the policeman at the same
time, and as a matter of fact
many people around this world do
not desire to see you in either
position, not to mention both at
the same time.
It is only natural to arm oneself
with the same if not better weapons
than the enemys* a basic Ameri American
can American doctrine and surely, you
all mighty white father, you are
not going to deny us that right
while permitting it to yourself.
Nobody can defend me better than
myself, so why dont you save some
money for the American taxpayer
and let us worry about defending
ourselves?
The whole thing is a question of

monopoly over international pres prestige
tige prestige and furthering ones national
interests, in other words na nationalism,
tionalism, nationalism, Mr. Editor, and it is just
sickening when you label others as
motivated by Nationalism while you
play the role of the saint who is
all for peace, on the surface of
this earth, yet exploding A bombs
under' the surface of the earth.
Double standards arp nice to

The Alligator accepts all letters to the \
editor. Due to space limitations, however, ;i
ji we are unable to print letters exceeding:
i; 250 words. Names will be withheld upon |
ji request of the writer.

have, aren't they, Mr. Editor? I
am sure the Russians would agree
point by point with you for they
are no less responsible than you
are. So do not blame us Kids
for terrorizing the peace of the
world with our noises while the
Adults are slugging it out.
Third, a biased statement of
yours and I quote Israel could
use the bomb to safeguard herself

Monday, January 10, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

from the omni-present threat or
attack by the Arab states. I think
I have to refresh your memory
as to who invaded who in 1956,
or werent you born yet at that
time? I have to remind you that
75% of the population of Israel
migrated to Palestine after 1936*
that 75% came from all over the
world; the Americans ex exterminated
terminated exterminated the Indians, but there

were too many Arabs to exter exterminate,
minate, exterminate, they just pushed them out
of their homeland. So why not
obtain the bomb? Israel could ex exterminate
terminate exterminate more Arabs and make
room nor more immigrants, nice
and easy.
Where were you, Mr. Policeman
and Judge, when all this took place?
You must have been trained by the
police force of Denver for you

were aiding the robbers. Is that
how you are planning to protect
.me? : --
As for mer President Truman put
it I have Jewish voters but I have
no Arabs.
Finally, a last fine statement of
yours whoever aided in the con construction
struction construction of the present balance of
terror must smile at the thought
of the 10 new variables which
may be thrown etc. .". Looking
at those 10 potential club members
I see that only one is a Com Communist
munist Communist state and the rest gfot their
reactors wholly and 4 partially from
the U. S. Eight of these are tied
to the U. S. in one way or the
other and only one is called neutral.
You must have plenty of reason
to smile, Mr. Editor.
You created that Balance of
Terror; you exploded the first
bomb.
In case of anatomic catastrophe,
we are going to go all together
and playing the role of a saint
wont save you or keep you alive.
My chances are better Jesus
and St. Peter were from my
country.
GHASSAN SAMI NACHAWJ

Page 7



, The Florida Alligator. Monday, January 10. 1966

Page 8

Art Gallery Shows Artifacts

" The UF Gallery of Art opened the new year with
a selection of Indian artifacts from the world famous
Pearsall Collection. -
The exhibition, scheduled in cooperation with the
Florida State Museum, began Jan. 2 when Dr. William
Sears, chairman of the Department of Anthropology
at Florida Atlantic University and research associate
of the Museum, gave a talk on American Indian art.
Sears, an internationally-known authority on Indian
cultures of North America, was instrumental in
gaining the Pearsall Collection for the Museum.
The UF Foundation recently transferred the valuable
gift collection to the University for use of the
Museum following its purchase by an anonymous
donor for $150,000.
the Pearsall Collection is recognized
primarily as anthropological items, this exhibit
presents a selection of works chosen more for their

Staff Gets 'Warm-up l
For Fall Orientation

By FRAN SNIDER
** Alligator Staff Writer
Entering freshman and transfer
students taught the 1966 orientation
staff some lessons during the past
week.
The 170 students who went
through orientation prepared the
new staff for handling the larger
session in the fall trimester. The
smaller session, involving almost
as many staff workers as on onentees,
entees, onentees, went through most of the
same activities as the fall session.
This trimesters orientation
started Last Wednesday with eight
groups meeting for a discussion of
University College policies by Dr.
John Dunkle, assistant dean of the
school.
The groups also discussed upper
division colleges with representa representatives
tives representatives from 12 of the upper division
schools.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz,
talked about the history of the UC
College and discussed the value of
a liberal education a: the Presi President's
dent's President's Welcome Wednesday nigh:.
George Blaha. president of the
University Religious .Association
and assistant director of orienta orientation
tion orientation talker about religious centers
on campus and introduce:: repre representatives
sentatives representatives from the religious or organizations.
ganizations. organizations. After the meeting, the
URA held a reception in the John Johnson
son Johnson Lounge of the Flor.da Union.
Second trimester crier.tees are
treated differently from first tri trimester
mester trimester students registering'for
their classes. Fall freshman have
their schedules arranged on the
EB V machine after they decide what
classes they should take.
On Thursday morning the
groups went through registration
and pulled their own cards. They
also checked on their health re reports
ports reports at the infirmary.
Dean of Men. Frank T. Adams,
and Dean of Women. Mama Brady,
held forums for the new students
Thursday night to discuss the UF
rules and responsibilities.
Jake Dyal. new chancellor of the
Honor Court, explained the func functions
tions functions of the honor court and issued
the oath of honor to the students.
Student Government was ex explained
plained explained by Student Body Vice Pres President
ident President Dick Thompson. Thompson
urged the orientees to take an in interest
terest interest in UF affairs and to become
active in SG. t
, Friday orientation concluded
with a series of academic and psy psychological
chological psychological tests. Then the orienta orientation
tion orientation staff began a series of meet-
ALLIGATOR ADS
' ALWAYS ATTRACT
I
YOU'RE READING
ONE RIGHT NOW

mgs discussing the orientation
program.
Tom Backroeyer. student head of
orientation, met with his staff Sat Saturday
urday Saturday morning to compare notes
on the previous few days.
Backmeyer said the program
went fairly well for a new groip.
We gained the experience ne necessary
cessary necessary to enable the staff to handle
the larger fall orientation with over
4,000 freshman and transfer stu students
dents students to the UF College. Back Backmeyer
meyer Backmeyer explained.
The other members of the ori orientation
entation orientation staff were assistant dir directors
ectors directors George Blaha and John
Hume; office manager. John Dod Dodson;
son; Dodson; Director of Group Control.
Mike Monoghan; Director of Traf Traffic
fic Traffic Control. Sam Block and Tech Technical
nical Technical Co-ordinator. Skip Berg.
Dean William Cross, director of
orientation, commented, Orien Orientation
tation Orientation went off really well. The stu student
dent student and staff help were efficient
and no problems came up. It was
par for the course.. .just about as
good as blueberry pie.

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inherent aesthetic beauty, as works of art, rather
than objects and tools of man.
Among more than 100 pieces on display are a
group of totem poles by the Northwest Coast Indians.
The largest of the poles over 16 feet dra dramatically
matically dramatically contrasts in scale with the small Kachina
wooden dolls of the Hopi Indians and the three-inch
long Bird Stones of the Eastern Woodlands
Indians.
The stones resemble modern sculpture but are
actually handles for throwing sticks or Atlatls and
will be the oldest items on display, dating from fromabout
about fromabout 1500 B.C.
The Pearsall exhibition will continueat the Gallery
through Feb. 6. Hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Tuesday through Saturday and from 1 to 5 p.m.
on Sundays.

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Army Reserves To Meet

UF classes cranked back up
today, and meetings of the 3396th
Reception Station are cranking up
right behind, beginning this evening
at 7at the local U.S. Army Reserve
Training Center.
The unique unit, one of only a
handful in the entire Army network,
correlates its meeting with the
University calendar and has itself
been observing the exam and
holiday break since early in
December.
With a new year underway and
visions of military service still
daacing in many a young mans
head, the 3396th is ready to dis discuss
cuss discuss the Army Reserves 4-6
month active duty program with
UFers who wish to interrupt their

schooling or career; aS little H
possible.
Capt. Bill Fleming and his iH
cruiting team will be or hand wH
the answers tomgr.- ./ -I
and also next Saturday W h en
unit meets from 8 a.tr until s p ]B
at the training center Im'ifl
Eighth Ave.
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' . 1
j
(jUou{cA|a£ AeJ&cttbuA ua. omcL ukulla. au£\£kau{i&t...
A A
- A and SPORT COATS
S' t a il re d by
COLLEGE HALL . TIMELY
W^| : CLOTHES . BARDSTOWN
I J Select from fabrics f
Os All Wool and
Dacron Polyester
~S \ and Wool
(/\ \\ Wl li Re 9 $29.95 (Blazers) NOW $33
Vs\ )/ 39.95 $33
/Jk \ULfI 45.00 $36
/%y j\ 55.00 $44
A V Iwfi 65.00 $53
/I X*' 75.00 S6O
W 1 -- 85.00 $63
PANTS HINTS
WASHN WEAR. Be PERMANENT PLAIN FRONT
PRESSED. 65% DACRON 35% WOOL and WOOL BLEND
COTTON. FINE TROUSERS. CHOICE OF SHADES
TAILORED. POPULAR SHADES.
Reg $12.95 2 for $21.00
Reg $ 9.95 2 for $15.00 $7" F& 14.95 2 for $21.00 y
799 2 for $12.00 fjsfpf' 17.95 2 for $30.00 slspr.
SHIRTS
SPORT SHIRTS SWEATERS
COAT & PULLOVER
LONG AND SHORT SLEEVE ALPACA SHETLAND
LAMBSWOOL
Reg $ 7.95 $8.95 to $27.95
6.95 S 5"
5 95 20% Off
5.00 s3*
1/2 price SPECIALS
JACKETS (LINED)
SWEATERS
PARKAS
SPORT SHIRTS
919 lislil Smith's
PH. 372 1660 {J MEN'S SHOP

"
' '*' v >- iflf,

Sigs Paint Gator Offices
Offices of the UFs daily miracle* took on a new look during last
weeks registration period when Sigma Chi pledge brothers painted
the Alligator offices in the Florida Union basement. Richard Nichols
(left), Franklin Harrison and Charles White were part of the Sigma
Chi painting crew.
Army Steps Up
Officer Program

The U. S. Army is interested
in young men about to graduate
from the UF.
It wants to pin second
lieutenants bars on those quali qualified
fied qualified to \)vear them and ROTC
training is no prerequisite.
A dispatch from the IV UJS.
Army Corps in Birmingham shows
that the Army is stepping up its
conventional Officer Candidate
School Program, not only because
of the worsened situation in South Southeast
east Southeast Asia, but also because of
increasing retirements on the part
of career officers now marking
their 20th year since the end of
World War H.
Applicants must be U.S. citizens
under 27, and either graduates of
or senior students in colleges or
universities recognized by the
Department of Health, Education &
Welfares The UF is such a uni university.

- -- T -t*
§ ~
rent a car fram ECONO-CAR
we got so big
__ 'cause we charge so little
~ ; r r ---
Among the Big 4 in car rental, ECONO-CAR is First
jn Savings! Rent a Valiant or other Chrysler-built car
from as little as 3.99. .. including gas and oil, insur- a
ance, seat belts. Call for inquiry, pick-up or deliveryVl
ECONO CAN]
099 ft
per business day
plus pennies a mile
Ph. 376-3644 637 NW 13th St.

Monday, January 10, 1966, The Florida Alligator.

versity. university.
ROTC training is not mandatory,
and applicants may be married.
Enrollment in the program may
precede graduation by as much as
135 days.
Under the OCS Option program
for college graduates, the applicant
enlists in the Army for two years,
then undergoes eight weeks of basic
combat training and eight weeks
of advanced individual training
prior to assignment in OCS.
The various OCS career courses
have now expanded to include artil artillery,
lery, artillery, infantry, signal, engineers,
military police, Intelligence,
chemical, finance, armor, quarter quartermaster,
master, quartermaster, transportation, ordinance
and medical service corps.
Detailed information is available
at Gainesvilles U. S. Army
Reserve Training Center.

Page 9



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 10, 1966

k
||
f| 'fe|
TAIL END
Seats seemed to be at a premium in Florida Gym last week during
registration.
,_
found
.. .A GREAT WAY OF ADVERTISING
'GATOR Aui
- ~ "" **

Or By Appointment *^£gj^'jjh^pHHHjg3N^^KjflK^^yfeSjjKr^g|
Swimming Pools
Wall-to-Wall Carpeting J BEK ||B
Heat and 9Hr 55y| gBl n
Air Conditioning i^^Hl^H^l^H|HP^£flyin Mh SBuV SB'^^^HiX
Formica Cabinets *flf gfflf
Walk-In Closets Swra KH|j
Laundry Facilities V" li-z2 PK "* )BWw |{P
Free Parking J | j£fc| f|| B|BpWs^jjJ*g
Adjacent to Apartment *% J*\ jPjyy fl|
Central TV Antenna
Landscaping -M v *N# cJBBB^!
Sound Conditioning to ~ Ml t ~*'
Insure Privacy and Quiet J/ *
* w ;
e ;

Need A Crease In Your Pants?
Dont Come To Florida Press

People all over the world buy
books from us, but people in
Gainesville dont seem to know
about us. Mrs. Norlyn F. Bardo
said with a puzzled look.
Weve even had people come in
here wanting their clothes
pressed. she said with a chuckle.
Mrs. Bardo is one of 15 people
who help publish from 35 to 40
books a year at the UFs official
publishing house, the Florida
Press.
The press, with headquarters in
its homely red brick building at
15 NW 15th St., operates like other
publishing houses but publishes
only text books, historical and
reference books and other
scholarly works.
The publishing organization ac accepts
cepts accepts manuscripts from many
authors and is charged with com completing
pleting completing preparation of the book,
except for printing.
Although it is controlled by the
State of Florida. Florida Press
operates as a commercial organi organization
zation organization and sells over 2.000 books
a month.
Mrs. Bardo said the Florida
Press currently has 385 books in
print and plans to market 13 more
this year.
The organization also distri distributes
butes distributes many books for other pub publishing
lishing publishing houses.
Many oi me books published by
the organization have been written
by l*F professors, according to
Mrs. Bardo.
One of the most popular books
published by Florida Press was
written by Rembert W. Patrick,
professor of research at P. K.
Yonge Library, Mrs. Bardo noted.
The book. Florida Under Five
Flags. was first printed in 1945
and is now in its third edition.
Another book which the Florida^

Press published is the Atlas of Mrs. Bardo said this book is the
Florida by UF geology professor first of its kind to be published for
John R. Dunkle. any state and is going very well.
/£ BROILED
(g) FILET MIGNON
SMALL $1.85
MEDIUM $2.85
LARGE $3.25
, *3
STUDENTS WELCOME
"Maaoti (leAtau/icuit"
cut}: Motto* Motel
Dessert Idea: DELICIOUS APPLE PIE
with CINNAMON ICE CREAM
OUR SPECIALTY: Ribs and
Charcoal Broiled Steaks
NoUk QautaioiUm, Qla.
ACROSS FROM THE NEW SEARS



V i I and bookstore
. t THE" OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA BOOKSTORE
SELF SERVICE adjoining the hub
OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY A J x
TEXTBOOKS A SUPPLIES branch stores medical center, broward, tri shop & jennings
_ ..
nnnK # *ws* mm -WBsSr~!jl Jim m J II
- i L f|Hi
' fV&Mto- ; fPIf&IS # A>:.. B || \jJ" x # J ffWS
I llllllllli e|e|S nw --Z3L m*w*
R |T_, > *' A , B> f^^^Bl^|Hlli''v ''^jv
iHHHB a. 3~~mK a v i|pt
BHBmriMMWiHlii IB^MBP^rfinHHll^^^^HWWlilHHH^Hwli^Bllliiilifon^Miin^^^B^ffP^^^^^^^rm"^ ll t-jr-^imijj^^
V Check Our Usl For Your Needs H^S'vH'Sjl
I
;,
.'' w B| Jm|K '^it' >
JEJPb 3 <
*** -^^ ^^
I textbook price policy
USED BOOKS SOLD AT 23% DISCOUNT FROM NEW BOOK PRICE
tH ' WE PA Y 50 % OF NEW BOOK PRICE FOR USED BOOKS IN GOOD CONDITION -IF AUTHORIZED
TO BE USED AGAIN-AT END OF TERM
WE OFFER TOP MARKET PRICE FOR ANY OF YOUR TEXTBOOKS THAT HAVE BEEN DISCONTINUED
GET YOUR BOOKS AND SUPPLIES ON CAMPUS AND SAVE

Monday, January Florida Alligator,

Page 11



!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January ID. 1966

Page 12

L Mi ~
X X "if ~
g
ifiyi
n B| 1 f
it 1
VvlP:
y^Bf-HHiA\njr< gi
i^^HIHHNHHBHHr
PEACEFUL 'STAND -/N?'
No. it's simply the long, gray line of students wait waiting
ing waiting their turn for registration, which permeated the
basement of Tiger Hall last week.
UF Offers Research Awards

Several research awards for
1966 are being offered by the Cen Center
ter Center for Latin American Studies at
the University of Florida.
The awards are for scholarly
research in the social sciences,
including law. and the humanities.
Two types of awards are available:
summer faculty appointments and
research grants-in-aid for any
period during the year.
Purpose of the awards, accord according
ing according to Center Director L. N.
McAlister, is to encourage indivi individual
dual individual and cooperative research and
publication in the Latin American
field and to stimulate the develop development
ment development of related doctoral programs
at the University.
Re search supported maybe done

. t ' .*" 1 '"" 1 i i y in ii ' m
J : 4 r :
Hppr v>*. *.
-
mHi
Itfl s sTovt 1 Watch f ? r th ? brand new lcm & S!lv!a album
JR lTmrcilM auMEiKsfSSu I soon to be released. ... _i_ -r
N Ed a littni D LUwt tw jack jones wns 7
IB HI
Open 9 til 9 Wed. & Sat. 9-6 *'
* -. 376-1042

in the United States or in Latin
America, which includes South and
Central America. Mexico and the
West Indies.
The faculty summer appoint appointments
ments appointments are open to members of the
Universitys faculty and will be
made at the appointees current
salaries.
The grants-in-aid are for faculty
members and doctoral candidates
performing dissertation research.
These provide actual research
expense, including travel and sub subsistence.
sistence. subsistence.
The Centers Research Commit Committee
tee Committee will evaluate proposals and
make nominations so" awards to
the director of the Center.
Application forms are available

in the Center for Latin American
Studies. Room 450. Main Library.
Proposals must be submitted on
or before Feb. 1.1?66. with awards
to be announced by Feb. 15.

PARKERS
WELCOMES ALL STUDENTS
BACK TO SCHOOL
For your school needs, portable typewriters,
and repairs, see.
PARKERS
COMPLETE OFFICE OUTFITTERS
601 W. UNIVERSITY AVENUE
PHONE 372-2555

Paraguayan Student
S'
To Attend Classes

r ive youngsters from Asuncion,
Paraguary, arrived here last week,
bright-eyed and eager to get their
first glimpse of the American city
where they will live and attend
schools for the next seven weeks.
They were met by UF educatiort
professor Peter F. Oliva who plan planned
ned planned the visit. Dr. Oliva is a con consultant
sultant consultant to the binational (United
States and Paraguay) school in
Asuncion, where all five children
are students.
The group included Graciana
deAguirre, Cecelia deFelippe,
Daniel Burt. Fernando Pfannl and
Osvaldo Jaegli. The girls will
attend J. J. Finley School, and the
boys will go to classes at P. K.
Yonge Laboratory School.
Dr. Oliva said the purpose of the
journey here from Paraguay is to
allow the five foreign students an
opportunity to know people of the
United States better and to improve
their English.
Graciana will live with Mr. and
Mrs. James A. Noland; Cecelia
with Mr. and Mrs. William G.
Ebersole; Daniel with Dr. and Mrs.
Oliva; Fernando with Mr. and Mrs.
Nicholas J. Vigilante; and Osvaldo
with another UF education profes professor.
sor. professor. Dr. Emmett L. Williams and
his wife.
These seven weeks were chosen
because summer vacation is now

under way throughout the p ar
guayan school system. The
wil return to Asuncion Feb. 27
%/
Clearance
Sale
*
1/3 off
f
Open Fri. Until 9
Open A Student Charge
PERSONALITY
SHOP
8 East University Ave.



ll : 7 '.' ii
\ 4"'' < V £ '' X / > X
;' : -< ,
.. c&_ rk '^|||iif-fti
|hm
smoky?
Two students examine and reexamine their sched- atmosphere of the Florida Gym during last weeks
ules behind a NoSmoking sign in the otherwise cloudy hectic registration period.

Clip And Save For Later Appetites
"< 1 ca
\ M LITTLE PIGS OF fvj
\afr-V AMERICA I
j GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA ,:? I
BAR~B~Q AT ITS BEST j
4 , *' fm
n -*~. I
! 1625 N.W. 13th St.--Ph.372-7141 ;
| .SANDWICHES MENU jb<, j
| BAR-B-Q-PORK 50 70 J
I BAR-B-Q-BEEF 55 75
I HAMBURGERS 40......... 50
I CHEESEBURGERS .45 55 I
j h'aM.URGEE .75 .30
1 1 Do it yourself
II # SIDE ORDERS Pork and Beef & |
| f~£> SLAW (60z.) .15(pt.)...35 SANDWICH PACKsfe^St'vj
BEANS ( 6 oz.) .25 (pt.)... 50
| / FRENCH FR |ES -25-- 45 p ?s 3 60
I k < BRUNSWICK STEW, bowl .55 (pt.) .75 fqt.) 1.40 81ACK .85
J POTATO SALAD .25(pt.) -50 (All the .ngred.ents to 7^ll,
II fix your own sandwich Jj Mil
11 / and save 10C on each.) |
i £=vY SPECIALTIES |
l| - PORK (lb.) 1.65 I
j WE SPECIALIZE IN CUSTOM BARBECUING Jfg. ( s t b j. j!'!.'!.'!.'.'. ] .2. 45 J
Ip" Smoked.ls lb. Barbecue CHICKEN (half) '. 80 \
Ij CHICKEN (whole) 1.50 I
\~Jkr > _____ WHOLE SHOULDER (lb.) 1.35
ll i4&t baK B -Cl SAUCE (3 oz.). 15(pt.).65 J
jsjX| DIAL A MEAL FOR QUICK j
|/Pr SERVICE 372-7141 j

Monday, January 10, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

Culpepper Cites
Infirmary Switch

By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Governments key ac accomplishment
complishment accomplishment of the year was the
changeover of the infirmary to the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center,
Student Body President Bruce Cul Culpepper
pepper Culpepper said at a luncheon held in
honor of the Secretary of the In Interiors
teriors Interiors office staff Sunday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon.
If SG had not taken the stand
we did, and The Alligator had not

taken the stand it did over the sum summer,
mer, summer, the medical center would not
have taken over the infirmary,"
Culpepper said during a review of
the past year's SG administration.
My philosophy was that when a
president goes into office and
appoints his cabinet, they should
try to see the things they can do on
their own for the UF.
I wanted my staff to try to do
things that were never done before.
We had our party platform
which we started on immediately.
We worked on getting student work workers
ers workers an increase in salary and in
working on the Murphree Area
fence."
Culpepper said he found many
things on the platform which the
administration was unable to do,
but the staff tried to find alterna alternatives.
tives. alternatives. >
The Progress Party platform
had asked for a monthly listing of
married housing, but the SG staff
working on the listing, found the
housing changed from day to day.
Rather than sending out a monthly
listing, they kept informatioo. that
was Current available to callers.
Several long range projects were
mentioned in the platform. Very
little was accomplished on improv improving
ing improving food service, although Culpep Culpepper
per Culpepper said there Were many long
meetings with food service.
I don't know if we accomplished
anything with tneiu, but we tried,"
Culpepper commented.
The Florida Frolics, summer
entertainment organized by Steve
Gardner and the proposed handball
court lights, were items not on the
platform which were projects of the
present administration.
The SG blood drive coagulated
before it ever got to Vietnam,"
Culpepper recalled. He said the
experience will be valuable if an another
other another blood drive is ever started
on campus.
Culpepper also commented on
the sale of spirit hats. SG origin originally
ally originally ordered 1,000 hats and then
later ordered another 3,000.
During the first week of school,
the freshman bought most of the
first order and then we were left
without any hats to sell. The se second
cond second order trinkled in very slowly
and we never had enough hats on
hand to really have a hat sale.
But despite the setbacks, we
sold more of the spirit hats than
any other objects of this type dur during
ing during other years," Culpepper said.
There are about 2,000 hats left
for sale next fall by the new SG
administration.
We could have sold thousands
more than we did sell and I think
the next administration can really
make this-a campus wide sale. The
hats have been accepted by the
alumni and the students.
I even saw many of them worn
on Bourbon Street in New Orleans
when I went there for the bowl
game," Culpepper said.
Culpepper talked about a new
respect of SG on this campus.
Previously SG was ignored except
for the campaign, now people are
noticing our work all the time,"
Culpepper concluded.

S&AT^S
y /\ds ll 3
I REACH 1 J
BFIOPIE |T
B uwiy. £>. 2832 i g

Page 13



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 10. I9*e

Page 14

gator classifieds

for sale
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER
for sale. $7.50 for box of 500
sheets. Call ext. 2832. (A-67-
tf-nc).
3 BEDROOM, 1-1/2 baths, CCB,
fenced bade yard, built-in kitchen
plus refrigerator. $300.00 and take
over payments of less than SIOO.OO
per month. 2831 NE 13th St. in
Highland Court Manor. Call FR
2-3811 after 6 p.m. or UF Ext.
2832 8 to 5. (A-67-tf-nc).
FREE KITTENS. Assorted colors.
Four males and two females. Call
2-6018 after 5:30. (A-67-3t-c).
SPUDNUT. Cinnamon rolls, turn turnover
over turnover pie and 33 delicious varieties.
Donuts for those who want the very
best. Open 'til midnight. 1017
W. Univ. (A-67-10-c).
FLEETWOOD 3 bedroom trailer
10* x 57. Call after 6 p.m.
2- (A-67-st-c).
GRADUATING to military. Must
sell. Hanging lamp-S2B. Large
3- GE fan-sll. Lamp-$l 3.
Unique barrel bar, 3 sets glasses,
accessories-S3O. Large 2-panel
mural-$lB. Framed prints-$3/ea.
Other items. Fred Lane, 378-1046.
(A-67-st-c).
REVERSE CYCLE air conditioner conditionerheater.
heater. conditionerheater. Serves entire apartment.
Superior condition. Admiral
Royal, one year old. Half original
price. Going Army, Must SelL
$195 cash. Fred Lane, 378-1046.
(A-67-st-c).
POST OFFICE scooter. Ideal
transportation for campus. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. 100 MPG $325.
Call 2-7134 after 5. (A-67-3t-c).
OWNER SELLING 91 acres,
fenced, crossed fenced, modern
ranch home, permanent pasture.
Orange Heights Road. Close to
town. 372-0050. (A-67-st-c).
1965 HONDA 250 Scrambler. Priw
$475., Call ext. 2788 or 2789 anj
time between 8 and 5. (A-67-3t-c)

University Sandwich Shop
Nine Varieties of Sqndwiches
SALADS BEVERAGES DESSERTS
Open from 4 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.
Monday through Friday and from 12 Noon to 1:30 a.m.
on Saturday and Sunday
RUN BY STUDENTS... FOR STUDENTS
FREE Delivery: 8-1486 or 8-1487
! THRU 4/ -" S PLUS |
I TUESj *, \
1 at INGMAR thrr
I j

for sale
1965 HONDA SPORT 65. Less
than 1,000 miles. Will take S2O
for SIOO equity and take up pay payments.
ments. payments. Call 6-8085 after 6 p*m.
(A-67-st-c).
ONE 3/4 box springs and mattress
with head board. $35. Phone
6-9030. (A-67-3t-c).
wanted
WANTEDFiIe clerk and typist.
Six hours a week. $1.25 an hour.
Arrange at convenience. 378-1411.
(C-67-lt-c).
MALE SUBJECTS 21 years or
older for vocal X-ray. $5.00 per
hour after screening and teaching.
Call ext. 2039 between 9-12 and
1- (C-67-3t-c).
WANTEDMusicans interested in
working behind singers and show
groups this trimester and during
the summer. Should be familiar
with songs by James Brown. Otis
Redding, Carla Thomas, Barbara
Mason and Jackie Wilson. Call
2- after 5. (C-57-tf-nc).
NEED male roommate urgently.
Will reduce rent sls. Only two
blocks from Campus. Call Gator
Groomer, 6-9346. (C-67-st-p).
1963 YAMAHA 125 cc Motorcycle.
A-1 condition. Has electric start starter,
er, starter, turn signals, plus other ac accessories.
cessories. accessories. Will sell for $250 or
best offer. Call 372-6450 after
6 p.m. (C-67-3t-c).
r'
RIDERS WANTED to Cocoa. Leave
every Friday 5 p.m. Return Sun Sunday
day Sunday 8 p.m. $6 round trip. $3.50
one way. Call 372-6450 Monday
thru Friday after 6 p.m. (C-67-
3t-c).
IF YOU NEED extra money and
have Saturdays available, write to
Fuller Brush Co. at 1028 Clear Clearwater
water Clearwater Dr. in Daytona Beach with
name and address and phone at
which you can be reached. Average
earning: $1.75-$2.50 per hour.(C hour.(C---67-10t-c).
--67-10t-c). hour.(C---67-10t-c).

help wanted
PART TIME student help. Work
in 2-hour shifts. Hours. 11:30-
1:30 or 4-8. Longs Cafeteria,
313 W. Univ. Ave. (E-67-st-p).
COLLEGE STUDENTS 21 and over.
Six aggressive minded students
needed by large national corp corporation
oration corporation who would like to make high
earningsexplaining our well-re well-received
ceived well-received Student Starter Program to
friends and fellow students. Send
short resume with name, address,
phone number or how to be reached
to Professional Insurance Corpor Corporation,
ation, Corporation, P.O. Box 8522, Jacksonville,
Fla. Attention personnel depart depart-30-
-30- depart-30-
is the journalists
symbol for
THE END.
For the end to
your advertising
problems.,
use the symbol
college crowd :
<£ .... "rh
THE
FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
EXT: 2832

I TstVsT T 72-9523 '3 I
I WELCOME BACK, STU D E NTS-.-YA'LL I
I U A RUN OF I
WITH GLENN FORD I

autos
1962 FORD convertible. Whole Wholesale
sale Wholesale price. Call Mrs.- Louise
Hinton, Credit Union, ext. 2973.
(G-67-st-c).
1958 RAMBLER, 6-cylinder,
standard transmission, good con condition.
dition. condition. Clean. S2BO. 110 NW
9th Terrace, Apt. 8. See after
5 p.na. (G-67-3t-p).
for rent
FURNISHED ROOM. Male. S3O
per month. 320 NW Third St.
Off-street parking, share bath.
372-0481. (B-67-ts-c).
ONE BEDROOM cottage, Lake
Winnott. Lake privileges. S3O
per month. 23 miles from Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. 372-0481. (B-67-ts-c).
t
NEED 3rd male roommate for 2
bedroom A.C. apartment. Large,
close to campus. 921 SW 6th Ave.
Phone 378-4176. (B-67-10-10t-c).
TWO AND THREE-ROOM effic efficiency
iency efficiency apts. to University men or
married couples. 11l SW 3rd Ave.
'or call 376-9864. (B-67-3t-c).
JAMES BOND I

services
HORSE HAVEN Riding School
Group and private instruction]
Hunt seat and jumping. Call 376-
3454. Look for sign 6 miles West
on Newberry Road opposite store
(M-67-lt-c).
IRONING in my home. Call 376
4086. (M-67-2t-c).
* " i
oO
RELIABLE WOMAN desires
washing and ironing in her home.
Will clean students apartments.
Call 376-7079. (M-67-2t-c).
|
MNOW THRU TOP
I urn
I SRJAfiT WHITMAN JTg
I SUSANNAH YORK W?
I-STANLEY
IMODOREBKL
I SANDS 4%^
I 'Martin
WlpnE fIDER
( MICHAEL PARKS /cbiakaye
I**N!w!l3thStet23rdoed{|
Telephone 378-2434
GAINESVILLE'S LUXURY THEATRE
Doors Open Doily 12:30 P.M.
Cont. Shows All Dov Start 1 P.M
LAST 3 DAYS
At 1:30*3:30*5:30*7:30*9:30
'this is "fk
I A BIKINI jjfe,
i MACHINE Mf)
(order your
66 model Mp
GOlPIooI;;
NNpWEj^Mr-]
mhE.
MBlr|



Study Better
; 1 1
' < :
To Fine Backaround Music From A Zenith __
FM Radio. Couch's FM Headquarters. North
Florida's Complete Selection of Zenith FM
Radios.
Couch s
H I 376-7171 or 378-1681
SINCE 1933
"The store where you get more value for your dollar,
And service second to none."

nr iTs
HI J ELEMENTARY ;
The Most Student-Minded Businessmen
ADVERTISE IN THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

o S (
~ HOW TO WIN FRIENDS
AND INFLUENCE PEOPLE?
WILDEST, CRAZIEST
HUMOR & GAGS
Close In For The Way Out
AA t) 1511 NW Sixth St.
ttt Phone 372-1226

GITA LITRE BRIDGESTONE...
IT GOES A LONG WAY...
M JP' 1 .. WK
ySL gm 'x. fc. £y -v<
r < --w yjpff^S
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The Cycle Shop
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Gator Meets UF Gators At Sugar Bowl

Albert V, UFs mascot, traveled to New Orleans
over New Years for the Sugar Bowl and received a
royal welcome by cheerleader Marty Stone and his
stuffed gator before the Missouri-Florida tilt.

Jville Firm Gives
4 EG Scholarships

The establishment of four engi engineering
neering engineering scholarships for SSOO each
was announced Thursday by Dr.
Thomas L. Martin, dean of UFs
College of Engineering.
Known as the W. Austin Smith
Engineering Scholarships the
grants were established by the con consulting
sulting consulting firm of Smith and Gillespie
Engineers, Inc. of Jacksonville as
one-year unrestricted engineering
scholarships. They will be awarded
on the basis of scholarship, need
and conduct to junior and senior
students in the College of Engi-

Monday. January 10. 1966. The Florida Alligator.

nee ring as outright grants-in-aid.
The scholarships honor Florida
engineer W. Austin Smith, Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, who is chairman of the
board of directors of Smith and
Gillespie.
M#. Smith's long and useful
contribution to the engineering
profession in Florida well de deserves
serves deserves this recognition, and his
contributions will pay dividends
many times over in the education
of future Florida engineers, com*
mented Martin.
After his graduation from
Georgia Tech, Smith became the
first city manager of Tallahassee
and subsequently served as city
manager of Albany, Ga., and Fort
Pierce.
In 1929 he established a consult consulting
ing consulting engineering office in Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville which developed into the part partnership
nership partnership of Smith and Gillespie. The
firm was made a corporation in
January, 1963, when Smith retired
from active business participation,
remaining as chairman of the
board.

a AUNT JEMIMAS
All-You-Can-Eat
SPECIALS
* \ JeSa's f Mondays 4 w#dn#sdays
) ,'£*%*<. j Spaghetti, cole slaw and
£ P garlic bread $1
! I Tuesdays & Fridays
sauce, french fries.. .$1
Thursdays & Saturdays
Chicken, potato salad,
baked beans, rolls.. .$1.50
10% Discount to UF Students Showing I.D.'s
Open 6:30 a.m. til 10 p.m.

Daily
, t
N.W. 13th St. 116th Avc.

Albert V was transported to the game in his special
cage constructed atop a Homosassa Springs resort
advertising car. The alligator was a recent gift to the
UF by Homosassa Springs.

Danburg Finale
Sung In Tampa
Webb, Soloist
The musical composition,
Us Go Forth, written by Russell
Danburg, associate professor of
music, was featured Saturday dur during
ing during a special concert in Tampa's
Hixon Auditorium.
A committee from the Florida
Music Educators Association se selected
lected selected Danburg's work to be done
by a massed chorus of 1,000 voices
with a band and orchestral accom accompaniment
paniment accompaniment of 450 high school musi musicians
cians musicians as the closing number of the
FMEA clinic concert.
Let Us Go Forth" is the finale
of Danburgs cantata, Hertiage
of Freedom, which was prem premiered
iered premiered at the University of Florida
in May, 1962. The cantata is a
musical setting of the entire in inaugural
augural inaugural address of the late Presi President
dent President John F. Kennedy.
Guy B. Webb, assistant profess professor
or professor of music was bass soloist for
the Tampa presentation. Webb also
appeared as soloist four years ago.
Danburg conducted his own com composition.
position. composition.

Page 15



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 10, 1966,,

Page 16

BBDOBBBB
TUMOR CONFERENCE: Today, 2:30-3:30 p.m., J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, M-601.>
CHEST CONFERENCE: Today, 3:30-4:30 p.m., J. HJllis Miller
Health Center, H-611.
ADULT CARDIAC CATH. CONFERENCE: Today, 4 p.m., J.
Hillis Miller Health Center, Cath. Lab. Cons. Room.
§ AGRICULTURE DAMES: Today, 8 p.m., home of Mrs. Charles
Simpson, 2225 NW 6th Place. Speaker: Mr. and Mrs. Clyde
Brannon. Topic: Hand Writing Analysis.** _.
FACULTY CLUB: Today, 11:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m., Faculty
Club. Reopening for luncheons.
U OF F KARATE CLUB: Saturday, 9:30 a.m., Floor of Gym.
New members welcome. Contact Don Collyer, 1420 W. Univ. Ave.
U OF F DAMES: Sunday, 3:00-5:00 p.m., University Women's
Club, Newberry Road. January Dames Open House Tea. Repre Representatives
sentatives Representatives from each of the 11 colleges on campus will be there
to talk about their respective dame group.
FLORIDA PLAYERS: Tryouts for Clerambard, a modern French
comedy, will be held Monday and Tuesday, Jan. 10 and 11 from
4:00-5:30 and 7:00-8:30 in 239 Tigert.
1300 Students Seek
Mental Care Yearly

Each year approximately 1,300
University of Florida students seek
professional help from the mental
health services en campus," esti estimates
mates estimates Dr. William A. Hall,
specialist in student health.
Those students needing help in
almost all cases come to us of
their own free will,**- Hall said.
Only if a student is a clear and
present danger to himself or to
the university may we be forced
to act without the student
exercising his own discretion. Hall
emphasized that this situation is
rarely the case.
The psychological tests given
at the time of entrance are only
referred to if a student needs
help, then we have a base of mat material
erial material from which to begin therapy,
said Hall.
Dr. Harry A. Grater, director
of the University Counseling
Center, and his staff of trained
counselors not only give help for
emotional problems, but they also
give advice concerning vocational
choices.
Our main purpose is to help
a jstudent feel comfortable with
ever capacity he has to the maxi maximum,
mum, maximum, said Grater.
According to Hall tne mental
health service at the infirmary is
primarily an evaluation service
using an interview approach with
the student. If this approach proves
inadequate, the student is referred

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a

to the Medical Center dr other
source for more specialized
therapy.
While the other mental health
services are free, this more in intensive
tensive intensive therapy at the Medical
Center is not, however, the fee
is adjusted to what the individual
family can pay,* said Hall.
The problem that psychoanalyst
Erik Eriksonas labels as the
identity crisis* on college cam campuses
puses campuses is not a crisis according
to Hall. Hall does admit that the
students problem of securing his
own personal identity is more pre prevalent
valent prevalent on a large campus such as
the UF.
The vast number of F lo rid a
students have a very adequate
emotional and social adjustment,
affirmed Hall.
He said that each case is com completely
pletely completely individual and therefore
generalizations were impossible.
Hall did refer to the pressures
of a more complex society as being
the source of many problems.
By 1975 the average age of
Americans will be 25. More than
ever young people will be met with
the challenge of a more complex
and competitive world, said Hall.
The young people of today con control
trol control their own destinies more so
than any other previous generation.
In a world that is more complex
the young person is expected to
leave home, choosing the route of
his own destiny, Hall continued.

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Business College
Bolsters Funds

partnership between business
d education, destined to be a
owing trend in the decade ahead,
Keady is gathering momentum
der a new program established
W UFs College of Business Ad Ad
Ad istration.
Business Associates, formed
riier this year during a series
informal meetings throughout
e state, now has 30 charter mem memrs
rs memrs who have contributed S2OO to
000 apiece toward a512,000 fund
at will bolster existing andplan andpland
d andpland activities within the College,
edges are for a minimum of three
ars.
< ea has been excellent, Dean
Knald J. Hart said. There are
me geographic areas that are
gging in their response, but we
ticipate a great deal of personal
Kntact work next year and we hope
triple our current assets.
Actually, Business
Biould have seven or eight times
ore than $12,000 to be success successl,
l, successl, Hart continued. This kind of
stem for obtaining additional in in>me
>me in>me is the only way we can offer a
rst rate program. State funds give
I basis for a good start toward
hiding a sound college, but with
ly 58 per cent of the Universitys
erating budget produced by the
ate, we have to look to private
Bmations and assistance for the
emaining 42 per cent.
I Business Associates is sponsor sponsorid
id sponsorid on behalf of the College of Bus Busless
less Busless Administration by the Uni University
versity University of Florida Foundation, Inc.,

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ReNTINO 700 Squar. Footers & 900 Square Footers
* Individual Central Air Conditioning, Heating
* Wall-to-Wall Carpeting
Living Rooms, Bedrooms, Hallways f'K.vtRSITT aUI
* Sun Decks S
More Than 18 Beautiful Acres H
B Laundry Conveniently
Separate Storage u"
flf FLORIDA Xi
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Jll N 4 Sliding Glass Doors to Balcony I P*" *_
4h jl r A t Cabinets I
B Parquet Oak Flooring in Dining Rooms j
.p Central Television Antenna, All Apartments
Private Patios v Near Elementary/ Secondary'Schools
* Shopping Centers Nearby W >
a Close to Business, Industrial Complexes, Churches
* Only 500 From US. 441, Quick Access to Others_ J 2 \
lI,tHE S OAINESVIUE'S REMTAL AFABTMENT VALUE IVIMf-
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rrr

a non-profit corporation dedicated
to the advancement of the Univer University
sity University through private support.
With the assistance of Founda Foundation
tion Foundation officers Alan Robertson, dean
of University relations and devel development,
opment, development, and George Corrick, dir director
ector director of Ihe Division of Develop Development
ment Development Services, Hart and members
of his faculty have launched a cam campaign
paign campaign designed to acquaint busi business
ness business leaders with advantages of
joining Business Associates.
Dr. Robert S. Cline, professor
of insurance, is serving as direc director
tor director of Business Associates.
The immediate impact of this
concept will help up strengthen
our graduate course offerings, en enable
able enable us to start some additional
graduate fellowships and increase
our research facilities, particu particularly
larly particularly within the Bureau of Econom Economic
ic Economic and Business Research, Cline
noted.
Planning also has started for a
one-day seminar next April that
will give Business Associates
members a wide spectrum of data
from all business fields, presented
by a qualified panel of experts.
Were trying to build a continu continuing
ing continuing relationship with businessmen,
not just take S2OO a year from them
for three years,Clinesaid,citing
a series of mailings to charter con contributors
tributors contributors that have included pertin pertinent
ent pertinent data on graduating seniors, a
roster of faculty members avail available
able available for consulting purposes and
several monthly publications
issued by the College.

Memorial Loan Funds Begun
For UFer Killed In Viet Nam
a

Just 90 days before his
scheduled return home, a
young paratrooper died in Viet
Nam.
Today, and for years to
come, many young people will
enter the UF or complete
their studies here because
of the life of the young ser-*
geant whose dreams of re resuming
suming resuming his studies on the
Gainesville campus were
ended by a round of mortar
fire.
Two perpetual loan funds
as a memorial to Jeffry Let Letson
son Letson Kockritz have been
established at the UF by his
friends and the Storer
Broadcasting Company. The
former Florida student was
the son of Ewald Kockritz, a
Storer executive from Miami,
and Mrs. Kockritz.
Through participation of the
UF and the United Student Aid
Funds, Inc., each gift to the
loan fund is multiplied 12 1/2
times to create a larger
amount.
The funds, each in excess
of $25,000, were established
in the University College,
which registers all freshmen
and sophomores, and the

1$ START THE TRIMESTER RIGHT BY PATRONIZING 'GATOR ADVERTISERS

Monday, January 10, 1966, The Florida Alligator;

School of Journalism and
Communications.
According to his friends,
Jeff Kockritz had been un undecided
decided undecided about his field of study
at the UF. He realized his
obligation to his country and
felt it better to fulfill that
duty while in his sophomore
£ear rather than pursue the
wrong career.
Kockritz had reached the
rank of Explorer Scout while
in Miami Edison High School
and, as a freshman at the
University, he became a squad
leader on the Gator Guard drill
team. He was proud of both
achievements.
When he entered the service
he went to jump school and
became a member of the 101st
Airborne Screaming
Eagles. On maneuvers in
Okinawa, he was chosen
Paratrooper of the Month.
It was evident from his
letters that war and killing
were distasteful to him, and
he hoped his friends would
never have to be involved;
yet, he volunteered for Viet 4
Nam.
He was attached to the Head Headquarters
quarters Headquarters and Headquarters

Company of the 101 st
Divisions First Brigade and
had been in Viet Nam exactly
90 days when he was fatally
wounded by mortar fire on a
search and rescue mission
near the port of Qui Nhon,
as his unit encountered hostile
forces.
He had written, It is a
very strange feeling to be
shot at and to kill someone.
He told how the troops flushed
some Viet Cong into the road road
road None of them looked to be
over 22 years old. J dis dismounted
mounted dismounted the jeep and walked
down the street. .from a
doorway, a boy of about 18
spun toward me and started to
raise his rifle to shoot, and
as he did, I cut him down.
he was the first one I killed
face to face and I must admit
I wanted to cry as I asked
God for strength.
Although he never will re return
turn return personally, he will not
be forgotten on campus.
Through the memorial loan
funds, it is hoped others now
may go to college in his place.
The funds are being
administered by the Financial
Aid Officer to the UFs Dean
of Student Affairs.

Page 17



Page 18

t, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 10, 1966

UF In 1965: A Year Os Expansion

The UF marked 1965 with a
record number of students and
varied expansion of its programs
and facilities.
In addition to surpassing the
1,200 Ph.D* degree mark earlier
this month, the growing stature of
its vast curriculum was
emphasized last summer by two
significant grants totaling nearly
$5.5 million from the National
Science Foundation and National
Aeronautics and Space Adm inis
tration to support special facilities
and expanded areas of instruction.
Death claimed a number of
Floridas best known and loved
administrators and faculty mem members
bers members during the year, while note noteworthy
worthy noteworthy recognition came to others
of the staff who received honors
for outstanding teaching and
research.
Bids on four main construction
projects were accepted in March
and June.
A four-story chemistry
research building ($1,425,000),
six-story graduate research
library ($1,786,700), eight new
buildings for the College'of
Engineering to house coastal,
mechanical, electrical, chemical,
bioenvironmental and aerospace
departments ($5,354,000) and the
first phase of a Human Develop Development
ment Development Center devoted to childrens
mental health studies and cures
($898,400) became new additions
to the fast-moving campus con construction
struction construction picture that already in includes
cludes includes finishing touches on a new
Florida Union and classroom
building and an 8,000 seat
expansion of Florida Field in time
for the 1966 football season.
Listed below are chronological
monthly highlights of 1965 at the
University.
JANUARY
The winter trimester opened
!S with 14,450 students enrolled for
n classes. The total confirmed a
1 steady growth pattern an in increase
crease increase of 1,127 from January,l964,
and a jump of 2,091 from the
corresponding trimester figure
two years ago.
Classes were held for the first
time in the new, $1.5 million
College of Architecture and Fine
Arts complex, housing art, building
construction and architecture de departments
partments departments previously located in
temporary buildings erected
after World War 11.
Dr. Herbert E. Kaufman,
professor and chief of opthamology
in the College of medicine, was
named one of Americas Ten
Outstanding Young Men by the
U, S. Junior Chamber of
Commerce. It marked the third
time in six years that a member
of the Florida faculty had been
tapped for national recognition.
Kaufman was cited by the Jaycees
as a surgeon, teacher and renowned
researcher who has made signi-
ficant contributions to mans
knowledge about eye disease.
The UF received word in Janu January
ary January that its graduate school was
among 85 in the nation selected
for grants from the Woodrow
Wilson National Fellowship
Foundation. The money goes to
advance graduate education and to
provide funds to assist graduate
students beyond their first year of
study.
Dr. John J. Tigert, president
emeritus of the University, died
here Jan. 22 following a long
illness. Dr. Tigert came to the
University of Florida in 1928
following seven years as U. S.
commissioner of education and
became president emeritus upon
his retirement in 1947. The UFs
Alumni Association Executive
Council earmarked $20,000 from
its Loyalty Fund drive to establish

the Tigert Alumni Chair of Dis Distinction
tinction Distinction on the Florida campus.
FEBRUARY
The 30th anniversary of the
founding of the University College
was highlighted by a series of
lectures co-sponsored by the
Lyceum Council. The University
College arrangement has been de described
scribed described by a committee of consul consultants
tants consultants as one of the two or three
leading two-year general education
programs in America.
February also brought an
announcement that no additional
applications for freshman students
could be accepted for admission
in June or September, 1965, in
preparation for the third straight
year of no more than 2,800 fresh freshmen
men freshmen during the fall trimester.
The announcement of a full quota
wasr nearly two months earlier
than the 1964 cutoff date, reflecting
the great number of applications
filed.
MARCH
An engineering survey team
recommended that 53-year-old
Benton Hall, a campus landmark,
be torn down as soon as possible
because it no longer could be
considered a safe structure for
class arid laboratory use. Classes
were moved and the UF began
shifting lab equipment to other
locations to vacate the building.
The UF Gallery of Art was
dedicated in early March with Dr.
Wilhelmus Bryan, director of the
Atlanta Art Association, delivering
the main address. First exhibit
in the new gallery was Artists
of the Florida Tropics, a col collection
lection collection of 40 works by George
Catlin, Winslow Homer, George
Inness and James Audubon.
Twelve students won academic
achievement awards from the
Woodrow Wilson National Fellow Fellowship
ship Fellowship Foundation, ranking Florida
at the top of Region 6 which
includes colleges in Alabama,
Florida, Georgia, South Carolina
and Puerto Rico.
Dr. William M. Jones, associate
professor of chemistry, was among
91 young scientists named by the
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation of New
York for unrestricted basic re research
search research grants totaling nearly $1.4
million. Dr. Jones used his grant
to continue research in the area
of structure and geometry of or organic
ganic organic molecules and the mechanics
of organic reactions.
The University received an esti estimated
mated estimated $1 million trust fund to
provide scholarships for deserving
Pinellas County students from the
last will and testament of Metta
Heathcote, wealthy St. Petersburg
woman who died earlier in the year.
Dr. Emanuei outer, a 47-year 47-yearol
ol 47-yearol d medical educator with a
brilliant record as a teacher,
curriculum planner and scientific
researcher, was appointed dean
of the College of Medicine. Dr.
Suter had served as acting dean
since November, 1964. v
Dr. Merwin J. Larsen, chairman
of the Department of Electrical
Engineering, died at his home here
March 28. His death was attributed
to a heart attack and a memorial
scholarship was set up in his
memory.
Dr. Roger F. Palmer, assistant
professor of pharmacology and
medicine in the College of Medicine
and the top scholar of its first
graduating class, was named a
Markle Scholar. The distinction,
ampng the highest in academic
medicine for young scientists, was
awarded by the John and Mary R.
Markle Foundation of New York,
along with $30,000, spaced over a
five-year period.

APRIL
Faculty and staff members of
the University paid tribute to
President J. Wayne Reitz during a
10th anniversary celebration in
Florida Gymnasium on April 1.
Special greetings and gifts were
given to Dr. and Mrs. Reitz by
the faculty, the Alumni
Association, student government
and the University Womens Club.
Registrar Richard S. Johnson
died April 4. He was one of the,
most widely known of University
staff members and had served as
statistician for the Athletic
Association for almost 30 years.
A memorial scholarship fund was
established in his name.
The UFs physics building was
renamed Williamson Hall during
special ceremonies honoring Dr.
Robert C. Williamson, former
chairman of the Department of
Physics.
More than 3,600 graduates were
recognized at the annual
commencement convocation in late
April. Honorary degrees went to
guest speaker Lewis F. Powell,

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Richmond, Va., president of the
American Bar Association, and to
Mrs. Ruth Springer Wedgworth of
Belle Glade, an active state figure
in business, farming and civic
affairs. U. S. Congressman D. R.
(Billy) Matthews of Gainesville
and former Board of Control
Chairman Baya M. Harrison Jr. of
St. Petersburg received
significant alumni
MAYr~
First place honors for School of
Journalism and Communications
students were announced by Hearst
Foundation judges rating national
competition open to 47 accredited
schools of journalism. Florida
placed second in 1964 after fifth
and fourth positions the previous
two years. President Lyndon
Johnson presented the first place
gold medal award to UF President
J. Wayne Reitz and Journalism
School Director Rae O. Weimer
in ceremonies at the White House.
The UFs unique closed circuit,
talk-back television system for
teaching graduate engineering

courses became fully operational
later in May. Official dedication
of GENESYS (Graduate Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering Educational System) buildings
were conducted via a statewide
TV program that connected new
facilities in Orlando, Daytona
Beach and Cape Kennedy with the
main control room here.
JUNE
The College of Medicine recog recognized
nized recognized 43 new doctors during its
commencement convocation. The
new group brought to 250 the
number of students completing
work in the College since it opened
nine years ago.
Dr. George K. Davis, who
directed the Universitys nuclear
sciences program into a position
of wide respect throughout the
country, was named to head the
Division of Biological Sciences,
responsible for coordinating basic
biology programs on a University Universitywide
wide Universitywide basis.
H. V. Olsen Jr., recognized
authority in hospital admini administration,
stration, administration, director of the
Continued on P. 20



JF To Offer New
[Television Series

I a need for elementary education
lachers willing to volunteer for
Supervision of student practice in instructors
structors instructors in their qlassrooms may
|e met soon as an increasing
lumber of Florida teachers view
| unique television series offered
|y the UF.
I Dr. Robert L. Gilstrap, assis-
Lnt professor of elementary
Education at the University, gives
Elaudits to the television course,
ISupervision of Pre-Service
Teachers. Dr. Gilstrap is co coordinator
ordinator coordinator of the Drogram given
wice this year by the College of
education.
More than 250 teachers from
Uachua, Bradford, Marion, Co Coumbia
umbia Coumbia and Duval counties viewed
he series over Channels 5 and 7.
They also completed astudy guide,
participated in seminars and have
responded favorably to every phase
of the course, Gilstrap said.
Cooperating teachers admit they
have gained more confidence in
volunteering to have student teach teachers
ers teachers in their classrooms after
completing the course and learning
what to expect and how to be
effective supervisors.
Interns directed by teachers who
had viewed the telecasts said they
felt there was a gain in under understanding
standing understanding and respect by those

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teachers for the students as be beginning
ginning beginning professionals.
Since the response of Florida
teachers and the follow-up studies
of their later performance with
student teachers in the classroom
have been favorable, other states,
including Georgia, now are inter interested
ested interested in obtaining the> course as
part of their curriculum.
Although the demand in Florida
is great for repetition of the course
during the upcoming winter tri trimester
mester trimester that begins next month,
Gilstrap said heavy commitments
among members of the elementary
education faculty will prohibit their,
participation until next fall. Con-
siderable travel and attendance at
seminars conducted by tne faculty
is involved in planning for a par particular
ticular particular area.
College of Education faculty
members who contributed to the
teaching series were Dean Kimball
Wiles, the late Dr. Aleyne Haines,
Dr. Pauline Hilliard, Dr. Janet
McCracken, Dr; Charles Dur Durrance,
rance, Durrance, Dr. Robert Myers, Dr.
Joyce Cooper, Dr. Maurice Ah Ahrens,
rens, Ahrens, Dr. J. B. White andGilstrap.
Teachers with bachelors de degrees
grees degrees and at least one year of
classroom experience are eligible
to take the course. They must
obtain a recommendation from
their principal and approval from
the course coordinator. There is
no tuition.
Gilstrap encouraged Florida
teachers to write to the Depart Department
ment Department of Elementary Education at
the University for further infor information
mation information if they are interested in
scheduling the TV instruction for
their communities.


VANDALS AT WORK
Vandals struck late Saturday night on the main was taken from the wall and turned on. Other than
floor of the Florida Union building. A water hose, puddles of water on the floor, damages were slight,
which was scheduled for use only in emergency cases,
UF Prof Traces Asian Camel Ancestry

The modern camels of Asia and
North Africa had their origins in
North America, a UF professor
told members of the American As Association
sociation Association for the Advancement of
Science recently.
Dr. S. David Webb, assistant
curator of vertebrae paleontology
at the UFs Florida State Museum,
said fossil records of camels in
the New World extend back to origin
of the group 40 million years ago,
whereas camels first appeared in

Monday, January 10, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

the Old World three million years
ago.
Dr. Webb spoke to the Section
on Paleontology at the morning
session of the annual AAAS meet meeting,
ing, meeting, being conducted this week at
the University of California in
Berkeley.
Dr. Webb said study of the North
American record makes it possible
to trace ancestors of the Old World
' camel forms before they extended
their range to the Old World.
After evolving here thecamel thecameline
ine thecameline lineage crossed the Bering
Bridge to Asia before the Ice Age
set in, he stated.
Analysis oT the distribution and^

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anatomy of the New World ances ancestral
tral ancestral camelines indicates they were
not particularly well adapted to
arid environments, according to
Dr. Webb. However, he says,
they were already well adapted
to living in grasslands, and when
the climate deteriorated in certain
parts of the Old World during the
Ice Ages, the camels quickly de developed
veloped developed special adaptions to living
in desert and steppe.
At that time, according to Dr.
Webb, they developed their extra extraordinary
ordinary extraordinary abilities to desiccate the
other body fluids without affecting
the blood and to withstand extreme extremely
ly extremely high body temperatures.

Page 19



UF In 1965: A Year Os Expansion

Continued from P. 18
University Hospital and Clinics
later in June. He transferred
here from Rhode Island Hospital
in Providence.
JULY
The JJational Science Foundation
awarded the University $4,240,000
as part of a massive science
development program covering top
educational institutions throughout
the nation. President J. Wayne
Reitz called the grant the most
significant the University has
received. He said it reflects the
level of achievement in scientific
areas that has been reached and
provides the necessary resources
to help the University reach a
level of excellence.
The National Aeronautics and
Space Administration then gave
the UF a $1,190,000 facilities grant
for construction of a four-story,
space sciences research center on
campus. Completion of the struc structure
ture structure will enable various space spaceoriented

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oriented spaceoriented programs already under
way at the University to be housed
in one area.
*
Two national awards and a share
of a third came to the UF during
annual meetings of tne American
Alumni Council and American Col College
lege College Public Relations Association.
The Florida Alumnus Magazine
was cited for significant editorial
achievement in the field of alumni
publishing, the UF received an
incentive award for dis distinguished
tinguished distinguished achievement in the
development of alumni support
and the Florida university system
was among winners in honors com competition
petition competition for its promotion of
Project HELP (Higher Education
Legislative Program).
Dr. Arthur W. Thompson, his history
tory history professor and authority on
American history and culture who
earned international praise for
writings on the subject, died
July 12.

Announcement that the UFs
newest married student apartment
village would be named for Emory
Gardner Diamond was made later
in July. Diamond, who died six
years ago, was an outstanding
student leader, serving as presi president
dent president of the student body and clerk
of the Honor Court.
AUGUST
Richard H. Whitehead became
director of admissions and regis registrar.
trar. registrar. He had filled the position
in an acting capacity since the
death of Richard S. Johnson four
months earlier.
SEPTEMBER
Classes for the fall trimester
began on Labor Day and a record
16,874 students enrolled for the
14-week term. With the fall orien orientation
tation orientation program, straw spirit
hats appeared, replacing the
traditional freshman rat caps
as an institutional symbol.
OCTOBER
The UF Senate praised the
sound educational practice of
President J. Wayne Reitz, then
unanimously passed a resolution
expressing confidence in and
support of Dr. Reitz. The Uni University
versity University president reportedly re resigned
signed resigned from his post Oct. 3 a
rumor that touched off a wide
range of response from educators,
politicians, civic leaders and
friends. I have not resigned
was Dr. Reitz only comment on
the rumor.

Mnndav. January 10, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

The UF received a $538,150
grant from the National Science
Foundation for construction of a
biological sciences research fa facility.
cility. facility. The building is to be the
first unit of the planned life
sciences complex and will cost
$1,934,950, including the NSF
grant.
Homecoming *65 was celebrated
with the traditional and colorful
parade, Gator Growl, selection of
the sweetheart and appearance of
weU s known speakers for student
organizations banquets and break breakfasts
fasts breakfasts prior to the football triumph
over North Carolina State. Six
professors were named out outstanding
standing outstanding educators in their
respective fields during the
Florida Blue Key banquet. They
included Dr. George B. Butler,
chemistry; H. G. Davis, journal journalism;
ism; journalism; Dr. Irving J. Goffman, econo economics;
mics; economics; Dr. Ralph B. Kimbrough,
education; Dr. John Mahon,
history, and Dr. Oscar Svarlien,
political science.
NOVEMBER
The UFs Alumni Loyalty Fund
drive approached an all-time re record
cord record with $111,673 contributed by
8,178 persons.
The Teaching Hospital and
Clinics of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center were named for
former State Sen. William A.
Shands of Gainesville as part of a
special ceremony.
Graduate School Dean L. E.
Grinter reported the number of
students entering graduate study
at the University is increasing, as
is their intelligence. Graduate

students now comprise 13 percent
of the total enrollment at the UF
and 63 per cent of those starting
the graduate curriculum in 1964
ranked in the upper quartile of
scores on the Graduate Record
Examination of students applying
for advanced studies in the United
States.
DECEMBE R
Ellis Jones became director of
planning and William Elmore
moved up to the position of busi business
ness business manager in a pair of early
December promotions announced
by President J. Wayne Reitz.
The full-time enrollment of
15,988 students during the fall
trimester ranked the UF 26th in
the nation, accordlngtito a survey
of the nation's 30 largest institu institutions
tions institutions of higher learning.
Land was cleared in mid-
December for a 15-acre park near
the home of the late Pulitzer
Prize-winning novelist, Marjorie
Kinnan Rawlings. The UF Foun Foundation,
dation, Foundation, Inc., owner of the Rawlings
house, worked with Alachua County
commissioners to develop plans
for the recreation area that is
expected to be cpmpleted next
spring.
The 68 doctor of philosophy
degrees awarded at the end of
the fall trimester brought the total
presented since 1934 to 1,239.
The UF's graduate program has
grown to 28th among the nation's
colleges and universities in the
quantity of Ph.D. degrees awarded
annually and first in the Southeast.
The total excludes doctor of edu education
cation education and MJ). degrees.

Page 20



By EDDIE SEARS
Alligator Staff Writer
NEW ORLEANS Quarterback
>teve Spurrier threw the football
ike it was a hot potato and split
>nd Charlie Casey made his usual
jpectactular catches, but it wasnt
>no ugh as .Florida bowed to
Missouri 20-18 in the 32nd Annual
Sugar Bowl game.
Spurrier, the slow speaking
unior All-America, set five new
>owl marks and was named the
;ames outstanding player. It was
argely because of his efforts the
iators almost won the game in a
iracky, wonderful fourth quarter.
Down by a 20-0 count going into
ie final quarter, Florida was
onsidered finished and the Sugar
owl had the distinct markings of
giant mismatch.
But, suddenly the impotent
iator offense that had merely
layed at the ball for three quarters
xploded for three touchdowns.
Spurrier directed two of the TD
rives, on marches of 86 and 81
ards, and the third came after a
Jissouri fumble on the Tigers
0-yard line.
On the first drive, Spurrier
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Records Break; But Gators Ache, 20-18

used All-America end Casey as a
decoy passing to tight end Barry
Brown, flankerback Richard Trapp
and tailback Jack Harper.
The scored when
Spurrier completed a 22-yard pass
to Harper. But, the try for two
points was off as Spurriers pass
to Trapp was broken up.
Big John Preston kicked off for
Florida and two plays later
Missouris talented quarterback
Gary Lane pitched back to half halfback
back halfback Earl Denny. But, linebacker
Steve Heidt read the play and
clobbered Denny separating him
from the ball. George G randy
recovered the fumble for Florida.
Three plays later Spurrier kept
and with center Bill Carr leading
the blocking he scored. Again
Florida went for two points and
failed as Allen Trammells pass
was over the head of fullback
Alan Poe.
Missouri couldnt move the foot football
ball football and the Gators took over on
their 19-yard line. Again Spurrier
took advantage of the double cov coverage
erage coverage on Casey as he passed his
way to the Tiger 21-yard line
setting up the what was later
termed by sportswriters the most
beautiful catch in Sugar Bowl his history.
tory. history.
Spurrier tried two passes, but
both were broken up. However,
on his third attempt he lobbed
the ball in the end zone toward
Casey.
rm

I saw the ball coming and fig figured
ured figured it might be intercepted,
Casey said later. I couldnt shake
my defender and thought he might
have a good shot at it.
1 jumped at the same time he
did. The ball barely touched my
fingers and hit me on the face
mask. As it fell to my stomach
I grabbed it and held on for dear
life.
Casey held on to the ball and
Florida trai? id by only two points,
but again toe try for two points
\ | i MM
ijfl
GAGMBt STOPS
Missouri halfback, Charlie
Brown, who gained 120 yards
rushing, picks up short yardage
as Larry Gagner, a big bonus boy
of the Pittsburgh Steelers, stops.

was no good.
I thought we should go for
two points to start with so we
could get some momentum, Flor Florida
ida Florida head coach Ray Graves said
drilv after the game. We had to
go for two on the next two touch touchdowns.
downs. touchdowns.
To tell the truth I didnt think
we could score three times in the
fourth quarter, he added. We
had to get as many points as we
could.
Graves heaped praise on
Spurrier. He was great out
, there, he said. Hes a tremen tremenaous
aous tremenaous quarterback.
Missouri scored two touchdowns
in the second quarter. On the first,
halfback Charlie Brown scooted 10
yards for pay dirt.
All-America Johnny Roland
fired a halfback pass to Denny
for the second score. Bill Bates
kicked both extra points and added
a 37-yard field goal.
When the Tiger offense ran out

Kmsmmmmm

Monday, January 10, 1966 SPORTS

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BROWN DOWNED
But not after Charlie chewed up eight more yards on the Gators.
Allen Trammell makes the stop.

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of gas on the Florida 18-yard line
in the third quarter, Bates booted
what turned out to be the winning
field goal, a 34-yard effort.
In the fourth quarter Spurrier
completed 16 passes, just one shy
of the record for the entire game.
He ended up completing 27 of
45 for a fantastic 352 yards. Casey
pulled in five for 108 yards and
Brown caught nine for 88 yards.
The Tigers monstrous
defensive wall kept the pressure
on Spurrier all afternoon and held
the Gators to a minus two yards
on the ground.
Meanwhile offensive guard
Francis Peay (pronounced pay)
showed his All-America form
opening gaping holes for the Tiger
backs. Missouri 257 yards
on the ground, and 50 in the air.
The fans saw two great teams,
he said. Spurrier is a great
player, but you dont hear too much
about (jdefensive end Lynn) Mat Matthews.
thews. Matthews. Hes a great one, too.

Spurrier Sets
Five Marks
NEW ORLEANS Floridas
All-America quarterback Steve
Spurrier was named the recipient
of the Miller-Digby trophy as the
outstanding player in the Sugar
Bowl.
Spurrier is the 19th player to
receive the trophy. Other players
who have won the award include
Doug Moreau, LSU end; Glynn
Griffing, Ole Miss quarterback;
Jake Gibbs, Ole Miss quarterback;
Billy Cannon, LSU halfback; Del
Shofner, Baylor halfback and for former
mer former Florida coach Pepper Rod Rodgers
gers Rodgers who was the outstanding
player as a Georgia Tech quarter quarterback
back quarterback in 1954.
Spurrier set five records in the
game, to wit:
45 pass attempts (old record
set in 1939 27),
27 completions (old record
set in 1939 19),
352 yards passing (old rec recoru
oru recoru in 19&3 242),
52 plays (old record set in
1944 43),
344 yards total offense (old
record set in 1963 257).

Page 21



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 10, 1966

Page 22

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RKORD BREAMIN' OB
Steve Spurrier flings one of 45 passes, a Sugar
Bowl record. He completed 27 for 352 yards, two
other game marks. ~
mocmmm
Jack Harper gets up after catching 22-yard touch touchdown
down touchdown toss from Steve Spurrier. The first Gator TD
made the score 20-6.

'* ||
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HUNGUP
Tiger fullback Earl Denny stop stopped
ped stopped for little gain by linebackers
Steve Heidt and Ron Pursell.

r
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'C
rffu^Pl
hi, gals!
welcome--or welcome back--to g'ville.
if you don't know me, i'm twig.... i'm
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west univ. ave. (one block from cam campus),
pus), campus), and i hope you'll be at home
here, too.
i've got what it takes to give you the
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look for our stable door. .and me in
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twig
i l
0*
1131 W. Univ. Ave., at 12th St.



Basketball Team Vacillates From Game To Game

By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Editor
Up and down.
Thats precisely what the Florida
,asketball team was in its seven
ames over the holiday break.

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Center Jeff Ramsey loses ball under pressure of

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The Gators won three and lost
four since the FSU game, a fact
which sterns to substantiate this
argument.
Fresh from a 75-62 drubbing
of FSU in Florida Gym, the Gators
traveled to CharlnttP tn mppt the

Kentucky defenders (1-r) Larry Conley, Tommy
Kron and Pat Riley.

North Carolina Tar Heels. Carol Carolina
ina Carolina was (and still is) highly
regarded. The Tar Heels attack
was headed by All-America candi candidate
date candidate Bob Lewis, the nations No.
2 scorer.
Florida played fine basketball

Monday, January 10, 1966, The Florida Alligator,

all nignt and was in the game until
the final minutes before Carolina
finally prevailed, 66-59. The
Gators actually led at the half,
no small feat whfen playing before a
partisan Atlantic Coast Conference
(ACC) crowd.
Next came the trip to the Pacific
Northwest for two games with
Washington. Both games were
fairly even with Florida emerging
victorious in the first, 66-60, and
losing the second, 78-69.
Clutch free-throw shooting by
Gary McElroy and Skip Highley
helped sew up the first win for
the Gators. The second night was
occasion for one of the teams
poorer performances of the cam campaign.
paign. campaign. Mistakes cost Florida
numerous opportunities to get back
in the game, which the Huskies
led from the start.
Coach Norm Sloan commented
on the two Huskie games, We
hadnt thought Washington was as
good as it turned out to be. We
had our troubles adjusting when
we found out.
The split with the Huskies gave
the Gators a 4-2 record entering
the Gator Bowl tournament. Their
first opponent was DePaul, a team
which had knocked off two teams
of the nations top ten.
In what guard Ed Mahoney called
our best game of the year, the
Gators upset DePaul 72-64, giving
notice that they can beat anybody
when theyre right.
But, next came the title game
against Penn State, which had just
squeaked by lowly Alabama in the
previous round. Florida was
erratic all night, and wound up
missing its third straight tourney
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KELIIR REBOUND AND SCORt
Junior Gary takes a rebound from Alabama's Johnny Smith (left)
and scores against Penn State in Gator Bowi Tourney (right).
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championship when Harry Winkler*,
elevated to a starting role for the
DePaul game, missed a 20-footer
with 10 seconds left. The missed
shot allowed Penn State to eke
out a 54-52 win.
Monday night the Gators were
back in Gainesville to open SEC
play against Alabama, where they
pulled out a 56-53 win.
In a game where the Gators
had no luck and made every mistake
imaginable, the Tide led 35-25 with
less than 10 minutes to J>lay.
A tactical error saved the
Gators skin. Bama, which had
been scoring from outside and on
drives all night, went into a freeze.
With the starting five playing
almost the entire game, the Tide
was unable to hold the ball against
the fresher Gators.
Bama miscues plus steals by
Mahoney and McE lroy put the
Gators down only one with 50
seconds left. A missed shot gave
Florida the ball and Norm Sloan
quickly called time.
When play resumed, Higley
brought the ball down and fired up
a jumper. It failed, but was tipped
in by Keller. Free throws by Mc-
Elroy and Mike Rollyson added to
the Gator lead.
Saturday the Gators took on
Kentucky, the nations No. 2 team.
Florida was never really in the
contest as 6-5 Thad Jaracz went
over, under, around and through
the taller Gators to score 17
points in the first half and build
a 40-28 Wildcat lead. The second
half saw the Gators fighting hard
to stay close, but never getting
any nearer than 11 points. The
final was 78-64.
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Page 23



Page 24

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 10, 1966

'Cat-Commodore Clash Coming

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
ATLANTA (UPI) Thundering
head-on like a pair of express
trains on a single track, the 2nd 2ndranked
ranked 2ndranked Kentucky Wildcats and the
3rd-ranked Vanderbilt Commo Commodores
dores Commodores collide this week for the
Southeastern Conference basket basketball
ball basketball lead.
Kentucky, one of only two major
unbeaten teams in the nation, has
the scheduling edge since the Wild Wildcats
cats Wildcats will be at Georgia Monday
night, then have until Saturday to
prepare for the Commodores who
must play this crucial game at
Lexington, Ky.
Vanderbilt, sporting 12 victories
and a two-point loss at Southern
Cal, will be host to Ole Miss Mon Monday
day Monday night and to tough Tennessee
Wednesday night before heading
into the Wildcats lair.
Vanderbilt and Kentucky are the
only teams which havent suffered
a loss within the SEC. The Com Commodores
modores Commodores made their league mark
3-0 Saturday night by beating Geor Georgia
gia Georgia 77-63 while Kentucky made US
conference debut in a 78-64 vic victory
tory victory at Florida the 10th straight
triumph for the fast-breaking
Wildcats.
In other Saturday night action:
Tennessee, which lost to Vander Vanderbilt
bilt Vanderbilt early in December, took over
third place in the SEC by routing
Ole Miss 102-55; Auburn beat
Louisiana State 74-66; Tulane top topped
ped topped Mississippi State 81-71; and
Alabama beat Stetson 75-50.
jjAmong the major independents:
Florida State beat Miami Friday
night 76-62 and the fading Hurri Hurricanes
canes Hurricanes lost to Jacksonville Saturday
night 71-69; Memphis State upset
Oklahoma City 97-87 on a 34-point
performance by sophomore Mikt
Butler; and Georgia Tech lost at
Wake Forest 96-80.
Sophomore Thad Jaracz led the
SEC Scoring Leaders
Name, team G Pts.Avg.
DeFore, Auburn 11 288 26.2
Lee, Vandy 13 307 23.6
Dampier, Kentucky 10 211 21.1
Andrews, Tulane 10 211 21.1
Riley, Kentucky 10 209 20.9
Nordholz, Alabama 11 216 19.6
Heroman, LSU 13 251 19.3
Williams, Miss. St. 10 186 18.6
Keller, Florida 10 181 18.1
Thomas, Vandy 13 221 16.9
SEC Standings
Cons. All
Team W L W L
Vanderbilt 3 0 12 1
Kentucky 1 0 10 0
Tennessee 21 73
Auburn 11 8 3
Georgia 11 5 3
Florida 11 6 4
Miss. State 11 5 5
Mississippi 11 4 5
Tulane 12 4 6
Alabama 0 17 4
Louisiana State 0 3 4 9
Independents
Team W L PF PA
Fla. State 6 5 787 772
Ga. Tech 6 6 968 916
Memphis St. 6 6 950 967
Miami 4 7 933 905
Frosh Swimmers
Win Handily
Floridas freshman swimmers
easily defeated South Florida Sa Saturday
turday Saturday 49-26 in a dual meet at
Florida Pool.
The Baby Gators set four new
freshman records in the romp over
the Golden Brahmans.
Andy McPherson SeTtew marks
in the 50- and 100-yar with clockings of 22.2 and 49.3,
respectively.
Butterfly records were set by
Steve Macri in the 100-yard with
54.5 and Barry Russo in the 200
with 2:03.4.

Kentucky attack Saturday night,
scoring 26 points before fouling
out with six minutes left in the
game. Kentuckys Pat Riley, who
had been averaging 23 points per
game, tallied only one against the
much taller Gators.
Big Clyde Lee, No. 2 scorer and
No. 1 rebounder in the SEC, had

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22 points and 16 rebounds to lead
the Commodores past Georgia. Lee
now has 1,409 points in two-and two-anda-half
a-half two-anda-half seasons six more than the
previous Vanderbilt scoring rec record
ord record it took Bobby Thym four sea seasons
sons seasons to amass.
Conference scoring leader Lee
DeFore tallied 21 points for Auburn

against LSU and is now averaging
J 6.2 points per game. But LSUs
Harry Heroman, who has a 19.3
average, was high man in the con contest
test contest with 25 points. <
Tennessee simply outclassed
Ole Miss Saturday night, vaulting
to ah 18-2 lead in the first five
minutes. Red Robbins led the way

with 26 points. The defense was par
for the Vols who have given up an
average of only 54 points per game
while posting a 7-3 mark.
I Seven-footer Craig Spitzer tal tallied
lied tallied 29 points to lead Tulane past
Mississippi State and sophomore
Mike Nordholz had 21 in Alabamas
victory over Stetson.



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SPORTS MACHINE

Page 25



Page 26,

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, January 10, 1966

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Kentuckys Tommy Kron looks around for ball and Gators Skip
Higley. Higley got the ball away for two, but it wasnt enough as the
Wildcats won 78-64.

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IT'S IN
All-SEC guard Louie Dampier
throws in a layup after driving
past Gators Mike Rollyson and
Skip Higley. ]

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THE 'GATOR AND ITS ADVERTISERS WELCOME YOU BACK TO THE Uof F
Mi
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But no one got the ball. Gators Mike Rollyson,
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Monday, January 10. 1966, The Florida Alligator,

SPORTS LtjlTOR
Looking at the holiday sports happenings in retrospect, it is
hard to decide whether Florida gained or lost prestige in the
sports world.
Take the Sugar Bowl game, for instance. Most of the nationwide
television audience turned from the game alter Missouri went
ahead 20-0. A comment from a friend of mine was, Let's watch
the Cotton Bowl, Florida is hopelessly outclassed.
For those who stuck with the game, the Gators projected an
image of the greatest offensive team in the nation in the fourth
quarter. But. how many fans stuck it out?
The ones who did are now saying that Steve Spurrier will be the
first million dollar bonus baby to sign a pro contract. Others have
him high on the list forth i966Heisman Trophy. Taking a realistic
look at things. Spurrier will have trouble duplicating his junior
performance with the loss of his three best receivers and the bulk
of his offensive line. And how many Southern quarterbacks have
won the Heisman award?
Then, one looks at, the basketball team and wonders what is
going to happen to it.
Norm Sloans charges have won three and lost four since the
FSU game on Finals Eve. They have looked like one of the nation's
better -teams (against North Carolina and DePaul) and like bush
leaguers (in the second game with Washington and against
Alabama).
Sloan has had more trouble figuring out who to play than anything
else. He has already had nine members of the squad in the starting
lineup. But, no combination really appears to be better than
another.
The two biggest hurdles facing the basketeers are speed and
shooting ability. This was most obvious Saturday when the team
was defeated by the unbeaten Kentucky Wildcats. Florida hit
only 25 per cent in the first half and was shown up by the Wildcats'
speed all afternoon.
If the Gators had hit just 40 per cent, which isn't asking too
much on one's home court, they would have been in the game
until the end, and might possibly have won.
Norm Sloans obvious game plan was highly successful as he
shuffled in and out ten different Gators while Kentucky Coach
Adolph Rupp went almost all the way with his starting five. Sloan
tried to wear the Wildcats down and was successful.
The other tenet of the game plan was to get some of the top
scorers (Louie Dampier, Thad Jaracz and Pat Riley) into foul
trouble. This also was successful. Riley and Jaracz both fouled
out of the game.
But, as the writers say, you have to put the ball in the basket
to win, and this is something the Gators have been highly incon inconsistent
sistent inconsistent at.
With a 6-4 record and the heart of the SEC schedule upon them,
Sloan has to come up with some steady shooting from somewhere.
Not that the Gators have no shots. Ed Mahoney and Mike Rollyson
were fantastic shots in high school and as freshmen. And Harry
Winkler has shown flashes of brilliance at times. If any member
of this trio regains his lost shooting eye. he along with Gary Keller
will be the key to the Gator offense. On this depends whether or
not Florida will have a good basketball year.
However bleak some consider the football and basketball pictures
at present, the future looks very bright. Footballs recruiting
year was its best in history and the freshmen basketball team has
a 7-0 record.
Among the notable grid signings were Jackie Eckdahl of Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville and Guy McTheny of Sarasota, the states best quarterback
duo in a decade. The freshmen basketeers look so good that three
of the performers could well start for the varsity next year.
This all makes the future look rosy, but most people want to
see results at the moment. In 1966, they are doubtful.
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Page 27



Page 28

l, The Florida Alligator, Monuay, January iu, lybb

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