Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
I
£, > Vol. 58, No. 66 University of Florida Wednesday, December 8, 1965
. .. ~ ...
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313 UF 26th In Size Os Universities

ill trimester classes attheUF
enat 10:05 p.m. today and final
*iinations begin at 7:30 p.m. to tonviov
nviov tonviov for 16.874 students enroll enrolljduring
jduring enrolljduring the current session.
Testing continues through Dec.
ff*|This trimesters graduates
wiibe eligible to receive their de defvs
fvs defvs next April 24 during com com-Bcement
-Bcement com-Bcement ceremonies at Florida
F'Bd.


tv.'&MBBRR if- n

The UFs full-time enrollment
total of 15,988 students during the
current fall trimester ranks the
institution 26th in a survey of na national
tional national figures by Dr. Garland G.
Parker of the University of Cin Cincinnati.
cinnati. Cincinnati.
Although Florida has 16,874 on oncampus
campus oncampus students and 400 others in
its graduate engineering program
at Cape Kennedy, Orlando and
Daytona Beach, the Cincinnati

study was compiled on the basis yielding the 15,988 total,
of full-time equivalency related The State University of New York
to hours studied by all students, (107,707), California state colleges
I We're Finished ]
Todays Alligator completes publication for this trimester. The £
Alligator will continue publishing on Jan 10, the first day of classes £
v following the Christmas break.

(97,730), University of California
(75,866), City University of New
York (56,120) and the University
of Minnesota (42,178) formed the
first five colleges and universities
in the United States.
Dr. Parker reported 3,292,539
full-time students and a grand total
of 4,586,057 among 1,095 accredit accredited
ed accredited universities, senior colleges
and four-year schools reporting
for his survey.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965

mm Kit , r
' E4M ; II J
§ ipqihhh^^^^^
International
JUNGLE BATTLE . American infantrymen and Communist forces
skirmished again today in the jungles around the Michelin rubber plan plantation
tation plantation 40 miles northwest of Saigon. The brisk firefight broke out as
men of the U. S. Ist Infantry Division fanned out through the jungles
hunting down a Viet Cong unit they cfashed with two days ago in a bitter
six-hour battle. A battalion of Americans suffered moderate casualties
in the Sunday night, but killed 231 Viet Cong by body count. Many more
Communist dead were believed dragged away.
>
STILL CONFIDENT . President Charles de Gaulle was returning
today to Paris not in triumph but apparently determined to go through
with the Dec. 19 runoff election against leftist Francois Mitterrand.
As the 75-year-old general motored to the capitol from his estate at
Colombey-les-deux-Eglises in Eastern France, top aides hinted strong
ly de Gaulle would put his first ballot rebuff behind him and compete a
second time. De Gaulle spent Monday in seclusion, pondering the vote
in which Frenchmen failed to give him the 50 per cent majority re required
quired required for re-election.
REDS FAIL AGAIN . Soviet space scien scientists
tists scientists failed today in their fourth attempt to put
a working package of instruments on the sur surface
face surface of the moon. The spaceship Luna 8 hit the
moon, but all indications were that it was
destroyed on impact instead of making a soft
landing. The systems of the station were func functioning
tioning functioning normally at all stages of the landing
except the final touchdown, the official Tass
news agency reported. Most Western observers
said the Tass report suggested a crash landing.
National
SPACEMEN RELAX ... A casually dressed pair of Gemini 7 astro astronauts
nauts astronauts soared into the fourth of their scheduled 14 days in space today
with scarecely a trouble in the world and began to get ready for a
rendezvous with Gemini 6 that may be staged next Sunday. Space twins
Fran Borman and James Lovell awakened from a nights sleep on an
alarm clock call from the tracking station at Carnarvon, Australia,
and started a rundown of the various experiments they will perform.
KHAN TO VISIT ... The White House announced today that President
Johnson will meet Pakistan President Mohammed Ayub Khan next
week in Washington not at Johnsons Texas Ranch. White House
sources also indicated Johnson will remain in the nations capitol
to hold his followup conferences with British Prime Minister Harold
Wilson. Announcement of the Presidents firm plans for the Ayub
Khan visit came as Johnson scheduled a lunch conference today with
his defense and state chiefs.
SOUTHERN TRIAL . Three white men go on trial at Selma, Ala.,
today in the slaying of a Boston minister following a civil rights
demonstration. Prosecutor Blanchard McLeod indicated he would
attempt to disqualify racially-biased jurors, and he said he had been
assured informally that such a challenge would be allowed by Alabama
Circuit Judge LJS. Moore. The three defendants, Odell Hoggle, 30, his
brother, Stanley, 36, and Elmer Cook, 41, were charged with the March
9 beating of the Rev. James Reebon a Selma street. Reeb died several
days later.
Florida
COLLINS FOR GOVERNOR? . Leoy
Collins is to indicate this week whether hell
run for another term as governor of Florida.
Collins, a deputy secretary of the U. S. Com Commerce
merce Commerce Department, said hell make a decision
and let it be known this week. If he decides to
enter the 1966 gubernatorial race, however, he
said hell hold off formal announcement until
he returns here for the Christmas holidays.
Hell merely announce he is resigning from the
Commerce Department. Some of the former
governors close friends said he has decided
fie should run and can win the race.
AIRLIFT DOUBLED . U. S. officials said today the Cuban airlift
may be doubled to two planes a day before the end of this week. The
sky shutUe, now in its fifth day, has landed 358 exiles here so far.
About 95 more were expected in by midday. Among the 96 arriving
Monday was Carlos Dorticos Pichardo, 61-year-old uncle of the
islands Communist president, accompanied by his wife, Delia, 52.
SswmJnt^nS
,0 itflM or turn awgy copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION E5 GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment (or any advertisement involving typo typographical
graphical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(I) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator wIU not be responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of ihe University of Florida and Is
pdillshari flee tiroes weekly except during May, June, and July when It is published semi-weekly. Only
represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class

Red Spending To Jump

By HENRY SHAPIRO
United Press International
MOSCOW (UPI) The Soviet
Union announced today it was
boosting military spending in 1966
by $666 million, a rise of 5 per
cent. The Russians made it clear
the boost was to counter the United
States increased war effort in Viet
Nam.
Finance Minister Vasily Garbu Garbuzov
zov Garbuzov announced a record peacetime
budget of $116.99 billion and said
12.8 per cent of this was ear earmarked
marked earmarked for military spending
$14.87 billion. Last year military
spending was reduced $555 million
to $14.2 billion.
The dollar figures are based on
the Soviets arbitrary exchange
rate of sl,lll to the ruble. Ac Actually
tually Actually the ruble is not a hard
currency which can be exchanged
on the world markets and the figure
is an artificial rate of exchange.
Western military experts said
STATEWIDE
Impact
QAtOR AdS

F.n mll r
~ *

the Soviet defense budget does not
represent actual expenditures for
military equipment that more
than half of it is disguised under
allocations for education, scien scientific
tific scientific research and other categor categories.
ies. categories. The U. S. defense budget for
the current fiscal year is 152.5
billion, plus an additional $1.7
billion President Johnson asked
later for Viet Nam.
In representing the budget to
the Soviet parliament for rubber
stamp approval Garbuzov did not

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mention the United States nor Viet
Nam by name. But his referee
to *imperialism and a war Tf
national liberation" are Com Communist
munist Communist equivalents.
Western diplomatic observers
said the figures he announced for
increased military spending were
really negligible in view of the
budgets disguised expenditures
and that the announcement may
have been intended as a propagan propaganda
da propaganda move to dramatize Soviet con concern
cern concern over the Viet Nam war.



Commission Eyes Racial Riot Remedies

By EDWARD SHIELDS
United Press International
BERLIN (UPI) -- Christmas spawns family reunions, but here
Christmas reunions are hampered by the ugly Communist Wall
which divides two worlds.
The Communists added a new tradition to Christmas here in
1963 when they allowed West Berliners for the first time in more
than two years to make one-day visits to their relatives in East
Berlin.
The West Berliners went through the Wall by the hundreds of
thousands, starting in the bone-chilling darkness of 7 a.m., and
not returning until the Communist midnight curfew.
The reunions went on for two weeks through the Christmas
season. They were repeated in 1964.
The Communists, seeking political capital, made it doubtful
almost until the last minute this year whether Berliners East
and West could have the only Christmas gift they really wanted.

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FOR INFORMATION, CALL 376-6720
p $ We'll have UF-type handball courts in
before tfie spring thaw.

Berlin: Wall Shatters Christmas

Yarmouth Loudspeaker Faulty

MIAMI (UPI) Loudspeaker
warning of disaster failed to reach
the passengers of the doomed
cruise liner Yarmouth Castle be because
cause because access to the public address
system was blocked by smoke,
the vessels cruise director testi testified
fied testified Monday.
Jose Martinez told a U.S. Coast
Guard board of inquiry it was his
job in an emergency to operate
the PA system. He was kept from
his post, he said, because chok choking
ing choking smoke filled the room where
the microphone was located.
Martinez, first witness as the
board began the third week of a
formal hearing into the disaster,
also said he was one of the first

CRUISE DIRECTOR TESTIFIES

But an agreement was finally reached on Nov. 24 after talks
that had dragged on since June.
One question the Communists had never left in doubt East
Berliners, except for the aged and infirm, would not be allowed
to go to West Berlin.
It was in tribute to the 17 million East Berliners locked in
their Communist satellite that other unique West Berlin customs
started.
On Christmas Eve the 26-mile length of the Wall and the whole
of the 68-mile barbed wire perimeter between West Berlin and
surrounding East Germany twinkle with the light of thousands
of candles.
Practically every home and shop along the border, and many
deeper inside the city, has at least one candle in the window as
a symbol to the fellow-Germans under communism that they are
not forgotten.

to see the flames spewing from
vacant Cabin 610 where the
fire apparently started -- but did
not turn in a general alarm.
I figured I wanted to notify
the master, Martinez said.
When he spotted the flames
through the door ventilator of Ca Cabin
bin Cabin 610, Martinez said, the ships
radio operator already was on the
scene with a fire extinguisher.
The radio man testified last week
that he activated a general alarm
box but other witnesses said the
alarm never reached the bridge
nor sounded on the ship.
The death toll rose Sunday to
90 of the 550 persons aboard the
Yarmouth Castle when Anne Martin
Jackson, 22, a passenger from
Vero Beach, Fla., died in a Miami
hospital of burns suffered in the
fire. The ship sank just before
dawn Nov. 13, about 125 miles east
of Miami, while on a cruise to
Nassau.
Just Arrived At
SILVERMAN'S
Regimental Stripe
Gator Orange & Blue
Ties In Pure Silk

GRADUA TION SPECIALS
ill 1 JOHNSTON PHOTOGRAPHY
1642 w. university ave./ 376-4995

The cruise director told the in inquiry
quiry inquiry board how he rushed to the
bridge to notify the Yarmouth
Castles skipper, how he was
blocked from reaching the public
address system and afterward how
he rushed below to awaken the
ships purser.
Martinez said he then began
hammering on the doors of state staterooms
rooms staterooms on a lower deck and guided
a group of passengers to the top
deck where they were loaded
aboard lifeboat No. 7.
Martinez said he left the flam flaming
ing flaming ship in the lifeboat because he
accidentally fell into it.
Union Trip
Deposits are now being accepted
for the annual Florida Union New
York City trip, which leaves
Gainesville on Dec. 28. The trip
offers seven days and six nights
in New York and includes round
trip train, hotel accommodations,
a Broadway musical, Lincoln Cen Center
ter Center Attractions and a complete tour
of the city.
The package trip will cost S9B
per person. A S3O deposit should
be made in the Program office,
room 315, Florida Union by Dec.
14.

Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

LOS ANGELES (UPI) Sweep Sweeping
ing Sweeping programs in employment, job
training, education and better po police
lice police relations are the keys to
solving the racial sickness in our
major cities, according to the
McCone Commission, which, in investigated
vestigated investigated the worst Negro riot
in this century.
In releasing its quarter- million milliondollar.
dollar. milliondollar. 101-page report on last
August's week-long riot in the
Watts-South Los Angeles area, the
eight-member commission Mon Monday
day Monday could not isolate one under underlying
lying underlying cause.
Rather. . . the causes and
contributing circumstances were
many. said Commission Chair Chairman
man Chairman John A. McCone, former head
of the Central Intelligence Agency
and the Atomic Energy Commis Commission.
sion. Commission. His group regarded problems
that precipitated the riot here as
universal among the nations large
urban areas.
The report listed such causes
as: High rate of Negro unemploy unemployment,
ment, unemployment, extremely low literacy rate
and poor preschool training, frus frustration
tration frustration over delay in implemen implementation
tation implementation of much-heralded federal
war on poverty, and resentment
of policy authority.
A contributing factor to the riot
here was a Negro population, which
mushroomed 10 times its size in
25 years. This, the commission
said, should have signaled the riot,
in which only about two per cent
of the citys Negro population par participated.
ticipated. participated. 0
First priority was given by the
commissions recommendations to
securing employment for those in
the Negro community who are un unemployed
employed unemployed and able to work. The
report also recommended a new
approach to educating Negro
children and greater emphasis by
police on crime prevention as an
essential element of the law en enforcement
forcement enforcement task.
Man Receives
Blood Refill
BOSTON (UPI) A2S-year-old
intern has successfully undergone
what doctors believe is the worlds
first total exchange of blood in an
adult to correct usually fatal liver
disease, it was disclosed Tuesday.
St. Elizabeth Hospital officials
said the intern, who was not iden identified,
tified, identified, was in good condition Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday and was up and about with
limited activity. He has been
eating solid food for several days.
A medical team at the hospital
replaced all the blood in the in interns
terns interns body with fresh blood twice
as they battled to cure the liver
disease known as fulminating hep hepatitis.
atitis. hepatitis. The blood exchange took
place last month.
Authorities estimated there
were 1,200 deaths a year in the
United States from fulminating
hepatitis.
It is not unusual for RH-incom RH-incompatible
patible RH-incompatible infants to undergo total
blood exchange. We are not aware
of any reports in medical litera literature
ture literature that this has been done in
adults before, Dr. Frederick
Stohlman, hospital medical chief,
said.
The experiment was undertaken
as a last resort.
I&ATQgIS
8 AOS T I
| REACH II
|pEOPIE)rT
li N i ¥ y 4 / I

Page 3



, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965

Page 4

students stomp
The 1966 Governors race is already well underway, with incumbent
Gov. Haydon Burns, ex-State Sen. Scott Kelly of Lakeland and Miamis
fiery little redhead Mayor Robert King High already'declared candi candidates
dates candidates for the spring primary.
The Alligator has been less than friendly toward the incumbent
Gov. Burns, primarily due to his meddling in the state university
system and also due to the controversial road bond which he backed.
Traditionally, the UF campus has been one small center of political
activity during statewide gubernatorial campaigns, but the interest
generated here has normally been among the student political activists
and the returning alumni many of 'them politicians rather than
among the studentry at large.
The adage is old and outworn, but the truth is that the
students of today ARE the leaders of tomorrow, and if student interest
regarding statewide races is as low in 1984 when the present sophomore
is 15 years into a business career as it is today, then good government
will remain a fleeting concept which is taught by civil teachers and
political science profs as the ideal, but is never quite realized.
What then do we ask? Attempts are presently being made on campus
to recruit student leaders to work in the Kelly, Burns and High cam campaigns.
paigns. campaigns. But these attempts affect only a small fringe element of the
student body the real activists.
Politics is meaningless to many students who do not understand
it nor care to attempt to understand it. Politics to many people is
tantamount to dirt, and most of the apolitical do not like to be tarnished.
Thus it is that the majority of students refuse to take a part in state
campaigns and hold back from any political affiliations, except when
some youthful star such as Kennedy appears on the horizon, wrapped
in idealism and untarnished by the political wars.
With all this considered, however, we request that students attempt
to familiarize themselves with the basic issues of the upcoming
campaigns, the personalities, and their backgrounds. And, if by doing
so they develop a strong attachment for one candidate, it is hoped
that they would not become a political introvert, but rather attempt
to influence others who either have no strong opinion or could care
less. Political education is something which this nation has refused
to stress all too long. It should become a facet of your university
career, if you plan to be a citizen in the true sense of the word.
So, follow the upcoming campaign and especially scrutinize the
candidates and their stands re: education and other particulars which
are or should be important to you, the student. Then, if the desire is
great enough, spread the word on campus, back home, and even
throughout the state.
proliferation
ohn Kennedy warned us about it while he was still alive. Attempts
have been made to get countries to refrain from doing it. And,
yet the maddening pace continues. By 1970 there may be 10 more
countries with nuclear capability.
The haves, of course, do not desire to see the present have nots
join the expanding Nuclear Club. But, unless a worldwide dis disarmament
armament disarmament conference becomes a reality, or unless coercion by the
present club members is used against the have-nots, the proli proliferation
feration proliferation will continue. The outlook is bleak.
Latest reports from London, Bonn and Washington demonstrate
that the following nations, now not considered as nuclear powers,
either now have or soon will have the potential for producing atomic
bombs: Canada, Czechoslovakia, Belgium, India, Israel, Italy, Japan,
West Germany, Sweden, and the Netherlands. In addition to these,
the names of Switzerland, Egypt and Indonesia have frequently popped
up in discussion of entrance requirements to theN-Club lately.
The present membership stands at five: The United States, Russia,
Great Britain, France and Red China.
The above-mentioned 10 nations at present do not show an overly
strong inclination to scrap the conventional and run headlong into the
Nuclear Age. However, the point of importance is that all of them
already have or are in the process of installing nuclear research
power reactors, ones which can be easily converted into plutonium plutoniumproducers.
producers. plutoniumproducers.
According to a quote by Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) boss
John C. Palfrey in Decembers U. S. News and World Report, by
1970 more than ten thousand kilograms of plutonium are likely to be
manufactured by the worlds nuclear power reactors each year
enough to create 1700 A-bombs per year.
No nation among the Potential Ten has taken the big step yet,
but should Israel, Japan or India, for example, decide to make the
big move, then proliferation could easily be triggered. And each of
these nations has good reason to join the growing club.
India at present lives in the nuclear shadow of Red China, and every
Sinkiang desert blast lures the Shastri Administration one step closer
to a defensive policy of initiating their own nuclear arsenal. According
to reliable reports, the Indians, though not in possession of a bomb
at present, are at least as far advanced down the nuclear trail as the
Chinese.
Likewise, with Japan poised between the U. S. and Mainland China,
the Nipponese, who felt the brunt of the first device 20 years ago,
have valid reasons of self protection for entering the race. Israel
could use the Bomb to safeguard herself from the omnipresent threat
or attack by the Arab states.
The present idea is that of building nuclear reactors in various
countries for peaceful purposes. How long will they remain peace peaceful?
ful? peaceful? Just as long as the ruling clique of the affected countries so desire.
Proliferation shall continue and the have-nots shall get the bomb
if that is what they want. And the world shall be the worse for it.
And, practically, there is little hope that this shall be averted, since
nationalism and patriotism is more important than world protection
and world order, and the battle between communism and capitalism
more important than whether there shall remain a battleground left
on which the battle can be fought.
Whoever aided in the construction of the present Balance of Terror
must smile at the thought of the 10 new variables which may be thrown
into the balancing process at a date not so distant in the future.
For, proliferation, in the pursuit of Peace, is peculiarly ridiculous.

A s the trimester comes roar roar,j\ing
,j\ing roar,j\ing to an abrupt halt, wild
rumors concerning the spring
campus election campaign con continue
tinue continue to penetrate the indifferent
atrposphere of the Florida Lnion
basement.
One has it that the possibility

MWERTO]
VWWEERO. CIS*.
"You're lucky! I got 2 seats left on a flight in 1983."
The
Florida. Alligator
Steve Vaughn Benny Cason
Editor Managing Editor
LETTER:
freshman rebuts Hutbhins
Dear Sirs,
In his column in The Alligator of Dec. 1, Dr. Robt. Hutchins, among
other things, stated that the Communist conspiracy which we poor
ignorant Americans have been made aware of, no longer exists.
Oh yeah? Well doc, think hard now, who was it that took over and
put missiles in Cuba just a few short years ago? Who has been, and
still is supplying arms to the murderous savages in the Congo? Who
was it that tried to take over Indonesia just about a month ago? Who
invaded who in Viet Nam, and still occupies about half the other guys
land? Who built and still maintains the Berlin Wall imprisoning those
in East Germany who desire to escape communism? Who is it that is
causing the guerrilla uprisings in South America, and who is illegally
arming them? Who constantly abuses its veto power in the U. N. in
order to frustrate world peace efforts? Who is the largest debtor in
the U. N. who still refuses to pay? Who was it that took over what
started out as a popular revolution, in the Dominican Republic,
threatening to turn this nation into another Cuba?
The answer, my dear doctor, is pure and simple, the Communists
both Chinese and Russian.
Then the good doc comes out with the profound statement that the
Russians would prefer the U. S. to the Chinese Reds in Viet Nam, and
Ho Chi Minh to both. It must have taken some real brain-straining to
figure that one out. I think my eleven-year-old brother can see that
he would rather live near one who passively resists him, than near
one who more actively acts against him, and that he would prefer one
who is neutral or even a bit friendly toward him over the others.
Such brain power!
Then he says that we should helpdefendViet Nam from the Chinese.
Sure doc. Here s what we should do (according to you). First, we build
U P i!* Vl ? t Nam t 0 ensure her from aggression by China then we
withdraw from S. Viet Nam. Then Ho Chi and his boys overrun S. Viet
Nam, while Mao Tse and his boys take credit for driving out the
paper tiger Americans, and we sit back and take it in the ear
You score again, doc!
He also states that the Russians need more domestic attention
So do we. So we try to ease tensions by trying to get them to join us'
or let us join them, in various projects, including some in the space
field, so,we can both relax some, and better our respective countries
So what do we get? We getalot of talk about American Imperialism
and. ,n general, the cold shoulder, except when they need sfrne whe"t.
The} are the ones causing high defense spending, not us
A y > he says that we sh( >uld trust the Russians. Tell me oh
great Ph.D in everything, would you trust a dog that has bitten yoS
of 54 times you walk by him? I dont think even you are that
fit grade. y r ** **: in policy youre still in
Mike Davidson, lUC

campus confetti

of a direct clash between Greeks
and Independents is not impossible.
At present, the aftermath of Blue
Key tapping continues, with several
fraternities formerly linked with
Progress Party reportedly back backing
ing backing sub silentio the candidacy of
freshman law student Buddy

Jacobs, the SAEs gift to the no. H
litical wars. ***"
Reportedly, a mammoth partv H
may be fielded behind the candi- |
dacy of Jacobs, with theex-U.R A H
president riding the crest of a
tremendous bloc vote support. H
According to reputable sources I
there may be a split arising withii I
the ranks of the SAE fraternity I
house Reports have it thathouse I
political titans Mike Hollingsworth |
and Charlie Edwards have hadbit- I
ter words and that Hollingsworth |
may go his separate way. This, of |
course, is only a rumor, and I
chances are that by February the I
Men of the House of the Lion shall I
be back together.
If this is true, the opposing
party (whomever that may be) may I
appeal to the old Greek versus I
Independent issue, last fully raised I
in the 1960 campaign when Inde- I
pendent Bob Parks took advantage I
of the intense Greek-Independent I
feelings to sweep to a landslide I
victory. Steve Cheeseman is re- 1
portedly the potential candidate I
who could possibly take advantage I
of such a position.
Ron LaFace, former President
of Florida Blue Key, is heading
the campus organization backing
the candidacy of former State Sen.
Scott Kelly of Lakeland, despite
some opposition. Mac Melvin, sen senior
ior senior law student who headed the
campus drive for Haydon Burns in
the *64 gubernatorial campaign
reportedly is steering clear of
commitment this spring. Could it
be that astute politician Mac has
heard the word from above?
CHRISTMAS STOCKING: Heres
what the following people should
get for Christmas.
FRANK GLINN A new, pearl pearlhandled
handled pearlhandled Jim Bowie knife, since his
old, trusted one is still embedded
in the back of a close friend.
DEAN LESTER HALE a five fiveyear
year fiveyear subscription to Charlatan
Magazine, a 200-pound bag of Ajax
detergent and a Don Federman
Voodoo Doll.
GOV. HAYDON BURNS A
four-lane highway running through
the Okeefenokee Swamp.
VICE PRES. FOR ACADEMIC
AFFAIRS 808 MAUTZ A re refresher
fresher refresher course on how to take
(and destroy) notes.
JIM CRABTREE An honor
bike.
BRUCE CULPEPPER A
three-months subscription to Jack
and Jill magazine, a spirit hat
and a giant-economy sized litter
basket, complete with litter.
DICK THOMPSON Eighteen
shares in the Port St. Joe Paper
Company, with dividends.
LINDA MITCHELL A new, red
1966 Futura Falcon with black up upholstery
holstery upholstery and an ATTACK engine.
JOHN WEBB, CHAIRMAN Ot
BOARD OF STUDENT PUBLICA PUBLICATIONS
TIONS PUBLICATIONS At least three new
members.
ED RICHER Fourteen gift giftwrapped
wrapped giftwrapped sit-ins in Bob Mautz
office.
HARRY PHILPOTT An athe atheist
ist atheist to head the philosophy depar
ment at Auburn University.
BILL KILLEEN An auto autographed
graphed autographed picture of Dean Hale, a
copy of Ralph Ginzburgs lates
edition of Eros and lifetime
protection against lawsuits.
MIKE HOLLINGSWORTH
Three autographed fan pictures o
Mac Melvin.
SHARON HODGE A nic
quiet little job as secretary to
some innocuous organization i
Mortar Board.
PERRY MOORE A new, 25-
cent, watered-down Coke, for con
sumption aWootball games.



SPEAKING OUT

state candidates should stress education

By JERRY BERLIN
Editors Note . Jerry Berlin
is a freshman law student from
Miami and presently a supporter
of the candidacy of Miami Mayor
Robert King High. He hopes, as
do the editors, that the forthcoming
election will see the generation of
greater interest among students
on the UF campus.

JTT he choice of who shall govern
the state of Florida is being
left up to the voters. Alliances are
forming, friends and acquaintances
are being re-established.
There are presently three de declared
clared declared candidates and probably not
a forth major candidate ... at
least not this year.
Last week Vice President Hu Hubert
bert Hubert Humphrey called on educators
from 11 southern states to join the
Government in improving educa education.
tion. education. He said:
There is tremendous transition
taking place in the Southland. No
other region of America has a
greater opportunity ... the eco economic
nomic economic gap between the South atnd
the rest of the nation is rapidly
closing and the education gap must
also close.
Florida is one of the fastest
growing states in the nation, yet
it ranks approximately 44th in ed educational
ucational educational spending.
The entire state should awaken
to this education crisis. But there
must be some impetus to move
the voters in the right direction.
We as students are the closest
group to this problem, and as a
group, must seek to assure our ourselves
selves ourselves that there will be adequate
and accredited educational insti institutions
tutions institutions available to ourselves and
our children.
Fortunately this is a guberna gubernatorial
torial gubernatorial election year and by choos choosing
ing choosing the proper man to govern us
for the next four years, we will be
taking a step to improve our lot.
LETTER:
tragic, but true
Re: The Alligator, Dec. 2
Don Golds Societys Inhibitions
and Dean Hales Bah, Humbug.
Mr. Gold, you put into print
something that is quite tragic, but[
true in our society. And it seems
to be more prevalent on univer university
sity university campuses than anywhere else.
Its very sad, you know. It really
is. You sit in class and listen, but
nothing goes in. And then you get
up and leave and then you sit and
listen again, but nothing goes in.
Not really. (Motivation is a great
word.) And in the course of twelve
hours, you hear and respond to
the same sounds: Is this seat
taken? How are you? Was
there anything due today? Hi!
Thank you. And it all comes out
like an involuntary cough, full of
dryness.
And you get up and leave and
walk on, counting as you go the
same counts between cracks as
you counted before. The same looks
as before, the same vacant, but
imploring look and you wish you
could go up and comfort and hug
. But no. You walk on and they
walk on and again you have failed,
again you have remained superbly
cold and impersonal! And you feel
sad. You feel so sad, because it
will happen again and again and
again. And you walk on . and
on . and on.
And what is really and truly
tragic, Dean Hale, is that all those
kind words spoken by casual
passers-by simply never come
about. They simply never come
about.
Jon Elliot

LETTER:

The question is now: who is our
man?
Our present governor has shown
his minimal interest in education.
Road contractors cannot be paid
off by increasing teachers salar salaries!
ies! salaries! Unless we have adequate edu educational
cational educational facilities, Florida cannot
sustain its present rate of growth.
' If Gov. Burns, as the Mayor of
Jacksonville, did not care enough
to do anything about HIS children
graduating from non-accredited
schools, should he now care about
others? Blood IS thicker than water.
Imagine our state schools in the
same condition as Jacksonvilles
non-accredited schools. It can hap happen,
pen, happen, and almost did, as evidenced
in the great Reitz-Burns dispute,
which if not for the UF student
body effort might still be boiling.
Scott Kelly may possibly be the
answer.
Kelly has been making a lot of

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political noise for the past two
years, but unfortunately has said
almost nothing about education un until
til until recently.
Kelly, after feeling the anti-
Burns sentiment at the UF Home Homecoming,
coming, Homecoming, began expounding sounds
of education. He has said there is
a problem. Fine we already
know that. He has said that educa education
tion education is very important. Fine again.
In other words, Kelly has shown
interest in us, but has yet done
nothing concrete.
What are his motives? Is he go going
ing going to do anything for education or
is he just making education
noises because it is politically
expedient? Does he believe in help helping
ing helping education, or is he just jumping
on the proverbial bandwagon.
Sometimes the means justify the
ends. Regardless of Mr. Kellys
reasons, if he can help education,
Florida will benefit. Surely this is

true isnt it?
I think not. We must be more
careful in examining the scruples
of the man to whom the highest
office goes.
Robert King High, Miamis re recently
cently recently re-elected mayor, rounds
out the triumverate of declared
candidates.
Plans are being made to build
a new junior college in Miami to
relieve some the the stresses of
the states largest college (Miami-
Date Junior College).
As chairman of Miamis down downtown
town downtown authority, High has been the
man to push this college to the
point of reality.
Robert King High IS doing some something
thing something about education. He is not
just jumping on the bandwagon and
talking in political generalities like
so many other candidates.
High is taking an active stand on
the issue.

Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

When examining a candidate for
governor, one must look at what
he is doing, not what he says he
might do.
As students, we must speak
out and urge all candidates to
support education. To date, only
one man has committed himself.
But we must continue to inform
him, as well as the other candi candidates,
dates, candidates, of the great need for quality
education in Florida.
The Vice President said last
week at Richmond, Virginia, to a
meeting of Southern educators, the
purpose of the gathering was to
insure that all the people of the
South have a chance to obtain edu education
cation education that will allow them to
develop their potential for leader leadership.
ship. leadership. Floridas governor should
adhere to this.
We now have the ball; lets carry
it properly and not fumble it. For
this loss, if we lose, will cost us
more than 50 Sugar Bowls.

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965

Collins heads Miami poll

Editor:
Upon reading Gary Blonstones
headline, Poll Shows Collins Win
in Governors Election, inSection
C (local news) of last Sundays
Miami Herald, I was surprised to
discover that our former governor
faired strongest in Central Flori Florida,
da, Florida, came in first in Dade County
with 20.8% more votes than Miami
Mayor Robert King High, and only
fell short by 5.3% of the vote to
Gov. Burns in the northern section.
14.5% in this later area was un undecided
decided undecided which, incidentally, is a
very healthy minority. The poll
was taken statewide of only regis registered
tered registered white Democrats with listed
telephones. The survey was taken
by Collins supporters and conduct conducted
ed conducted by Independent Research Asso Associates
ciates Associates of Miami on Nov. 20-21
among 786 persons in 19 Florida
counties representing 77% of the
electorate. Eight northern, eight
central, and three southern, (Palm
Beach, Broward', and Dade) coun counties
ties counties were chosen.
Statistics:
1. 54.7% of the voters contacted
favored Collins over Burns in
Nov. 66.
2. First Primary Poll: a. Col Collins
lins Collins 31.1%; b. Burns 24.8%;
c. Kelly 16.9%; d. High
13.2%; e. Undecided 14.0%.
3. Second Primary Poll: a.
Collins 54.7%; b. Burns
35.6%; c. Undecided 9.6%.
4. Southern counties (no statis statistics
tics statistics but Dade representing approx approximately
imately approximately 1/5 of the states popu population):
lation): population): a. Collins -- 42.3%; b.
Burns 18.3%; c. Kelly 3.8%;
d. High 21.5%; e. Undecided
14.1%.
5. Dade County (choice of Col Collins
lins Collins or Burns): a. Collins
61.3%; b. Burns 29.1%; c.
Undecided 9.6%.
6. Central Counties: a. Collins

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65.9%; b. Burns 28.1%;
c. Undecided 6.0%.
7. Northern Counties: a. Col Collins
lins Collins 40.1%; b. Burns 45.4%;
c. Undecided 14.5%.
All indications seem to suggest
that Collins will not run since he
has politically nothing to gain and
everything to lose. A Federal Cab Cabinet
inet Cabinet post (Sect, of Housing and Ur Urban
ban Urban Affairs) or a Senate seat
(George Smathers will very likely
step down in 1968 because of poor
health) would be too tempting to
take a chance on with any politi politically-minded
cally-minded politically-minded human being. Al Although
though Although it really would be a genuine

Merry Christmas
It's difficult to get enthusiastic about Christmas with a week-and week-anda-half
a-half week-anda-half of exams staring you in the face.
However, it is with sincere wishes that all our readers will enjoy
a well-deserved Christmas Holiday that we conclude the publishing
of this trimesters Alligator.
This was a trimester for which we all have much to be thankful;
it saw the iron hand of political meddling in the university system
smacked and perhaps seriously injured. It saw the Florida football
team earn a 7-3 record, national ranking and a post-season ticket
to the Sugar Bowl. It saw the University community grow both physi physically
cally physically and in terms of excellence.
For all those who aided in the giant strides made by the University
in the Fall of 1965, we offer our sincere wishes for a very Merry
Christmas. For everyone, we hope that Christmas shall be the cul culmination
mination culmination to a very eventful year.
For those young men entering military service upon graduation,
we trust that your efforts will be in behalf of terminating the conflict
and eventually bringing the possibility of a true peace to a society
which truly needs peace on earth.
For those who look into the future, we would remind that the New
Year brings much untested promise . promise for reform of old
mistakes, a new, fresh slate on which to write the tale of a new phase
in our lives.
Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

l
I;:

blessing for the majority of Flor Florida
ida Florida voters to turn out Haydon Burns
next November.
Oh well, I suppose we all try,
hope, and struggle for the Ideal,
and as far as I am presently per personally
sonally personally concerned, Its 13.2%
Time during the first Democratic
Primary. Then it will probably
have to be Go Team in the sec second,
ond, second, and Democrats and Indepen Independents
dents Independents for whomever the Repub Republican
lican Republican nominee is in the general
election even if its as poor a
choice as they made in 1964.
Chuck Elliott, 3AR

food for thoughfl
Editor: I
I should like to direct this suggestion in general to all the student!
at UF, but in particular to the fraternities on campus.
This is my first term at UF, having transferred from a Mid
university. Immediately before coming here, I lived for several month!
in Ann Arbor, Mich., attending the University of Michigan as a
student. Michigan has a student body of over 30,000. The campus is!
beautiful, tree-lined, ivy sort of place. Most of the students live i!
apartments. Very few go Greek. At night, the campus is quite dark an!
eerie. Ann Arbor isnt much different from Gainesville when it com!
to having their share of odd-balls. Women have been attacked sin!
who knows when, and the problem will no doubt continue. However!
some of the fraternities at UM are doing something constructive t]
alleviate the situation. After reading in The Alligator about one of ouJ
young fillies being kidnaped over the weekend, I thought I might tej
y'all how the Yankee gentlemen attempt to protect their women fnikl
The frats have organized an escort service. They run a continuous!
ad in The Michigan Daily listing a phone number to which ANY (Greek!
or not) coed can call and request a male escort to walk her to her!
campus residence from the library, Union, lab, etc., for free. Toray|
knowledge, the system has proven most successful. I dont knowhow|
the fraternity men have worked but the arrangements among them-l
selves, but it shouldnt be too complicated. In any event, this exem-|
plifies the true spirit of good will to which fraternities would have usl
believe.
May this be food for thought.
MacLaren David Peace, 3As|
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I
MOBILE HOME?
Old Fla vets, looking like post-war vintage mobile homes, are being phased out and will soon be replaced
by new married student housing.

/Hoof Court Finals Slated

Regional winners of moot court
competition throughout the United
States, including the UFs three threeman
man threeman team, will meet in the final
round of national judging at New
York, Dec. 14-17.
More than 60 students from 21
colleges and universities will pre present
sent present appellate cases with the final
elimination presided over by U.S.
Supreme Court Justice John M.

: v l
M^^^Shts.*. s' Bi signer ifip§^&^^^
Jaw Jgfflp
ARCHITECTURAL LADS: From left, Professor J.T. Lendrum, George Scheffer,
David Gleason, James H. Anstis and Richard H. Stipe.

Architects Get
Awards
Six UF students in the Depart Department
ment Department of Architecture recently re received
ceived received scholarship awards for out outstanding
standing outstanding achievement in architec architectural
tural architectural construction and design dur during
ing during the annual convention of the
Florida Association of Architects.
The Florida Solite Company of
Jacksonville contributed S4OO for
the scholarship fund.
James H. Anstis. West Palm
Beach, received SIOO for academic
excellence in studies of construc construction
tion construction with David C. Gleason of
Tarpon Springs rated second in
that division for a SSO award.
Architectural design awards of
SIOO and SSO respectively, went
to Richard H. Stipe. Falls Church.
Va., andGeorgeScheffer, Caracas.
Venezuela.
Christopher Benninger of
Gainesville captured the design
competition first prize of $75 and
Carlos Gonzalez of Philadelphia.
Pa., placed second for $25.
XER6X e6fs?r§[
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Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
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Harlan.
Floridas moot court team won
the Southeastern Regional Tourna Tournament
ment Tournament last month in Atlanta.
Robert Manley of Miami, Bruce
Lazar of Winter Park and Gordon
Harris of Jacksonville will repre represent
sent represent the University with Gene
Brown of Tallahassee and Woodrow
M. Melvin of Milton serving as
alternates.

IN A 007% SURVEY (the samplers were BONDed)
all girls tested said it was any anything
thing anything but Top Secret that the
most fashionable undercover
stuff going these days is the
latest French, Italian and A-
Go-Go lingerie by
2 iW
Close In For The Way Out
.tl AT AA 0 1511 NW Sixth St.
tftPhone 372-1226
. Trim Materials Humor Decorations
ALOU... Novelties -Toys Lingerie

Fletcher Baldwin, associate
professor of law and faculty advi advisor
sor advisor for the team, will accompany
the law students to New York.
Winners of the national moot
tournament will receive awards
of law books and trophies.
The University of Florida sub submitted
mitted submitted the best brief in the na national
tional national meet a year ago after win winning
ning winning regional honors at Atlanta.

A Cold Shoulder

While swallows may be return returning
ing returning to Capistrano, the snowbirds
of New York, New Jersey, Pennsyl Pennsylvania
vania Pennsylvania and other weather-prone
states of the North apparently are
migrating to the UF.
Figures released for on-campus
enrollment at the UF show about
1,300 of the 2,156 out-of-state stu students
dents students hail from areas normally hit
by colder temperatures.
New York leads with 274 students
in attendance; New Jersey is next
with 157, followed by Virginia, 127.
and Illinois, 120.
Floridians number 14.242 of the
record 16.874 student population.
The remainder are from other
countries (476) or the 49 states.
Idaho, Montana and North Dakota
each have one student at the Uni University
versity University and Alaska and Utah have
two apiece.
Enrollment this year is up 1,173
from the fall trimester a year ago.
Dade County retained its lead for
Florida counties with 2,829 stu students,
dents, students, nearly 17 per cent of the
overall total and 188 more than in
1964.
Dade is followed by Alachua
(1,318), Duval (1,313), Pinellas
(987), and Orange (926) among
leading counties on campus.

New York?!
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Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Only one of the state's 67 coun counties
ties counties is not represented at the Uni University
versity University this yearLiberty. Three
Florida counties have fewer than
five students enrolledGlades
with four, Lafayette with three and
Franklin with one.
Students this year include 11,711
men and 5.163 women, respective
increases of 747 and 426 over the
1964 totals.
A boost also was noted in the
Graduate School enrollment with
the current 2,182 students, 190
more than last year. Florida ac accounted
counted accounted for 1,198 of the total,
followed by New York (77), Penn Pennsylvania
sylvania Pennsylvania (49) and Georgia (48).
There are 212 graduate students
here from foreign countries.
Rice-Grose
Bicycle Shop
1632 W. University Ave.
SELL* BUY* TRADE
REPAIR BICYCLES
Open From 9 to 6
Monday- Saturday
Across From Campus

Page 7



Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

On or off the green, the Golf has sporting dash and style jSjj^K
exclusivTcalibre Cloth (65% Dacron polyester/35% Jj
cotton) itwards off wind, sheds rain, and is completely S/A
wash and wear. With zip-front, double-lined yoke, and Mg
\ JV '^Sr
> 9 V fill FREE PARKING ON IST FEDERAL LOT jj ;'
tonoonfoo* rear of store We
* A
PINNA ML FOUR SPEED I
PERFORMANCE specialists jMI MONAURAL "DROP-A-MATIC
Jg| SOLID STATE PORTABLE
sales and service agent for CAJJD fSjj with power transformer I
U i|JJjj| Regularly $47.50 Now $42.25 I
SPORTS CAR SERVICE FOR THOSE HOLIDAY TRIPS sru '" w fll
STALWART SWEDISH WBHMt
Service on All Makes and Models of Sports Cars lljjjt
Major Overhauls-Rings, Valves-Clutch and Transmission Work I DEUII
1 B /yjy/'
Electrical Systems Competition Tuning Lucas and Bosch Ignition Systems JSJjf
PINNA PERFORMANCE SPECIALISTS JR T
1031 SOUTH MAIN STREET I
Phil Crisl Manager 378-2136 DOUBLE POWERED AM I
(A) TINSEL GARLAND '|B feet of bright silver CAg 24 feet of I-inch silver foil roping, PA J\.
wida. For mantel, tree or window. JJJJ *> us#fu w effective. Univ.

Page 8



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Page 9

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965



i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965

Page 10

Igator classifiedsi

for rent
3 BEDROOM, 2STORY unfurnished
house. Kitchen equipped: in nice
residential section. $125. per sac.
Available Jan. 1. Call Wayne Masco:
at Ernest Tew Realty. S?S-44&1.
(B-66-lt-c).
A WARM, QUIET ROOM for uuOf
student in NW section. U* of
refrigerator. No drinking or smfc smfcing.
ing. smfcing. 376-0006. (B-66-lt-c).
APT. TO SUBLET in Colotaal
Manor Apts. Call 378-4772. (B (B---66-1
--66-1 (B---66-1 t-c).
ROOM IN PRIVATE HOME to stud?
for finales. 2049 NW 9Ave.forone
woman student. Call 6-6997. (B (B---66-1
--66-1 (B---66-1 t-c).
NICE, CLEAN corner single room.
Three blocks from Univ. $25 per
month. Men only, upperclassmen.
1614 NW 3 Place. For appt. call
2-7366 or 2-2946. (B-66-lt-c).
NEW 1 & 2 BEDROOM APTS.
Air cond. Couple only. Available
now and January. FR 2-9569. (B (B---65-2t-c).
--65-2t-c). (B---65-2t-c).
ONE BEDROOM furnished apt.,
new, across from Ramada Inn.
Central air cond. & heating, park parking.
ing. parking. $l2O per month. FR 2-6232.
(B-65-2t-c).
ONE BEDROOM furnished apt.,
available Jan. 1. Nice location.
Reasonable. 372-7377. 311 NW 26
St. (B-65-2t-c).
ONE ROOM furnished apartment,
private entrance and bath, S4O
monthly. 15 min. walk to campus.
Call 2-7228 after 6 p.m. (B-65-
2t-p).
Tl ii n mmwmmm %
COED ROOMMATE TO SHARE
modern apartment within walking
distance of campus. 8-1530. Apt.
4, 1824 NW 3 Place. (B-65-2t-c).

1 [AREA SHOWING!I
I 2 n .IJHHi men at Oiangi Prison...bat only|
one rould be King of the park...! I
InikL*
Bm Mw I
rr nfl B a n /a B {Mr

for rent
LARGE ULTRA-MODERN
jaoeas anpcs AvuDa&fe aoty X'
qunec eeasKTtnw wstft ~i.-
oxi snernous RAtmLO?.
spinster iac Jocsiec wary mr mrvenaefnfH
venaefnfH mrvenaefnfH witt xr xttaigus?
Mxsc u heliewr a: 3TE nv.
V# f titn. L. T-SB
RX)lr for rrub
Dins* xr canines. R3O me. Drcpw
nttec srjujHiUf floor
;u-n.i;aumii armnsMum. Dal Mite
ii 2f W 4 t
(B-45*In-*;, L
ONE HEDSLTCM umsiwi uwr v vroent.
roent. vroent. 5170 lec numb iiuiludng
A.C.. heis ijc vamr luiiaam ire
3. Call 8-23iSik L 324 NW 4 Awk.
#L. (B-65-2t-c]%
FURNISHED AIR-CONDmC NED
APT: 2 blocks from Anderson Hail
& Library. S6O/ roo. A Tillable for
winter trimester for 2 students or
one male to student to share with
present occupant. Come by 1414-
1/2 NW 2 Ave. (upstairs). (B-64-
3t-c).
NEW AIR-CONDITIONED APT.,
with kitchen. Suitable for 2 or 3
people. SBS per month. From
campus a 5 min. walk. Call Ricky
at 376-9252. (B-64-3t-p).
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM apt.
Air-conditioned. 2-1/2 blocks
from campus. Married couples.
S9O month. Call 8-4257. (B-64-
3t-c).
NEAR CAMPUS. Air-cond. apt. for
2nd trimester. Suitable for 2 or 3,
$75 and SBS. Suitable for 3or 4,
SIOO. Tenants pay electricity.
Univ. Apartments. 6-8990 after
4 p.m. (B-65-2t-c).

for rent
4 BEDROOM. wW bad! 22$
~ A?C L Oil -Kxvnwjvdtote
.p x- 5 sriaews. rr
;.ue
DKJaK*ddK late s3s
nv>ralC*. Dal
X.S
DSE: !S2XiK funnsted ape tor
rem. 3SAT 51 H Awe. Call S7B S7B
- S7B ii mrcninj: Nerwees: 7-10 and
N-f 1.-TT., #tc v w
ONI 3EDB2CM apartment ready
tor wapasy. Married couples
imttten. Nc rfa.ldtren or pets. Call
STfr-flitf*. ,E-fs-4t-c).
I 3EDRCCM unfurnished apt.,
txxDuiu* after December 15. 1
ijdcist irem campus. Kitchen equip equip;er
;er equip;er jins one air cond. unit. Call
S-dILJ see at 103 NW 21 St.
1 BEDROOM furnished, dark-wood
paneled new studio apt. across
from golf course. Call 372-6452.
After 7:00. (B-63-tf-nc).
ONE OR TWO male students to
take over two room apartment
for winter trimester. One block
from campus. Air-conditioned.
Phone 8-4973. (B-59-3t-nc).
APARTMENT available in Jan. in
Colonial Manor. Call 8-3697. (B (B--6sr2t-p).
-6sr2t-p). (B--6sr2t-p).

; NED

mjbjL- 1
m fTF m M "~ M
(L*' <
1 for rent |
FOR WINTER TRIMESTER. Fur Furrwms
rwms Furrwms tor boys. Double or
Private hath, air cond.
CvNtveeaeM h? Univ. and town. 105
NW 7 Terr. ST2-0809.(B-65-2t-c).
FOR WINTER TRIMESTER. Con Conscientious
scientious Conscientious male room mate to share
1 bedroom apartment. Furnished.
Air-conditioned, kitchen. SBS
monthly. Call 8-4972. (B-64-3t-c).
SINGLE FRONT CORNER ROOM
with kitchen, TV, phone and study
room privileges. 231 SE 2 St.
(B-64-ts-c),
real estate
FOR SALE BY OWNER in highly
restricted area, three lovely
homes each with 3 bedrooms, cen central
tral central heat and on large lots. Near
elementary school. (I-61-6t-c).
TWO AND ONE-HALF ACRES in
W. Gainesville area with elegant
new 3 bedroom, 2 bath home.
Large family room, separate din dining
ing dining room and living room. Central
heat. $19,500. Call Les Jackson,
builder, 378-2222 or 376-7090.
(1-62- st-c).
MUST SELL 3 bedroom CB house.
1-1/2 baths, large screen porch,
carport, 2 utility rooms. Excellent
cond. Newly decorated. S6OO down,
no closing cost. $Bl payments.
372-6985 or 376-1254. (I-66-lt-c).

services
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL: Beautiful
color portraits, cap & gown, appli applications,
cations, applications, copies, etc., reasonably
priced. SNEERINGER PHOTO,
1013-1/2 W. Univ. Ave. 378-1170.
(M-64-3t-c). s
personal
M. D. D. Inc. is looking for new
ideas, not hair brained schemes,
but good sound thinking. If you
think you have a sound idea and
want to sell it or get financial
help while putting it to work, call
me at 2-3572 day or night. Ask
for Mr. Corson. (J-62-st-p).
WANT TO CRAM FOR EXAMS?
In peace and quiet? Holiday Inn of
Williston (where the Fighting
Gators stay) offers special rates
to U of F students. Phone for
reservations. 528-4801. (J-62-
st-c).
HAPPY 21st BIRTHDAY JO. Dont
take too big a swallow. (J-66-
lt-nc).
HAPPY THIRD ANNIVERSARY
JILL. (J-66-lt-p).
I I "iSmturgm I
| 23rt MAB I
J Gainesville's Luxury Theatre
I Doors Open Da My 12:30 p.m.
I Cent. Show all May start 1 p.m.
1 LAST DAY!
|l :203:205:207:259:30
an incredible orgy of
sights and sounds
I
j BeaijlipJL Qiis ipye
I Fun- awo wuper
I STELIA STTVENS HONOR BLMXMAN
I iAMESBOOTH UONELBTRES
| WmajN*. METROCOLOR



gljst Arrived At-
OVERMANS
mental Stripe
j|Er Orange & Blue
| lies In Pure Silk
pm
>u Tues. Dec. 14
Whe KNACK
Hta Tushingham
B].-Sat. Dec. 15-18
mGE TO LIVE"
B-Tues. Dec. 19-21
I MAN WITH THE
WDLDEN ARM
led.-Sat. Dec. 22-25
ROUSTABOUT
I Plus
|JAMA PARTY
li.-Tues. Dec. 26-28
I CHARADE"
d.-Sat. Dec. 29-Jan. 1
Sellers Loren
MILLIONAIRESS
un.-Tues. Jan. 2-4
)NJUGAL BED"
4
Wed.-Sat. Jan. 5-8
T DON'T
KNOW YET

LEE MARVIN is sure of an Oscar nomination!"
Time Magazine
"Lee Marvin is great!" "Lee Marvin is brilliant!" "Lee Marvin is hilarious!"
Citizen News Washington D C Daily News Cue
COIUMBI* PICTUWS PWtStNTS SIANa RBAMfR p* oowction
UAU KtSl Ul OSKAR ftl/ABfTM
Pnm LEIGH SIGNORET FERRER MARVIN WERNER ASHLEY
SEGAL GRECO DUNN KORVIN *o RUEHMANN liua skala
EMW> KATHERINE ANNE PORTERSSHIP OF FOOLS'
4 % fastmwa 70

CLASSIFIEDS

9
lost-found
FOUND Slide rule in vicinity of
Engineering Bldg. Call for Alan
after 7:00 p.m., 378-4124. (L-65-
2t-p).
LOST Brown wallet containing
ID. $lO reward. Bob Watson, 428
Trusler. (L-65-2t-c).
FOUND Portable radio in area
of park across from Jennings Hall.
Call Alan, 378-4124 after 7:00 p.m.
(L-65-2t-p).
LOST Gray letter jacket with
white shoulder bands. Call Terry,
372-9388, room 253. (L-65-2t-p).
LOST Black ski sweater, multi multicolored
colored multicolored yoke, size huge. Lost about
a month ago. $lO reward for re return.
turn. return. De Young, 32-B Buckman,
372-9317. L-61-6t-p).
REWARD FOR RETURN OF my
red wallet. Call 8-3767. (L-66-
lt-c).
I frank bcboromHiJ
If SINdTRO-KeRR I
llceoJWaTiNjl
\ i r[* iH :T*l H
|W 6ERALDINE PAGE |
8 MARTIN MANLIUS Production
[JearAgHurd

for sale
MOBILE HOME. 1956 model travel
home. Bx3o, 2 bedroom. One con converts
verts converts into study. Ideal for students.
SBOO. or any reasonable cash offer.
Contact Robert Teboe at 376-4680
or see at Shady Nook Trailer Park,
Lot #34. (A-65-2t-p).
8 x 28 ELCARTRAILER. Air cond,
heat, furnished. Excellent condi condition.
tion. condition. $795. Phone 376-7478 even evenings.
ings. evenings. (A-65-2t-c).
FRIGIDAIRE refrigerator, $25.
Smith Corona skyriter portable
typewriter, $25. Buick hardtop
1955 special, $175. TV antenna
20 mast, sls. TV Westar 8-PIA
$35. Call 2-1300. (A-61-6t-p).
1963 ALLSTATE compact motor motorscooter.
scooter. motorscooter. Convenient transporta transportation.
tion. transportation. 35 mph. See afternoons. Worth
$l3O, only SB4. 2626 NW 2 Ave.
(A-64-3t-c).
1964 HONDA 150. Forced to sell.
$295. Call Robert Bass at 372-
9220. (A-64-3t-p).
TRAILER, 20x8. Ideal living quar quarters
ters quarters for students. Air cond., rea reasonable.
sonable. reasonable. Also Baldwin Grand Pi Piano,
ano, Piano, makes nice X-mas present.
Reduced. 378-3463. (A-65-2t-c).
TV, RECLINING CHAIR, brown

rug, blue rug, hi-fi radio-record
player) kitchen table, upholstered
chaise, barbecue pit, men's
English bike, window fan. Call 378-
1570 after 6. 101 NW 21 St. (A (A---65-2t-c).
--65-2t-c). (A---65-2t-c).

for sale
0
1963 HONDA SPORT 50. Very good
condition. $l5O. Call 8-4910. (A (A---65-2t-p).
--65-2t-p). (A---65-2t-p).

BRAND NEW Gretch folk guitar
for sale. Must sell, SBO. Call Den Dennis
nis Dennis Shea, Sigma Nu House, 372-
9406. (A-66-lt-c).

BANCROFT tennis racquet and
Wilson model 2024 baseball gloves.
Both practically new. Both S2O.
Call 2-3540. (A-66-lt-p).
1962 LAMBRETTA, TV 175. Very
good condition. Call Jeff, 2-9285.
$l5O. (A-66-lt-p).
1962 ALLSTATE. Good condition.
Call Barry, 6-9365. (A-66-lt-p).
RIFLESCOPE, Tasco Zoom 3-7 x.
Never used, still in box. sls. Call
Paul after noon, 372-9415. (A-66-
lt-p).

1961 500 cc NORTON DOMINATOR.
$475. Call 372-4480. (A-66-lt-c).

CHARLES CHIPS: Potato Chips,
pretzels and cookies. In air tight
cans. Wed. nights at 7:00 to 8:30
p.m., East Hall parking lot. (A (A---66-1
--66-1 (A---66-1 t-p).
MAGNOVOX STEREO CONSOLE.
Beautiful cabinet. Like new. $75.
Phone 2-7360 evenings. (A-66-
lt-c).
STEEL STRING guitar, good tone,
going cheap. Call 8-4249 after 5.
(A-54-ts-c).
1965 HONDA 65 cc. Like new.
Must sell. $275. Make offer. Ron
Holden, 376-9158, Hume Hall,
room 2110. (A-60-7t-c).
1964 80 cc YAMAHA motorcycle.

Excellent condition. Must sell.
Call R. Corseri, 2-0358. (A-63-
tf-nc).

sometiaveit.
jJI THRU
jf|r Tr tues
some den t THIS FLICK j
RECOMMENDED
sC<2.'-\\ iM A FOR
BIG KIDS
-y/>. _: ? legrfW
hsr\
?v _OS
STaMUNG
win TwmmcHw a classic
I OUR GANG COMEDY I *. I
I i mi^w

Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

autos
1964 FAIRLANE SPORT COUPE.
Bucket seats 4 speed, 289. R&H.
Excellent tires. Seat belts, low
mileage. Call Helen, 6-3086, or
6-3149 after 2 p.m. (G-66-lt-c).
1960 BLUE VOLKSWAGEN. Lug Luggage
gage Luggage rack, sun roof, new battery.
Excellent condition. $750. Call
6-6487. (G-66-lt-c).
1963 JAGUAR XKE ROADSTER.
Gray with red interior in excellent
cond. AM-FM radio. Good tires.
Many extras. See Oscar Rich at
Shell Station, 1805 SW 13 St. (G (G---66-lt-c).
--66-lt-c). (G---66-lt-c).
1959 FORD. Business coupe. $295.
Call after 6 p.m. 376-9067. (G (G---64-3t-c).
--64-3t-c). (G---64-3t-c).
1956 PLYMOUTH. Ideal for
campus transportation. $135.
Call 6-0264. (G-64-3t-c).
1962 CORVAIR MONZA. 4-speed,
standard transmission, radio, 4
new tires. Transmission and en engine
gine engine just overhauled. S9OO or offer.
Phone 6-3261, ext. 2267 (day), or
6-0889 after 6 p.m. (G-64-3t-p).
1963 VOLKSWAGEN, red. Radio
and heater. sllsO. Call 2-6821
after 5:30 and weekends. (G-65-
2t-c).
1964 KARMAN GHIA and 1964
Chevrolet Impala, for sale or
trade. Small equity continue pay payments.
ments. payments. Pay off near wholesale
value. Both in excellent cond. Call
6-1564 after 5:00 or before 9 a.m.
(G-65-2t-c).
1956 DESOTO, power brakes,
steering. Air cond., heat. Recently
tuned, new battery. Top condition.
$225. Call Health Center, ext.
5701. (G-65-2t-c).

Page 11



, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965

Page 12

[classified s|

autos
1962 CHEVY IMPALA CONVER CONVERTIBLE.
TIBLE. CONVERTIBLE. In excellent cond. White/
red interior. 250 hp VB, all power
asist. and many other extras.
Phone 376-4936. (G-62-ts-c).
1958 MGA. Excellent mechani mechanically.
cally. mechanically. Must sell. Best offer. Call
George Gagel, 376-9256 after 12
noon. (G-62-st-c).
wanted
MATURE STUDENT WANTS TWO
mature male students to share 3
bedroom house for next two tri trimesters.
mesters. trimesters. S4O a month apiece, in includes
cludes includes everything. 2 blocks from
campus. 1414 NW 2 Ave. (C-64-
3t-c).
RIDERS TO CONNECTICUT.
Leaving Dec. 15, returning Jan. 4.
Call 376-9209. Ask for Tom. (C (C---64-3t-p).
--64-3t-p). (C---64-3t-p).
FEMALE ROOMMATES. Rent $35
monthly. One block from campus.
1918 NW 1 Ave., 378-3017. (C-64-
3t-c).
MALE ROOMMATE TO SHARE
2 bedroom apartment. Occupancy
now or after Dec. 15. 17 SW 24
St. Older or grad preferred. Call
372-9651. (C-64-2t-p).
ROOMMATE to share 2 bedroom
house with nut. $45 a month. In Includes
cludes Includes utilities. 211 NW 9 Terr,
after 6:00, see Lee. (C-63-4t-c N
ONE ROCK N ROLL lead guitar
player that can sing, for estab established
lished established rock n roll band. Booked
solid next trimester. Call Jim at
2-6225. (C-65-2t-c).
MALE UPPERCLASSMAN OR
graduate student to share 2 bdrm.
central heat and air cond. apt. for
SSO. Contact Ron Sherman, 6-6396
or leave message. (C-65-2t-nc).
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE large
front corner double room with full
separate unit. Includes kitchen,
utility and study room privileges
with linen and maid service. 231
SE 2 St. Call 376-4592. (C-65-
2t-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
modern air conditioned apartment.
Call after 5:00 at 8-3586. (C (C---62-ts-c).
--62-ts-c). (C---62-ts-c).
_ j
MALE ROOMMATE for next term
or move in now. Preferrably Law
student. 2 bedroom house, one mile
from campus. $32.50 per month.
Call 8-3230. (C-61-ts-c).
ROOMMATE to share 4-room
house. SIOO per tri. plus 1/3 of
utilities. Very quiet location. Call
8-4814 after 5 p.m. (C-63-4t-c).
MALE ROOMMATE to share two
bedroom apartment three blocks
from campus. S3O per month. Call
Bill at 378-4746. (C-63-3t-c).
RIDE WANTED TQ ST. LOUIS.
Dec. 15. Call 8-4437. (C-66-lt-p).
Just Arrived At
SIL VERMANS
Regimental Stripe
Gator Orange f Blue
Ties In Pure Silk

wanted
TWO GIRLS to share a room in
beautiful 2 story house for next
trimester. Call 378-4490. One
block from campus. (C-66-lt-c).
2 RIDERS TO PHILADELPHIA.
Leave Dec. 17 or 18, return Jan.
3 or 4. $25 one way, or S4O round
trip. Call Tom, 378-3428. (C-66-
lt-c).
ONE MALE ROOMMATE beginning
Jan. Starlight Apts. Air cond., 2
blocks from campus. Call 2-3540.
(C-66-1 t-p).
RIDERS TO HOLLYWOOD. Leave
Monday, Dec. 13. Call after 5 p.m.
8-4584. (C-66-lt-c).
RIDERS TO MIAMI ON THE morn morning
ing morning of Dec. 13 and/or back to
Gainesville on Jan. 4. Call Fran
at 8-3788. (C-66-lt-nc).
RIDERS TO NORTH MIAMI AREA.
Thursday, Dec. 16. Call Steve at
8-4577. (C-66-lt-nc).
ONE FEMALE ROOMMATE to
share 2 bedroom studio apt. $35
mo. Close to campus. 378-3483.
(C-66-lt-c).
ROOMMATE WANTED. Female
student to share furnished apt.
within walking distance to campus.
Call 378-4593. (C-66-lt-c).
MALE STUDENT to share apt. in
University Gardens. 702 SW 16
Ave., Apt. 201. Anytime after 5
p.m. (C-64-3t-p).
LIVE IN STYLE at Univ. Gardens.
Need one roommate for new 2
bedroom, 1 bath central heat &
air., all electric, furnished apt.
Pools, tennis courts, handball.
Only $41.25 per month and 1/4
utilities. Drop postcard to Don
Nunneker, 712 SW 16 Ave., Apt.
208. Pll contact you. (C-65-2t-c).
RIDERS WANTED TO NORFOLK,
Va., Leave Dec. 12. Call Keith
at 372-9307. (C-65-2t-nc).
ROOMMATE TO SHARE 2 room
apt. Univ. Apts., 2 blocks from
campus. Central heat and air cond.
$33/mo. Call Larry Glazer, 372-
4124 before Friday 12/10. (C-65-
2t-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE for 2nd tri trimester.
mester. trimester. Large 2 bedroom apt.
across street from campus. Call
372-8569. (C-65-2t-c).
RIDE TO MIAMI. Would like to
leave Dec. 17 and return Jan. 5.
S. Brown, rm 2028 Hume. Call
6-9227. (C-65-2t-nc).

\A Tradition In Time...
372-8658 211 W. University Are

Theta Chi Tabs
New Officers
Theta Chi fraternity has elected
its new officers for the next tri trimester.
mester. trimester.
Jourdan M. Burke, 4BA, from
Satellite Beach was elected Pres President.
ident. President.
Robert R. Osterhoudt, 4JM,from
Washington D.C. was named Vice-
President. William A. Ross of
Lakeland was elected Treasurer
and Jon Winder was voted in as
Secretary.
John Verdon, a transfer student
from Michigan State, will be the
Pledge Marshall for the next tri trimester.
mester. trimester.
The men of Theta Chi are plan planing
ing planing a celebration for their 50th
Anniversary here on campus. The Theta
ta Theta Chi, one of the first five frat fraternities
ernities fraternities at Florida, was founded
in 1856 and here in 1916.
The celebration to last one week
will include the return of 1,000
brothers of this chapter. Expected
to arrive are J. Broward Cul Culpepper
pepper Culpepper and former Gov. Fuller
Warren.
1
WSEUWB I
Free to
College
Students
. to others
A new booklet, published by a
non-profit educational founda foundation,
tion, foundation, tells which career fields lets
you make the best use of all
your college training, including
liberal-arts courses which
career field offers 100,000 new
jobs every year which career
field produces more corporation
presidents than any otherwhat
starting salary you can expect.
Just send this ad with your name
and address. This 24-page,
career-guide booklet, "Oppor "Opportunities
tunities "Opportunities in Selling," will be
mailed to you. No cost or obli obligation.
gation. obligation. Address: Council on Op Opportunities,
portunities, Opportunities, 550 Fifth Ave., New
York 36, N. Y UFl2-6

*
*>
WANTED:
HAPPY
HOLIDAY
SEASONS
for
a<&,i
IJjk R s
(WE HATE DON FEDERMAN)
___ . -T
r l >
if she doesnt give it to you...
get it yourself!
JADE east;
>3H|mBSBBa£zE. pj u ~rs
After Shave, 6 oi., $3.50 ~ ~
Deodorant Stick, $1.75 g
Buddha Cologne Gift Package, 12 oz., $8.50 3§
Spray Cologne, $3.50 ,-i ztf" Mi
Buddha Soap Gift Set, $4.00
Cologne, oz., $3.00 ~
After Shave, 4 oz.. $2.50 swank, new york sole distr:butor



I|F Gift Totals
Dver $2 Million
jift assets of the UF Foundation, Inc. are now in excess of $2 mil-
K members of the Foundation Board heard at their meeting here
Kt weekend.
The total represents a tenfold growth in the Foundations assets
l, ce its reorganization only two years ago, according to a report
|jm Foundation Treasurer W. Ellis Jones.
Kphe Foundation is dedicated tc private support of the UF. Its total
| se ts were $215,000 just prior to reorganization of the Foundation
oro the University of Florida Endowment Corporation in December,
K 3.
This encouraging growth, University President J. Wayne Reitz
|ld the board members, is bold evidence of the dynamic role the
lundation can play in support of quality education.
I Reitz indicated that the growth of such support is a result of increas increas|g
|g increas|g public awareness of the financial needs of the University and the
Ital part private support has in meeting these needs.
I Foundation President Dr. Clyde O. Anderson, St. Petersburg, pre-
Ided at the meeting which was attended by 25 of the 30 Florida business
[id professional men who comprise the Board of Directors.
I Title to the Pearsall Collection of North American Artifacts was
[ansferred by the Foundation to the University for use by the Florida
[ate Museum. Final payment on purchase of the famed collection
[as made by the Foundation last spring using an anonymous gift of
150,000. The collection, valued at more than $600,000, is considered
he of the worlds finest collections of its type.
In other action the Board reviewed plans and proposals for several
niversity projects requiring support from private funds and approved
lodilications in investments held under the Frederick W. and Grace
. Brecht Trust held by the Foundation for scholarships.
The next meeting of the Foundation was set for spring 1966.

T 3
inPMr
1
i Syr*
jjpfl Jr
? er r Wk Hn
W f jt~-. *1
As a Pan Am Range Professional on the ETR youll have a pretty good idea
after the first year or so. Pan Am is responsible for specifying almost all the
range instrumentation hardware and systems for the nation's space and mis mis\
\ mis\ o rw YlP\f) Orad site ,aunches at the Eastern Test Range. Its a vast technological operation
ao {/* M M 'f giving you exposure to a great diversity of advanced tracking, telemetry, com-
J_ _ munications, data handling and display systems which will help you choose
UO yOU KnOW in a fairly short time where your career interests lie.
If? her# llnil imfit tfk hp Even when y u do decide you arent tied to your first area of discipline,
t yUll Ct/lf'ff't' t/Le Quite the contrary. The nature of the new range technology produces and
IfZ /* winm*} Pan Am encourages a multi-disciplined individual who works in many spe-
IO years TTOnt now cialties (radar, telemetry, electrical, optics, command/control, timing, hydrau hydraulics,
lics, hydraulics, statistics, infrared, orbital mechanics, structures, air conditioning, instru instrumentation,
mentation, instrumentation, communications and many others).
At the onset you have several main directions open to you.
You may find that systems engineering is what you're best qualified for. In
our Engineering Group, youll be developing specifications for range instru instrumentation
mentation instrumentation systems, evaluating bids from industry, providing technical guid guidance
ance guidance for future development, monitoring manufacture and installation, and
phasing systems into operational status.
Or you may be best suited to the front line as an Operations Engineer a real realtime
time realtime monitor of vehicle flight performance at one of the down-range tracking
stations from the Bahamas to the Indian Ocean, or on one of the fleet of
advanced range instrumentation ships.
On the other hand, you might qualify for our engineering administration
groups involved in technical management, industrial engineering, environ environmental
mental environmental operations control, production control, industrial support, instrumen instrumentation
tation instrumentation and facilities planning.
Whatever your initial preference, youll be seeing the entire range in operation.
For further information, see you/ Placement Director. Or write to Manager of
College Relations. Dept. 602
GUIDED MISSILES
RANGE DIVISION
PAN AMERfCAN WORLD AIRWAYS, INC.
750 S. ORLANDO AVENtjE, COCOA BEACH. FLORIDA
An Equal Opportunity Employer

STUDY WING
For the convenience of stu-
dents during final exams the
Campus Club, The East Wing
Dining Hall of the Main Case- :
teria. Hume Cafeteria. Gra- :
ham Snack Bar and Tolbert
Snack Bar will remain open :
until 2 a.m. on Sunday, Mon- :
day and Tuesday, Dec. 12, 13 :j
and 14. The East Wing will <
be strictly for studying. j:

2nd 100: Ray, Reitz

UF President J. Wayne Reitz
and Athletic Director Ray Graves
AWARDS
The UF has presented citations
of merit to two visiting delegates
to the 16th annual Caribbean Con Conference
ference Conference on the UF campus.
Miss Virginia Prewett, editor editorial
ial editorial director for The Latin Ameri American
can American Times, and Charles Fenwick,
consultant for the Department of
Legal Affairs of Pan American
Union, were recognized and honor honored
ed honored at the dinner meeting.

FLORIDA UNION: Each organization desiring Blanket room space
reserved for Winter Trimester meetings, please note DEADLINE of Jan.
10. 1966. There are extra copies of the form at Florida Union Informa Information
tion Information Desk.
EDUCATION DAMES: Today. 8 p.m., Home of Mrs. J. B. Whites,
1711 N. W. 10 Ave. Will exchange homemade Christmas decorating
ideas.
MENSA: Through Dec. 15, 12-1 p.m.. Main Cafeteria Reserved
section. All new members please try to come at least once.

will be featuredon the University's
promotional television program,
The Second 100 during Decem December
ber December and January on WUFT-TV
(Channel 5) here.
The 15-minute interviews with
Dr. Reitz and Graves also will be
shown in Orlando (WFTV), Palm
Beach (WPTV), Pensacola (WE AR)
and Jacksonville (WJXT) as part
of weekly schedules arranged for
those cities by the Universitys
Alumni Association and Florida
Blue Key, mens leadership fra fraternityco-sponsors
ternityco-sponsors fraternityco-sponsors of The Se Second
cond Second 100.

Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

| Chinese Book
;S Comes Home
At long last Culinary Road To
China, a unique Chinese cook cookbook,
book, cookbook, written by Grace H. Young,
wife of faculty member Canning
K. M. Young, has arrived from
Taichung, Taiwan.
The book had its beginning in
Gainesville where Mrs. Young
taught a Chinese cooking class, in
response to her students inquiries,
much research was undertaken.
Culinary Road To China is a
virtual encylopedia on Chinese cul culture
ture culture in the realm of food.
Mrs. Young will be honored at an
autographing party sponsored
by the Hostess Committee of the
Florida Union Board, December
13, from 3:30 5:00 p.m. in Bryan
Lounge of the Florida Union.
The public is invited to stop by
and meet Mrs. Young.
Painting
Stolen
A painting was reportedly stolen
from the northwest wing of the
Florida Union building between the
hours of six and seven p.m. last
night, according to Craft Shop man manager
ager manager Mrs. G. K. Welborn.
The painting was the back view
of a female nude figure holding a
green tunnel sign. The name
Schmidt is written in the lower
left-hand corner of the 2-1/2 feet
by 4 feet painting.
Anyone having information con concerning
cerning concerning the painting should contact
Mrs. Welborn, University exten extension
sion extension 29571.
Tickets Onj
Sale For
Prep Contest
Tickets for the Starke- Wauchula
state Class A championship foot football
ball football game Friday night at Florida
Field are on sale now at Stadium
Building ticket windows.
If the tickets are bought in ad advance,
vance, advance, they will cost students $1
each. At the game Friday night,
they will cost $2 each.
Correction
CORRECTION ... Due to a typo typographical
graphical typographical error in the Monday Alli Alligator,
gator, Alligator, the phone number for Let
Freedom Ring was given incor incorrectly.
rectly. incorrectly. The listed number was that
of the local State Attorneys office.
The correct number for the local
Let Freedom Ring is 372-3364.
Just Arrived At
SIL VERMAN'S
Regimental Stripe
Gator Orange A Blue
Ties In Pure Silk

Page 13



i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965

Page 14

SPOR TS EDITOR |HPR
WWgr

Along list of holiday sports events is upcoming, and the
Gators will be involved in both a football bowl game and a
bowl basketball tourney.
The basketball team has four games before the Gator Bowl
tourney including tonights clash with highly-touted FSU.
On Dec. 18, the Gator cagers travel to Charlotte, N. C. to meet
the always-powerful Tar Heels of North Carolina. Three days
later, they find themselves in Seattle to meet the Washington
Huskies in the first of two games. Then comes the Gator Bowl
show against DePaul, Alabama and Penn State.
Before the season began, it appeared that the Gators would be
a very tall, very slow team which couldnt compete with the speed
of a Kentucky or a Miami.
But, after two games this image has been completely erased.
Now a starting five of Gary Keller at center, Dave Miller and
Paul Morton at forwards and Dave Higley and Ed Mahoney at
guards appears likely.
Instead-of being slow, this unit is faster than average with
quick guards and hustling forwards who can shoot from outside.
With the new look, the Gators may be able to go a long way.
At any rate, they should easily dispose of the Seminoles tonight
and win another Gator Bowl championship. The team should have
at least a 7-2 record when the students return in January.
Some bowl predictions:
LIBERTY Auburn (5-4-1) vs. Mississippi(6-4)-- The Tigers
may have finished second in the SEC and they do have Alex (the
bomb thrower) Bowden, a genuine Gator slayer, at quarterback.
But the Rebels finished the season as one of the better SEC teams
with five wins in the last six games. Defensively Ole Miss is
stronger despite Auburns statistical edge. MISSISSIPPI 17,
AUBURN 7.
BLUEBONNET -- Tennessee (7-1-2) vs. Tulsa (8-2) The
Vols are fresh from a win over West Coast champ UCLA and
aim to preserve their lofty national ranking. Tulsa has the famed
passing combo of Billy Anderson to Howard Twilley, whick broke
all the records this fall. Tennessees tough secondary coupled
with its surprisingly potent offense should bring home the bacon.
TENNESSEE 21, TULSA 12.
GATOR Texas Tech (8-2) vs. Georgia Tech (6-3-1) J. T.
Kings Red Raiders have been one of the biggest surprises in
1965. With a fabulous offense (Tom Wilson, Donny Anderson,
and co.), Texas Tech will be hard to stop. Bobby Dodds Yellow
Jackets are equally explosive with sophs Kim King and Lenny
Snow heading up the offense. The Red Raiders are a little more
talented and a bit more experienced than the Jackets and should
win a wild one. TEXAS TECH 35, GEORGIA TECH 24.
SUGAR FLORIDA (7-3) vs. Missouri (7-2-1) The Gators
have a knack for beating teams they arent supposed to and losing
to others of lesser caliber. Missouri has speed, size, power and
top coaching. The Tigers look unbelievably tough. For this precise
reason, Florida will beat them. FLORIDA 21, MISSOURI 15.
COTTON Arkansas (10-0) vs. LSU (7-3) The Hogs, under
quarterbackin man Jon Brittenum, have been unbeatable all year.
With a 22 game win streak to preserve, they wont falter against
the tough Tigers. ARKANSAS 28, LSU 14.
ROSE Michigan State (10-0) vs. UCLA (7-2-1) This duo
met earlier in the season and State escaped with a 13-3 victory.
That was before the Spartans came into national prominence.
Now they have something to preserve, the national championship.
The Spartans will have Gary Beban eating dirt all afternoon.
MICHIGAN STATE 35, UCLA 6.
ORANGE Nebraska (10-0) vs. Alabama (8-1-1) Steve
Sloan, the Tides outstanding senior quarterback, will be aiming
to end his college career in the same manner as his predecessor,
Joe Namath. He will run around and pass over the powerful
Cornhuskers for a massive chunk of yardage and Nebraskas
perfect season will be gone. ALABAMA 22, NEBRASKA 10.
BRAHMA Cow-Cow (10-0) vs. IMM (Institute of Montana
Mines) (7-0-3) The Mooers finished their tough schedule
in grand style by whipping Cheyenne State 42-7. The Diggers were
tied in their final game by Burke, a team the Mooers handled
easily early in the season. Although both teams are unbeaten,
Cow-Cow has more at steak and will be herd. COW-COW 27,
IMM 17.

Hm/mw

Seminoles Tackle Gators,
Looking For Revenge

Fresh from a tremendous 121-57
destruction of Tampas hapless
Spartans, Florida States Sem Seminoles
inoles Seminoles storm into Gainesville to tonight
night tonight for a battle of the unbeatens
against Floridas Gators.
Game time is 8 p.m. in the
Florida Gym. A Freshman en encounter
counter encounter between the Baby Gators
and FSUs Frosh precedes the big
game, starting at 5:45 p.m.
Florida, sporting a 2-0 record
after the opening 80-59 and 77-66
victories over Jacksonville Uni University
versity University and Miamis Hurricanes,
respectively, will be playing its
last game until after final examin examinations,
ations, examinations, when the Gators travel to
Charlotte Dec. 18 to play North
Carolinas Tarheels.
The Seminoles, off to their best
start in several years, roared to
65-25 halftime edge over Tampa
Monday night, in a game which saw
six Seminoles score in double fig figures.
ures. figures. The Tallahassee team hit
on 60 per cent of its field shots.
A spirited contest is expected
between the traditional rivals,
reminiscent of last years Florida
victory over FSU in Florida Gym,
where FSU's big man, center
Gary Schull of Pompano Beach,
and guard Charley Fairchild trig triggered
gered triggered a near-free-for-all involv-
RATINGS
BASKETBALL
NEW YORK (UPI) The United
Press International major college
basketball ratings with first-place
votes and won-lost records through
games of Saturday, Dec. 4, in
parentheses:
1. UCLA (29) 2-0 341
2. Michigan (5) 2-0 236
3. St. Jos. (Pa.) (1) 2-0 225
4. Duke 2-0 185
5. Minnesota 2-0 168
6. Vanderbilt 1-0 137
7. Kansas 2-0 123
8. Providence 1-0 104
9. Brigham Young 2-0 78
10. Bradley 2-0 73
Second 10-11, San Francisco 47;
12, lowa 20; 13, Kentucky 17;
14, Louisville 14; 15, North Car Carolina
olina Carolina State 12; 16 (tie), Ohio State
and New Mexico 10; 18 (tie),
Tennessee and Boston College 9;
20, Dayton 8.

CIVIL SERVICE
CAREERS IN
HYDROLOGY
Water Resources Division
of the
U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Will Interview Undergraduates and Oraduates
DATE*. FEB 8, 1966
CONTACT* YOU PLACEMENT
WUHMWh OfF|CE QR WR|TE TQ
RICHARD C. HEATH
WATER RESOURCES DIVISION
U.S OtOLOGICAL SURVEY
244 RtOIRAL BUILDIN6
ocala Florida 32670
* iiniriAi* inert**" -- r j
Th# Geoltfical Survey is an Equal Opportunity Employer

ing a host of Gators. Both Schull
and Fairchild will be in FSUs
starting five tonight. The two teams
split last year, each winning home
encounters and losing away.
For the Gators. Coach Norm
Sloan may go with same starting
five that he used in the effective
Saier Makes
6-10 Jump;
Milers Shine
Frank Saier, a Jimmy Carnes
recruit at Furman who didnt want
to leave his former coach, high
jumped 6-10 Monday, a height ne never
ver never before reached by a Gator leap leaper.
er. leaper.
Saier, who excelled at Furman a
year ago, will have to Sit out a
year of ineligibility this year due
to transfer. He will compete with
the Florida Track Club.
Coach Carnes came to UF from
Furman a year ago and Saier fol followed
lowed followed him here.
Miler Frank Lagotic, a transfer
from West Point, recorded a 4:16.5
mile in practice. Lagotic will sit
out a year and participate for the
track club also.
Freshman Chris Hosford and
Dieter Gebhard also recorded mile
times under 4:20.
Bell Big Gun
In Cooper Win
The Campus Dormitory Basket Basketball
ball Basketball Playoffs were held with the
following dormitory winners:
Murphree Area Fletcher N; Tol Tolbert
bert Tolbert Area Tolbert 3; Hume Area-
Jackson; Graham Area Cooper.
In the semi-finals, Fletcher N
defeated Tolbert 3 by a score of
45-20; while Cooper defeated Jack Jackson
son Jackson 42-31.
In the championship game, Coop Cooper
er Cooper defeated Fletcher N by a score
of 40-31. Tom Bell led with 23.
II PATRONIZE M
m gator iii
m ADVERTISERS
X X-X
v..y.y .v.v
V.Vj.V.'/.V.WV.V.V.'.'.V.V.V.V.V.,.. Xv.vX*

win over Miami. Sure starters are
6-9 forward Gary Keller, who
scored 30 against Miami in
Floridas first win over the Hur Hurricans
ricans Hurricans in Miami in 8 years, guards
Dave Higley and Ed Mahoney, and
senior forward Paul Morton. 6-5
forward Dave Miller, outstanding
in the Miami victory, may replace
Jeff Ramsey at the other starting
position. Miller scored 16 points
in the conquest of the Hurricanes.
* *
In short bursts, the squid prob probably
ably probably is the fastest of all marine
creatures, according to the Miami
Sequarium.
* *
When cast-iron plows appeared
in the early 1800s many farmers
refused to use them for fear of
poisoning the soil.

gives
man
an
unfair
advantage
jib
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a pf
men ''amsJ*V
iiw
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Schedule Costs Vols Major Bowl


By DAVID M. MOFFIT
ATLANTA (UPI) lf ever there
was a team that got the short end
of the shuffle, it would have to be
Tennessee.
Here are the Vols, ranked seven seventh
th seventh in the nation and with the second
best record in the South-- yet
relegated to the Bluebonnet Bowl.
Tennessee beat Rose-Bowl bound
UCLA, tied Orange Bowl-bound

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Alabama, beat Gator Bowl-bound
Georgia Tech and, at 7-1-2 has a
better record than Louisiana State
and Florida which wound up in the
Cotton Bowl and Sugar Bowls, res respectively.
pectively. respectively.
However, the Vols really have no
one to blame but themselves. In
mid-November, when most teams
had only one game left to play and
the bowl officials were beginning

Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

to get the shakes worrying about
which teams they would be able to
land. Tennessee still had three
games to go.
Look at it from the officials
viewpoint. Not only did the Vols
have only four victories at that
point, they had just lost to a
questionable Ole Miss team 14-13
in a televised game and anyway,
with their emphasis on defense,
they werent likely to provide the
sort of fireworks that bowl fans
like to see.
Its too bad they were so im impatient.
patient. impatient. Tennessee averaged 26
points a game in a down-the down-thestretch
stretch down-thestretch offensive display that bur buried
ied buried Kentucky and Vanderbilt and
left UCLA gasping on the ropes.
What a bowl game that Tennes Tennessee-UCLA
see-UCLA Tennessee-UCLA battle would have made.
The Vols won it in the closing
seconds to the tune of 37-34.
Their opponent in the Bluebon Bluebonnet
net Bluebonnet Bowl Dec. 18 at Houston ap-

pears made to order for the Vols.
Theyll be facing the 15-ranked
Tulsa Hurricanes which figures
theres only one way to travel
by air.
Tulsa scored 315 points while
posting an 8-2 mark and averaged
better than 330 aerial yards per
game.
Thats fine by Tennessee which
considers its pass defense its fin finest
est finest weapon. The Vols 17 inter interceptions
ceptions interceptions were second only to
Alabamas 20 in the defensively
tough Southeastern Conference.
And Bama got seven of itk steals
in a wild finale with AuburiC-
Any layman can predict the Vols
defensive strategy against the Hur Hurricanes.
ricanes. Hurricanes. Theyll be dogging Tulsa
quarterback Bill Anderson all
afternoon with their entire defen defensive
sive defensive backfield fanning out to cover
the receivers with special em emphasis
phasis emphasis on record-setting end
Howard Twilley.
It will be interesting to see if
Tulsa can throw against the Vols
as it did against so many of the
lightweight foes on its schedule.
This has been an unusual season
for Tennessee. The team suffered
a psychological blow at mid-season
when three assistant coaches were
killed in an automobile accident
and a physical blow when sopho sophomore
more sophomore quarterback Charlie Fulton
suffered a knee injury.
The shook off the death of those
coaches, found a replacement for
Fulton li# sophomore Dewey War Warren
ren Warren and rolled up their best record
in nearly a decade.
What they deserved and didnt
get, however, was a major bowl
berth.
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Page 15



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, The Florida Ailightor, Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965

Page 16