Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Christmas
On Campus
Christmas Carol
Reading Friday

The UFs traditional presentation of Dean Lester L. Hales reading
of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol" is scheduled Friday at
7:30 p.m. in University Auditorium.
Sponsored by Sigma Nu fraternity, the event, as popular on the

:<
DEAN HALE
UF ROTC Cadet
Parade Saturday
The joint Army and Air Force
ROTC parade honoring the grad graduating
uating graduating seniors of both programs
will be held 10:30 a.m. Saturday.
This will be the first time that
this trimester's cadet staff has
demonstrated its proficiency in a
combined service parade. This
will also be the first formal mil military
itary military parade for 1600 freshmen in
the ROTC program.
Admiral William B. Tucker, USN
(Ret.), will be the reviewing of officer
ficer officer for the parade. Admiral
Tucker, who once served as Com Commandant
mandant Commandant of the 15th Naval Divi Division,
sion, Division, retired in 1959 and is now
See PARADE on p. 10

1 ii
i L
DOLLARS TROPHY
Three Tau Epsilon Phis stand with their five-foot high Bill Fleming
Memorial Trophy for collecting the most money for Dollars tor
scholars Drive with SI6OO. They are (from left): Jerry Rosenthal,
drive chairman; Lee Borden, vice president; and Jerry Levine,
president.

campus as the holiday class break,
was first held in 1929 at the Sigma
Nu house. Since 1957 it has been
open to the public in the Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.
It was 28 years ago that Hale,
now dean of student affairs, took
over the reading of the classic
sermon against selfishness. The
readings were done by various
members of the faculty until 1937
when Hale, then an instructor of
speech, walked to the rostrum and
began, "Morley was dead." Since
then he has missed only three
readings.
The dramatic reading will be
enhanced this year with music
from several campus groups. De Department
partment Department of Music Professor
Russell L. Danburg is responsible
for the arranging and conducting
of much of the music to be used.
The pianist-composer also will
accompany a group of eight
carolers from the University Choir
followed by the faculty string quar quartet.
tet. quartet.
Carolers include Julienne
Belger, Geraldine Graham, Lenore
Beirbaum, Martha Wirth, Woody
McDonnell, Denny Sherry, Edward
Burros and Leo Dryer.
Evelyn McGarrity will present
a solo. Director is Elwood Keister.
Members of the faculty string
quartet include Edward Troupin,
Ina Clair Forbes, Robert Schieber
and Marie Henderson.
**A Christmas Carol" was writ written
ten written in 1843 and was acclaimed by
Dickens himself as "the greatest
success this ruffian ever a achieved."
chieved." achieved."
Hale introduced music to the
reading with the late Claude Mur Murphree
phree Murphree at the organ and members
of the Sigma Nu fraternity singing
Christmas carols.

Tree Lighting Sunday

Christmas tree lighting, an an anual
ual anual event on the UF campus, will
be held Sunday night 10:30 out outside
side outside University Auditorium.
Carillon music will begin at
10 p.m. followed by carols and a
welcome by Judy Huggins, who is
in charge of arrangements.
The lighting is sponsored by
Mortar Board, senior women's
honarary, whose members will
join in the singing with members
of Sigma Alpha lota, women's
music honorary.
Nancy Stablein will didicate the
tree. Each year it is dedicated
to the spirit of Christmas for uni university
versity university students.
Following the program outside,
the auditorium, the University
See LIGHTING on p* 10

The Florida
Alligator
Vol. 58, No. 62 University of Florida Thursday, December 2, 1965

SPENCER NEW MANAGING EDITOR

Cason Named Editor

Benny Cason, journalism grad graduate
uate graduate student from Worthington
Springs, was named editor of next
trimesters Florida Alligator yes yesterday
terday yesterday by the Board of Student
Publications.
Ron Spencer, freshman law stu student
dent student from Plant City, was named
managing editor.
Steve Vaughn, present editor,
graduates at the end of this tri trimester.
mester. trimester.
Cason graduated from the UF
with a B. S. in journalism with
honors last April. He received the
Elmer J. Emlg Award, which is
voted on by the faculty and which
goes to the senior whom the faculty
thinks has the most potential for
service to journalism in Florida.
He also is a past vice-president
and secretary-treasurer of Sigma
Delta Chi, national professional
journalistic society; a member of
Kappa Tau Alpha, journalism
scholastic honorary society; and a

AT RELIGION-IN-LIFE WEEK

Miss Ward To Speak

Called to be Human" is the
challenge which religion extends
to UF students in 1966. Religion Religionin-Life
in-Life Religionin-Life Week, Jan. 23-26, is again
featuring the highly-regarded
English scholar Barbara Ward
(Lady Jackson).
Miss Ward will be on campus
Jan. 25 for an informal discussion
in McCarty Auditorium. She will
appear again the next day at 10:55
a.m. in the Gym for the feature
address. Her subject has not yet
been announced.
Accompanying Miss Ward will be
Rabbi Louis Levitsky and Dr.
James Gustafson. Levitsky, who
will speak Jan. 24, is a former
president of the Rabbinical Asso Association
ciation Association of America, a member of
the faculty division at Rutgers
University, and a noted author.
Gustafson is the head erf religious

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UF vmjmmWUF TREE: Ho-Ho-Ho

CASON SPENCER
winner in the 1965 William Ran*
dolph Hearst college writing
contest for investigative reporting.
Cason, currently Alligator man managing
aging managing editor, also was a recipient
of the $750 Jacksonville News Club
scholarship in 1964.
Spencer graduated from the UF
with a B. A. in political science
with honors last April. He plans
to transfer from law into Journa Journalism
lism Journalism graduate school in January.
Spencer, currently an Alligator

studies at Yale University. He will
be the keynote speaker Jan. 23.
Lady Jackson's merits are ex extensive.
tensive. extensive. She is foreign affairs
writer of The Economist of Lon London,
don, London, and is regarded as one of the
most influential writers in
England. Educated at Somerville
College, Oxford, she took first
class honors with a degree in
philosophy, politics, and eco economics.
nomics. economics. She has made appearances
on such programs as The Great
Challenge" and Meetthe Press."
Her articles have made regular
appearances in the New York
Times Magazine Section.
An accomplished author, Miss
Ward's books include The Rich
Nations and the Poor Nations,"
Faith and Freedom," Five I I.
. I. See RELIGION on p. 9

columnist, has served in the past
as executive editor and editorial
page editor. He has worked on
The Alligator seven trimesters.
He has been a member of the
Board of Student Publications for
two years, a member of the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union Board of Managers,
chairman of the judiciary commit committee
tee committee of Legislative Council, presi president
dent president pro tempore of the Council
and a member of the political
science scholastic honorary so society.
ciety. society.
Cason announced that a staff
meeting will be held in The Al Alligator
ligator Alligator offices next Monday at
5 p.m.
"Were asking that all persons
Interested in working on The Al Alligator
ligator Alligator next trimester come to this
meeting," Cason said. "Those
interested in working but who can't
come to this meeting should leave
a message for the editor."

BARBARA WARD



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Dec. 2, 1965

K world

International
COMPOUND BESEIGED . Communist guerrillas slipped into the
South Vietnamese province capitol of Tam Ky early today and attacked
the American military compound and government headquarters with
hand grenades and small arms fire. No American casualties were
reported and Vietnamese losses were termed as light. In Saigon,
an American military spokesman reported that U. S.Air Force planes
showered the North Vietnamese capitol of Hanoi Tuesday with over a
million propaganda leaflets. It was the largest single leaflet drop of
the war.
CHINA ACCUSES . Communist China accused the United States
Wednesday of attacking Chinese fishing boats and killing some of the
fishermen. The charges, broadcast by the Communist New China News
Agency, said U. S. jet planes bombed and strafed Peking's boats on the
high seas several times. The broadcast added a**strong protest" note
was sent to President Johnson. The news agency said the latest attack
came November 25, when two U. S. jets allegedly circled a fishery
commune boat in the Bac Bo Gulf, then fired two volleys of shells,"
killing a fisherman.
LEADER KILLED . Karya Khakti, a Jakarta daily newspaper,
reported Tuesday that D. N. Aidit, leader of the huge Indonesian
Communist party, was shot and killed with other fugitive rebels on
Saturday. The report said Aidits body was found among the corpses
of several fugitives killed in an assault on a suspected Communist
hideaway. Aidit, who built the party into a formidable power in Indone Indonesia,
sia, Indonesia, went into hiding following an unsuccessful attempt to oust President
Sukarno on October 1.
ESCAPE . Three young East Germans,
one of them a 24-year-old nurse, fled to West
Germany Wednesday through Communist bor border
der border minefields and barbed wire, police said.
They told police they were dissatisfied with
political conditions in East Germany.
National
STEPPED UP . The United States has solid evidence of a major
expansion of Communist Chinese military and economic aid to North
Viet Nam, authoritative sources said Wednesday. Peking has stepped
up the flow of both war materials and industrial supplies to the North
Vietnamese and added Red Chinese engineering troops have been sent
to help repair the rail line linking Hanoi with southern China. The
State Department, commenting on the intelligence report, said Red
China has extended more than SSOO million in economic aid to Hanoi."
DEATH TOLL . A U. S. military spokesman said today American
forces in Viet Nam total 40 killed, 117 wounded and five missing in
action during the week ending last Saturday a drop of 200 from the
previous weeks announced total. The spokesman reported that Amer American
ican American casualties for the week of the Chu Pong Mountain and la Drang
Valley fighting climbed to a total of 248 killed, 527 wounded and 14
missing. The figure of 248 dead in the week of fighting in which the
Communists suffered nearly 10 times the same number was four higher
than American losses during the entire first four years of American
action in Viet Nam from 1961 through 1964.
i
Florida
AIRLIFT ... A chartered airliner flew to Cuba yesterday to bring
82 residents of the Communist island to the freedom of the United
States. The exodus is expected to be the biggest refugee airlift in
history. Refugees leaving Cuba Wednesday were the vanguard of
thousands possibly a minimum of 100,000 expected to be flown
to the U. S via Miami, over a period of years under an agreement
with the Fidel Castro Regime.
T-MINUS 3 DAYS . Gemini 7 astronauts
Frank Borman and James Lovell yesterday
sought a medical go-ahead for blastoff Saturday
on mans longest venture in space Barring
last-minute snags, the 8,000-pound Gemini 7
spacecraft will be lifted into the sky at 2:30
p.m. Saturday. It will be the first afternoon
launch in the Gemini program. Besides flying
longer in space than anyone else, the astro astronauts
nauts astronauts will boost Americas total man-hours in
orbit to 1,300, more than double the amount
logged by Russian cosmonauts.

OPPOSING VIEWS

gg v I \
|v
Assuming somewhat opposing
viewpoints at the student march
on Washington about the Viet Nam
situation last week were two UF
students, above, and an American
Nazi Party member, below. The
UFers are Hoke Griffin left, and
Jim Fine.
| fIV S MMHB
BO MB HANOI?
Still another side of the march
story was represented by the Pol Polish
ish Polish Freedom Fighter, below who
urges more staunch action. These
photos were shot by roving Al Alligator
ligator Alligator lens man Bob Ellison.
=S-

The Florida Alligator is an
official publication of the
University of Florida and
is published daily, Monday
through Friday morning
during regular trimester and
twice weekly during summer
trimester, except holidays
and vacation periods.
Entered at U. S. Post Office
at Gainesville as second
class matter.

Ex-Captive Mum

BADTOELZ, Germany (UPI)~
An American sergeant who escaped
from his Veit Cong captors de declined
clined declined Wednesday to discuss prison
life with two U. S. Army men
possibly brainwashed by the Com Communists.
munists. Communists.
M. Sgt. Isaac Camacho, 28, of
El Paso, said he met Sgt. George
E. Smith and Spec. 5 Claude C.
McClure in a prison camp in
Viet Nam after being captured by
the Viet Cong. But he declined
to detail life in the camp with
them.
Moon 'Colors
Photographed
WASHINGTON (UPI) A team of
amateur astronomers has seen and
photographed mysterious color
glows on the moon which some
scientists believe may be caused
by gases escaping from the lunar
interior.
The National Aeronautics and
Space Administration NASA re reported
ported reported Tuesday that the strange
moonglow was observed in the
crater Aristarchus during a four fourhour
hour fourhour period before daylight on Nov.
15, through a 16-inch telescope
at Port Tobacco, Md.
Such colored lights have been
seen on the moon several times,
but this is apparently the most
successful attempt to capture them
on film.
Some scientists attributed the
colors to fluorescence of the
moon's surface caused by bom bombardment
bardment bombardment of radiation from the sun.
But others believe they are lun lunar
ar lunar gas wells, proving that the
moon is not a physically dead
object.

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Smith and McClure, freed this
weekend by the Communists, said
in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, they
wanted to quit the Army and lead
a campaign to end the Viet Nam
war. Camacho said he wished to
say nothing about this.
Camacho, a member of the
Army's Special Forces, was cap captured
tured captured Nov. 23, 1963, and escaped
July 9, this year. He is now
stationed here with the lOthSDeciai
Forces Group.

~W*r
Pr u>dcy
And 7
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fh*t
Special
Date...
visit
fcarmantllas
jf SCrimpr
11 a.m.-7 p.m.
7 days a week
706 W. Univ.



MCEmIIerS ,2, & 3
9am -spm
2nd FLOOR IN FRONT
OF AUDITORIUM
J.HILLIS MILLER HEALTH CENTER
SPONSORED BY
MEDICAL BOOK STORE
A / branch of
I v and Ibookstore

DeGaulle Election

Margin Narrows

By United Press International
PARIS President Charles de
Gaulle appeared to be running
scared today in a surprisingly nar narrow
row narrow race for the presidency.
De Gaulle made his first speech
of the current political campaign
Tuesday night, warning of hate hateful
ful hateful confusion" within France if he
is not re-elected.
The speech had been scheduled
suddenly, apparently prompted by
political polls indicating his pop popularity
ularity popularity has dripped to less than
50 per cent among voters who
have already made up their minds.
In the hard-hitting television
address, de Gaulle claimed credit
for most of the changes in France
since World War n. He cited the
social security act, the national nationalization
ization nationalization of major companies, suf suffrage
frage suffrage for women and farm reform.
The president attempted to
knock down his opponents common
campaign pledges for a reversal
of the Gaulllst policy of calculated
aloofness toward Frances Com Common
mon Common Market and NATO partners.
Dismissing the Viet Nam con conflict
flict conflict as an absurd war, de
Gaulle said alliances could force
France into battles she doesnt
want.
De Gaulle also said the election
of any one of his five opponents
Dec. 5 would infallibly mark a
return to the hateful confusion in
which the state previously dragged
Itself along to the misfortune of
France.*
He said the next president should
be a man of the entire nation.
It is under this conception
and for this reason that I ask
for your confidence, de Gaulle
said.
The Interior Ministrys most re recent
cent recent poll gives de Gaulle 48.9
percent of the vote. Observers
still consider de Gaulle a shoo-in
against any single candidate, but
the president is known to abhor the
idea of a possible runoff election
Dec. 19.
De Gaulle feels a runoff would
be beneath him, and that his role
in French life demands an over overwhelming
whelming overwhelming endorsement on the first
ballot.
This was the reason he agreed
to Tuesday nights speech. In
accepting the advice of his aides
de Gaulle obviously had become an
active candidate for the presi presidency,
dency, presidency, not the aloof office-holder
confidently awaiting re-election.
Jean Lecanuet, the personable
young Centrist whose Kennedy
style campaign helped pressure
de Gaulle into making the extra
speech, appeared on television im immediately
mediately immediately before the president.
He said de Gaulle should not
worry about chaos after his de departurethat
parturethat departurethat France has young
men to take over the ship of state.
Some morning newspapers
seemed to feel de Gaulle had hurt
his imagenot helped it.
He was no longer de Gaulle,
it was a double, appearing less
sure of himself, suddenly aged,

Five UF Artists On Display

The 10th annual Florida State
Fair Arts Exhibition is on display
through Dec. 20 In the University
Gallery.
The exhibit will feature five
UF artists Keith Hatcher. Vin Vincent
cent Vincent Plsanl, Stuart Purser. Alan
Greenfield and Michael Stack Stackamong
among Stackamong 25 Florldains.
The display Includes sculptures
and oil paintings and originally
was shown at the opening of the

Thursday, Dec. 2, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

the newspaper Combat com mented.
Candidate has hurt Charles
de Gaulle, it added.
* 'Vi
| Christmas (
(In Poland:{
I Hares, Fish f
(((( By EDWARD SHIELDS ((((

WARSAW (UPI) Hares in :(:(
(:(: the window and fish in the wash:(:(
(:(: basin signal Christmas in Po- :(:(
(:( land. :((
Christmas here is a final,
:(: flustered rocket-burst of :(:
:((( gaiety before the gray resig- :(:
:(:( nation of the East European :(:
:(:( winter. (
*
The Communist regime £
(:(( makes no attempt to
(:(( the holiday spirit and even, (:(:
:(:( within the narrow confines of (:(:
:(:( the chronically overextended(:(:
:(:( economy, encourages it.
Since 1956, the Roman Cath Cath:(:(
:(:( Cath:(:( olic Church has been given a :(:
:(:( free hand to celebrate the
:(:( religious side of the holiday. :(:(
(:(: From the starkly tradition- :£
(:(: al Gothic of Stefan Cardinal (:(
(:j: Wyszynskis rebuilt St. Johns;:::
(:(: Cathedral to the smallest (:(:
(((: wooden village church, sold- (:'
:(:( iers in the uniform of ihe(: ; :
:(:( Polish Peoples Army kneel (:(:
((next to babushka shrouded ((:(
:(: peasant women and stylish ((:
:(: wives of bureaucrats at the :!(;
:(: Christmas Midnight Mass. :':
Poles have their Christmas (£
;(:( dinner on the night of the :(:(
(:(: 24th a feat of 12 traditional :(:(
(:(: dishes, including flshlngray :(:(
(:(: sauce and mushrooms, and (:(
(:(; usually without meat.
:(:( Christmas trees usually are ((
:(:( those which were not up to (:(
:(:( export quality, or toppings (:(
;(:( from the seasons timber- ;(:(
:(( cuttings. ;(:(
More a.id more Poles are ;(:(
:(;( following official urging to :(;(
((: buy artificial plastiG trees (:(:
(:(: but these, too, must be bought (:(:
(:(: when they appear.
Christmas fare is a long- :(;!
:(:( term project. In the days be- (:(;
:(:( fore the holiday, few homes X;
:(:( in the spreading, modern :(:(
:(: apartment blocks lacked a :(:(
(:(: hare hanging head-down in the ;(:(
(:(: frosty air outside the living ;(:(
room window. (::
V. ,V
Bathtubs and even the
;(:( hand basins in office wash- >(;
:(:( rooms teem with carp (:(
:(:( being kept alive to be the ((:
((: feature of the Christmas Eve (:(
(:(: dinner. (:(
As Christmas ends, the
x Poles feel fortified for winter.
9
)%******************"* **#* %****?*?*v

Florida State Fair in Tampa last
February.
One of the five merit awards
of SSOO was presented to Michael
Stack for his painting 11 The Red
Stripe. Stack is a graduate
student in the UF Department of
Art.
The UF Gallery is open daily
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sun Sundays
days Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m. and is
closed on Mondays and Holidays.

Page 3



; The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Dec. 2, 1965

Page 4

EDITORIAL
compromise
In Tuesdays Alligator, the editors criticized the
Legislative Council for its passage of the first
reading of the controversial section 9.3 b. the section
of the Student Body Election Laws dealing with the
violation and enforcement of election laws which had
come under severe fire after freshman law student
Ed Matz petitioned the Honor Court for a ruling
that the check-off system employed by political
parties constituted influence.
The Alligator felt then, and still does, that the
system of check-off tables in which fraternity and
sorortiy members as well as certain independents
are asked, and in some cases almost forced into
voting and checking in at the check-off tables is
inherently improper to the conduction of an uncoerced
election. But, then, there are valid reasons for its
continuation. Perhaps the best of these reasons is
that sororities and fraternities foot the bill for
much of the campaign and hope to gain electoral
benefits as a result of such monetary appropriations
to the parties.
But in benefiting from a victory, the Greeks must
also prove to the party hierarchy that their members
turned out to votepresumably for the candidate
of the houses choice in other words, to be paid
in patronage, the fraternity must prove it produced
in votes at the polls.
Earl Barkers motion on the floor Tuesday night
to compromise the bill by adding an additional
ammendment providing for check-off tables
WITHIN the 100-foot distance in which coercement
is outlawed seems to be at least a practical solution
to the present problem. Barkers amended motion,
passed on second reading, allows the tables within
the 100 feet, yet says they must be manned, not by
the party members as in the past, but rather by
members of the Honor Court. This should remove
political favoritism and coercement from the check checkoff
off checkoff system.
Perhaps the Alligator was unwise in its harsh
criticism of the Council for its unrepresentative
action of the previous Tuesday. At least the criticism
in part caused the Council to alter a situation
which, if it had continued, The Alligator feels would
have maintained a system under which all students
did not earn the equal protection of the law.
Now the burden of conducting the check-off system
is thrust onto the lap of the Honor Court, the
judicial body which originally ruled that check-offs
conducted within the 100-foot distance constituted
influence in itself.
Compromise of conflicting legislative thoughts is
one of the established cornerstones of the American
political process, especially when that compromise
results in benefits to a majority of the people
concerned. Such is the result of the new bill.
The Legislative Council is saluted for its action
Tuesday night, an action which saw party lines
partially erased in the pursuit of policies bene beneficial
ficial beneficial to the majority of the student electorate.
the veep
Student Body Vice President Dick Thompson took
time from his chores as presiding officer of the
Legislative Council Tuesday night to cri i:iz? tie
Alligators Tuesday editorial which, he said, implied
that he (Thompson) was ramrodding through legis legislation
lation legislation which was directly beneficial to the SG
executive wing and, in particular. Progress Party.
Thompson was not irate and he conducted himself
in a manner appropriate to the presiding officer
of a body as diverse and potentially explosive as
the Legislative Council. He felt simply that the Al Alligator
ligator Alligator had been unfair in its criticism of him.
The criticism was not meant to be directed at
Thompson, but rather at a Council which in the past
has not always been representative of the students
it purports to represent. Tuesday night we think
it was.
Thompson has been a very effective presiding
officer. He was instrumental, likewise, in the in investigation
vestigation investigation of the new public functions manager,
an issue which alarmed those uninformed students
who felt that student initiative and control was
possibly being diminished. And, with parliamentar parliamentarians
ians parliamentarians the caliber of Jay (Skip) Haviser and Earl
Barker in the Council wings. Thompson couldnt
have exercised parliamentary dictatorship even had
he tried. He didnt.
Students who have never taken the opportunity
of sitting in on a Council meeting have missed
the opportunity to gain an understanding of how the
legislative process, with all its admitted deficiencies
and idiosyncracies, operateson a college level.
They have also missed seeing a Council con conducted
ducted conducted remarkably efficiently by a Vice President
who manages to put the interests of students ahead
of those of the parties and other conflicting interests
by acting on most occasions as a bipartial referee.

CHecK OUT [ VOTEJ^^
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we DONT Tftt> TO IMFLOfiNCt I
you IN UO UK VOTIN6- HOW^. J J
COULO LITTLE OLE. Me. f j
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DEAN LESTER
Hale
ah, Humbug!
jjj| Scrooge isnt the only one who rejects Christmas. Almost
e'iUiy line of Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol offers a
message that we often scorn to apply to ourselves. For example,
the popular complaint today that nobody cares is personified
in Scrooge.
It was the very thing he liked to edge his way along
the crowded paths of life, warning all human sympathy
to keep its distance.
In a day when the United States has a higher standard of living
and greater material blessings and opportunities than ever before,
it is hard to reason how we can ignore the meaning of Christmas
by bitterness and lack of concern one for another. With all of our
guaranteed freedoms, society is still seriously disadvantaged and
will continue to be until we can overcome spiritual poverty.
The Spirits body was transparent: so that Scrooge
observing him, and looking through his waistcoat,
could see the two buttons on his coat behind. 4 1 am
here tonight, he told Scrooge, to warn you that you
have yet a chance and hope of escaping my fate of
wandering through the world witnessing happiness you
might have shared, but missed on earth.
We all have yet a chance of developing better attitudes, but
to do so we should try to see ourselves as others see us and
to look into our own past and into the future for clues to our
weaknesses. The spirit of our forebearers may be transparent,
but if we are willing to look we can learn from them.
Tell me if Tiny Tim will live!
How often we remain hardened towards life until someone we
love or admire is taken from us. Few, if any, have the second
chance given Scrooge to make it up to the Tiny Tims, the parents,
the teachers, the friends whom we have ignored or hurt.
Scrooges wealth is of no use to him. He dont do any
good with it.
And there is our money and our time and talent. Too much of it
is wasted or spent foolishly or selfishly. It is used to degrade
and disrupt and condemn instead of to help and construct and
create.
Im not at all sure I wasnt his most particular
friend: for we used to stop and speak whenever we
met.
One never knovys when a speaking acquaintance may become a
true friend. Time must not be so short that we cant use any of
it in being friendly. We dont know when a kind word spoken to a
casual passer-by might be the lift he needs for a personal crisis.
But Tiny Tim was very light to carry and his father
loved him so. that it was no trouble; no trouble.
Somehow burdens are never as heavy when one carries them
with love and dedication. Life becomes almost unbearable when
resentments and hate and intolerance predominate our thoughts.
Studying is a chore when unmotivated by a will to learn But
sacrificial effort becomes no trouble when driven by deen
desire. p
Some people laughed to see the alteration in him
but he let them laugh and little heeded them- for he
was wise enough to know that nothing ever happened
on this globe for good, at which some people did not
have their fill of laughter in the outset.
The fear of ridicule discourages many from reform. Not onlv
is this true of individuals but also of groups and gangs A f ra
ternity may be afraid of the scorn of the system if it reallv
accepts and plays the new role of brotherhood in academic academicsociety.
society. academicsociety. Upperclassmen who have learned the hard wav about
the necessity for scholarship and mature judgment often find i
difficult to admit their new attitude and to influence the Freshman
to profit from their experience. resnman
spirit ZFjr HUmbUe ** "* wormy

Florida Politic!
by Mike Garcl
his past weekend Robert King High, the |
cently re-elected Mayor of Miami,
hia candidacy for the office of Governor o f|
State of Florida. H
High's formal announcement was somewhat ail
climatic in that it was no big surprise to anyo
As High occupied the runoff position with Bui
in 1964, the good Mayor was a natural to try a?ahl
1966. I
However, Highs candidacy presents little thrl
to anyone in the race. His main support cornel
from the South Florida voters centered in Mial
and the Negro bloc vote, the best High could
is another second place. H
Although a substantial number of voters put h|
in the runoff last time, it was also a substantl
number who defeated him in favor of
Burns, the ratio being better than 2-1 against tl
Miamian.
Highs stand on Civil Rights proved to be |
downfall in the 64 runoff when an
najority of North Florida voters turned
defeat him. H
However, in the recent mayoralty campaign H
Miami, Mayor High failed to poll the majority I
the Negro precincts as he had expected. A lo
of the Negro vote would severely hamper High
chances in the statewide race.
Other candidates are also having their trouble
Scott Kelly, former state senator from Lakelan
is having a hard tome converting the South Flor
dians over to his way of thinking. Senator Kelly
negative stand on Metro in the last governor
race incurred much displeasure among Dade Coun
voters.
Kelly, who was branded as a neo-segregationi
in the last campaign, is finding it difficult tot
accepted by the more liberalminded Miamian
Senator Kellys greatest forte is in the Nor
and West parts of Florida as in 1964. However,
should be pointed out that in a significant numbe
of these counties, Kelly wonby quite small pluralities
As a consequence, Kelly missed the runoff by 20(H
votes.
Burns, on the other hand, was strongest in ttH
metropolitan areas. He based his campaign on grasH
roots city committees and county
support. H
The little people in the big cities were the oneH
who put Burns into the runoff. And we can be mofl
assured that these little people will be workin
for the Governor the next time around.
OO O I
Still no word from the Collins camp, and thH
prospect of Collins entering the race is lookin
dimmer. Some people who purport to be clos
to Collins have said that he will run; howeves
Collins announcements are looking more and nioi
like political balloons testing the wind for a tr
at senator rather than another try for the chai
in Tallahassee.
O O O
Speaking of Tallahassee, it has been reportt
that Gov. Burns will soon be rounding up suppo
on the campuses of Florida's universities. Sin
education is going to be a big issue, all candidate
will be beating the bushes for workers l ook oB
SG leaders. I
Robert King High and Scott Kelly have alrea*
made some contacts on the UF campus. The woj
and publicity in favor of a candidate on any tamp
will prove invaluable. I
It is doubtful if Burns will make much hea wB
in the light of his recent visit to this campt
Most people feel that a great amount of fenc
mending will have to take place before Burns C B
count on the UF as an ally.
EDITORIAL STAFF I
Bruce Dudley executive edit j
Drex Dobson assistant managing editt
Maureen Collins ...... editorial page ed|B
Andy Moor .. sports e *
***
Associate Editors Fran Snider (stude
government), Dick Dennis (assistant sports editor*
Eunice Tall (features), Pete Cook (copy)> er |B
Miller, Yvette Cardozo, Eddie Sears, Cheryl Kuri*
Reporters Bob Wilco*
Susan Froemke, Jeff Denkewaiter, Sharon Hobinso*
Norma Bell, Judy Miller, Steven Brown. Ujnj
Rabinowitz, Kathie 1 Keim, Jim Bailey. "1
Solomon, Justine Hartman, Arlene Caplan, *
Silow, Lonnie Brown. I
** J
Cartoonists Ralph Knudsen, Don Wrl^J
Photographers N ick Arr
Sam Johnston. Gerald Jones, ItonShey|



/ /aAF i\
ff ' |By////flal
V W jy I
kK v fl (uAS^^ESa^B
\ \ j^SBSBKw' JSf \ Jr
. '^r^S!y :
"Let Freedom Ring"
G.D.I. raps justice
Editor:
I cannot condone vandalism, but I can unequivocably condemn dis distorted
torted distorted justice* Roderick Harvey, Hugh Parks, and Warren Fine ham
had being victimized by a travesty of justice simply because they
do not enjoy the semi-social immunity of belonging to one of our
courageous, enlightened and progressive- minded social fraternities.
I dare say that if one of these members of such august bodies were
in their shoes, it would be laughed off as Boys will be boys*' or
Theyre just having fun.
How many of you have been victimized by one of these boys water
balloon fights or have spent sleepless nights listening to their blood bloodcurdling
curdling bloodcurdling cheers, or have passed by one of these formidable structures
and heard the blaring radios? The list can go on and I leave you to
fill it in.
Now these three students will have a marred record for one act
which might be a more courageous expression of resentment against
those fun-loving boys. Could they not be made to amend this terribly
destructive act of vandalism by washing off the paint?
I think we G. D. I.s had better start looking for alternatives to
this kind of situation.
An enraged G. D. I.

Editor:

societys inhibitions

It was Friday night and the boy,
frustrated with studying, went to
a movie. He walked back alone
following the movie and went for
a snack at the C. I.
The girl didnt have a date Fri Friday
day Friday night and thus spent the night
at the library studying. Yet, dis dissatisfied
satisfied dissatisfied and not really realizing
the motivation, she too later went
to the C. I. Thus, two totally in independent
dependent independent lines intersect.
The boy and girl enter almost
together, the girl taking one table,
the boy another. During the course
of their stay, their eyes met once,
twice, and as the girl rose to
leave still again their eyes met
his saying: You are so lovely,
Id give anything to see you smile
to speak to you just once
but how . .?

Editor:
So the infirmary has been under Dean Stanleys thumb for ten
years? Has the deans reign really been that oppressive? Your
editorial makes him seem like an inept dictator, keeping magnificent
medical institution from its deserved greatness.
This campus does not deserve great medical facilities in its in infirmary
firmary infirmary unless it pays for them. You will not obtain the services of
the world-renown specialists you desire by offering the moderate
salaries currently in effect for the infirmary staff.
How about some statements from Dean Stanley and Provost Martin?
Do either of them really want the infirmary? Would you want it either
if many of the injuries and illnesses you see are faked or exaggerated
for the purpose of getting ROTC, physical education, class, and test
excuses?
Oh yes, do put the infirmary in the Medical Center or perhaps the
Seagle Building. At least its convenient now. But, as the saying goes,
Out of sight, out of mind and then you could more profitably use
your time to vent your wrath on mandatory ROTC and food service.
P. S. What happened to our student body president who was so
interested in the infirmary last year during his campaign? He was
invited to every meeting of the committee that studied the infirmary
the past several months, but he attended none. Perhaps he was too
busy selling spirit hats and getting SG block seating.
John Ten Broeck

questions dictatorship

And her shining eyes seeming
to reply: I understand. The boy
finished his cup of coffee and left
a few minutes later. The two lines
had intersected, then passed on in
their straight and unerring paths.
Why couldnt two people who
wanted to meet simply do so? Why
did this thing happen? Does society
get such a hold on a human being
from awareness on that it even
supercedes their own desires and
natural instincts? Where is the
solution? Until society can remove
these instincts or superimpose
their codes around their instincts,
then surely there is going to be
conflict . conflict or compro compromise.
mise. compromise.
Where, oh God, is there an
agreeable solution?
Don Gold, 2UC

AN EDITORIAL:

ja ial a local number.
%i A mans voice answers.
Let freedom ring, he says
and goes on to insinuate that racial
troubles and assaults on police men
are part of a Communist plot to
destroy police departments.
The man, who has recorded his
message, tells his listeners, A
revolution is taking place in the
United States between two opposing
ideologies Communist slavery
and American freedom and that
they are meeting head-on.
Caught in the middle and taking
most of the lumps are the men of
your local police department, he
continues.
The man who doesnt identify
himself adds that, The top
Communist objective is the de demoralization
moralization demoralization of America's last line
of defense your local police
department.
The enemy has made headway
through false news reports of
police brutality and the paralyzing
effect of liberal-dominated police
review boards, he adds, and
quotes a California police com commissioner
missioner commissioner as saying that this con continual
tinual continual downgrading of police cannot
continue if America, as we have
known it, is to survive.
But wait.
Theres a solution to this
terrible Communist conspiracy, he
says.
The John Birch Society has in inaugurated
augurated inaugurated a drive to help local
police muster the support they
deserve in this titanic battle a against
gainst against the rising tide of crime
and Communist-inspired racial
revolution.
Just send 10 cents in coin for
an article that reveals the con conspiracy
spiracy conspiracy behind the drive to destroy
your local police department, the
man urges.
This is one example of the type
of nonomogues Let Freedom
Ring records for presentation
over telephone wires each week.
The organization, which has been
condemned on the floor of theU.S.
Senate by Sen. Jacob Javits of New
York indulges in propaganda which
is not only in bad taste, but borders
on slander and libel.
To say the least, Let Freedom
Ring is questionable. It consis consistently
tently consistently downgrades public officials
and accuses them of being Com Communist
munist Communist sympathizers and pinkos
LET
FREEDOM
RING
372-3344
...as advertised in Campus Con Conservative.
servative. Conservative.

NEW DAILY SCHEDULED AIR SERVICE
Gaines villa . .Tampa ... Ft. Myars
NORTHBOUND SOUTHBOUND
City FLIGHT NUMBER City FLIGHT NUMBER
Leaves 1 3 Leaves 2 4
. <*
Tampa 9:00a.m. 5:00 p.m. Gainesville io:loa.m. 6:00P.m.
Arrives Arrives
Gainesville #!SOA M 8:50 PM Tampa lisooA M
ADVANCE- RESERVATIONS REQUIRED ON ALL FLIGHTS
|vi|\ A aid Reservations 4 Information
FLORIDA taxi CAU 378-1966
IIB travel agent

let freedom ring?

if they do not conform to the ideals
set up by Let Freedom Ring.
Yet, it offers no feasible solution
to the problems it claims exist.
The organization is typical of
those individuals who constantly
criticize government actions, yet
refuse to work inside the structure
of government to cure its ills.
Although the group urges return
to pure constitutional government,
it itself does not conform to the

LETTER
burn, baby, burn

Editor:
Be black and have nothing save
a white mans morality with which
to fight the hunger and the slums
and the shame . Then surprise
us with streets of fire and blood
until white cops and liberals come
to establish a moments peace ..
Be the starving yellow peasant
and one late day explode with anger
and vengeance, warring under any
flag that promises a tomorrow.

ANNUAL
Channukah Dinner
Sunday, Dec, 5, At 6 P.M.
Reservations Required
THE HILLEL FOUNDATION
Night
At (
Humpty
Large Dei Monico,
THURSDAY Baked Potatoit,
Tossed Salad/
STEAK NIGHT 5-9 P.M. Hot Buttered Roll*
$1.07
HUMPTY DUMPTY
Drive-In & Restaurant
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEALS
372-5387 310 NW 13th St

Thursday, Dec. 2, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

standards set by the Framers of
the Constitution.
Where is the ability to compro compromise
mise compromise so brilliantly displayed by
our forefathers? Let Freedom
Ring paints all issues as black
and white, with no shading of gray.
Where is the courage to stand
and fight publicly exhibited by men
like Alexander Hamilton? The
voice on the telephone which spews
forth Let Freedom Ring** propa propaganda
ganda propaganda is anonymous.

Then the white defenders of free freedom
dom freedom land with bombs and napalm
to solve the military problem posed
by an alien conspiracy.
Until we realize how close Watts
and Viet Nam are and build social
structures instead of military
ones, there will be many more
wars and many more cries of
Burn Baby Burn.
Martin Kahan, lUC

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Dec. 2, 1965.

Page 6

Flame Proof! JKP Indulge in a bit of Feminine
SWIRL BRANCH <*s, ao ~' ad where HE can see it... and you
nrD BBC
I IvCEj jSr Jordan-almond pastel colors SizesM
S
Grope no more, my lady. First class //I / j / 8
com P artmen^s TB jj jl C I
Three main compartments give you room Jfrafilfe
VHHMniMP for your pearls and lots of big jewelry There's also a necklace A. ChriStlTiaS-ribbon beading and eiTl- C. A Me "J
, bar and a deep pocket across the full width of the lid. Plus ten SeSslsreSt normative
BRBRBBBM' **' tray compartments for your earrings and pins Closed, it meas- w||||lL broidery On 3 tWO-tOned COStUme. Sugar
ures a compact ii" xrx 3%* h. Lined with rich rayon velvet. wKasast* coated aqua with iced-green blouse and necklace m
EE' LADY BUXTON i#*. trim ... also in sugarplum pink with S'nen-dll
winter-white blouse and trim. green
/"Bp|' tones or a winter-white jacket; and on the th s ) acket^B
l PHONE 372-8421 106 W. UNIV. AVE. j|| overblouse as well. Also in iced-green blouse arej
JPK with same tapestry tone needlepoint. W
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OUo H. wain "ASK YOUR FRIENDS"



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even the side are defrosted!
SAAB provides a flow of cool
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Result: summer it cool. In
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' Slocks
We know that "SLACKS" are a practical gift, but many B
guys in school just have to be practical. Os course, he
I would rather have a sports car, but this year he'll set- 1
tie for several pair of slacks. Great assortment. From B
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Specialists in University Clothing o

2 1965 The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Dec. 2, 1965

Igator classifieds!

| for rent f
LARGE two bedroom, well fur furnished
nished furnished duplex. Air conditioners,
natural gas. Quiet and close to
campus. Two-trimester lease.
Water and sewage free. Call 376-
6494. (B-61-st-c).
FURNISHED: 2 rooms for 2 males.
One block from campus. slls per
trimester per person. Call Jim
Hodge at FR 6-9345 or see at
1602 NW 1 Ave. (B-60-4t-c).
1 BEDROOM, furnished apartment.
All electric, heat and air condition conditioning.
ing. conditioning. Clean, modern. 3 blocks from
campus. Available Dec. 20. Call
376-5743, (B-62-2t-c).
AIR CONDITIONED room for rent.
One block from campus, maid ser service,
vice, service, wall-to-wall carpeting, sink,
refrigerator, excellent heat, new
easy chair, large desk, book shelf
and special appliance outlet. Avail Available
able Available January 1. $13.75 per week.
376-9247. (B-62-2t-p).
APARTMENT TO SUBLET. $75
monthly. Large living room, bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, kitchen and dining area aixi
bath. Call 6-0539. (B-62-3t-c).
NICE NEW FURNISHED one bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment. Washer included.
Walk to campus. Perfect for two.
Phone 378-3584. 1824 NW 3 Place,
apt. 22. (B-62-3t-c).
ONE OR TWO male students to
take over two room apartment
for winter trimester. One block
from campus. Air-conditioned.
Phone 8-4973. (B-59-3t-nc).
SUBLEASE Jan.-Aug., luxurious
one bedroom apt., air conditioned,
all electric large kitchen and di dinette,
nette, dinette, pool. Only 5 min. from
campus. Call 378-4062 between
5-9 p.m. (B-61-3t-c).
1 <
TWO BEDROOM HOUSE. S9O
monthly. Air conditioned, heat.
Call 378-4668. (B-61-ts-c).
QUIET MODERN air conditioned
apartment. 5 mins, from campus.
S9O. Call 378-1446. (B-61-3t-c).
ATTENTION: Male graduate Law
and Medical students. Apartment
suitable for 3 students. Available
Jan. 1, 1966. Two doors from John
Tigert Hall. $l2O (Ist and last
month rent in advance). Call 378-
2559 between 9-5 or 6-4968 even evenings.
ings. evenings. (B-61-st-c).
UNFURNISIffiD duplex apartment.
S9O. Walking distance from school.
1107 NW 4 Ave. Call 378-3403
after 5:30. (B-60-st-c).
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY. New
large furnished two bedroom gar garden
den garden apartment. Air conditioned,
swimming pool. Convenient to
campus and P. K. Yonge to sublet.
378-2717. (B-56-ts-c).
AVAILABLE immediately Colonial
Manor apartment. Call 378-3489.
(B-60-3t-c).
ONE BEDROOM attractive studio
apartment for 2 students. 3 blocks
from campus. Available Jan. 1824
NW 3 Place, apt. 26. Call 8-3013.
(B-61-ts-c).
lost-found
LOST Black ski sweater, multi multicolored
colored multicolored yoke, size huge. Lost about
a month ago. $lO reward for re return.
turn. return. De Young, 32-B Buckman,
372-9317. (L-61-6t-p).
LOST Womans silver ID brace bracelet
let bracelet in the area between Infirmary
and Univ. Aud. Engraved*Ginger*
Stan. Call 372-9166. Reward.
(L-62-ts-c).

for sale |
FASHION MINDED WOMEN; Sarah
Coventry jewelry is now being sold
in Gainesville. Have a showing in
your home and receive free jewel jewelry.
ry. jewelry. Sororities and other organiza organizations
tions organizations can receive cash commis commissions
sions commissions for money raising projects.
Call after 5:00. 378-4278. (A (A---62-2t-c).
--62-2t-c). (A---62-2t-c).
TWO QUAKER HEATERS. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Heat six rooms.
One for $25 and one for SSO.
Pipe free. Call 462-1232. (A-62-
2t-c).
FINE WORKING EMERSON 19
portable TV. Less than one year
old. SSO or best offer. Call 376-
0809. (A-62-3t-c).
1961 ALLSTATE motorscooter.
Good condition $l2O. Call 378-
4366 after 5:00. (A-62-2t-c).
HANDBALL GLOVES distributor
for U. S. Handball Association.
Better quality at a lower price
($4.20) than competitors. Contact
Phil Shenkman, 372-9487 or Joel
Galpern, 376-9260. (A-59-st-c).
STEEL STRING guitar, good tone,
going cheap. Call 8-4249 after 5.
(A-54-ts-c).
FRIGIDAIRE refrigerator, $25.
Smith Corona skyriter portable
typewriter, $25. Buick hardtop
1955 special, $175. TV antenna
20* mast, sls. TV Westar 8-PIA
$35. Call 2-1300. (A-61-6t-p).
GIRLS WHITE BLAZERJACKET.
Never worn, size 8. Paid sl6.
Will take $lO. Call 2-2003. (A (A---61-2t-c).
--61-2t-c). (A---61-2t-c).
1965 HONDA 65 cc. Like new.
Must sell. $275. Make offer. Ron
Holden, 376-9158, Hume Hall,
room 2110. (A-60-7t-c).
1965 YAMAHA 250 cc. Super Sport
motorcycle. Like new must sell.
Call 376-2755. (A-60-3t-c).
1 KAY ELECTRIC custom guitar
with Bigsby tail piece. Sacrifice
$75. Call 378-4668. (A-61-ts-c).
AUTOHARP good condition, sls.
Call after 6:00 at 2-6986. (A (A---60-4t-c).
--60-4t-c). (A---60-4t-c).
help wanted
MALE DESK CLERK wanted. 4-9
shift. Apply at Manor Motel office,
2325 NW 13 St. (E-60-3t-c).
CALLING ALL SALES HELP in including
cluding including managers, crew directors
and salesmen. Fuller Brush has
unusual opportunities for Satur Saturdays
days Saturdays only. Approximate earnings
of sls to S2O a day. For appoint appointment
ment appointment write to H. Silver, 1028
Clearwater Dr., Daytona Beach,
Fla. (E-55-10t-c).

11 1
*thriTsatT "15WJTEI I
"THE MOST BRILLIANT THE MOST
EXCITING THE MOST INTELLIGENT
MOVIE I HAVE SEEN THIS SEASON"
The New Yorker
BREATHLESS
JEAN SEBERG JEAN-PAUL BELMONDO
Plus Journey To Understanding
NOTHING BUT A MAN

I wanted

FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
apartment. S9O. beginning Jan.
Right behind Norman Hall. Call
8-4869 after 11 a.m. (C-61-3t-c).
ROOMMATE to share comfortable
and convenient room in prime lo location
cation location near campus. S3O monthly.
Call 8-3402. (C-61-2t-c).
ONE FEMALE ROOMMATE to
share modern, well-equipped 2
bdrm. apt. at Univ. Gardens. Win Winter
ter Winter trimester. Includes central
heat and air-cond., swimming pool.
Call FR 8-3003. (C-61-ts-c).
ONE COED to share apartment in
Colonial Manor. Phone 378-3752.
(C-61-3t-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE over 21 to
share apartment in Colonial Man Manor.
or. Manor. Call Linda, 8-2487. (C-61-
3t-p).
MALE ROOMMATE for next term
or move in now. Preferrably Law
student. 2 bedroom house, one mile
from campus. $32.50 per month.
Call 8-3230. (C-61-ts-c).
COED ROOMMATE wanted for next
trimester. Modern one bedroom
apartment, 3 blocks from main
library. $45. monthly. Call 378-
4523 after 6:00. (C-59-2t-c).
ONE OR TWO GIRLS to share a
two bedroom apartment. Starlight
Apartments near Norman Hall.
378-3082 after 4:30. Prefer senior
or graduate student. (C-59-3t-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
apartment three blocks from
campus. One bedroom. Call 378-
4893. (C-58-st-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
apt. beginning in Jan. Colonial
Manor. Please call after 7 p.m.
at 378-3355. (C-60-4t-p).
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
apartment at Colonial Manor next
trimester. Call 378-3602. (C-60-
4t-c).
RIDERS TO WASHINGTON, D. C.,
3 p.m., Dec. 13 or 6 a.m. Dec. 14.
$lO. Call 378-3761 after 4:30 p.m.
(C-60-3t-c).
SINGLE ROOM for winter and sum summer,
mer, summer, for not over S6O. per month.
Must be within 2 or 3 blocks from
campus. Does not need kitchen, but
would like air-conditioning. Call
Jeff at 6-9252 after 8 p.m. (C-57-
tf-nc).
-
MALE STUDENT to share room
with full separate unit. Includes
kitchen and study room with linen
and maid service. Call 376-4592.
(C-62-lt-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
modern air conditioned apartment.
Call after 5:00 at 8-3586. (C-62-
ts-c).

| autos |
1958 TR-3. Green. Good condition.
Heater top excellent tires.
Call 376-0540 evenings. (G-62-
lt-p).
1962 CHEVY IMPALA CONVER CONVERTIBLE.
TIBLE. CONVERTIBLE. In excellent cond. White/
Red interior. 250 hp VB, all power
asist. and many other extras.
Phone 376-4936. (G-62-ts-c).
1960 FALCON, 4 door. Radio,
heater. S3OO or best offer. Call
376-0824. (G-62-st-c).
1962 CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE.
327 engine, powerglide, tonneau
cover, transistorized ignition sys system,
tem, system, good condition. Call 378-2057.
(G-62-3t-c).
1951 CHEVROLET. Excellent
mechanical condition. $125. Call
372-5091 after 5 p.m.(G-62-4t-p).
1958 MGA. Excellent mechani mechanically.
cally. mechanically. Must sell. Best offer. Call
George Gagel, 376-9256 after 12
noon. (G-62-st-c).
MUST LEAVE COUNTRY must
sell 1964 Chevrolet Impala Super
Sports. Air conditioned, conver convertible,
tible, convertible, like new, the works. Very
small equity and take over pay payments.
ments. payments. Call 6-9026, 6-0506 or
2-1458, ask for Robert. (G-59-
st-c).
1963 FIAT 1100. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. $650. Phone after 5:00.
6-6124. (G-61-3t-c).
1965 AUSTIN HEALY SPRITE,
5 mo. old. Blue, mint condition.
372-0539, Edward White. $1595.
(G-603t-p).
real estate
FOR SALE BY OWNER in highly
restricted area, three lovely homes
each with 3 bedrooms, central heat
and on large lots. Near elementary
school. 372-8175. (I-61-6t-c).
I M
m e nj
HUH

SENSUOUS AND SENSUAL FUN FUNPHILANDERERS
PHILANDERERS FUNPHILANDERERS ROMP THROUGH
FIELDS OF WAVING GIRLS!*
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TAILOR MADE FOR MASTROIANNI,
MASTROIANNI-WATCHERS AND
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A. | MBASSV MCTUMts
[gfiuCiiii fie mit mlyl 1:00 3:06
wfiSnKfwTtTZ Tisr 5:12
9:24

real estate
FOR SALE BY OWNER in highly
restricted area, three lovely
homes each with 3 bedrooms, cen central
tral central heat and on large lots. Near
elementary school. (I-61-6t-c).
5 ACRE TRACT FOR $1750. Will
trade for free and clear mobile
home for comparable value. Call
Ernest Tew Realty, Inc., anytime
376-6461. (I-61-st-c).
HOME NEEDING RE PAIRS and re redecoration
decoration redecoration on 3 acres of land off
Newberry Road. Owner must sell.
Price $12,500 with small down downpayment.
payment. downpayment. Call Ernest Tew Realty,
Inc., anytime at 376-6461. (1-61-
st-c).
INCOME PROPERTY FOR SALE.
2 buildings, room for more. Lot
285x105*. See anytime at 1105 NW
6 St. Call 376-1730 between 1-5
p.m. (I-61-st-c).
TWO AND ONE-HALF ACRES in
W. Gainesville area with elegant
new 3 bedroom, 2 bath home.
Large family room, separate din dining
ing dining room and living room. Central
heat. $19,500. Call Les Jackson,
builder. 378-2222 or 376-7090.
(1-62-st-c).
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M. D. D. Inc. is looking for new
ideas, not hair brained schemes,
but good sound thinking. If you
think you have a sound idea and
want to sell it or get financial
help while putting it to work, call
me at 2-3572 day or night. Ask
for Mr. Corson. (J-62-st-p).
WANT TO CRAM FOR EXAMS?
In peace and quiet? Holiday Inn of
Williston (where the Fighting
Gators stay) offers special rates
to U of F students. Phone for
reservations. 528-4801. (J-62-
st-c).
WILL TRADE slightly used law
books for traveling luggage. Con Contact
tact Contact Mike Plunkett any afternoon
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lEducafion
Honorary
Initiates
The Alpha Phi Chapter of Pi
Lambda Theta, national honorary
and professional association for
women in education and related
fields, recently initiated 17 UF
coeds into membership.
Prospective members must ac achieve
hieve achieve high academic standing, give
evidence of high moral and pro professional
fessional professional standards, possess qual qualities
ities qualities of leadership and exhibit the
ability to live and work effectively
with others.
New initiates are Joan Carr,
Marilyn Cavuoti, Nancy Isabella,
Sherry Allen, Sharon Chambless,
Sandra Ann Comins, Marcia Mase,
Madeline Beck, and Faiths. Smith.
Also Nancy Sue Foster, Bar Barbara
bara Barbara L. Ross, Patricia Brames,
Linda Greenan, Carol O. Brewton,
Nancy Bridges, Mary Elizabeth
Baggett, and Barbara Kohler.
Rice-Grose
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1632 W. University Ave.
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HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS DAMES: Today, 8 p.m., Home
of Mrs. Lowell C. Hammer, 3923 NW 36 St. Regular monthly meeting.
Homemade Christmas decorations ideas will be exchanged.
PHI DELTA KAPPA: Today, 5:30 p.m., University Health Center
Cafeteria. Speaker: Dean Kimball Wiles, College of Education.
ALPHA KAPPA PSI PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS FRATERNITY:
Today, 7:15 p.m., M-611 Medical Center. Speaker: Dr. Frank Good Goodwin.
win. Goodwin. Rush functions. Refreshments.
ARTS AND SCIENCES DAMES: Dec. 4, 6 p.m., Pot-luck Dinner.
For information call Julia Myers at 8-2869.
NEWMAN CLUB: Dec. 4,7 p.m., Catholic Student Center. Annual
Christmas decorating party and songfest.
HILLEL FOUNDATION: Dec. 5. Hillel Foundation. Election of
officers and Hanukah Banquet. For reservations call FR 2-2900.
WESLEY FOUNDATION: Dec. 5, 6:30 p.m., Wesley Foundation.
Christmas banquet. Presentation of Warner Klievers Round the
Cherry Tree and Christmas folkcarols. Reservations will be due
today.
MORTAR BOARD: Dec. 5, University Auditorium. Annual Christmas
Tree lighting ceremony.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON: Dec. 5, 4-7 p.m., Sigma Alpha Epsilon
house. Spaghetti dinner. Cost sl.
SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON: Dec. 6, 8 p.m., Physics Auditorium.
Speaker: Dr. Francisco Garcia. Topic: Ground Water fbr Urban
Water Supplies.
ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS DAMES: Dec. 7, 8 p.m., Univer University
sity University Womens Club. Speaker: Mr. Charlie Woods of Publix Market.
December graduates will be honored. Bring a small gift ($.50-$l)
or donate 50 cents for a gift for the Dec. 12 part at Sunland any anything
thing anything for a young girl. For questions call 6-0700.
EDUCATION DAMES: Dec. 8, 8 p.m., Home of Mrs. J. B. Whites,
1711 NW 10 Ave.

College Os Health
Honors Dr. Mase

Faculty members of the UFs
College of Health Related Pro Professions
fessions Professions have honored their dean,
Dr. Darrel J. Mase.
Mase was recognized for 15
years of service to the UF, seven
of them as dean of the pioneer
college which provides education
for health related careers.
At a testimonial dinner at the
Ramada Inn, Dean Mase was pre presented
sented presented a scroll for his creative
contribution to the University; his
initiation and development of this
unique College; for his foresight
in recognizing the broad range
of professions involved in meeting
mankinds health needs and for
developing educational methods to

Thursday, Dec. 2, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

GRANT ADV INC JOB No 2566-65 AD No SA 4A

help meet these needs; for his in inspired
spired inspired leadership and restless
concern for the improvement of
this nations educational programs
for the health professions, and for
providing an atmosphere in his
college that encourages and engen engenders
ders engenders the creative growth of his
staff colleagues in the pursuit of
their professional and personal
aims.
Dean Mase Joined the UF faculty
as professor of speech in 1950
and became coordinator of the
Florida Center of Clinical Ser Services.
vices. Services. He became dean of the
prototype college in 1958.
The college, an outgrowth of the
medical center study which for formulated
mulated formulated the Health Center con concept,
cept, concept, has developed educational
programs which bring into sharp
focus the significance of all ancil ancillary
lary ancillary health professions as neces necessary
sary necessary elements in the total health
care picture.
in sucn a setting, students train training
ing training as medical technologists, phy physical
sical physical therapists, occupational
therapists, rehabilitation counsel counselors,
ors, counselors, health and hospital admin administrators,
istrators, administrators, clinical psychologists
and speech and hearing special specialists,
ists, specialists, receive clinical training and
learn the interrelationships of
their fields and those of medicine
and nursing in order to work to together
gether together toward the cure of disease,
toward rehabilitation and mainten maintenance
ance maintenance of health.
FUNLAND
AMUSEMENT
CENTER
WHERE STUDENTS
MEET FOR RECREATION
GAINESVILLE'S
LARGEST SELECTION
OF GAMES
1011 W. University Ave.
2 Blocks From Campus

Page 9



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Dec. 2, 1965

Graduation Date
Set For April 24

UF will conduct its annual com commencement
mencement commencement ceremonies on Sunday
April 24, 1966, Dean of Student
Affairs Lester Hale said today.
Dean Hale explained early an announcement
nouncement announcement of the graduation date
was made because the University
catalog list commencement for
Religion
Continued From Page 1
deals That Changed The World,"
"India and the West," "Towards
A World of Plenty," "The West
at Bay," and "Policy for the
West." She has received honorary
degrees from Harvard, Columbia,
Smith, Fordham, and many other
schools.
This year the Religion-in-Life
program is emphasizing the in informal
formal informal aspects of the program.
Qualified individuals in the field
of theology will come to Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville to conduct informal discus discussion
sion discussion with students in the dorms
and fraternity and sorority houses
throughout the course of the week.
"Our committee feels that in inasmuch
asmuch inasmuch as our theme is Called
to be Human* that we should treat
our program in the most humane
way by involving individual stu students
dents students in informal, soul-searching
discussions rather than merely
the large, formal sessions,** says
Religion-in-Life Committee
Chairman Ron Lanier.

He concluded, "We have a lot
of diversity in our program this
year. It should be an enriching
and valuable experience for stu students
dents students and faculty.**
Parade
Continued From Page 1
an Assistant Professor of Math Mathematics
ematics Mathematics at the UF.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz,
Colonel William Boaz, Jr., Col Colonel
onel Colonel Arlo Mitchell and Susan Hull,
the reigning Military Ball Queen,
will also be present on the re reviewing
viewing reviewing stand.
Besides the pass-in-review of
the combined cadet corps, the
parade will include demonstrations
by the Billy Mitchell Drill Team
and Gator Guard and the presen presentation
tation presentation of awards to outstanding
cadets.
The 140-piece Gator Band will
provide music, and bleachers will
be available for all spectators on
the drill field west of the stadium.
Lighting
Continued From Page 1
Choir will begin its program
inside. They will sing until the
crowd can assemble to hear UF
President J. Wayne Reitz* Christ Christmas
mas Christmas address.
The Christmas tree lighting is
part of Christmas On Campus
which includes the reading of
the Christmas Carol by Dean Les Lester
ter Lester Hale and the Choral Unions
singing program.
fXCTO'X COpICSI
1-19 Copies, 10v ea. 2U&
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Copies Made While You Walt
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1620 W. UNIVERSITY AYE.

Monday, April 25, in line with
the Monday schedule employed last
April.
"We feel it is in the best in interests
terests interests of the students, their fam families
ilies families and the University to change
the date to a Sunday,** Dean Hale
said, citing travel arrangements,
motel accommodations and loss of
time from work by parents as
main factors in the switch.
"We had a number of requests
from students that prompted this
decision,* he added.
The program will be conducted
on Florida Field, beginning at
4 p.m. If weather conditions pro prohibit
hibit prohibit the outdoor ceremony, ac activities
tivities activities will be transferred to
Florida Gymnasium, Dean Hale
said.
There will be no baccalaureate
service in conjunction with the
commencement; however, it is
hoped local churches will arrange
special portions of their services
earlier in the day to recognize the
graduating seniors.
Tentative plans are being made
by University President J. Wayne
Reitz to host a reception for grad graduates
uates graduates and their families on Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, April 23. Details on that
portion of the weekend agenda
will be announced later.
Dean Hale admitted the trimes trimester
ter trimester calendar produces difficulties
in scheduling commencement to
avoid as much conflict as possible.
"Many students have been seek seeking
ing seeking a return to the old plan of
three separate graduations each
year,** he said, "but with our tri trimesters
mesters trimesters ending in December, April
and August, followed by a rapid
return to a new term of classes,
it*s just not feasible to alter our
format at present. If a change is
to be made from the trimester
system in the future, we certainly
will give serious consideration
to scheduling additional com commencement
mencement commencement ceremonies.

Student Painters
Suspended From UF

UF students involved in last
months painting of several frat fraternity
ernity fraternity houses have appeared be before
fore before both Municipal Court and a
university disciplinary committee.
Action of the disciplinary com committee
mittee committee on Nov. 12, resulted in
the three being suspended from the
UF until January, 1966 When they
return they will be on disciplin disciplinary
ary disciplinary probation, according to Dean
of Men Frank T. Adams.
On Nov. 16 two of the three,
Roderick R. Harvey, lUC, and
Warren D. Fincham, 3AS, appeared

If you have two hours
and $6 per week you
i can s l by Christmas.
Gainesville Municipal Airport
Waldo Road

SCENE
ON
CAMPUS

! ,1 ; i ,-.s V-
H : 'Mi
DIXIE
FROM
DIXIE
Dixie Dean, 2UC from St Pete,
has an unusual name and likes it.
Dixie is a journalism major. Her
favorite part of college?parties
and dancing.

before Municipal Court.
The City Judge witheld judgment
until next year, Campus Police
Investigator, G. E. Watson said.
At that time they will appear be before
fore before him and he will then advise
them of his verdict.
Thus, the sentence is left pend pending,
ing, pending, with no guilty verdict or
acquittal being made.
The third student involved, Hugh
Parks Rusk, Jr., 3AS, paid a
fine and did not have to appear
before the City Judge.

Phi Beta Kappa
Elects 29 Here

Twenty-nine students were elec elected
ted elected to Phi Beta Kappa last Friday
by the UF Chapter, Beta of Florida.
Founded at the College of Wil William
liam William and Mary in 1776, Phi Beta
Kappa is the oldest Greek fraer fraernity
nity fraernity in America. The society is
for recognition and encouragement
of academic excellence in the lib liberal
eral liberal arts and sciences.
All students in the upper 15 per
cent of their graduating classes
in the College of Arts and Sciences
are eligible. However, most of
those elected have had over-all
Upper Division averages of 3.5
or higher. In addition, several stu students
dents students have been elected from the
Colleges of Law, Education, En Engineering
gineering Engineering and the Graduate School.
Certified as elected:
College of Arts and Sciences:
Graduated April, 1965: Ann
Schwab Beaver; Ada Patricia Ma Mahon,
hon, Mahon, Julia Carolyn Re veil.
Graduated June, 1965: Barbara
Larue Clark; Samuel Charles Fun Funde
de Funde rbuck; JoAnn Helen Notaris.
Graduated August, 1965: Max
Leroy AUee, Euguene Ellis Clark,
William Walter Herring, Mary
Duane Martin, Donald Lynn
McElwee, James Judd McEnnan,
FunkToSpeak
Dr. Arthur L. Funk, Professor
of Humanities, will be the speaker
for the Unitarian-Universalist
Fellowship Sunday at 11 a.m. in
room 324 of the Florida Union.
His talk, East Meets West:
the Impact of Christianity," will
be based on Information and im impressions
pressions impressions gathered during his five
years service abroad with the
United States Information Service.
As Director of USIS, Dr. Funk
spent three years in Madras, In India,
dia, India, and about two years in Mad Madagascar.
agascar. Madagascar. After taking his Ph.D.
at the University of Chicago, he
first joined the faculty at the UF
in 1947. He served abroad with
the USIS from 1956 to 1962, when
he returned to the UF.

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Helen Virginia Neel, Ruth Ann
Davis Ryals, Shirley M. Willcock.
Candidates for degrees in
December, 1965: Donald Fleit
Burger, Allan Ray Gaither, Maryle
Goodnow, Agnes Elizabeth Loraine
Fennell, Augustine Samec, Marsha
Anne Van Loon Tamburrino, Don Donald
ald Donald E. Wilkes Jr., Susan Raye
Atteridg Zambito.
College of Engineering: Thomas
Edward Albert.
College of Law: Richard Les Leslie
lie Leslie Horn.
Graduate School: JoanSacknitz
Carver, Aubrey Clise Daniels, H.
Scott Pyron, Joseph Francis Vogel.
NOW THEY KNOW
HOUSTON (UPI) Newsmen
getting ready to cover the Houston
ApoUos hockey team this season
were wondering in what high re regard
gard regard they were held by the team's
front office. Callers asking about
a press party were told to report
to the penalty box in the rink at
the coliseum.
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Lagers Set Sail On Winning Season

By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Staff Writer
Floridas basketball team, using
DICK

Dennis Dennisassistant
assistant Dennisassistant sports editor

Cornering the head gridiron coach of a school that plays
big-time football in this era of high-powered pressure recruiting
can be likened unto snaring a bird on the wing.
Coach Dan Devine of the Missouri Tigers seldom stays in
the same place for too long a time. He was reached by phone in
Kansas City early yesterday morning for an exclusive interview
concerning the Jan. 1 Sugar Bowl game between the Gators and
the Tigers.
Florida has an excellent team; our two scouts were much
impressed by UFs play in the Florida-Florida State game,
Devine disclosed.
I look for a high-scoring game. But the two team offenses
are really different. We are primarily a running team, while
its evident the Gators can throw exceptionally well.
Our offense has been off-and-on all season. Its been good
some games, and hasnt done so well in others. Florida has
a better passing attack than any opponent weve faced this season;
Spurrier and Casey present a problem. In addition, our scouts
say Florida can run well too, Devine noted.
Devine was asked to elaborate on Mizzous foremost talents
on offense; quarterback Gary Lane, and two-way star halfback
John Roland.
Long Time Regulars
Both have been regulars for three years, and are good, sound
athletes. Lane calls most of the plays and is a fine passer.
He is a strong threat on outside running in the keep-or-give off the
belly-series option play.
At 6-1, 200, Lane is a durable quarterback, Devine outlined.
Roland is one of several players who goes both ways in the
two-platoon system. Hes a great ball carrier, a hard runner
who wont quit til he crosses the goal line. He's also a hard hardnosed
nosed hardnosed tackier, and a tremendous defender, the Missouri Mentor
said.
Lane was named National Back of the Week after scoring three
touchdowns and passing for a fourth in Missouri's 30-0 thrashing
of Oklahoma. Roland, drafted a future as a junior by the
National Football League St. Louis Cardinals, scored three in
the Tigers 44-20 whipping of Kansas.
Roland, 6-2, 207, also intercepted one pass, caught one, com completed
pleted completed an aerial, recovered a KU fumble,and set up a score
with a 35-yard punt return. Still another standout is the real
Charlie Brown, leading ground gainer with over 800 yards rushing.
This will be the Tigers fourth bowl appearance in Devines
eight years. Runnerup in the tough Big Eight Conference, Missouri
finished 7-2-1.
Like Better Record
Wed like to have a better record, but you must admit, we
played a real tough schedule. We lost our first game to Kentucky,
which was later ranked fifth in the nation, we tied Rose Bowl
bound UCLA, and we lost by two points to Orange Bowl bound
Nebraska. The games we didn't win were very close.
Devine-coached teams have always stressed defense. This
Tiger squad shut out three foes, and allowed all but three foes no
more than seven points.
This team is not the best Ive ever had, Devine said with
conviction. But its more than lived up to my expectations. On
defense, were a lot like Florida. The players like to scramble
a lot and be in on every play.
I have known Florida coach Ray Graves for a long time, and
have a lot of respect him. Both teams are capable of playing
any team in the country so Im looking for quite a battle from
Florida, Devine concluded.
If Santa doesnt come
to see you, may it only
be because you made
a 4.0 and he thinks
youre lying.


its height advantage and superior
ball handling, easily defeated Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville U. last night 80-59 before

m

ROMP OVER JU 80-59

a less-than-packed-house in
Florida Gym.
Dave Higley, the point man in the
Gators' 1-2-2 offense, led the
Gators with 16 points and con consistent
sistent consistent ball handling. Several
times the junior Ohioan drove
through the entire Dolphin team for
baskets. He hit on seven of ten
attempts from the field.
Gary Keller was the nights high
point man with 17. Keller fouled
out with five minutes to go. Jeff
Ramsey dumped in 15 points in
a fine effort. Other Gators in
double figures were Ed Mahoney
and Paul Morton with 11 points
each.
The Gators jumped off to a 6-0
lead early in the game and were
never seriously threatened. The
lead was lengthened to 38-26 at
halftime and rose to as many as
El
TWO FOR KELLER: Miller
readies for rebound

NEW YORK (UPI) The 1965
United Press International all-
America football team: the max maximum
imum maximum number of votes a player
could receive was 242:
OFFENSE
Pos. Player A School Votes
E. Twilley, Tulsa 194
T. Hines, Arkansas 159
G. Arrington, Notre Dame 166
C. Crane, Alabama 130
G. Van Horn, Ohio State 81
T. Ball, Kentucky 85
E. White, Nebraska 54
Q. Griese, Purdue 98
HB. Garrett, So. Cal. 195
HB. Anderson, Texas Tech 146
F. Grabowski, Illinois 178
DEFENSE
Pos. Player & School Votes
E. Brown, Minnesota 128
T. Phillips, Arkansas 99
T. Yearby, Michigan 96
E. Smith, Michigan State 100
LB. Nobis, Texas 187
LB. McAdams, Oklahoma 144
LB. Kelley, Ohio State 62
HB. Rassas, Notre Dame 160
HB. Webster, Michigan State 155
HB. Roland, Missouri 148
HB. BENNETT, FLORIDA 41
SECOND TEAM OFFENSE
Pos. Player A School Votes
E. Crockett, Arkansas 45
T. Peay, Missouri 44
G. Maliszewskl, Princeton 56
C. Killorin, Syracuse 31
G. Hindman, Mississippi 42
T. Mack, Michigan 32
E. Washington, Michigan St. 39
B. Little, Syracuse 79
B. Juday, Michigan State 49
B. Jones, Michigan State 33
B. Anderson, Tulsa 18

1965 UPI All-America

25 points in the second half as
Coach Norm Sloan shuttled his
players in and out like wild cards.
Although the Gators looked rusty
at times and were frustrated oc occasionally
casionally occasionally by the Dolphin press,
they turned in some impressive
statistics.
Florida hit 28 of 51 shots from
the floor for a .549 percentage.
The Gators made good on 24 of
34 free throw attempts for a cred creditable
itable creditable .706 rate.

KS9B5 EBWBjffjifjpy

, Thursday, Dec. 2, 1965

Page 11

HIGLEY HITS: Drove for Gator score in first half

SECOND TEAM DEFENSE
Pos. Player A School Votes
E. Jeter, Nebraska 65
T. Barnes, Nebraska 87
T. Shay, Purdue 52
E. Patton, Georgia 19
LB. Goovert, Michigan State 39
LB. Cody, Auburn 34
LB. Emanuel, Tennessee 32
HB. Gaskins, Washington 29
HB. Wachholtz, Nebraska 24
HB. Horak, Texas Christian 15
HB. Mosher, California 13
HONORABLE MENTION
OFFENSE
Ends: CASEY, FLORIDA (38);
Hadrick, Purdue (28); Altenburg,
UCLA (11); Malinchak, Indiana(9);
Bunker, Oregon(s); Clancy, Michi Michigan
gan Michigan (5); Williams, Washington (5).
Tackles: Carlson, Nebraska
(14); Singer, Purdue (12); Bellas,
Penn State (11); Gillingham, Min Minnesota
nesota Minnesota (6); Allison, Missouri (5);
Burns, Northwestern (5).
Guards: GAGNER, FLORIDA
(23); Battle, Georgia (22); Nlland,
lowa (20); Richardson, UCLA (15);
Regner, Notre Dame (14); Ban Banducci,
ducci, Banducci, UCLA (8); Bedrick, Texas
(5); Garamendi, California (5).
Centers: Pryor, Ohio State (7);
Kasperek, lowa State (6); Dittmann,
Navy (5); Diroitroff, Michigan State
(5).
Backs: Beban, UCLA (15); So Solich,
lich, Solich, Nebraska (13); Brittenum,
Arkansas (8); Burnett, Arkansas
(8); Sloan, Alabama (8); SPUR SPURRIER,
RIER, SPURRIER, FLORIDA (8); Norton, Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky (7); Shivers, Utah State (7);
Bowman, Alabama (6); Apisa,
Michigan State (6); Garrison, Ok Oklahoma
lahoma Oklahoma State (6); Pifer, Oregon
State (6); Conjar, Notre Dame (5);
Sander, Ohio State (5); Jones, Ar Arkansas
kansas Arkansas (5).

Jacksonville took five more
shots than the Gator team but made
five less also. The Dolphins were
frustrated all night trying to get
the ball inside to their big man,
Dick Pruet. The 6-9 center made
good on only four of eleven floor
attempts and wound up the night
with a mere 12 points.
The Gators next test comes
Saturday at Miami Beach when
they take on Bruce Hales Miami
Hurricanes.

SPWRTS

DEFENSE
Ends: Long, lowa (18); MATT MATTHEWS,
HEWS, MATTHEWS, FLORIDA (17); We Isa cos cosky,
ky, cosky, Miami, Fla. (15); Harris,
Colorado (12); Lam mo ns, Texas
(9); Shinholser, Florida State (7);
Banazek, Northwestern (6);
Champi, Army (6); Gilmer, Ala Alabama
bama Alabama (6); Belsler, Indiana (5);
Matan, Kansas State (5); Moreau,
Louisiana State (5); Parker, Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia (5).
Tackles: Lucas, Michigan State
(51); Van Dyke, Missouri (18);
Thornton, Auburn (16); Foster,
Washington State (14); Frosberg,
Washington (13); Williams, Ar Arkansas
kansas Arkansas (13); Townes, Tulsa (8);
Rice, Louisiana State (7); Savidge,
Princeton (7); Ratner, Cornell (6);
Strohmyer, Nebraska(6); Druanko,
Notre Dame (5); Urbanek, Missis Mississippi
sippi Mississippi (5).
Linebackers: O'Billovlch, Ore Oregon
gon Oregon State (21); Lynch, Notre Dame
(21); Hansen, Illinois (15); Cec Cecchinl,
chinl, Cecchinl, Michigan(B); Good, Marshall
(7) Tobey, Oregon (7); Bugel,
Ohio State (6); Clarke, Army (6);
Buffone, Louisville (5); Campbell,
Idaho (5); Ilg, Colgate(S); Lag rove,
Louisiana State (5).
Halfbacks: Japinga, Michigan
State (11); Brasvell, Arkansas(lO);
Carey, Notre Dame (9); Bird, Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky (8); Hawkins, Arizona State
(8) Glnrlch, Penn State(B); Longo,
Notre Dame (8); Fill, Ohio State
(7); Sullivan, Maryland (7); Volk,
Michigan (7); Acks, Illinois (6);
Brown, Syracuse (6); Hughes,
Georgia (6); Novogratz, Pittsburgh
(6); Sixkiller, Miami (Fla.) (6);
Smith, Southern California (8);
Crabtree, Pittsburgh (5); Fronek,
Wisconsin (5); Shaw, Southern
California (5).



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Dec. 2, 1965

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