Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Tine Florida Alligatfr

v
Remained on the clock during Saturday's
Florida-FSU football game and things looked
like this:
JUF Smimus&m HH2T
|, W& |J
KImBMPi if* E
'WJp m. TBB A yw *BBf M tKBf WV
;sgfc |^ i(
iS&BF , -*: ? JP
y Mir
" s r % | IlHp ; JP *% A v I ; t^ilo^of
'
. 41
Remained on the clock when some changes
were made:
i4*J jS u i^l
.XftXi,.. /*
jfi Br v u > T J y. Hiufl
B K-' B 1
B r '* JH
He.

Over-The-Shoulder
Grab By
Jack Harper

Gave Gators
s ..
Second Touchdown
In Second Quarter

Koi. 55, //o. 55

FSU fell thanks to antics like this:
t it',-
~ '£k .r J 9HHK |#'-
ppppppppi^^l
Jjggjflgfl

University of Florida

FSU CHEERS...

Gator Lightning
Hits Seminoles

By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Staff Writer
Let me use a quote from Gen.
Bob Neyland This is a team
that won't be beaten, and can't be
beaten.'
That was Coach Ray Graves'
observation after his Gators had
pulled off a come-from-behind
miracle and whipped FSU, 30-17.
He knew, however, that the Gator
victory was accomplished in away
which the late general would not
have condoned.
The Seminoles appeared to be
the miracle workers, when, with
2:12 left on the clock Ed Pritchett
passed to Jerry Jones to put the
Seminoles on top, 17-16.
Not to be denied, Steve Spurrier
led the Gators downfield 71 yards
in six plays to score. 'The final
stroke was a 25-yard pass from
Spurrier to Charley Casey to put
Florida ahead 23-17 with 1:12 left.
Then, with only 19 seconds re remaining,
maining, remaining, Allen Trammell inter intercepted
cepted intercepted a Pritchett pass and
streaked 46 yards for the final
points.
Game statistics were completely
dominated by the Gators, who led
13-3 at the half thanks to two long
TD catches by Jack Harper. They
went for 52 and 37 yards res respectively.
pectively. respectively.
The Seminoles racked up their

Court Decision
On Check-Offs
May Be Nixed

By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Legislative Council began nulli nullification
fication nullification of the Honor Court's deci decision
sion decision on check-offs last Tuesday
night by passing the first reading
of a bill designed to make check checkoffs
offs checkoffs legal within 100 feet of the
polls.
After a heated discussion, Leg.
Council passed first reading of the
bill. Second reading is set for to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow night. During the discus discussion,
sion, discussion, Progress Party Chairman
Tom Backmeyer said check-offs
were Just for the party to see how
its members were voting."
I think the Greeks could walk
100 feet to the polls after they turn turned
ed turned in their check-offs," Skip Ha Haviser,
viser, Haviser, Action Party floor leader,
countered.
It doesn't interfere with the
check-offs to move them 100 feet
out."
Any influence is influence,"
argued Leg Council member Gary
Goodrich. Intent makes no dis-

Monday, November 29, 1965

..TURN TO TEARS

BY LEG COUNCIL

three points on a field goal by
Pete Roberts after Seminole end
George DAlessandro blocked a
Spurrier punt.
Spurrier reported the 25-yard
scoring strike to Casey was not
planned in the huddle.
The defense had been playing
back on us all game. I knew we
had enough time (two minutes re remaining)
maining) remaining) so I was content to just
hit for short gains and move on
down field, Spurrier commented.
I could have hit Casey for a ten
yard gain, but I saw the defensive
halfback come up fast, so 1 mo motioned
tioned motioned Charlie to go deep, and
waited. Fullback Knapp (Don) gave
me a great block, giving me a lot
of time to set up.
Leading Gator ground-gainer for
the season, Alan Poe, was praised
by Graves as being the kind of ball
player considered a hero by his
teammates. Poe, despite a knee
Injury suffered in the Miami loss,
was called on to spell starter John
Feiber.
The Tampa Robinson graduate
rushed for 61 yards in 17 carries,
most of it coming in crucial crucialyardage
yardage crucialyardage situations. He was third
in team pass-receiving, with 37
yards and three receptions.
I didnt think about my knee
after the game started. Poe ad-
See GRAVES on p. 9

ference.
Eleven justices whose only in inclination
clination inclination was to vote for check checkoffs,
offs, checkoffs, decided check-offs were an
influence. They were unable to vote
aga.nst the influence."
Gor v ich accused the Council of
being motivated only by politics and
George Blaha, secretary of legis legislative
lative legislative affairs, jumped up to protest.
I resent Mr. Goodrich's ques questioning
tioning questioning the decision of the council,"
Blaha said.
Jeff Fuqua, Action Party Chair Chairman,
man, Chairman, said that individual infrac infractions
tions infractions were the problem, not check checkoffs
offs checkoffs Influence.
If you move the check-off girls
100 feet away you will disrupt the
system so badly that there is no
reason to have it," Fuqua said.
I can't see how check-offs can
be an influence when both parties
have them," commented Terry
Moore.
A move to postpone the first
See CHECK-OFFS on p. 5



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Nov. 29, 1965

i
_'f
International
DE GAULLE AGAIN?... President Charles de Gaulle entered the final
week of the French presidential race Sunday. He is reportedly still
loftily confident of reelection Dec. 5, but causing anguished concern
to aides that he might not make it after all. The contest that started
less than 10 days ago with de Gaulle an apparent shoo-in, now seemed
to have become a real race. Members of the government and leaders
of the ruling Union for the New Republic Party UNR unleashed a whirl whirlwind
wind whirlwind offensive this week to recover lost ground.
MORE TROOPS? ... Top U.S. military men in South Viet Nam asked
visiting Defense Secretary Roberts. McNamara Sunday for more Amer American
ican American troops to stem the tide of Communist reinforcements reaching
this embattled country from North Viet Nam. The request by U.S. mil military
itary military leaders for more American manpower was made during more than
five hours of intensive briefing sessions with McNamara. The defense
secretary had arrived earlier Sunday for a two-day visit to seek a
status report on the situation and an appraisal of the outlook for the
future.*
RETURNED... Two priceless manuscripts and a bejeweled crown
stolen from the Vatican were returned to their glass-covered cases in
the Vatican Library Sunday. Police disclosed that the thieves who slip slipped
ped slipped into the lightly-guarded seat of Roman Catholicism and stole them
early Friday had also tried but failed to break into an adjacent
room where a treasure trove of gold, silver and other precious items
are kept.
SPLIT WIDENS... Russia Sunday denounced Red China for trying
to set up rival Communist movements that would only play into the
hands of imperialists/* The Communist Party newspaper Pravda said
such actions may do great harm to those who sponsor them. Indeed
whom are they, the Chinese, going to disassociate themselves from.
This means disassociation from an overwhelming majority of Marxist-
Leninist parties.
National
HOLIDAY 8L00D ... The Thanksgiving holi holiday
day holiday traffic toll soared the 500 mark Sun Sunday,
day, Sunday, raising fears that it would exceed the 1964
high. Last year United Press International
counted 577 traffic deaths during the 102-hour
holiday. The National Safety Council does not
record traffic deaths during this (i family hol holiday
iday holiday period" which began at 6 p.m. local time
Wednesday. However the Safety Council said
in a similar four-day period this time of year
575 persons would die in traffic accidents A
United Press International count yesterday
showed at least 506 persons dead in traffic
accidents since the start of the holiday.
ON TRIAL... Three Ku Klux Klansmen go on trial in federal court
Monday on charges stemming from the nightrider slaying of Mrs. Viola
Liuzzo, a white civil rights worker from Detroit. The defendants
were charged in an indictment with conspiring to violate the civil rights
of an unnamed citizen. The Klansmen are Collie Leroy Wilkins, who
has been acquitted in the killing of the mother of five, William Eaton
and Eugene Thomas, all of the Birmingham area.
Florida.
LAUNCH HOLDUP . The Federal Space
Agency said Sunday night an electrical prob problem
lem problem was discovered in the vital guidance
system of the Gemini 7 spaceship being read readied
ied readied for launch Saturday. The trouble could
delay the launch of Gemini 7 astronauts Frank
Borman and James Lovell but its effect will
not be known until Monday. Project officials
were hopeful that the Saturday launch date
still could be met.
TAX ACHE ...The Florida revenue commission says a 5 per cent tax
on wholesale sporting goods has not shown a positive pattern of collec collection
tion collection since it went into effect in August, 1963. The tax was enacted by the
legislature to finance bond issues for purchase of state recreational
land. Little land has been purchased, primarily because court chal challenges
lenges challenges and an unpredictable collection pattern have made it impossible
to sell bonds.

Hiah Throws Hat In Ring

By CHARLES E.TAYLOR
MIAMI (UPI) Miami Mayor
Robert King High entered the race
for governor Saturday with a stab
at the Haydon Burns administra administration
tion administration for multiplying abuses and
a promise to make education the
first concern of a positive pro program
gram program to meet Florida's needs.
High, 41, formally joined Burns
and Scott Kelly of Lakeland in the
race at a rally at his home. The
High Time signs from his 1964
race were out, a seven-piece band
blared, about 300 supporters clap clapped
ped clapped on the lawn, and one of his
six children had a screaming ses session
sion session inside the house.
The mayor said he planned to
begin campaigning immediately.
He said Don Petit, former news newspaperman
paperman newspaperman and county managers
administrative aids, would be his
campaign coordinator but that he
had not picked a manager.
High, who recently won a fifth
term as mayor of Miami, said
the only other candidate who might
enter the race for four years in
Tallahassee is former Gov. Leoy
Collins. High said he was con convinced
vinced convinced that Collins so far has not
made up his mind.
Expressing concern about the
crisis in education in the state
and the threat of new taxes, High
said a new mood is necessary
in Tallahassee which rejects the
philosophy of an administration
officially committed to the pro proposition
position proposition that to the victor belongs
the spoils*.
The abuses in Tallahassee have
multiplied to frightening propor proportions,
tions, proportions, High said. He cited partic particularly
ularly particularly a kind of awesome power
the state has never seen before
he said was unleashed in the cam campaign
paign campaign for approval of the Burns
road bond program.
He charged that while many of
us were trying to sell* education,
the incumbent governor was try trying
ing trying to sell road bonds.**
High claimed some of the credit
for the defeat of the S3OO million
road bond issue at the polls four

I food sepvice division I
I Gator Specials I
I SERVED AT LUNCHEON AND DINNER IN ALL CAFETERIAS I
[Complete Meal 97Q
MONDAY Italian Spaghetti with Meat Balls I
TUESDAY Golden Fried Chicken 4 I
WEDNESDAY English Meat Loat with Brown Gravy I
Gri,,ed Chopped Steak Onion Rings I
-FRIDAY French Fried Fillet of Fish, Tartar Sauce I
SATURDAY Baked Sugar Cured Ham Fruit Sauce K 1
I SUNDAY Roast Young Tom Turkey, Jsm I
Cornbread Dressing & Giblet Gravy I
| ( All mea,s complete, with following choices-) I
potato or buttered RICE J iT ft
ONE VEGETABLE 2 ROLLS or 2 BREAD SLICES I
ANY 10c-15c DESSERT ANY BEVERAGE
student jobs are available at times I
| !! nterested contact the Food Service office in the Main I
L M .JS^i | Jftxt, 256) for further infotmation. J

weeks ago. Citing his accomplish accomplishments
ments accomplishments as mayor, High also men mentioned
tioned mentioned a reduction in utility rates
resulting from legal action by the
city of Miami, the re-establish re-establishment
ment re-establishment of passenger service-once a
day-on the Florida East Coast
Railway as the result of another
Miami suit, and a 12 per cent drop
in taxes in Miami over the past
half-dozen years.
High promised in the months of
campaigning before the spring pri primaries
maries primaries to present to the people

Big Red Buildup
Due In Cambodia
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (UPI) Communist China is pouring
substantial new quantities of military aid into Cambodia, Prince
Norodom Sihanouk announced Sunday.
The Cambodian chief of state, speaking in Kampot Province 170
miles south of here, said the Chinese would give Cambodia enough
light and heavy weapons to arm 20,000 men, three MG-17 fighter
planes, seven other aircraft, some anti-aircraft artillery and several
patrol boats.
Sihanouk sent a seven-man military mission to Peking last week, and
had his information ministry declare at the same time that the United
States, South Viet Nam and Thailand would be held jointly responsible
for the grave consequences" that were certain to arise from any
bombing of Cambodia.
'* 11 I
U of F Staff & Faculty Since 1935
GAINESVILLE FLAr CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
I Bldg. J Ext. 29731

a positive program to meet the
growing list of needs."
He put education at the top of the
list and also mentioned problems
of senior citizens, the need for
more industrial development a
realistic road building program
transportation and pollution pro k
lems in urban areas, and the need
for revision of the state Constitu.
tion.
He said he felt financial prob problems
lems problems would be solved without new
taxes.



Student Unrest Nothing New

STANFORD, Calif. (UPI)
Stanford University professor
holds that parents who feel student
unrest is a sign of a failing nation
can take comfort from history.
What would parents think if they
read these headlines?
Five hundred thousand students
strike for peace.
University prexy driven from
country by students.

Columbia Records I
SweepstakeS I
vJS 36S,OOOOTZ es I
All You Need To Enter Is Your Birthdate I

THERE ARE THOUSANDS OF
WINNERS 1 GO TO YOUR
COL UMBIA RECORDS DEALER l
Take the entry form from this
supplement to your Columbia
Records dealer.
See the list of Lucky Birthdates.
If yours is posted, you have already
won a FREE albumyour selection
from the 365 great performances
listed on the following pages.
(SEE THE COMPLETE SUPLEMENT AT THE RECORD BAR)

IF YOU HAVE A LUCKY BIRTHDATE.
YOU AUTOMATICALLY QUALIFY FOR THE
SWEEPSTAKES PRIZES!
The drawing it to to told on
January 10,1966.
GRAND PRIZE, a breathtaking array of gifts
for tto antire family:
SIO,OOO in cash!
A1966 Ford Mustang hardtop!
A ranch mink coat!
A Suzuki motorcycM
A Columbia "360" Stareo Systam plus
365 Columbia records!
A 23* Westinghouse color TV sat!
A portable Maatarwortr phonographl
A Mastorwcrk AM/FM transistor radio!
In addition to tto
Grand Prize, tha following swaapstakas
prlzas will to given:
2 SECONO PRIZESI 966 Ford
Mustang hardtop; 5 THIRD PRIZES
Suzuki motorcyde; 10 FOURTH
PRlZESColumbia "360 Stareo Systam
plus 100 Columbia etoums; 25 FIFTH
PRIZESI2** Westinghouse TV sat;
50 SIXTH PRlZESMostorworfc portable
phonograph phis 50 Columbia albums;
100 SEVENTH PRIZES Masterwork
AM/FM transistor radio.
NO PURCHASE REQUIRED!
HERES AU. YOU DO:
1. Salact any Columbia album (ona LR) from
tha following pages that you would like
BinaMa
CO rOOOstrO
On tha official entry form, or a plain piece
of paper, print your birthdate. tha album
title and number, and your name and
address. Also print tha name of your
record dealer.
If under 18 years of age, please have a
parent or guardian also sign.

Student unrest is as old as high higher
er higher education, said Professor W. H.
Cowley of the Stanford School of
Education.
Riots and rebellions raged
throughout the academic world in
the fourth century, A. D., he said.
Students drove Saint Augustine out
of the University of Carthage, then
cheated him out of his fees as a
private teacher in Rome.

RECORD BAR
923 W. Univ. Ave.

2. Taka tha entry form to any participating
Columbia Records dealer and check your
birthdate against tha Lucky Birthdays
. posted. If yours is ona of tha Lucky
Dinnasys, you nvo viiiMy won mo
record album vou lalocted ohis a chance
for ona of tha Lucky Birthday
Sweepstakes Rises.
3. Entries must to mailed to Lucky
Birthday Swaapstakas. D. L Blair
Corporation. Box No. 365, New York,
New York 10046. Winning claims must to
Dostmerhad before January 3.1966. and
racaivad before January 10. 1966.
Submit only ona entry term par parson.
Duplicate or salsa claims will disqualify
entrant All winning claims are subject to
final varffication by tha Judges.
4. Anyone over tha age of ton and living in
areas where this offer is made available
by Columbia Records dealers may enter
u># ?jw6tipiumt. t/nptoyMS (ina tncir
families) of Columbia Broadciwting
Systam, Inc., Ms divisions and
subsidiaries, and their advertising and
contest agendas; and those angled in
tha sale and distribution of Columbia
NKOfot, woo mir Mvviniini ana
contest agencies, are not eligible.
5. Lucky Birthdatss have been selected at
random, by electronic computer, by tha
D. L. Blair Corporation, an independent
Judging organization rrtwee decisions are
final on all aspects of this offer.
Sweepstakes prize winners will be
selected at random trom among an
winning birthdate entries.
6. Winners will to notified by mail by the
D. L Blair Corporation.
No substitutes will be made for any prize
offered or selected.
This sweepstakes is subject to Federal,
State and local regulations and is void
where prohibited by law.

American students have been
involved in public issues since the
Revolution, Cowley notes.
Thete is no stopping student
activism in the public arena but
those who expect to be as influ influential
ential influential outside the campus as inside
are naive indeed, said Cowley, a
self-styled student agitator 40
years ago while editor of the Dart Dartmouth
mouth Dartmouth University newspaper.

on other campuses...

Berkley Students
Name Communist

BERKELEY, Calif.. (UPI) Communist Bettina Aptheker has been
chosen by fellow University of California students to be a member of
a campus committee that will play a major role in shaping student
conduct rules.
The 21-year-old history major, who disclosed her Communist Party

affiliation two weeks ago, was the
top vote-getter in a field of seven
undergraduates seeking election to
the campus rules committee.
Results of the recent election,
which had a light turnout, were
announced Wednesday. Miss Ap Aptheker,
theker, Aptheker, daughter of Marxist the theoretician
oretician theoretician Herbert Aptheker, will
be one of three undergraduates on
the committee.
The committee was created by
Chancellor Roger W. Heyns to ad advise
vise advise him on student political rules.
The chancellor indicated recently
that he would give considerable
weight to the opinions voiced by
the committee in reaching future
decisions on student regulations.
In addition to the undergradu undergraduates,
ates, undergraduates, the committee will be com comprised
prised comprised of two graduate students,
four faculty members and one re representative
presentative representative of the school admin administration.
istration. administration.
Os the 27,000 students eligible
to vote, only 5,900 cast ballots.
Two liberal campus organizations
also scored victories in another
election.
Two liberal campus organiza organizations
tions organizations also scored victories in an another
other another election.

Customs Changing

DALLAS (UPI) Catholic students at Southern Methodist University
have put some modern dally customs Into their worship during Masses
at the Newman Center.
At two Masses each Sunday, the students arrange chairs around the
altar in a setting reminding the viewer of the Last Supper. Altar boys
are college men In campus clothes.
The offertory hymn Is sung to a folk melody. At the offertory, one
young woman and a young man bring bread and wine to the altar.
Once each Sunday after the two Masses, the Catholic students dis discuss
cuss discuss the sermons in an Informal meeting and talk over the recent
changes In Catholic liturgy.

Angry Spanish Students
March On Italian Embassy

MADRID (UPI) Thousands of
angry Spanish university students
marched on the Italian Embassy
here Sunday and smashed windows
in protest against anti-Franco
demonstration in Milan, Italy.
Shouting Viva Espana long
live Spain and Franco si, Italia
no." The students surged through

For Your
Protection
We Use A
Locfced-in
1/vWOhIIm #
LQXtNf

All ymvr .Mrfi or* trovtod with
Hi it pofMtMT mmM-hmetoriml nt
#*mmrd loimtt odor, ,tmpk,
othor MkKmi bactorit,
....... AU OA V LONG I
fv Neuhoot cleaners
# 315 NW 13th St.
(| mAMftCl72BW.Uniy.Avi

Monday, Nov. 29, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

3

Administrators
Take Dim View
Os Flick Shows

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (UPI)
The University of North Carolina
disciplined eight students for their
part in the showing of stag movies
in a mens dormitory earlier this
month.
Officials confirmed Wednesday
the students, whose names were
not released, were disciplined for
involvement in the case. Two were
placed on one semester probation.
Six were given official reprimands.
Two others were cleared.
Dean of Men William Long said
the films were hard core porno pornography.
graphy. pornography. He said between 400 and
600 students saw the films at prices
that started at a nickel and rose
as high as 25 cents as the showings
progressed.
The films were brought to the
campus by a student, Long said.

the heart of the capital in response
to pamphlets distributed through throughout
out throughout Madrid Saturday by the Her Hermandad
mandad Hermandad de Alfereces Provlncion Provlncionales.
ales. Provlncionales. This group, supported Gen Generalissimo
eralissimo Generalissimo Francisco Franco dur during
ing during the 1936-39 civil war.
Referring to the Milan demon demonstrations
strations demonstrations and burning of the Span Spanish
ish Spanish flag there last week, the pamph pamphlets
lets pamphlets said:
Spaniards: For the hatred and
envy of a selfish faction of the
Italian people and the cowardice
of their authorities, the national
emblem has been outraged."
The demonstration began shortly
before 1 p.m. in the Central Plaza
Emilio Castelar. The crowd swell swelled
ed swelled to several thousand as the dem demonstrators
onstrators demonstrators marched past the U.S.
Embassy on Calle Serrano.

The Florida Alligator is an
official publication of the
University of Florida and
is published dally, Monday
through Friday morning
during regular trimester and
twice weekly during summer
trimester, except holidays
and vacation periods.
Entered at U. S. Post Office
at Gainesville as second
class matter.

Page 3



i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Nov. 29, 1965

Page 4

: f e jff er mmrnmmmmmm 1
; m&w! jgpjyjf'all iliiL.
FOOTA6EFSDH THEBE THIUK THEVBE WSTOF THER iWCO^CLIFeCM iMX go nj TO
r a X
tie 601A LOT CK 0U) HAV OiO w see PD #X) THAT WHAT 00 Loen^ayn- Rurt- P MVuiune i
MCE EDHMEUT OJ 'TIMES COLOR SPR6AD? WER£ '{CO H6AK 7 CARSO A BOUT BLACK AW WHIT 6. j
3£[ COT OUT THE ROMANCE fa fA / I
uxve eor compete!

Tlie
Florida. Alligator
Steve Vaughn Benny Cason
Editor Managing Editor

Hutchins Hutchins-3t
-3t Hutchins-3t must be 30 years since Rev. Robert Gannon, then president of
Fordham University, proposed a six-year elementary school, a
three-year high school and a three-year college, bringing the student
to the end of formal liberal education and to the B. A. degree at ap approximately
proximately approximately the age of 18.
Father Gannons object was not to speed up education. It was to
squeeze the water, the triviality and frivolity, out of the system, to
keep the student up against material that was important and challeng challenging
ing challenging and to enable him to enter upon advanced study, if he was interested
and qualified, before he was so bored with schooling that he could never
bring himself to look at a book again.
Now at last the new president of Fordham, Rev. Leo P. McLaughlin,
has announced that Fordham is actually going to do something about
Father Gannons idea. The Jesuits may move slowly, but, unlike some
other educational groups, they move.
Father McLaughlin is not prepared to take any serious risks. He is
limiting the Fordham experiment to 40 or 50 students. They will
probably be so good that no program can do them permanent harm.
But Father McLaughlin is bucking the system. He has introduced the
Gannon proposal with only one modification: a seven-year elementary
school and a six-year college bring the student to the B. A. degree at
the age of 19 instead of 18. He is saving three years of wasted time
instead of four; but three-quarters of a loaf no pun intended is
almost as good as one.
Every country in Europe, and every country in the world whose
educational system follows the European model, has for at least 150
years prepared students for advanced professional work, what we call
graduate study, by the age of 18 or 19. It is true that the students who
go on to advanced work in these countries ar£a much smaller per percentage
centage percentage of the population than are their counterparts in America. It is
true that they are the products of elite schools. But there is no evi evidence
dence evidence that they are superior to American students; and there is no
reason why American schools should be worse than those elsewhere.
On the face of it, 13 years seems enough for a basic, liberal educa education,
tion, education, the kind every citizen ought to have. No rational objection can
be advanced to the Fordham plan.
But, as I say, Father McLaughlin is bucking the system. He will find
that other universities will not recognize the degrees his students get;
nobody is supposed to receive the B. A. without a certain number of
credits showing that he has been an inmate of an educational institution
for a certain period of time.
Father McLaughlin, his faculty and his students will have to be as
hardy as they are intelligent. If they can preserve, they may make what
is called a breakthrough in American education.
Copyright 1965, The Los Angeles Times
The Alligator accepts all letters to the |
| editor Due to space limitations however |
| we are unable to print letters exceeding g
& 250 words. Names will be withheld upon g
| request of the writer g
v.

GUEST COLUMN
the new campus left

By THOMAS PAUKEN
They say we are defending
freedom in Viet Nam. Whose free freedom?
dom? freedom? Not the freedom of the Viet Vietnamese.
namese. Vietnamese. Id say the only freedom
we are defending there is the free freedom
dom freedom of the Pentagon military vul vultures.
tures. vultures. These are not the words of
a member of the Communist Party
USA nor the empty harangue of a
mentally disturbed individual
seeking publicity. This statement
was made by Paul Potter, out outgoing
going outgoing president of the Students for
Democratic Society (SDS), a youth
organization in the forefront of the
current student protest movement
generally referred to as the new
campus left.

"You Know Deor-I'll Bet A Man In Your Condition
Could Gel- A Crack At The Heavyweight Champ"

Guest columnist Thomas
Pauken is a graduate student
in political science at George Georgetown
town Georgetown University. He is a mem member
ber member of the national eight-man
bipartisan steering committee
of the Symposium for Free Freedom
dom Freedom in Viet Nam.

SDs is but one of several youth
groups which have formed loose
alliances to engage in a series of
protests over such diverse issues
as free speech, civil rights and
peace. Also involved are the
Marxist-lined W. E. B. Duois
Clubs, the pro-Peking Progres Progressive
sive Progressive Labor Movement, the Student

Peace Union, Young Socialist Alli Alliance,
ance, Alliance, and the Student Non-Violent
Coordinating Committee (SNCC)
among others.
Hundres of thousands of words
have been written in recent months
about this new phenomenon. Yet,
the American people have only a
vague understanding of what this
movement is all about and what
possible implications it has for the
future of our society. A number
of serious misconceptions which
have arisen regarding this new
student radicalism should be dis dispelled
pelled dispelled once and for all.
For example, the impression a abound
bound abound in this country that the
'mpus radicals in their various
protests represent the thinking of
a substantial portion of the Ameri American
can American college population. In actuality
the vast majority of college stu students
dents students abhor the ideals and tactics
of the new campus left.
Nonetheless, the new radicals
have succeeded in creating quite
a stir on the American scene.
Lacking broad collegiate support,
they have had to rely principally
on organizational genius to attrac
public notice. Through formation
of alliances of far leftist and mi l
tant groups, the establishment o
effective communications, the a a-of
-of a-of substantial financial
backing, and the dedication o
skilled personnel, the new radical
have compensated for their lac
of numbers.
The organizational ability o
new campus left was brough
sharply into focus at Berkeley a
year when a tiny faction of activists
was able to humble a mighty uni
versity. Another example of then
talent was the Washington marc
in August called the Assem
of Unrepresented People.
The abundance of the new colle collegiate
giate collegiate left's financial resources
have been demonstrated on numer
ous occasions. A recent New Yor
Times article quoted Dr Stephen
Smale of the University of Cali California,
fornia, California, an active participant in (
new left, as stating that the vie
Nam Day Committee spent $15,00t
for a teach-in at Berkely,
spent about $3,000 a month inpre
paration for the October 15-
leftist demonstrations across
country protesting American pn tS
ence in Viet Nam.
(Continued Tuesday)



>ip wb^*S[^&SlSSm9^^
IsHiiAKi f**\ 3? mSSmm**--
IUK -. wmtMmh
11 : -m * r w i# r. y
11 "* ; EjjfrKZiinrr
M fr HKfe^k
*** S jfe &&
:% HI A
§ f ~^Wl K |k- 1
m > Bsk ?>?,'
NEW FLORIDA BLUE KEY TAPPEES

Florida Blue Key recently tapped 28 new members.
They are, first row from left, John W. Wolf, Tom
Backmeyer, Bill McCollum, Dick Thompson and Bill
Ryals. Second row: Leo Rock, Jim Cooney, James
Hauser, Andy Hall and John Doughat. Third row:
Sam Ullman, Wayne Alford, Bud Robison, Pete

Alligator Lurks In Hazard
On Golf Club Second Hole

Not every golf course has a
seven-foot alligator for a hazard.
And not every college has a golf
course.
The University of Florida has
both.
In most aspects, the University
of Florida Golf Club on Newberry
Road is a typical golf club. It was
purchased from the Gainesville
Golf and Country Club by the Ath Athletic
letic Athletic Association in 1962. It has an
18-hole course for faculty, staff
and students, and a swimming pool
and dining facilities for the faculty.
It has a complete maintenance staff
and a specific set of rules. But, it
has a unique night watchman that
alligator in the water hazard on the
second hole.
From the pond, the alligator may
not see very far, but from the club
house, Coach Conrad Rehling can
stand and survey most of the golf
course and the university agricul agricultural
tural agricultural fields in the distance.
I would say, as to the degree
of difficulty and as to conditions,
that the course is an excellent
test of golf skill and that it is
well-conditioned,' the golf pro
commented.
The course received national
publicity three times this year.
It was chosen for the National
Women's Collegiate Tournament,
the golf team placed fourth nation nationally
ally nationally in NCAA and student Bob
Murphy won the national amateur
championship.
"We have our smallest atten attendance
dance attendance on Monday when we average
about 50 players. Each day the
number increases until we reach
the peak of the load, around 160,

jrayMigl
( / -" T^S.
ESCOITEO rnoADr ADirNT S' \
AND EUROPE ORIENT \
INDEPENDENT JAPAN-AFRICA MMmMI ""* 1
All t MEDITERRANEAN SjWHP;!, p r bb a J
STEAMEI ROUNO-THE- Sp-*i.sts J
CRUISES WORLD
TO I N ,v-^
/*WO R LD
((( 1 /77 TRAVEL
service
808 W. University Ave. Phone 378-4641

on Saturday," said the coach.
During the week, anyone with
university identification and a dol dollar
lar dollar greens fee can play. But on
Friday, Saturday and Sunday, the
club requires starting times and
foursomes.
Often on weekends, the pro will
ask twosomes to play together.
"I can't understand college kids,"
said the pro. "Os all people, they
are the ones who don't want to play
with strangers -- even when the
strangers are their fellow stu student
dent student j."
The most frequent players are
the members of the golf team, who
are under the instruction of Coach
Be mays Bishop.
"People have no concept of how
much work it takes to be a reason reasonably
ably reasonably good player," Coach Rehling
claimed. "A par-shooter on the
golf team practices four to five
hours dally. It usually takes about
five years to develop a good game."
For competitive golf, the coach
said the course has a "good de degree
gree degree of difficulty." The only prob problem
lem problem is it "Just doesn't quite have
the length."
For instructional golf, the coach
said the course is excellent. After
completing the first golf course in
required physical education, stu students
dents students may take Golf n at the club.
Referring to these students, the
coach said that "when they come
out to the club, most of them have
never had a real playing situation.
Most kids have no concept of the
length of holes and the difficulty
of different hazards, although their
training in golf education and eti etiquette
quette etiquette has improved over the

Zinober and Carlos Piedra. Last row: Sid Stubbs,
Doug Thompson, George Blaha, Drew Haslett, Hank
Raatama, and Don Poucher. Bill Fleming and Mike
Stratton were honored posthumously. Absent when
the picture was taken were Steve Cheese man, Allen
Trammell, Carl Heishman. Jim Moore and Lee
Willis.

years."
At the beginning of the course,
students frequently play in the
rough, get into other fairways,
and confuse rules. For instance,
once a girl hit a ball and then
noticed another player in its path.
At the top of her voice, she scream screamed,
ed, screamed, Tee!"
After observing classes, the
coach said, "I've found that girls
will do better than boys the first
few weeks. But, when it comes to
keeping it up, the girls give up
when it demands more work."
Coach Rehling said one of the
biggest problems on the course
Is the players' tempers.
"A person may get mad, swing
his club, and tear up a four-inch
divet which causes about SSO
damage and which takes from eight
to ten weeks to get back to
normal."
"I go out there sometimes and
almost cry. The players don't know
how hard we try to make the course
beautiful. It belongs to them. They
must help us take care of it."

NOTICE
j- - ..... Bn
TTze Board of Student Publications is accepting applica applications
tions applications for the following positions:
EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
MANAGING EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
DEADLINE for applications: Monday, November 29, 1965
-
INTERVIEWS will be conducted on Wednesday, I
December 1, 1965
Applications may be picked up in Room 9, Florida Union

reading vote was defeated.
Bud Robison said. Court opin opinions
ions opinions are not sacred. He question questioned
ed questioned whether influence was any dif different
ferent different at 100 feet or 10 feet.
Leg Council passed the first
reading by a vote of 21 for and 16
against.
The Council amended the Hall of
Fame and Whos Who charters to
make them agree with the national
charter. They also approved the SG
Insurance Plan.
The charter of the Florida Re Review,
view, Review, a new campus literary mag magazine
azine magazine was passed. The magazine
will be of limited publication.
The Florida Alligators request
for funds for a secretary was pass passed,
ed, passed, but the editor and managing ed editor
itor editor of the Alligator were denied
wage increases.
The Alligator asked for the in increases

ANNUAL
Channukah Dinner
Sunday, Dec, 5, At 6 P.M.
Reservations Required
THE HILLEL FOUNDATION
16 NW 18th St. 372-2900
G gator ADS SELI Ss *Ci cjp'
4O S r
OHO. A*
// you have two hours
" i aH and $6 per week, you
i. can sol b y Christmas.
Gainesville Municipal Airport
Waldo Road
-

Monday, Nov. 29, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Check-offs
Continued from Page I

creases increases to try to bring the wages
of the editors up to the salaries
paid to editors of other college
newspapers which publish daily.
The Alligator is already SIB,OOO
ahead on its sale of advertising for
the year.
Meanwhile, a Moot Court request
also granted $l5O for a trophy for
Dollars for Scholars. The trophy
will be called the Bill Fleming
Memorial Trophy.
CHARLATAN OUT
Charlatan Magazine goes on sale
today on University Avenue next to
the Gator Shop and by Florida
Book Store. Charlatan is an off offcampus
campus offcampus college humor magazine,
voted tops in the nation last year
by college magazine editors.

Page 5



Page 6

1, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Nov. 29, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I vi e
I e e
I
\ a
I |
5 Tank, j
c ^e
I tfevf |
dears
j Day. |
GO
K
*>
o^
K
%
I --The Alligator Staff 5

wanted
1
< IL
ONE MALE ROOMMATE to share
one bedroom, air conditioned
apartment. Preferrably 4 or 5 EG.
For winter trimester. Call 378-
3187. (C-53-ts-c).
c _
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
apartment three blocks from
campus. One bedroom. Call 378-
4893. (C-58-st-c).
TWO WITTY COEDS to share two
bedroom apartment for winter tri trimester.
mester. trimester. One block from campus.
$25 monthly plus utilities. Call
378-4776. (C-58-3t-c).
SINGLE ROOM for winter and sum summer,
mer, summer, for not over S6O. per month.
Must be within 2 or 3 blocks from
campus. Does not need kitchen, but
would like air-conditioning. Call
Jeff at 6-9252 after 8 p.m. (C-57-
tf-nc).
FEMALE ROOMMATE, Rent,
$35.00 monthly. One block from
campus. 1918 NW 1 Ave. Call
378-3017. (C-55-st-c).
COED ROOMMATE wanted for next
trimester. Modern one bedroom
apartment, 3 blocks from main
library. $45. monthly. Call 378-
4523 after 6:00. (C-59-2t-c).
ONE OR TWO GIRLS to share a
two bedroom apartment. Starlight
Apartments near Norman Hall.
378-3082 after 4:30. Prefer senior
or graduate student. (C-59-3t-c).
ONE COED ROOMMATE for winter
trimester. Behind Norman, close
to campus. Call 378-4574 after
4:00. (C-59-st-c).
for sale
STEEL STRING guitar, good tone,
going cheap. Call 8-4249 after 5.
(A-54-ts-c).
GRADUATING. Must sell a 1964
Nashua Trailer (55x10) with auto automatic
matic automatic washer and T. V. antenna.
Take over payments of $72 per
month. Call after 5 p.m. 6-5410.
(A-56-st-c).
7* FOLD UP POOL TABLE with
sticks and balls. $35. 2017 NW 7
Lane. Phone 6-4201. (A-59-st-c).
HANDBALL GLOVES distributor
for U. S. Handball Association.
Better quality at a lower price
($4.20) than competitors. Contact
Phil Shenkman, 372-9487 or Joel
Galpern, 376-9260. (A-59-st-c).
MOTORCYCLE, 1962 BSA, 650 cc,
like new. Only 6,000 miles. S6OO.
Call 378-2886 between 4-8. (A (A---59-2t-c).
--59-2t-c). (A---59-2t-c).
I GATOR ADS SELL

AJO iV

autos
1956 DODGE. Radio, heater, power
steering and brakes, auto trans transmission,
mission, transmission, new tires. $175. Call
8-4814 or 8-4175. (G-57-3t-c).
1958 RENAULT DAUPHINE. Good
condition tires. Ideal for campus
transportation or for second car.
$125. Call 2-0609 between 8-5 or
2-0006 after 5. (G-57-3t-c).
1962 FORD GALAXIE convertible.
Excellent condition. Reason for
selling going in service. Phone
466-3120. (G-56-st-c).
MUST LEAVE COUNTRY must
sell 1964 Chevrolet Impala Super
Sports. Air conditioned, conver convertible,
tible, convertible, like new, the works. Very
small equity and take over pay payments.
ments. payments. Call 6-9026, 6-0506 or
2-1458, ask for Robert. (G-59-
st-c).
VOLKSWAGEN wsw rim tire and
tube to be used for spare tire.
sl2. Call 6-8085 after 6 p.m. (G (G---57-lt-c).
--57-lt-c). (G---57-lt-c).
1959 VOLVO. BANK FORCES
SALE. BEST OFFER. CALL 378-
1930. (G-59-2t-c).
help wanted
STUDENTS NEEDED TO ASSIST
MANAGER. QUALIFICATIONS (1)
U of F student in good academic
standing. (2) Can work evenings.
(3) Can work 18-22 hours per week.
S4O. per week salary (S9O on full
time basis). Call Mr. Malaghan at
8-2966 between 9:00-5:00. (E (E---48-ts-c).
--48-ts-c). (E---48-ts-c).
CALLING ALL SALES HELP in including
cluding including managers, crew directors
and salesmen. Fuller Brush has
unusual opportunities for Satur Saturdays
days Saturdays only. Approximate earnings
of sls to S2O a day. Feu: appoint appointment
ment appointment write to H. Silver, 1028
Clearwater Dr., Daytona Beach,
Fla. (E-55-10t-c).
CARRIER NEEDED. Position open
for Alligator Circulation Carrier.
Must have car and be free Ist and
2nd period each day. Pay $lO
per week. Contact Bruce Matza,
Univ. Ext. 2832 or 8-4052. (E (E---50-tf-nc).
--50-tf-nc). (E---50-tf-nc).
Just Arrived At
SIL VERMAN'S
Regimental Stripe
Gator Orange & Blue
, Tlfifi jnPureSUk
I
Itonite
I 1 *** A
_> e element
||Mj

for rent |
ONE OR TWO male students to
take over two room apartment
for winter trimester. One block
from campus. Air-conditioned.
Phone 8-4973. (B-59-3t-nc).
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY.New
large furnished two bedroom gar garden
den garden apartment. Air conditioned,
swimming/ pool. Convenient to
campus and P. K. Yonge to sublet.
378-2717. (B-56-ts-c).
MODERN, one bedroom furnished
apartment. Three blocks from
campus. S9O. monthly. Call 378-
3182. (B-56-ts-c).
FOR RENT in January. One bed bedroom
room bedroom modern apartment. Air con conditioning
ditioning conditioning and pool. S9O. per month
for two. Call 378-8715. (B-59-
3t-c).
UNEXPECTEDLY available Jan. 1
in private home. Convenient and
comfortable corner room for quiet
gentleman. Across from campus.
Apply 321 SW 13 St. (B-59-lt-c).
ONE BEDROOM studio apartment
for 2 students. 3 blocks from
campus. 1824 NW 3 Place, Apt.
37. 8-4779. (B-59-3t-c).
TWO BEDROOM, completely fur furnished,
nished, furnished, kitchen equipped, apart apartment.
ment. apartment. One half block East of Law
School. Available on or before Jan.
Ist. 1236 SW 1 Ave. FR 6-0865.
(B-59-3t-c).
real estate
4 YEAR OLD CBS house vacant.
3 bedrooms, large Florida room,
large lot. SSOO. equity and move in.
House will be open Thursday. Call
2-3118. (I-57-st-c).
LARGE LAKE FRONT lots on clear
sand bottom. Twin Lakes, 20 miles
East of Gainesville. SI6OO. Easy
terms. Roberts C.Smith. Reg. Real
Estate Broker, Micanopy. Phone
466-3120. (I-56-st-c).

11 I
1
A NJf.l3thST.at I B
1 23rd ROAD BLVD.%^

Charles Vine is only No. 2... \
Thats why he tries harder... &
fiBeST
CReTAGeNT i the whole -M '' WL \
ide world colo Wi|w
FEATURES AT 'A'jHH
1:20, 3:20, S :20, 7:20,9:35
STARTS THURSDAY!
KiooC'C
...Incredible Org 0f..... Sight* and SoundsAr
"""5 GEORGE SANDERS. tecmkmm

personal
TENA FAFARD would like to in inform
form inform all her friends that she is now
with Miladys Beauty Salon, 517 w
University Ave. Phone 6-3802*
Evenings 378-2201. (J-58-ts-c)!
services
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios. 372-0300. (M (M---8-ts-c).
--8-ts-c). (M---8-ts-c).
p -
lost&found
LOST Welcome Aboard door
mat in vicinity of Winnjammer
front door. Its return would be
welcomed aboard the Winnjammer.
(L-56-3t-c).
END TUES.
7 9
i? 'IM ALLRIGHT ****
ifrai
mil-1 IAN CARMICHAtt
VflUll
PLUS THE APPLE"
Eck Lemmon
lee RemscK
DaYS asm*
or wme
ann noses
'"SUSAN SLADE"
Troy Donahue Color

GAINESVILLE'S LUXURY THEATRE
Door* Open Doily 12:30 P.M.
Cont. Show* All Dov Start 1 P.M.
LAST 3 DAYS



fcemini Instrument Panel*
Floating Dandruff Problem

Dr. Eugene Tubbs, former flight
Kgeon for the manned Gemini
ace shots and currently a resi-
nt in internal medicine at the
diversity of Florida Hospital, told
some of the astronauts prob prob
m prob s for the non- medical mem-
l rs of his audience in his
Medical Problems in Space talk
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center
st week.
T Laced in with the physiological
J-oblems and solutions were such
tories as:
J The floating cameras Theas Theaslonauts
lonauts Theaslonauts knew before they went up
Kat objects would float inside the
Bapsule.
[ But actually experiencing it was
till a delight. Much to their glee,
Biey could leave a camera sus suspended
pended suspended in mid-air, turn to do
nother chore, and return to find
he camera floating in the same
klace.
$ The dandruff On the fifth day
If the eight-day Gemini V flight,
Conrad and Cooper were surprised
to discover a film of accumulated
Kandruff floating through the cap-
Isule. The dandruff became ionized
land migrated to the instrument
panel, and during the last few days
jof the flight they had to brush it
away to see the instruments.
Oral hygiene We fabricated
a special chewing gum and dental
[floss, Dr. Tubbs said, but didnt
expect it to do the job like a good
brushing. But the problem, like
many surprises in the strange en environment
vironment environment of space, solved itself.
After a nap following a meal, the
astronauts awoke expecting their
mouths to feel dirty. Instead, they
felt as if they had just brushed
their teeth.
Later medical investigation re revealed
vealed revealed that the 100 per cent oxygen
which they were breathing had
killed off all the bacteria in their
mouths.
Rice-Grose
Bicycle Shop
1632 W. University Ave.
S E L L* BU Y* TRA DE
REPAIR BICYCLES
Open From 9 to 6
Mondoy-Saturday
Across From Campus

OMB I
MEN'S AND WOMENS I
FANIS AND JACKETS |
* Cords I
i| Denim
'- White Slim Fits I
* White White Levi's I
11 wEg Brown Californians
White Californians I
* Matching Jackets
BKnMi*' Galiesville I
,Zw Stockma Supply Co. I
At the Gainesville Livestock Morket I

GREASY KID STUFF?

The doctors were concerned a about
bout about perspiration and body odor
since the astronauts would be
wrapped tightly in a space suit
for eight days. They came up with
a special soap and gave it a try on
the Gemini V flight. The astronauts
washed with the soap before don donning
ning donning their space suits and came
out smelling like a rose, Dr.
Tubbs said.
Another problem facing the doc doctors
tors doctors and engineers was the dis discomfort
comfort discomfort of staying in a stuffy,
bulky space suit for eight days.
Man has never devised a more
uncomfortable garment than a
space suit, said Dr. Tubbs.
But once in space and weightless,
the astronauts discovered that even
a space suit was comfortable.
Included in the talk was a selec selection
tion selection of slides of the steps taken in
dressing an astronaut for flight,
several shots of the walk in space,

New Village Light Bills
Same As Rent?

By JERALDINE W. BROWN
Alligator Staff Writer
Recent electric bill receipts have resulted in many complaints from
village residents according to Dale Braman, assistant manager of
Diamond Village.
Some bills were as high as $53, Braman said.
Robert Nefzger, village manager, pointed out that one resident in
building 296 (the last building to house families) paid as much as $45
for electric bill.
According to Nefzger, bills cover kilowatt-hours used from check-in
time, August 25 for some, to Oct. 4. There is a range from 17-40 days.
Some residents complain that electric bills are just about the same
as rent. Braman noted that rent in the newly constructed married
student housing area ranges from S6O to $65 monthly.
The electric bill rates are supposed to be cheaper than the sliding
rate (reported reduction in cents per kilowatt-hour after specified
point is reached) from Florida Power, Braman explained. We pay
2-1/2 cents per kilowatt-hour here.
Braman quoted 19 kilowatts as the annual average kilowatts used per
day in the married student villages. He added that this figure leaps to
26 during the summer months because of the use of air conditioning.
According to Braman, 30 per cent of the bills were above the average
rate. Thirty per cent of Diamond Village bills were less than the aver average
age average Corry Village electric bill, 20 per cent were less than the
average Schuct Village electric bill.
Some residents compare these bills with their former Flavet n
electric bills, Braman said. However, we find the rate is really
cheaper in Diamond.
Braman explained that an allowance was made in Flavet 11.
A certain number of kilowatt-hours was free, then all kilowatt kilowatthours
hours kilowatthours used over the allowance cost four cents, explained Braman.
Something might be done about the bills already out. Just what will
be done, I dont know. Housing should come up with something at the
end of the week, he concluded.

scenes around the Cape, and slides
of the medical equipment used to
monitor blood pressure and other
information from space.
The Russians have an extreme extremely
ly extremely rigid physical exercise program
for astronauts, said Dr. Tubbs.
But our astronauts keep them themselves
selves themselves fit. Some like to lift weights,
some go skin diving.
Dr. Tubbs, in the Air Force since
May, 1963, was assigned to NASA
in October 1963 and later became
Acting Chief of Launchsite Medical
Operations. He interned and stud studied
ied studied under a fellowship in research
cardiology at University Hospital
before serving in the Air Force.
He received his M. D. degree from
Emory University after under undergraduate
graduate undergraduate study at the University
of Florida.
His talk was sponsored by the
Alpha Epsilon Delta pre-medical
fraternity.

BIG OIL LANDS
TULSA, Okla. (UPI) The In Independent
dependent Independent Petroleum Association
of America (IPAA) reports a vast
area of land in the United States
is leased for oil and gas produc production
tion production or exploration.
About one-fifth of the land area
of the nation now is under lease
for future drilling or production
or already is producing petroleum,
the IPAA said. Os the 32 states
that produce oil or gas, more than
25 per cent of 13 of them is cover covered
ed covered by leases for production or ex exploration.
ploration. exploration.

| CUP THIS W.L.Aekk C.Ci'f*':!;
i SPECIAL! MONDAY & TUESDAY ONLY!
Reg. sl.lO Box Dinner wh c..^.
COMPLETE DINNER
CLUDES: 3 pieces of Frirdgj
Chicken, French Fries, Cole^H^K
Slow or Gravy and Rolls Eu SW&M
NO SUBSTITUTIONS. WgJW
One Coupon Per Customer!
COL SANDERS ..
AVAILABLE AT
S Kentucky Tried Afcken
214 N.W. 13th S*. 207 RE. 16th Av.
Phone 376-6472 Phone 375-2959

flHjl
B
I i I fl
'-\v -vS I j^M
1 -'', i,
>^ ; iiimi^M
.' ' '!
jmm
I

BRAINY BETH
Who says beauty and brains don't match? Beth Gregory, 4AS from
Orlando has both. She has often been on the Dean's List, is an Army
sweetheart, football fan, and a IXI.
Beeps May Signal
Union Communications

'By DOUG STENSTROM
Alligator Staff Writer
When the Florida Union moves
to its new building, possibly by the
end of next summer, some people
may be puzzled by strange noises
coming from staff members
pockets according to Florida Union
director William E. Rion.
Rion said a very modern inno innovation
vation innovation in communications systems
is being planned and investigated
for use in the new $4.44 million
Florida Union quarters.
He explained that the system in involves
volves involves the use of small receivers
-two inches wide by three inches
long operated from a central
control unit.
The receivers will be carried
in the pockets of staff members
as they work throughout the build building.
ing. building.
" When one of the staff is needed
from directors to janitor the
central control can notify him with
a beep-beep from his receiver. The
person can call in to the office by
one of the many telephones which
will be placed throughout the build building/'
ing/' building/' Rion said.
He added that the receivers
would be able to pick up the signal
anywhere up to 100 yards from the
control unit.
Rion pointed out that the system

Monday, Nov. 29, 1965. The Florida Alligator,

would be particularly valuable m
coordinating janitorial services.
"You never know in what part of
the building the janitors are work working.
ing. working. When an emergency arises we
wont have to search the premises
for them, he said.
Rion made it clear that due to
cost factors the decision to install
the communications system is not
definite.
He said it would cost SSOO for the
control unit and from SIOO to $l5O
for the receivers depending on the
model purchased.
He noted that $900,000 besides
the cost of the building has been
appropriated for various costs and
furnishings and that the cost for the
new system would come under this
fund.
"If we run short on money in fur furnishing
nishing furnishing the building, the plans for
the system will be discarded,
Rion stated.
He said, "Some hotels and fac factories
tories factories have had excellent results
with the system. We think it could
save us a lot of steps and would be
a tremendous aid in maintaining
personnel control.
Rion said other plans for an
"elaborate sound system for the
building have already been ap approved
proved approved and Included in the contract.
He described this sytem as being
"Very versatile and said it in includes
cludes includes the "piping of music to
every public area in the building.
"The building's sound sytem will
be complete in every respect, par particularly
ticularly particularly with the installation of the
pocket receiver system which will
eliminate the need for paging over
the loud speakers, Rion stated.
1-19 Copies, lty ea. 20*
Over, 9$
Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Nov. 29, 1965

Diamond 'Scape
Nearly Done

By JERALDINE W. BROWN
Alligator Staff Writer
Newiy constructed Diamond Vil-.
lage ground work nears completion
according to Robert Nefzger,
village manager.
The Universitys plants and
grounds department has planted
palm trees and Lagerstroem at
each building, Nefzger said.
He added that oak, maple, "and
hickory trees will also be planted
in the married students village.
The community service build building
ing building (Building 307) will be the center
of attraction because of the numer numerous
ous numerous array of shrubs surrounding
it, Nefzger explained.
Sidewalks will wind through the
village grounds with ramps at in intervals
tervals intervals to accommodate baby car carriages
riages carriages and grocery carts, the
manager said.
The ramps are needed because
the village is situated in a hilly

African Studies

Program Expanded

By KAREN MADSEN
Alligator Staff Writer
Students interested in the study
of African affairs will be able to
take advantage of a new program
being offered here.
The African Studies Program is
being organized this year under
the directorship of Dr. Rene Le Lemarchand,
marchand, Lemarchand, assistant professor of
political science at Florida.
The purpose of this program,
Lemarchand said, is to expand the
existing undergraduate program to
the field of African affairs.
He added that the immediate ob objective
jective objective of the program is the for formation
mation formation of an undergraduate social
science program with supporting
work in African linguistics.
The ultimate goal of the pro program,
gram, program, he said, will be a special specialization
ization specialization in the affairs of Central
and Eastern Africa. The program
eventually may offer some grad graduate
uate graduate courses.
Students who complete this pro program
gram program will receive a Certificate in
African Studies, Lemarchand said.
He added that these students will
be ideally qualified to participate
in the foreign assistance programs
of the United States.
Those enrolling in the program,
Lemarchand said, will take 24
hours in African studies and 24

c m pus

BBD3EOB

PI BETA PHI Meets Wednesday, 8 p.m., at the home of Mrs. T.
R. Ellinor. 2210 NE 10th Terr.
ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA lnitiates and former members are
invited to initiation ceremonies and tea today at 4 p.m. in Johnson
Lounge, Florida Union. Seminole pictures will be taken.
AIP Dr. Alex Smith will speak today at 4:40 p.m. in Bless
Auditorium on graduate work in physics. His talk is sponsored by the
American Institute of Physics and Sigma Pi Sigma.
CCUN Business meeting, 8:15 p.m., Tuesday, Room 200, Florida
Union.
FORESTRY CLUB Meets 7:30 p.m., Dec. 1, in Austin Cary
Forest.
NAVY OCS RECRUITING TEAM Will accept applications in the
Florida Union.
M m

area.
Nefzger said that the State Road
Department has plans for a 60-
foot-wide throughway.
The road will stretch around
the perimeter of the village from
the Medical Center parking lot
(southwest of the village) to the
Flayet II area (northeast of the
viUage), Nefzger said.
lie added that the road and park parking
ing parking area, on each side of it will
each be 20 feet wide. Residents
will park perpendicular to the road.
A sidewalk will parallel the
entire throughway, Nefzger con continued.
tinued. continued.
The manager added that three
playgrounds have been proposed.
Swings, slide boards, teeter teetertotters,
totters, teetertotters, and merry-go-rounds will
be provided for children. Basket Basketball,
ball, Basketball, volleyball, shuffleboard, and
tennis are proposed for adults,
he said.

hours in one of many secondary
fields: anthropology, sociology,
history, political science, geo geography
graphy geography or economics.
They also will be required to
take two years of French or Por Portuguese
tuguese Portuguese and one year of linguistics
with specialization in African lin linguistics,
guistics, linguistics, he added.
At present, only one course in
the history of Sub-Saharan Africa
is being offered, Lemarchand said.
Further courses are planned for
next trimester and additional
courses for the fall trimester of
1966, he added.
These courses will be offered
in the fields of history, anthro anthropology,
pology, anthropology, political science, geo geograph,
graph, geograph, economics and sociology,
he said.
The program is sponsored by the
National Defense Education Act and
is administered by an African
Studies Center, Lemarchand said.
The center plans to bring lec lecturers
turers lecturers to Florida from other
American universities, Lemar Lemarchand
chand Lemarchand said, and to build up the
present library resources here.
He added that the program hopes
to provide scholarships for stu students
dents students who are willing and able to
specialize in African studies and
to coordinate the skills of all the
departments which will participate
in this program.

CAROLYN PLAZA I A I ll I I 1
OU.K-SAVE j(J| |Ht
THOUsUIP
Who Are Saving Money
SAVE Money, Time introducing:
and Parking Space m
SAVE On Every Item, Every Day Quik-Save jfjj)
Health, Beauty Aids Cosmetics
Magazines Greeting Cards THE STORES
Photo Finishing Xerox Copying
* OVER 3,000 ITEMS
Paperbacks DAILY
DEEP MAGIC hand cream
REG. $1 SALE 67c
SUAVE I CREST
HAIR SPRAY W#U
rig. si SALE TOOTHPASTE
NORWICH EG n
ASPIRIN 1Q m ObC
reg. 49c SALE I9y

QUIK-SAVE
Xoroz Copies at low ot 8C Eockl
HIGHEST QUALITY WORK
Acctpttklt lor Tono Papers, ThoMt, Ek.

FILM AND DEVELOPING AT DEEP DISCOUNT PRICES
COLOR PRINTS 19c BLACK & WHITE PRINTS 7c
(plus tax where apolieable- quantity rights reserved)
PRICES GOOD THROUGH SATURDAY, OCT. 23 1965
NOW: TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU
1620 W. Univ. (Carolyn Plaza) and 9 W. Univ. (Downtown)

Carolyn v
Plaza
V i-f pA
4 USSU J



We Couldnt Stop Them: Peterson

y JEFF DENKEWALTER
W Alligator Staff Writer
Be just couldnt stop them on
hird down and long yardage
ft head football coach Bill
Json re-echoed this statement
B-al times when interviewed
Bporters following Saturdays
ting on a folding chair and
a towel to wipe the perspir-
V off his face, Peterson praised
Eators for coming up with the
play.

ed. I wanted to play, I wouldnt
B missed this for the world. It
B great to win.
B relaxed Ray Graves, puffing
santly on his ever-present
Br, sat atop a cold drink con confer
fer confer and spoke about the Sugar
fe-bound Gators.
This is the best team Ive had
e I came to Florida, Graves
used. There are three char charristics
ristics charristics that set this team above
others leadership, striking
ler, and its the sort of team you
to coach.
I The leadership or our 21
liors has meant a lot to us this
son both to the youngsters
the coaching staff. It was the
iors who were responsible for

ROStIgSM2 m BM
Regularly sl6
Includes shampoo, / Bf
set, and styling
300 D NOV. 29 DEC. 16
AGNES' HAIR STYLISTS
6 NW 13th Street Phone 376-9922
Bf v^B
BB
v.
Xv v
I B m B < !
:if |i

Graves

Continued from Page I

We could hold them on first
and second down most of the time,
but on third and long yardage
situation, they hurt us, said
Peterson.
Peterson lauded Gator quarter quarterback
back quarterback Steve Spurrier for his play
under pressure.
Spurrier is a better quarter quarterback
back quarterback than I thought he was, Peter Peterson
son Peterson commented. When they
(Gators) needed the first down,
Spurrier usually came through!
After we completed our
miracle pass and took a 17-16

the comeback win over LSU, Geor Georgia,
gia, Georgia, and FSU, following losses to
Mississippi State, Auburn, and
Miami
Like I said in September, this
is the type of team that can score
from anywhere, and go down the
field in a hurry.
Graves was asked why the Gators
chose to stay on the ground during
the early part of the game.
We knew we had to do a good
job against the Seven Magnifi Magnificents.
cents. Magnificents. Our offensive line thought
it could whip FSUs line. Led by
center Bill Carr, the front seven
turned a tremendous job in block blocking
ing blocking one of the best defensive lines
in the country.

lead, I thought we would win it.
But Florida kept its head, and
came right back at us.
The FSU mentor called Gator

BBHBTBBMHWHTIf

Monday, Nov. 29, 1965,

"'" * 'j^B
jpj
||M^.
Bf fT*
K, Jr *** -
: ,
*#% **-
flllll ..**mJBK y

>.B .>^a|
881
V JMHIIHiHHMVMMfIHHfIpBRHIiI
FEIBER GRIMACES: Gator trainers help junior fullback
from field following first quarter mishap.

Harriers Third In Meet

The Florida State cross country
team, whose football counterparts
wish the gridiron battle had ended
two minutes earlier, beat the clock
and four state opponents to capture
the first annual Florida State Inter Intercollegiate
collegiate Intercollegiate Cross Country Champ Championship

'MfaaZ'
W 22 E. UNIV. AVE.
For the first time!
All you could ask of nature
you get in a
p£l £0 vAo

Now the loveliest d6collet6
bra in the world-the famous
Bali-lo has been adapted
for small figures! A lighter lighterthan-air
than-air lighterthan-air push-up foam pad
lifts the small or soft-tissue
bosom to the front and cen center,
ter, center, producing full, femi feminine
nine feminine cleavage, rounded and
real. The pad replaces flesh
that would normally fill the
undercup and sides. Use
what nature gave you to
best advantage try on a
Bali-lo More-so today. Nylon
lace, bolstered with an all-
Lycra spandex back, for

FOUNDATIONS SHOP
SECOND FLOOR

halfback Jack Harper the best back
his team has played all year.
Harpers got the speed and the
moves a good back has to have,

SPORTS

Page 9

ionship Championship Saturday morning in
Gainesville.
A determined rush by the FSU
squad placed two Seminoles among
the top three finishers. Tom Gra Graham
ham Graham set a new varsity course rec record
ord record of 20:18.8 for four miles.

amazing support and com comfort.
fort. comfort. White or black, 32 to
36. A and B cup sizes, $7.00
Bali-lo More-no in cut low and
wide, back and front, to nhow
your new nhape in any neck neckline.
line. neckline.

said Peterson.
Peterson attributed lack of ball ballcontrol
control ballcontrol to his team's poor showing
in the first half.
"1 don't think we had the ball
more than 20 plays in the first
half. When you dontJbave the ball,
you can't score."
Peterson praised Ed Pritchett
for a good game performance.
"I don't think there is anyone
in this room who would go out on
that fijeld after three operations on
the same knee. Well, Ed did. He's
proven himself a fine competitor,
and that's the type of boy I'll play
anytime.
"I think Phil Spooner ran real
well today. He had to do more than
his share with Jim Mankins hobbled
with a badly sprained ankle."
"The team had confidence at
halftime that we could win even
though trailing," said Peterson.
Peterson disclosed to reporters
his game plan for containing Spur Spurrier
rier Spurrier and end Charlie Casey.
"Several times we blitzed our
safety, Butch Riser, against the
Gator line. We wanted to put that
additional pressure on him. I de decided
cided decided to put our cornerback, Bill
Campbell, on single coverage most
of the time against Casey. Bill's
the fastest defensive back weve
got, I figured he could do the job."
Commenting on the Spurrier to
Casey touchdown toss, Peterson
explained, "We were in a zone
coverage situation with everyone
dropping back to cover the pass
receivers. Casey ran into the right
spot and got the pass.
"This whole year has been a
disappointment to me. The boys
have played hard, but it seems the
other team is always just a little
bit better than us."

The top five FSU distance men
totaled 28 points. Miami ran second
with 42 markers. Coach Jimmy
Carnes' Gators dashed In third with
58 points.South Florida, competing
with a combined freshman-varsity
unit, struggled across the wire with
90 points.
Top finisher for the Orange and
Blue was Dieter Gebhard, former
varsity course record-holder, who
placed fifth among the 25 entrants.
Larry Powell finished right be behind
hind behind him In sixth position. Austin
Funk, Gene Cote, and Bob Halliday,
finished 14th, 16th and 17th, res respectively.
pectively. respectively.
The powerful Florida freshmen
defeated FSU's yearlings In a
three-mile event. Miami entered a
three-man contingent, which was
too few to count in team scoring.
Besides giving the Gator frosh the
Freshman Florida State Intercol Intercollegiate
legiate Intercollegiate Cross Country Champion Championship,
ship, Championship, the event was also scored as a
dual meet.
Florida accumulated 23 points;
FSU 49. The Orange and Blue
youngsters finished with a dual
meet record of 12-0.
Mickey Haddock paced the 20
competitors with a time of 14:22.
Another Gator, Steve Atkinson,
came in second. Chris Hosford
finished third for Florida, and
fifth overall.
The first annual Intercollegiate
Cross Country Championships
came out pretty well. I hope the
meet will continue to grow. Next
year It will be staged In Miami,*'
Carnes commented.
"This ends the cross country
season. We've already begun work
on the forthcoming track campaign.
It seems like there's always some something
thing something to be done.
"We'll have several entries In
the Orange Bowl Invitational Track
Meet on Jan. 8," Carnes concluded



Page 10

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Nov. 29, 1965

' ~ JPjRpBHHf*
* m t9t kk #' l "flb
- Jtf Ei ft
* 88
v / Jtt w^Bb, .. u - 4 if
IH4b W" jf BBF
aKsasialiMWWaK.
8 Vb ~ BL
£* ! ijndL ft ft ft'

TIES MARK: Casey leaps high in first quarter for 52nd catch of season to tie SEC mark;
Casey later broke record.

Photos By Ron Sherman

i mi 11 &! te
,* b JK mBH ft B.b B 8 ~m m w
SB yyi laif ]S2k^^m&.^m*
,bl'" ftHBpF" II ftft^B^^^V^H|||^^^HH^
M. Jaw &
X
' %§;;
Jm TijC
/& ipBBHB JB
4/ rTfl

CALLED BACK: Baeszler's scoring romp in first quarter
nullified by illegal procedure penalty.

pK l ___L IBP ft' £ V i i
* j| Ts
;A'W Hr WUm a
g jr mBK Mmm m
BnBBSBBife H§Oi fjniSv .jjIMKMKBy, -JwHHft H
K j§ B

POWERING UP: Feibr digs for hole in the middle of
FSU line in early going.

Swim Coach
Gets Conked
After Big TD
One of the happiest Gator fans
when Florida scored its winning
touchdown Saturday was swim
coach Bill Harlan.
Harlans exuberance was short shortlived,
lived, shortlived, however, but it wasnt any anything
thing anything the Seminoles did to make
it that way.
The swim mentor leaped high
from his seat in the press box boxtoo
too boxtoo high for his own good.
His head struck a two-by-four
directly above his seat and a
nasty knot appeared on his fore forehead.
head. forehead.
4 *lt was just a normal reaction
on my part, Harlan said. Be Before
fore Before I knew what had happened, I
got conked.
Florida-partial writers all went
wild over the Spurrier-to-Casey
pass. Many hugged each other and
jumped around like little boys.
Alligator Sports Editor Andy
Moor was grabbed by the legs by
B-team defensive back John Hor Horton.
ton. Horton. Moor was left no alternative
but to grab hold of Horton and be
bounced around the press by the
gleeful Gator gridder.
Scores
FLORIDA 30 rau u
Miami 0 Noire Dame 0
Tennessee 21 Vanderbilt 3
USC 56 ... . Wyoming 6
Brigham Young 42 New Mexico 8
Cow-Cow 42 Cheyenne State 7
Mississippi 21 .... Mississippi State 0
Army 7 Navy 7
Boston College 35 Holy Cross 0
Alabama 30 Auburn 3
Quantico Marines 20 . Memphis State 14
Texas Christian 10 SMU 7
Baylor 17 Rice 13
Georgia 17 Georgia Tech 7
Texas Western 38 West Texas 21
NFL
Baltimore 24 Detroit 24
Chicago 35 New York 14
Cleveland 42 Pittsburgh 21
Washington 34 Dallas 31
Philadelphia 28 St. Louis 24
San Francisco 45 Minnesota 24
Los Angeles 21 Green Bay 10
AFL
Buffalo 20 San Diego 20
Boston 27 New York 23
Kansas City 52 Houston 21

E'3r P^F*^jMK9 Jb # \ "MjF' JJ*J§
A HB jgojjKF j&SgjSL TF .^Ktja^^M
-St Bft % 888 Wi
IffH jgg|S
* W #)ryapf jjp ... ai^n" -
Mis |jrJpy
Br JF.
gp% I|gH|^B|Hk~
9fck UFJ/? Jp W 9
(§f mip* |
tv . w *JBr
I, #IL I IJF Jp llMi I
' Kg> 2M M
L
aerial as Card rushes to join him. (Below) Forty-six
yards later, Trammell nears fourth Gator TD as FSU
endMaxWettstei n watches.
x MHW Tpl
Jr f gjg
4 jb 9W* 9|^Hl^^B'^4* N *%. | b9B K J^/^HH
- Hf'.. % jjfc JF mI £ B K|o|tfp 8 v ..
li^l^^ipi^iiaiiai^^iP^iy^ l^l^ nim ijJa
v "l jl %ll"* 1 - <'
rl^H
Bbb--v., 4 IE.. B
- % .bk- 9|'^. ,) &%t?~?''bs$ f t *''>£'&'
Wm c ;? Jgrjm/m.
!>?.,',s\? ; l :; r v f^- ,, | &&,?' b J9t ,!'{.'
-t .#v/' bk
si
JUST BEGINNING: Harper sprints for first score on
si del ine pass pattern in second quarter.



seven Southeast Teams Make Bowls

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
LtIANTA (UPI) Records
Lbled like tenpins Saturday as
L southeastern Conference wrap-
L up its season on a high offen-
L n o te with the Alabama Crim Crimin
in Crimin Tide winning its second
Laight league championship.
Steve Sloan all but erased the
Led Joe Namath from the Ala-
La record book while passing
L crimson Tide to a 30-3 vic-
L, over Auburn and Steve Spur-
L became the all-time confer conferee
ee conferee passing leader during
[oridas last-minutecome-from last-minutecome-fromhind
hind last-minutecome-fromhind 30-17 victory over Florida
Lte.
Tennessee, which has a shot at

Br* >4 X ;jjy?' ~ i JyTalw
H l f BHP WBk, XkJK
VW k. y iMi-lrf ,My J? 8k : Jtt A At
SMmv T K> f" fv. Y- J K Wf f. I T
a/ilfr.i fIT i Jfy, f- 9
B| JR sJm j yl*o B
Imm jit*
hESJffH?
Sil
|1 luiyWw ijr jp
1
S lA -v :. 8r I x^BpigU^^lr^a
r r***- TIB v4W villi', :;
Cv %k.. .J!. 11
jk % mmjff
Ka# ,< w/ j jk I Hi H wi i
IPOE PONDERS: After one of his three catches, Poe
attempts to elude Bill McDowell.
K Tffo
Hjpl As &, !5F%, HL f^SH^Kc^dflfifilHHbH'V £.
gg*lr |rj| . ; v M m if
BKEiu^xKS
SASTER: Geoige DAlessandro blocks Spurrier punt to
up first-quarter field goo I
, Monday, sto 9 p.m.
12 oz. CHOICE
mm t-bone
I Steak Served With French
2310 S.W. 13th St. Fries, Cole Slaw, Hot Rolls
I and Butter.
505 N W 13th St sj 69

the nations defensive crown, beat
Vanderbilt 21-3; Georgia exploited
its tough defense to upset Georgia
Tech 17-7; Ole Miss trounced Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi State 21-0; the Miami
Hurricanes battled heavily favored
Notre Dame to a scoreless tie;
and Memphis State was upset by
the Quantico Va. Marines 20-14.
That wraps up the regular sea season
son season for the Southeast except for
one more game. Once-beaten,
eighth-ranked Tennessee plays
once-beaten, fourth-ranked UCL\,
a Rose Bowl entry, at Memphis
next Saturday.
The Southeast wound up with
seven bowl teams. Alabama plays
Nebraska in the Orange Bowl,

Florida plays Missouri in the
Sugar Bowl, Louisiana State plays
Arkansas in the Cotton Bowl, Au Auburn
burn Auburn and Mississippi are paired
in the Liberty Bowl, Georgia Tech
plays Texas Tech in the Gator Bowl
and Tennessee meets aerial-mind aerial-minded
ed aerial-minded Tulsa in the Bluebonnet Bowl.
Sloan completed 13 of 18 passes
for 226 yards and three touchdowns
in the rout of Auburn. The senior

Moor WM
SPORTS EDITOR HHHH

A strange air seemed to reign over Florida Field when FSU
took a 17-16 lead with only 2:12 to play.
Everyone knew the Gators could and would score. The only
question in everyones mind was: Is there enough time?
Gator fans neednt have fretted. In the coolest (and best for that
matter) performance of his life, Steve Spurrier guided Florida to
the touchdown it needed more than any other all year.
Consider the things which mulled over in Spurriers mind when
he came on the field to assume control of the Gator offense on
the UF 29:
If I cant do it now, how can we live with ourselves for a year.
If I cant do it now, well have to suffer the humiliation of
going to the Sugar Bowl with a 6-4 record.
If I cant do it now, once again theyll say I am unable to
bring the Gators back.
If I cant do it now, the fans will really be on Coach Graves
neck.
With all these things in mind, Spurrier couldnt help but be a
little nervous when the Gators broke the huddle. But, it never
showed through.
In six plays, the junior Tennessean marched his team down the
field to score. The touchdown play epitomized the whole drive.
Seeing a possibility for the score because the Seminole defender
Bill Campbell was covering Charley Casey tight, Spurrier motioned
his favorite target deep into the end zone, where he laid the ball
right where it had to be. The Gators had won.
Instead of being embarrassed at going to the Sugar Bowl, the
team can hold its head high. A convincing win over Missouri would
put it back in the top ten, since most of the polls are holding out
on final ratings until after New Years Day bowls.
Spurrier completely solidified his claim to all-America status.
His play-calling and execution Saturday were comparable to the
same in the Ole Miss game. Both rank with the best performances
by any college quarterback this year.
One Gator Better
Spurriers performance may have been great, but one Gator
turned in a better one. Spurrier himself would attest to this, since
the man in question is his roommate, Bill Carr.
Carr, the most unsung hero for the Gators all season, played
his greatest game Saturday. Not once was FSUs all-America
middle guard Jack Shinholser seen in the Gator backfleld. Carr
met this feriocious Seminole head on and whipped him decisively.
To add some magnitude to Carrs performance, one has to
appreciate the accomplishments of Shinholser. The 217-hulk has
been dubbed the leg breaker after he performed such an act
on Baylors ace quarterback, Terry Southall, and Georgias top
runner, Bob Taylor. He is undoubtedly the most feared man ever
to play defense for FSU, or perhaps any school.
This was not just a flash-in-the-pan performance by Carr.
The Pensacola junior has started every game at center since he
donned a Florida uniform. His play has been so consistent that he
has never been noticed before.
Carr, a fierce competitor who hates to lose, was one of the
Gators who took the Miami loss hard.
When you lose like that, you just cant stand it, Carr said
outside the Gator dressing room in the Orange Bowl.
The real guts showing of the afternoon, however, did not
come during the play. It happened when fullback John Feiber
hobbled his way on the field before the second half.
Feiber was injured badly in the first half, but wouldnt be denied
the opportunity to watch the rest of the game, despite his throbbing
ankle.
Now its all over. The regular season is finished (except for an
exciting match between Tennessee and UCLA next week) and the
Gators tied for third in the conference. Alabama, playing like it
always does in the second half of the season, came on to win it.
It was a most successful year for the conference with six of
its eleven members participating in bowls.
It is by no accident that the Florida Gators are on the list.

A Perfect Xmas Present
CHOOSE FROM 60
USED TYPEWRITERS
i
all guaranteed
CASH DISCOUNT OR EASY TERMS
Kiser's Office Equipment
604 North Main Street

quarterback shared honors with the
Alabama defense which picked off
seven Auburn passes.
Sloan, who spent two seasons in
Namaths shadow, wound up with
more pass completions (97), yards
gained passing (1,453) and total
yards gained (1,499) than any other
Bama player in one season. He
also tied Harry Gilmers 19-year 19-yearold
old 19-yearold record for 160 pass attempts.

Monday, Nov. 29, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Spurrier became the second
leading ground gainer and top pas passer
ser passer in Southeastern Conference
history. He completed 18 of 28
passes for 282 yards and three
touchdowns and had 316 yards total
offense against Florida State.
This enabled the junior quarter quarterback
back quarterback from Johnson City, Tenn.,
to break Zeke Bratkowskis rec record
ord record for most yards gained passing
by 61 yards as he finished with
1,885. His total offense bag of
2,105 yards was only 82 yards shy
of Frankie Sinkwichs record.
No other passer in conference
history ever threw more passes
(284) or completed more (147).
With a two-year total of 3,194
yards and a season to go, Spur Spurrier
rier Spurrier could become the leagues
career yard gaining champ.
Florida State took a 17-16 lead
over Florida with only 2:10 left
to play but Spurrier put the Gators
back in front with a touchdown pass
to senior end Charles Casey who
wound up with league records for
most passes caught (58) and most
yards gained on receptions (809).
Senior fullback Stan Mltcltell
scored on runs of 62 and two yards
to vault the Vols past Vanderbilt.
Tennessee has now given up a total
of only 58 points in nine games.
Georgia capitalized on a fumble
recovery and a pass interception
for its first 10 points. Techs
sophomore quarterback Kim King
couldnt cope with the hard-charg hard-charging
ing hard-charging Georgia line in the first half
but wound up with 196 air yards
and a new season total offense
record for Tech at 1,676 yards.
Ole Miss, winning five of its
last six games after a poor start,
quickly accepted the Liberty Bowl
bid. The Rebels were impressive
on defense, especially against
passes, but mounted only one real
drive of their own.
SEC Standings
Team WLT WLT
Alabama 6 11 8 11
Auburn 4 11 5 4 1
Tennessee 312 612
Florida 42 0 73 0
Mississippi 53 0 64 0
Louisiana State 33 0 73 0
Georgia 33 0 64 0
Kentucky 33 0 64 0
Mississippi State 15 0 46 0
Vanderbilt 15 0 27 1
Tulane 15 0 28 0
Alabama, Conference champion;
Tennessee plays UCLA Dec. 4.
Independents
Team WLT PF PA
Southern Miss. 72 0 127 60
Virginia Tech 73 0 188 134
Georgia Tech 63 1 222 150
Miami (Fla.) 5 4 1 199 138
Memphis State 55 0 215 153
Florida State 4 5 1 121 119
Dorm Leaders
Dorm bowlers went to the line
recently, with the following sec sec.ions
.ions sec.ions winning recognition in area
league play: Murphree Area win winner-Murphree
ner-Murphree winner-Murphree M, Tolbert Area
winner-North 111, Hume Area win winner-Jackson
ner-Jackson winner-Jackson and Graham Area-
Cooper.
With football and bowling com completed,
pleted, completed, the individual leaders are:
Murphree Area-Murphree E, Tol Tolbert
bert Tolbert Area-East IV, Hume Area-
Jackson, Graham Area-Staff.
Dorm teams currently are bat battling
tling battling under the boards to determine
the basketball championship, with
good participation in all dorm
areas.
Second trimester dorm action
will begin with volleyball as the
first sport.

Team

Page 11



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Nov. 29, 1965

1023 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE

OVER 3,500 NATIONALLY ADVERTISED BRAND ITEMS

CHANEL
CARVEN
COLONIA 471 1
DANA
FABERGE
ENGLISH LEATHER

CREST
toothpaste 570
HIDDEN MAGIC
hair spray Re 9- f- 50 QOP
R eg si r a a
deodorant JJJjP
PRO Reg. 69$
toothbrushes 29C
SUAVE Reg. $2
styling gel 890
AQUA-NET
hair spray Re g .si.29 470
FRESH
START 09C
GILLETTE SUPER
,ta | ,l,ss s s .o | 50 C
THERAGRAN M
vitamins J7 89 OQ
100s y wl#

THE REGULAR PRICES LISTED ABOVE ARE NOT OUR EVERY DAY
LOW PRICES. SHOP AND COMPARE

FREEWAY NATIONAL INC.
EVERY ITEM DISCOUNTED EVERY DAY
SAVE Bp,# 40%

SPECIALS GOOD MONDAY THROUGH WEDNESDAY

MAX FACTOR
BRUT FOR MEN
GANT FOR MEN
SCOTCH 'N SODA
GUERLAI N
JADE EAST

Reg. $5
FABERGE
Cologne
For Men
ill.
Reg. $1.75
MAX FACTOR
Pancake
iU?
Reg. sl.lO
REVLON
Lipstick
Refills
79*

ACROSS FROM UNIVERSITY CITY BANK

LANVIN
JEAN NATE
MATCHABELLI
YARDLEY
OUTDOOR MAN
BLACK-WATCH-FOR-MEN

LISTERINE
Antiseptic Reg 99 MAN POWER
spray deodorant Reg. $1 59C
SCOTCH
,N a? A $i.69
LYDIA GREY 1Q
tissue Re s- 35< ? |O v
AMBUSH
cologne Re o-$ 2 -5o \ | b JJq
MODESS Reg. $1.69 I
sanitary napkins 48 ' QOC
SCHICK
Hot Lather n. 49C
HEAD-AND- shampoo!
SHOULDERS
Re g $1 Us V
A-L-L CARTON I
popular brand frO CQ
cigarettes yfciDv

REVLON
SHULTON
GILLETTE
SCHICK
MENNEN
POND