Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Tflhe Florida 1 ligat#r

'' 4.' ~< i. *'
>ol. 58, No. 54
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THE HALLS OF LEARNING (ALMOST) *.-****"*
Construction workers and teachers don't usually have a great deal in common. But the space in which
this worker stands will be taken over by a stately professor when the building, slated to house a new
chemistry unit, is completed across from the Florida Union.

Night Bus To Run Until Lights Up

By YVETTE CARDOZO
Alligator Staff Writer
One empty seat is keeping the
SG night bus service from start starting
ing starting no one has been found to
fill the bus drivers spot.
The bus service, scheduled to

Honor Court Passes
Check-Off Petition

By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Check-off tables will have to be
at least 100 feet away from the
election booths in all upcoming
student government elections ac according
cording according to an Honor Court de decision
cision decision Tuesday evening.
In an 8-3 decision, the Honor
:ourt decided check-offs within
he 100 foot area was in violation
if section 9.3 b of the SG election
aws.
Ed Matz, ILW, presented a pet pettion
tion pettion to Honor Court Chancellor
id Stubbs asking for a judgement
n the election law. Matz felt
heck-offs were in violation.
The election law in dispute says,
'lt shall be unlawful for any per peron
on peron to seek to influence the voters
n any way within 100 feet of any
tolling place.
During the Honor Court meeting,
vlatz asked the justices to deter deterferry

ferry deterferry coeds from dorms and soror sorority
ity sorority houses to the main library,
will begin as soon as a driver can
be employed, according to Secre Secretary
tary Secretary of Interior Mike Malaghan.
The buses will run until adequate
lighting is furnished to now-dark

mine what influence was and
what the law exactly meant.
Many voters have little idea
of a candidates qualifications.
They leap for the chance at dir direction,
ection, direction, Matz said.
Augie Schilbach, presidential
candidate for Challenge Party last
year, asked why the party leaders
were so anxious to have check checkoffs
offs checkoffs if they were not an influence.
I asked people in Graham area
if they thought check-offs were
an influence. They said yes. They
especially thought freshman would
be influenced by the check-off
procedure.
I ran my own campaign last
year and since I didnt intend to
win, I didnt have anyone to pay
back and didnt need check-off
slips to see who voted for me,
Schilback said.
To win an election, you must
See CHECK-OFF on p. 7

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campus areas, said Malaghan.
Plans for lighting began after
the killing of Kathryn Oliveros in
the College Inn. The alleged kid kidnapping
napping kidnapping of UF freshman Barbara
Morris sped up the lighting sche schedule
dule schedule in addition to sparking bus
service plans.
Malaghan urged any student with
a chauffeur drivers license to ap apply
ply apply for the bus driver job which
pays $2 a night. The buses are
scheduled to run one hour nightly
from 9:30 to 10:30 p.m.
The lighting facilities, ori originally
ginally originally scheduled for completion
in eight months, may be well on
their way by the end of this tri trimester,
mester, trimester, according to Malaghan.
A three-phase program has al already
ready already been started with a check
on existing lighting facilities, said
Malaghan.
Some of the existing lights are
burned out or blacked by shrub shrubbery.
bery. shrubbery. Correction of this is first
on the order of business, he said.
The second phase will involve
installation of floodlights. A pre previous
vious previous poll of 1,000 coeds place the
Gator Pond area near McCarty
Hall and the area near Walker
Auditorium top on the wanted
list for lighting.
These areas will be among the
first to be lit, said Blaise Picchi,
chairman of the student Campus
Lighting Committee.
The third phase in the lighting
See BUS on p. 8

Dental School
f
1 Step Closer

With release of $37,000 by the
Florida Cabinet Tuesday, the UF
dental school took one more step
toward reality.
The dental school, in planning
stages since 1957, has 1969 or 1970
set for its opening date.
Initial staff members approved
for the school are a combined
post of dean-professor at a salary
of $24,000 a year and a $3,950
per year secretary.
The $37,000 was released to
cover half year salaries for the
dean and secretary ($13,975), ex expenses
penses expenses ($3,500), operating capital
outlay ($11,000), and other ser services
vices services $8,525). The budget forth?
following year is expected to be
$66,000.
Provost Sam Martin said he has
been interviewing prospects for the
dean's spot during the past weeks.
The decision will be made by Feb February,
ruary, February, he said, with the new man
coming to Gainesville in June.
This dean plus two additional
faculty members will plan the
schools curriculum. $5-6 million
in buildings will be constructed
according to needs outlined by the
initial staff-established curri curriculum.
culum. curriculum. These buildings will be ad adjacent
jacent adjacent to the present Medical
Center, said Dr. Martin.
Between now and 1970, 30 to
40 additional faculty members will
gradually be phases in, according
to the provost. During this time

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TREE-TOPPING TROPHY: Steve Gardner,(r), Dollars
Chairman, looks over the 5-foot-6 Bill Fleming Mem Memorial
orial Memorial trophy with basketball player Gary Keller. See
Page 15 for details of tomorrow's basketball game.

Thursday November 18, 1965

the dental buildings will be under
construction with the first classes
scheduled for 1969 or 1970.
Following the footsteps of the
Medical Center, the dental school
may start classes before a dental
clinic is fully constructed. The
Medical School began classes in
1956 with the hospital opening in
1958.
(sss Mount I
f In Drive j
The student participation is
tremendous," Dollars for Scholars
chairman Steve Gardner boasted
yesterday.
Sororities have really been
working hard," Gardner said.
The ADPis have been holding
up people nightly for all the change
in their pockets; the Chi Omegas
are having a party at their house
from 7:30 until 10:30 tonight and
the DPhiEs are selling tickets
for a dance to be held after To Tomorrows
morrows Tomorrows Freshman-Varsity bas basketball
ketball basketball game."
Gardner reported that he had
to go to the Gainesville Police
Station yesterday.
It seems that some student
was so enthusiastic that he was
out soliciting in residential areas
until 10:45, he said. Os course,
there were complaints. The police
See DOLLARS on p. 8



>, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Nov. 18, 1965

Page 2

News Around
The World
from the wires of United Press International
International
*3
TROOPS CONFINED . Provisional President Hector Garcia-
Godoy's press secretary announced that Dominican armed forces
have been restricted to their barracks. This heightened reports of
an impending rightist coup against the Garcia-Godoy government.
An Armed Forces spokesman immediately denied any restrictions
were issued. The military has protested Garcia-Godoys appointments
of leftists to his government as well as his inability to get civilians
to surrender hidden weapons from the April 24 revolt.
RECORD LOSS ... Four U. S. Navy planes were downed over North
Viet Nam during a bridge-bombing mission 33 miles southeast of
Hanoi. Two of the pilots were rescued, one killed, and another re reported
ported reported missing. The warplanes, all hit within a 35-minute period,
were downed by conventional ground-fire and automatic weapons.
REMOVES POWER . Rhodesian Premier lan Smith announced
Wednesday he intends to "strip the trappings of office from Governor
Sir Humphrey Gibbs, including the guards at the gate of his house.
The rebel premier declared Gibbs was no longer the acting governor
of the British colony. Smith also admitted cutting Gibbs' telephone
lines. Tuesday a spokesman had blamed the failure on "technical
difficulties.
RED ROUNDUP .. Radio Jakarta reported
Tuesday Indonesian army forces have killed 50
Communists and captured 580 others in a sharp
exchange in East Java. The reported fighting
followed an order from President Sukarno
urging all Indonesian government agencies to
purge themselves of elements connected with
the abortive Communist-backed coup of Octo October
ber October Ist.
o
National
PEACE POSSIBLE . United Nations Secretary General U Thant
said Tuesday that had "some bold steps been taken last year in the
political and diplomatic field, the tragic developments in Viet Nam
might have been avoided. Thant was apparently speaking of the peace peacetalk
talk peacetalk offering extended by North Viet Nam through the Secretary
General's office. The State Department confirmed the rejection of
such offers because they did not consider them sincere.
NO RECORD . The first session of the 89th Congress did not
set any legislative record, although it was hailed by President Johnson
and his colleagues as the most productive in years. A final resume of
legislative activity published in the Congressional Record Tuesday
showed the 349 public law bills passed were 59 less than those approved
by the 88th Congress in 1964.
DECISION REACHED . Defense Secretary Robert McNamara
and major aluminum producers reached a compromise agreement
to sell the government's aluminum surplus at a rate of 100,000 to
200,000 tons a year. The new agreement provides that not less than
150,000 tons of government aluminum will be purchased by the pro producers
ducers producers in '66.
DONATING BLOOD . The Red Cross was speeding 222 pints of
blood to Viet Nam Tuesday, a donation from the students of Stanford
University showing their support for the American war effort in
the war-scarred nation. Robert Clark, organizer of the program,
said the blood program would be repeated at 90-day intervals as
long as the war continues.
Florida
ANOTHER SEALIFTER ... The State
Department announced plans to add another boat
to aid of the Cuban sealift. Meanwhile two
other vessels arrived in the Cuban port of
Matanzas to pick up about 200 refugees. A total
of 376 persons fleeing Cuba have arrived in Key
West since the operation began Saturday.
SITE SELECTED . The world's largest nuclear generator will
soon be built at Miami, Florida Power and Light Company officials
announced. The giant power plant, costing over SIOO million, will near
completion in 1970 and will increase the company's electrical output
by 6.2 million kilowatts. Large-scale nuclear plants are already
operating in several points in New York, Illinois and Massachusetts,
with others engineered for New York, Illinois, and Connecticut.

Goldwater: GOP No 'THREAT* I

CHICAGO (UPI) Barry M. Goldwater said
Tuesday the Republican Party was in "bad
shape and had a "long way to go before it
could become a threat to the Democrats na nationally.
tionally. nationally.
The defeated Republican presidential candi candidate
date candidate and ex-Arizona senator said he would like
to see more "cohesiveness in the GOP. He said
Republicans still are not as badly split as the
Democrats, however.
"I'd have to say that as of today the party is
in bad shape, Goldwater told a news conference.
"We have a long way to go. We must do well.
He added, "I wouldn't say we have a good
chance.
Goldwater, here to address the National As Association
sociation Association of Real Estate Boards, said the Re Republican
publican Republican Party, to make a good showing in the
1966 elections, should "hold its own in the
Senate, pick up 40 House seats and maybe take
a governorship or two.
Goldwater said that if the national GOP con convention
vention convention were held tomorrow, former Vice Presi President

Wilson Seeks 'Crisis Point
In Rhodesian Revolution

LONDON (UPI) Prime
Minister Harold Wilson met ur urgently
gently urgently with the cabinets defense
committee today to consider a
series of developments bringing
the Rhodesian situation toward a
new crisis point.
As the cabinet met, Zambian
President Dr. Kenneth Kaunda said
in his capitol of Lusaka that if
Britain did not protect the Karila
Dam which supplies electricity for
Zambias copper industry he would
call on other powers to help. He
did not rule out Communists.
Africans carried out their big biggest
gest biggest mass demonstration against
rebel Rhodesian Primer lan Smith
outside the Southern Rhodesian

I GUESS
WHAT?
I Our photographer
I may come back!!
I 4; :u
I vrJi i? pir Y TH F DC Y ?A U^ ANT HIM TO! IF YOU DID NOT HAVE
I Y U C J URE TAKEN FOR THE 1966 SEMINOLE. YOU CAN
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town of Bulawayo. Most of the
3,000 Africans broke ranks when
confronted by mobile police
patrols.
Wilson also was moving to cir circumvent
cumvent circumvent Rhodesian newspaper
censorship and keep Rhodesians
informed of developments by using
shortwave radio. The Voice of
America added its facilities to the
campaign.

mtl^7

dent President Richard M. Nixon would be the nominee. S
Everywhere I go, people want to hear about $
Nixon, Goldwater said.
Gold water said he would not seek the presi- §
dential nomination in 1968. I dont know if you £
remember, but Ive been through it, he said. $
Once around the track is enough. ;X
The Arizonan called for increased use of S
air power in Viet Nam. He said that marshaling S
yards, industrial areas and rail yards should not S
be considered sanctuaries. |
If we hit those areas, Goldwater said, it
would bring the war to a quick close. *:
I can't say that we need a large number of $
ground troops there, he said. Viet Nam is not $
conducive to a big land war. Its very rough
country to fight in. £
Goldwater said that John Lindsay, newly elec elected
ted elected mayor of New York, would have an effect
on national politics if he does a good job.
I dont have the same policies as Lindsay -x
and I think 85 per cent of the Republicans agree
with me, Goldwater said.

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Is hoe Repair Shop!
I HEELS ATTACHED I
5 MINS.
I SOLES ATTACHED I
15 MINS.
I At 2 Locations I
I CAROLYN PLAZA I
FR 6-0315
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I Opp. Ist Nat'l Bank t
FR 6-5211 I



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Thursday, Nov. 18, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

REVLON
SHULTON
GILLETTE
SCHICK
MENNEN
POND

Page 3



The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Nov. 18, 1965

Page 4

Chu Pong Battle Resumes;
Elephant-Of-War Killed

By MICHAEL T. MALLOY
SAIGON (UPI) ~ U. S. cavalrymen battling on the
slopes of Chu Pong mountain today fought off waves
of attacks by fresh Communist troops. U. S. 852
Strategic Command bombers blasted Red hilltop
positions in close support.
The Communists were reported using elephants
to bring up supplies. Cavalrymen said they killed
one elephant with machine gun fire in the fighting
which broke out at noon and was continuing at
nightfall.
U. S. Intelligence officers said the Communists
apparently had thrown a fresh battalion -about
1,500 men into the battle and that the attackers
were not believed to be part of the 66th North
Vietnamese Regiment virtually annihilated in the
past three days.
The Intelligence officers said the new Communist
forces were more liberally supplied with mortar
ammunition than the troops the cavalrymen whipped
three miles farther south in the first major con confrontation
frontation confrontation of U. S. and North Vietnamese troops.
An Air Force spokesman said four U. S. planes
were shot down over North Viet Nam today during
a raid on a missile site. An American helicopter
was shot down Tuesday at Chu Pong with loss of
four to 13 lives.
Col. Hal Moore of Bardstown, Ky., commander
of the Ist Battalion, said some of his men were
convinced Chinese Communist advisers were with
the North Vietnamese.
The heaviest fighting was carried out with mor mortars
tars mortars and a spokesman said American cavalrymen
killed 13 Communists and captured one during the
afternoon before the Communists broke off the
attack except for sporadic sniper fire. The battle
zone near the Cambodian border is 225 miles north northeast
east northeast of Saigon.
There was no report on American casualties today
but front dispatches reported the losses so far were
the heaviest of any Viet Nam action. The weekly toll
could top last weeks record high of 86 Americans
killed and 230 wounded.
A spokesman said the four American jets shot
down today were downed during a 35-minute period
while bombing the highway and railroad bridge near

U.S. Or North Viet Nam;
Who Wants Peace Talks?

WASHINGTON (UPI) There
is an old axiom in diplomacy that
youre not likely to gain at the
conference table anything the
enemy doesn't believe you can win
on the battlefield.
This, according to authoritative
administration sources, sums
the reasons for the American re rejection
jection rejection about a year ago of two
Communist Viet Nam offers to
meet for peace talks at Rangoon,
Burma.
President Johnsons top advi advisers,
sers, advisers, particularly Secretary of
State Dean Rusk, felt that the per perilous
ilous perilous U. S. military position in
late 1964 plus the shakiness of the
Saigon government then made the
American negotiating position im impossibly
possibly impossibly weak.
Rusk argued that the Commu Communists,
nists, Communists, knowing this, must be willing
to meet only in the hope of getting
a settlement which would amount
to surrendering South Viet Nam
to the Reds. The President agreed.
In confirming reports early this
week that the United States had
rejected two offers to talk which
came through United Nations Sec Secretary
retary Secretary General Thant, the State
Department said only that it did
so because there was no evidence
of serious intent on the other
side. There was no elaboration.
But other administration offi officials,
cials, officials, speaking privately, provided
these additional details:
When the first offer from Hanoi
came in September, 1964, Rusk
opposed accepting it on these
grounds:
The presidential election
campaign was just gettft started

and it was a poor time to explore
dubious peace feelers.
The United States would be
negotiating from a position of
weakness in the light of recent
military reverses suffered by
South Vietnamese and American
forces, then less than one-eighth
the size they are now.
Word of the proposed Rangoon
talks inevitably would reach Saigon
and cause the collapse of the tot tottering
tering tottering regime at a time when the
United States could lest afford this.
In early February, the United
States began bombing North Viet
Nam. It already had begun aerial
attacks on Communist supply lines
through neighboring Laos, although
Washington still will not acknow acknowledge
ledge acknowledge these officially.
At the same time, a buildup in
American military strength was
starting. On April 7, President
Johnson, under pressure from
allied and neutralist nations as
well as some Americans, an announced
nounced announced his willingness to enter
unconditional discussions with
the Reds.
Meantime, U. S. troop strength
The Florida Alligator is an
official publicatkm of the
University of Florida and
is published daily, Monday
through Friday morning
during regular trimester and
twice weekly during summer
trimester, except holidays
and vacation periods.
Entered at U. S. Post Office
at Gainesville as second
class matter.

Hanoi. Two of the pilots were rescued, one was
killed and the other was listed as missing. All four
planes were hit by conventional anti-aircraft fire.
Authorities said the helicopter dropped like a
stone* from an altititue of 1,000 feet, killing all
aboard.
Air Force briefing officers in Saigon disclosed
that American planes attacked and damaged two
surface-to-air missile sites near Hanoi Tuesday.
One of the planes was shot down by a missile fired
from another site, not under attack, and the pilot
was believed lost.
The missile sites, 32 miles northeast and 35 miles
northwest of Hanoi, were the 14th and 15th attacks
by American planes.
The new fighting in the Chu Pong mountain, 220
miles northeast of Saigon, broke out five miles north
of the battleground where American troops killed an
estimated 1,300 North Vietnamese regulars in three
previous days of vicious fighting.
Men of the U. S. Armys Ist Air Cavalry Division
were fanning out to kill survivors of the shattered
66th North Vietnamese Regiment when the Com Communists
munists Communists opened up today with small arms and mortar
fire.
First reports did not say how heavy the fighting
was or how many Communists were involved. It was
not known whether the enemy forces were survivors
of the defeated regiment or new regulars moved in
as reinforcements.
The high-flying 852 s from the Strategic Air Com Command
mand Command base on Guam flew their second support mis mission
sion mission of the battle, dumping tons of 1,000-pound
bombs on the mountain slopes. The huge jets flew
three separate runs and the explosives tore huge
chunks out of the heavily jungled slopes.
Reports from the Chu Pong front today told of
sniper fire from wounded Communist infantrymen
who had been lashed to trees by retreating comrades
and filled with life-sustaining drugs.
Military authorities in Saigon said the confirmed
Communist toll, by body count, was 890, but Ist
Cavalry commanders confirmed reports that the
Communist regiment of about 1,300 men was all
but annihilated during the earlier fighting.

mounted. There now are more than
165,000 American servicemen in
Viet Nam, plus a powerful segment
of the Navys Seventh Fleet off offshore
shore offshore providing some of the attack attacking
ing attacking planes.
By the end of 1965, U.S. strength
will be near the 200,000 mark.
Although victory is nowhere near
in sight, the Communists are taking
increasingly heavy punishment
both in North Viet Nam and in the
jungles of the South.
The United States now would be
negotiating from a vastly stronger
position than a year ago. Yet
Rusks extremely sensitive dip diplomatic
lomatic diplomatic antenna has not picked up
any new offers to talk.
This confirms the administra administration
tion administration view that the Reds a year ago
were wiUing to talk peace only
because they believed the United
States was ready to give up.

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I Red China Again j
i Barred From U.N.
By BRUCE MUNN
UNITED NATIONS, N. Y. (UPI) Communist China was barred
from the United Nations today for the 15th time since it came to
power in 1949. The General Assembly vote on the issue was a 47-to-47
tie.
It was the first time that Nationalist China had failed to get a
plurality of at least eight votes.
Twenty nations abstained from voting on the resolution sponsored
by 12 Afro-Asian powers to seat Red China and to expel the Taiwan
government.
Two Dahomey and Laos refused to participate in the vote and
one Congo Leopoldville was marked absent.
Just prior to the vote on the main resolution, the Assembly voted
58 to 49, with 11 abstentions, to require a two-thirds majority vote to
decide the question of seating Communist China.
Therefore, the supporters of Communist China did not come close
to obtaining a two-thirds majority of the members voting.
Psychological Gain
They did, however, win a psychological and political victory because
for the first time the United States could not muster a plurality for
Nationalist China.
Todays deadlock climaxed a change in the general attitude on the
question of Chinese representation which began when France and a
number of French-speaking African countries decided to recognize
Peking in 1964.
For Nationalist China and the United States, there was the satisfac satisfaction
tion satisfaction of knowing that even had the assembly failed to affirm that it was
an important matter requiring a two-thirds majority to decide,
the 12-power resolution of Cambodia, Albania and 10 other countries
would have been defeated.
A resolution cannot be adopted by a tie vote when a simple majority
is required. The last time the assembly voted on the China issue was
in 1963, when Nationalist China was on the big end of a 57-41 vote.
There were 12 abstentions.
There was no vote on China last year because of the deadlock in the
assembly over financial responsibility for peace-keeping operations.
In 1961, the Assembly voted 61-34, with 7 abstentions, to require
a two-third majority on the China question. Todays vote was on a
resolution sponsored by the United States and nine other countries
merely reaffirmed the 1961 decision.
The pattern of voting today on the question of seating Red China
contained a number of surprises and changes from past positions.
It affected both sides.
A United Press International survey of the delegations Tuesday night
indicated that 51 probably would vote for Communist China and 50
for Nationalist China. But there remained enough doubtful voters to
swing the result in either direction.
Last minute switches and diplomatic maneuvering Tuesday night
proved more satisfactory to Red Chinas supporters than those
supporting the Nationalist government of Chaing Kai-Shek.
Jamaica, Chile and Cameroon, all of which voted for Nationalist
China in 1963, announced they would abstain in todays vote.

Ceylon, at the last minute, pre presented
sented presented an amendment to the reso resolution
lution resolution calling for the seating of
Communist China and the immedi immediate
ate immediate explusion of Nationalist China
from the world body.
Ceylon's move was aimed at
those delegates who favor seating
Communist China but refuse to
pay the price of ousting the Na Nationalist
tionalist Nationalist government.
The United States and other
sponsors of a procedural resolu resolution
tion resolution to require a two-thirds
majority vote to decide the ques question
tion question of Chinese representation
remained confident it would be
adopted prior to the vote on the
main resolution.
KING-SIZED
CABBAGE
KIRKSVILLE, Mo. Mrs.
Orville Buress grew a cabbage in
her vegetable garden 33 inches in
circumference and weighing 7
pounds, 10 ounces.

r
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We feature Valiants & other
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PHONE 376-3644



Union Slates Sale

The International Committee of
Florida Union Activities presents
the International Christmas Fair
Sale on Nov. 30-Dec. 2, in the
Florida Union Social Room.
Gifts for all members of the
family from at least 20 countries
will be on sale. Most of the im important
portant important items will be priced under
$5.00.

for Your
Protection
We Use A
tocked-in
Deodorant.
H^U*LOXENE

All your shirts are treated with
this patented 9 anti-bacterial agent
at a safeguard against odor, staph,

other infectious bacteria,
ih Mi If ALI DAr lONGI
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O 315 NW 13th St.
CL CLEANERS 728 WUnA ~

^
faWimiX I f 111 *_la^B
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This is Jaguar for men. After-shave and cologne com combined.
bined. combined. Women like it. Because it doesnt smell like the
stuff they wear. Men like it. Because it comeson stronger.
Stays on longer. Jaguar is lusty. Powerful. Potent. Its
bottled in a stark, strong, smoky-glass cylinder. Its only
for the man who gets a bang out of living, a charge
out of leading-who plays to win, whatever the game.
After-shave/cologne, s 3.so. Soap on a r0pe, 5 2.50.
Gift soap, box of 3, $ 3.00. Jaguar from Ynrdley.

2

Religious Center Sponsors
Talk On Social Diseases

By WINIFRED K. VASS
Alligator Staff Writer
Venereal Disease will be the
topic of a panel discussion at
the Presbyterian University Cen Center,
ter, Center, 1402 West University Avenue,
on Friday, Nov. 19 at 7:30 p.m.
The panel will discuss the pro problem
blem problem from various standpoints in including
cluding including medical, sociological and
psychological.
Dr. Hugh Hill, Associate Pro Professor
fessor Professor of Obstetrics and Gyne Gynecology
cology Gynecology at the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center and Assistant Dean
of Students of the College of Med Medicine,
icine, Medicine, will present the medical
aspects of the V. D. problem,
its detection, effects and treat treatment.
ment. treatment.
Researth Associate in the Col College
lege College of Nursing and a social an anthropologist,
thropologist, anthropologist, Dr. Carol D. Taylor,
will present the sociological as aspects

AGNESS
HAIR STYLIST
16 NW I.3th Street
Phone 376-9922

pects aspects of V. D., its effects on our
culture, our children and our na nation.
tion. nation.
Professor of Psychology, Dr.
Sidney M. Jourard, will deal with
the problem from the psychological
viewpoint, its effect on the human
personality who must continue to
live with himself and his fellow
men.
The director of the Presbyter Presbyterian
ian Presbyterian University Center, the Rev Reverend
erend Reverend William G. Neville says,
One of my greatest services as
a campus counselor is to young
people caught in these circum circumstances.
stances. circumstances. They must be helped to
face the responsibility to them themselves
selves themselves and to their families of
reporting the situation before it
is too late. This panel has been
set up in order to inform young
people of the facts.
Neville quoted the American
Medical Association Journals
statement: Many authorities be believe
lieve believe that thousands of young people
simply arent aware of the dangers
of V. D. Once infected, they are
complacent about treatment.
There is no reason for complac complacency.
ency. complacency. The venereal diseases can
blind, cripple and even kill,

/^yk'^c' ' t *&%' vSW|||jMr i :
FOOD DRIVE: Steve Cole (right) and Allen Kynes
venture into the Super Market shopping for food for
the IFC's food drive for needy families.

Feast For Needy
Planned By Greeks

UF fraternities are supplying
27 needy families with a luxur luxurious
ious luxurious Thanksgiving dinner this year.
Sponsored by the Interfraternity
Council and handled by the Coun Councils
cils Councils Social Service Committee
under the direction of Steve Cole,
a food drive is now under way,
with a goal of a sls meal for
each family.
The food drive started Tuesday
and will continue through next
Tuesday. The food will then be
delivered to the families.
Each of the 27 fraternities on
campus have been given the name
of a needy family and will deliver

steatk mmi
At
The
Huimpty
Dumpty
Large Del Monico,
THURSDAY Baked Potatoes,
Tossed Salad,
STEAK NIGHT 5-9 p.M. Hot Buttered Rolls
$1.07
HUMPTY DUMPTY
Drive-In & Restaurant
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEALS
372-5387 310 NW 13th St

Thursday, Nov. It, IMS, Tfca Florida Alligator,

the food baskets in person, ac according
cording according to Chairman of the Ser Service
vice Service committee, Herman Green.
The food is to give the families
one luxurious dinner on Thanks Thanksgiving
giving Thanksgiving day, not a means of stock stocking
ing stocking their shelves, Green said.
The meal will include a trad traditional
itional traditional eight pound turkey, with all
the trimmings including cranberry
sauce, stuffing and fruitcake.
The names of the families were
supplied by the Salvation Army.
Although this is the first year
of the IFCs drive it is expect expected
ed expected to be an annual affair, Green
said.

Page 5



\, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Nov. 18, 1965

Page 6

EDITORIAL
victory
Ed Matz won.
The check-off 9 system, a sys system
tem system of electioneering and exerting
influence on voters, has been a abolished
bolished abolished within 100 feet of any
Student Government polling place.
What Matz won was not a per personal
sonal personal victory, for he did not seek
that, but a victory for all students.
It is a victory which will protect
their constitutional rights against
a system which is not legal in any
state and which, due to swift Honor
Court action Tuesday night, is no
longer constitutional on this
campus.
We must praise Matz for bring bringing
ing bringing his petition before the Honor
Court. He devoted many hours
researching and presenting the pe petition.
tition. petition.
To Ed Matz we extend a simple
thanks.
But Matz is not the only one who
deserves praise: the members of
the Honor Court must also be com commended,
mended, commended, for it is they who voted
to end electioneering.
The members, by a 8-3 vote,
rose above party affiliations and
political pressures and t did what is
simply their duty. What is com commendable
mendable commendable is that they did it swiftly,
with no beating around the bush.
Two persons stood against abo abolishment
lishment abolishment of influence at the polls
Jeff Fuqua, Action Party Chair Chairman,
man, Chairman, and Tom Backmeyer, Sec Secretary
retary Secretary of Finance.
Backmeyer c ont end s that
influence means actual campaign campaigning,
ing, campaigning, not marginal influence.
If Leg Council had considered
check-offs an influence, they would
have mentioned it in the election
laws," he said.
Backmeyer's reasoning shows
two fallacys first he admits that
the check-off system is indeed in influence,
fluence, influence, and second, he places
Legislative Council as the final
arbiter of election matters. Leg
Council should not have this power;
this is one that belongs solely to
the Honor Court.
Fuqua contended that the issue
was whether or not the check-offs
constituted influence, and said that
individual cases of influence could
not be attributed to this system.
Both Backmeyer and Fuqua have
been remiss in their duties as
student government representa representatives.
tives. representatives. They have placed the old
system of patronage before legal
and constitutional considerations.
They have not taken a broader
view that of their duty to the
students they represent.
For this, they are definitely not
to be commended.

Tlie
Florida Alligator

Steve Vaughn
Editor

Florida^ol^i^^^

by Mike Garcia
still is no change in Leoy Collins position relative
to the Governors race. He is continuing the vigil off in
the wings.
Collins has one big worry if he enters the Governors race
and doesnt win it can spell political suicide. Collins popularity
with the people of Florida is much like the popularity Burns
enjoyed before the defeat of the Road Bond Issue. Both men were
looked upon as unbeatable; therefore, why try?
However, as we can see, Governor Burns popularity balloon
burst when his Road Bond program lost. Just as easily can the
undefeatable signs stigma be erased from the Collins image.
A DEFEAT, or even a close victory/would limit Mr. Collins
chances for the Senatorial seat in 1970.
One would be astute to suspect that Mr. Collins and Sen. George
A. Smathers have had long talks with President Johnson the
discourse centering around Senator Smathers future political
aspirations. Smathers, who has been ill for some time, may not
run for another term in 1968.
IF THIS be the case, that Smathers will not run, Mr. Collins
will not enter the Governors race. He will wait for 1968.
However, if Smathers intends to run, we can look for Leoy
in 1966.
It is reported that Burns and Kelly are putting out some feelers
here on the campus of the University of Florida. It is also re reported
ported reported that several people have been approached to head up a
committee for Collins in the event he runs.
As education is going to be a big issue in the upcoming gover governors
nors governors race, the various college campuses will be hotbeds of
political activity.
o o o
HOWEVER, gubenatorial elections are not the only events which
stir up a hotbed of activity. The recent appointment of Mrs.
William H. Roberts to the post of Public Functions Manager has
caused quite a stir among certain parties.
Public Functions Manager will be charge of coordinating all
activities, such as: speeches, plays, concerts, and ballets.
Mrs. Roberts will be in charge of the auditorium.
Mrs. Roberts, a graduate of Yale, has had much experience
in public relations, promotion and advertising.
The big stir was caused when certain parties on the Board of
Managers of the Florida Union complained to Mr. W. E. (Bill)
Rion, director of the Florida Union, that they had not been in informed
formed informed of the appointment of Mrs. Roberts.
A MEMORANDUM dated October 29, 1965, announced the
appointment of Mrs. Roberts. However, on November 11, another
announcement was sent out by Mr. Rion. The second bulletin called
a meeting of interested parties to discuss the position of Public
Functions Manager.
It was reported that the latter meeting was called partly because
of a note written to Mr. Rion by a member of the Board of
Managers. It was further reported that the note indicated the
writer would not go along with the action of the Board and Mr
Rion and that the whole problem should be brought out into the
open.
Mr. Rion called the meeting and the cards were said to have
been laid on the table. Certain concerned parties on the third
floor of the Florida Union think otherwise.

Benny Cason
Managing Editor

Grumble I
by Don Federman.
RE: Dean Hale's column of 11/16
It would seem that if dirty" magazines
"dying members of an old collegiate society
Dean Hales thoroughly over-simplified
alized attitude on humor magazines is also
that tradition -- that, or Dean Hale has reaches
some blissful state of sexlessness.
BUT THEN one cannot transcend one's own
one, though, can abstracHMnto barrenness.

The venerable!
Dean shall endure I
in his ways as long!
as there is sex. I
It is not that his I
position is hope-1
less or outmoded!
(for the man who!
always makes!
it is just as much!
a sympton of the!
same problem)j|
it is, rather, in I
flexible.
Hales problem
seems to be his
philosophic pos-1
ture, which, like I
aging bones,
becomes fixed and
brittle and ulti-1
mately breaks un-1

der the slightest stress. For him, the obscene
the off-scene. He has taken the wearing of
too literally; thus he does not see his body, s(H
let's not talk about it. But all this talk of
someness and decency is just one huge
of restraint. H
The explosion is inevitable the pornographeiH
defiles the body in his excesses as Dean Hale doesH
in his inhibitions. But co-existence is possible (i. eB
the body as well as religion or a countrys mostH
sacred views can be ribbed) when one takes suchH
things lightly and realizes that the sacred and profane
are coorelates, not excluded opposites. Alas, when
you become rigidified in a position, however, we have
right and wrong, and thus, the anger that comes when*
one attacks that position (for we are now attacking
the man). I
POOR DEAN HALE doesnt buy this (how can he?).
It is fitting he should quote Snuffy Smiths "times
a-wastin" (befitting his comic strip mind of Little
Orphan Annie and the Jackson Twins). I might add
Dean Hale, that Andrew Marvell (for your benefit
a late Renaissance poet) gave similar advice for
different reasons to a certain "coy mistress.
Now about some contradictions and a little naivete.
The Dean quite rightly stresses the learning ex-B
perience in informal college extra-curriculars. But
only a Snuffy Smith mind with grades as a criteria
for learning would reconcile this noble idea with
intramurals (and extending this example), Lesley
Gore, handball court lights, the oft-bombastic jour-B
nalism of The Alligator, SG privileges and petty!
bickerings, all of which I suppose are "learning I
experiences."
It seems that for only some names is learning I
learning." We cant all be roses. So when someone I
questions the Viet Nam policy, his literature is I
senselessly stolen (not by the Administration, buM 1
doesnt matter it is all part of the sanjMtfmg).
And when he requests that Student money
be used to solve the tragic slum problem in East
Gainesville (seeing that the city cares little) or
desires a Communist speaker on campus, he, of
course, must be denied and disparaged, because this
is not learning commensurate with "higher educa educational
tional educational goals."
God knows, Dean Hale, youre not being asked to
embrace contrary opinions, merely live and gr w
with them (after all, they have to tolerate and learn
from you).
AS FOR THE re-direction of fraternity Hf e >
how the memory of an ice-cream lady fades. Deny
the body indeed?! Fund-raising drives, Christmas
parties for underprivileged children, et al are dor> e
only for thie knowledge that it is good (somehow
something is lost this way, nest-ce pas?).
Greeks have to prod themselves into
(and dont forget to run a picture of us playing
Claus to Negro children in The Alligator). Let me
tell you I know one fraternity (who would spend, 1
others, hundreds on campaign poop), who when ask
to contribute to a Christmas fund for a Negro mat
supporting three kids on $lB a week, couldnt fin a
penny to spare. Re-direction indeed!
Obscene, in its primary sense, means foul o
disgusting. This refers as much to qualities
character as to kinds of thought, for they are inti intimately
mately intimately involved in each other. We cannot laugh
>ou deny us our tongues. Righteousness is not ne
to godliness. There are books to chronicle tins.
For, have you REALLY read Shakespearian Hale
Try "Midsummers Night Dream. I would say to
you, Dean, as Hermia to her father, "I would have
you see with MY own eyes.

i. IK
Sggf
| V "Wk
m I- m



| Some Thanksgiving f
Turkeys To Have
Different Taste?

By RAY COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Thanksgiving dinners at the UF
will have international flavor added
to them, this year.
UF*s foreign* students will be
invited into Gainesville area homes
to enjoy the Thanksgiving feast
with their American hosts.
Col. Glenn Farris, foreign
student adviser, said the purpose
of these meals is to give the
foreign student the experience of
a typical Thanksgiving dinner.**
In a few cases** Col. Farris
said, hindu students may decline
the offer of turkey and concentrate
on vegetables and other dishes
that compliment the Thanksgiving
turkey.** He explained that these
students follow dietary laws which
prohibit them from eating certain
foods.
Difficult Job
These Thanksgiving dinners will
be coordinated by the Gainesville
Committee for International
Friendship. The difficult job of
matching these students with their
American hosts, Col. Farris said,
will fall upon the hospitality com committee.
mittee. committee. The chairman, Mrs. Nancy
Baldwin, must determine how many
students a family can accommo accommodate
date accommodate and arrange the details of
transportation, place of meeting
and time.
To give the foreign student a
better understanding of Thanks Thanksgiving
giving Thanksgiving and other American hol holidays,
idays, holidays, the Foreign Friends Com Committee
mittee Committee of the First Methodist

Check-Off Tables

From Page I
influence people/ Matz argued.
Checking-off is the last link in
the chain of influence.
Joseph Weiss, 7 AG, said that
an election official at the Hub
reminded him to hand in a check checkoff
off checkoff slip and gave Weiss one of his
own to turn in to the collection
girl.
Tom Backmeyer, Progress Par Party
ty Party chairman, spoke against the
petition. Influence means actual
campaigning, Backmeyer argurd.
The Legislative Council has
shown that influence means actual
campaigning--not marginal influ influence.
ence. influence. When the law was passed
several years ago, check-offs were
already an established tradition.
If Leg Council had considered
check-offs an influence, they would
have mentioned it in the election
laws.
Jeff Fuqua, Action Party Chair Chairman
man Chairman contended that the whole issue
was whether or not check-offs
influenced anyone. He said the
influences alluded to during the
testimony were individual cases of
election influences and were not
applicable to the question concern concerning
ing concerning check-offs.
Schilbach argued that the indlu indluence
ence indluence didnt have to be direct in influence.
fluence. influence. Subtile ways of influ influence
ence influence are often much more effec effective.
tive. effective.
Backmeyer said that influence
ment something more than turning
in check-offs. It means something
out in the open, he commented.
The purpose of check-offs is
to see how the vote is within
the party. We want as accurate

Church of Gainesville has pre prepared
pared prepared a special booklet, Our Am American
erican American Holidays, which explains
the origin, significance and cus customs
toms customs of the leading holidays in the
United States.
Col. Farris said that not all
of the foreign students will remain
on campus during the Thanksgiving
holidays. He pointed out, for
instance, that many of the Cuban
students have parents or other
relatives living in Florida with
whom they will spend their holiday
period.
A few foreign students will travel
through various parts of the United
States.
Welcomed Rest For Some
For some,** said Col. Farris,
the holidays are a welcome re respite
spite respite from classes which gives
the foreign student an opportunity
to review their academic subjects
in which they will be examined
next month.**
To find out how the foriegn stu students
dents students feel about these Thanksgiving
dinners, the Alligator interviewed
three foreign students who have
attended these meals in the past.
Vincent Chen, a citizen of Hong
Kong, said, It was a nice ex experience
perience experience getting to know your cus customs.*
toms.* customs.*
Chia Chu Soong, a Chinese stu student
dent student from Formosa, said the dinner
was ok.** The people were
friendly but the food was different
from the oriental food. Soong
said he likes many of the Amer American
ican American foods, but he still prefers
Chinese food.
Eddie Chan, another citizen of
Hong Kong, said that the people
he had dinner with last time were
very friendly and that he loved the
turkey.

a gauge as possible, he said.
The Honor Court then discussed
the question of whether or not a
justice who had personal opinions
about the case when he entered
the room should be allowed to
vote.
Stubbs first thought that the
justice should be disqualified, but
later decided that the justices were
not a jury and could legally enter
the room with their own personal
opinions.
In an unprecedented move,
Stubbs allowed an Alligator report reporter
er reporter to stay in the room while the
justices deliberated.
The conversation went like this:
It was admitted there was an
influence.
It was a marginal influence and
it would be very inconvenient to the
people taking check-offs to be 100
feet away form the polls.
It may be marginal influence,
but its influence. Weve got to
uphold the clear meaning of the
law. Inconvenience to party of officials
ficials officials is inconsequential.
We should ask, according to
the election laws is th There have been people who cam camplained
plained camplained about the check-offs.
There is utter choas around the
polls because of the check-offs.
The people gathering around make
it hard to find out where to go to
vote in that area.
A justice asked for a vote on
the question and the Honor Court
decided that marginal or not, in influence
fluence influence was influence. The check checkoff
off checkoff tables must be moved at least
100 feet away from the polling
places.

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Vjp

Nel Laughon of the Seminole staff has apprehended
James Bond Agent 007 who she says is going
to be the guilty one who has the task of selecting
Miss 1966 Seminole.
Deadline is Friday 5 p.m. for organizations to
submit entries for Miss Seminole. Applications are

Debate Team
To Travel

The Debate Society faces its
largest challenges of the early
season next weekend when UFs
team will compete in a major re regional
gional regional tournament, the DSR-TKA
at Emory University, Nov. 18-20.
While varsity debaters Jeremy
Gluckman, Howard Freeman, Ri Richard
chard Richard Smith and John DeLancett
debate in Atlanta, novice debaters
will compete in an important pre preholiday
holiday preholiday novice tournament at the
University of Georgia. Richard
Mann, Lynn Earls, Allen Foster
and Sharia Herndon compose the
novice team.
For the season the societys
record is even at twelve wins and
twelve defeats.

Ever Met A Pilot?
A Different Breed
Confident, Unusual
Able to leap tall buildings
in a single bound
MEET ONE IN YOUR MIRROR AFTER
YOUR $5 INTRODUCTORY LESSON
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Municipal Airport Waldo Road

SHES GOT THE CULPRIT

HAMLET
STATE THEATER
NOY. 21, 22,23
SI.OO
Tickets purchased
Nov. 16-19 from
Phi Mu Sisters &
Pledges all benefit
Dollars For Scholars.
Purchase Yours
NOW! 1

Thursday, Nov. 18,1965, The Florida Alligator,

available at 9 Florida Union. Each contestant must
present an 8xl0 portrait photograph with their
entry.
James Bond is really actor Sean Connery who
has agreed to judge the contest of UF's most
photogenic coeds. Picture is from the Plaza Theatre,
Gainesville.

inhere
are
you
/////
m
Men go where their thoughts take
them. The journey to Truth is a
revelation of Spirit the king kingdom
dom kingdom "within you. Hear this lec lecture
ture lecture titled "Where Are You Go Going?
ing? Going? by ELBERT R. SLAUGHTER,
a member of the Board of Lecture Lectureship
ship Lectureship of The First Church of Christ,
Scientist, in Boston, Mass.
Oman mbb Kart
FLORIDA UNION
AUDITORIUM
Thursday, Nov. 18, 8 P.M.
PUBLIC Cordially Invited

Page 7



\ t The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Nov. 18, 1965

Page 8

Igator classifieds

I for sale
CAMPUS WARDROBE sports sportswear
wear sportswear and cocktail dresses, also
accessories. Size 8-12. Over 80
articles. Excellent condition.
Brand names include Susan
Thomas & Evan Picone. Call 376-
5616. (A-42-ts-c).
26 BOYS BICYCLE. Very cheap.
Call 378-1017. Ask for Rhea. (A (A---
--- (A---
GUITARS AMPS DRUMS
All Musical Merchandise Christ Christmas
mas Christmas Specials NOW 10-20-30%
Discount to University Students.
DERDA MUSIC CO., 622 N. Main
St. (A-42-st-c).
THOUSANDS of feet of lumber. Dif Different
ferent Different size and length. In old church
building. Will sell lumber feet or
part of building. Call 466-3300,
ask for Mr. Bryan. (A-52-st-c).
GRADUATING must sell: 1964
Skyline Mobile home, 10 x 52*
custom, 1 bedroom, completely
furnished, central heating, air airconditioned,
conditioned, airconditioned, many custom extras.
Ideal for single student or couple.
Will bargain from $4000; financing
available. Call 376-2787 after 5
p.m. and on weekends. (A-52-3t-c).
ESTABLISHED delivery business.
Student owned and we wish to keep
it that way. Call 6-9965. (A-53-
3t-cL
ARVIN 1650 Watt thermostatically
controlled forced air electric heat heater,
er, heater, SIO.OO. Small Electric Fan,
$3.00. Kenmore Automatic Zig-
Zag sewing machine, $65.00.
Trundle Bed (2 single beds), Sim Simmons
mons Simmons innerspring mattresses,
$55.00. Healthkit Monaural Hi-Fi
consisting of model SS-1 speaker
system, WA-P2 reamp, W-TM am amplifier,
plifier, amplifier, Garrard model T turn turntable,
table, turntable, Pilot FM tuner, Philco AM
console radio, SIIO.OO. Hallicraf Hallicrafters
ters Hallicrafters Model SX-25 super defiant
communications receiver, AM
shortwave, separate speaker,
$75.00. Call 6-1328 after 5:00
p.m. (A-54-2t-c).
1965 YAMAHA motorcycle. Like
new $325 or best offer. Call 376-
2516 after 6 p.m. (A-54-3t-c).
AIR CONDITIONER, 2 yrs old old
- old BTU 110 volt. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. 3 yr. guarantee on com compressor.
pressor. compressor. Winter price SSO. Kemp
Logan, 2-9427 or 6-9208. (A-54-
lt-c).
ANTIQUE and modern guns. Call
FR 2-5688 or see at 314 NW 36
Drive. (A-54-2t-c).
TRANSISTORIZED Tachometer.
One piece 0-6000 r.p.m. Best
offer over S2O. R. Palmer, Flet Fletcher
cher Fletcher M 179. (A-54-2t-p).
STEEL STRING guitar, good tone,
going cheap. Call 8-4249 after 5.
(A-54-ts-c).
services
IN AHURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios. 372-0300. (M (M---8-ts-c).
--8-ts-c). (M---8-ts-c).
POSTERS, PLACE CARDS, flower
arrangements and etc. Printing of
all kinds handled. Phone anytime
372-7273. Artistic Creations. (M (M---
--- (M---
JUST REOPENED. Faye's Dress Dressmaking
making Dressmaking Shop. Expert tailoring and
alteration on ladies' and men's
clothing. 312 W. Univ. Ave. (M (M---54-st-p).
--54-st-p). (M---54-st-p).

. 1
autos
1962 CORVAIR STATIONWAGON.
4-door, 4 speed trans. seat belts.
$995. Call 376-0213 after 6:00.
(G-51-st-c).
1954 FORD, 6-cylinder, 2 door,
stick shift, overdrive (20 mi/gal.).
Two new tires, brand new radiator,
no rust or body dents, mechani mechanically
cally mechanically sound. $250. 248-B Flavet
m. FR 6-3211, ext. 5317 (8 a.m.
to 5 p.m.) or FR 2-7886 (nights).
G-51-st-p).
1963 JAGUAR XKE Roadster. Gun
metal grey w/red interior. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. AM/FM radio.
Good tires. Many extras. Phone
372-3266 or see at 3632 NW7Ave.
(G-52-4t-c).
PORSCHE, 1959, radial tires,
radio, never been raced. Excellent
condition. Jim Shields. FR 2-9410
- leave message. (G-52-ts-c).
1960 AUSTIN HEALY French
racing blue. New top and tonneau,
radio, heater and valve job. SIOOO
best offer. Call 378-3162, ask for
Pete. (G-53-3t-c).
1965 CORVAIR MONZA, conver convertible.
tible. convertible. Air conditioned, radio, auto
trans. S2OO under book price.
$2195. Cash only. Phone 378-1988
after 5:00 p.m. (G-51-st-c).
1962 CORVAIR MONZA. 4 speed,
radio, heater, seatbelts, wsw tires,
wire wheel covers. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. $995. Call 378-4987. (G (G---53-2t-p).
--53-2t-p). (G---53-2t-p).
1954 CHEVROLET. $l5O. 4-door,
6 cyl. auto, trans., radio, heater.
For dependable transportation a around
round around town, it is hard to match at
this price. Please call B. J.Smith,
Univ. Ext. 2898 or home 376-4131.
(G-54-3t-c).
1932 PLYMOUTH and 1957 POR PORSCHE
SCHE PORSCHE speedster without engine.
1951 DODGE TRUCK with camper.
Engine needs re-assembling. Call
FR 2-5688 or see at 314 NW 36
Drive. (G-54-2t-c).
wanted
ROOMMATE WANTED for Univer University
sity University Gardens, 2nd story corner
apartment. 2 bedrooms. Rent
$41.50 monthly. Call Karen or
Denice. 8-1019. (C-53-3t-p).
ONE MALE ROOMMATE to share
one bedroom, air conditioned
apartment. Preferrably 4 or 5 EG.
For winter trimester. Call 378-
3187. (C-53-ts-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share apt. beginning in January.
Colonial Manor. Please call after
7 p.m. Phone 378-3355. (C-52-
4t-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE over 21 to
share apartment in Colonial Manor.
Call Linda, 8-2487. (C-54-3t-c).
FOUR (4) NON-STUDENT tickets
to UF-FSU game. Call 372-6687.
(C-54-2t-c).

I GAME ROOM I
BILLIARDS
POOL
FREE
no sw 34th st
Westside Shopping Center

j help wanted
OPENINGS FOR EXPERIENCED
cashiers. Full or part time em employment.
ployment. employment. Only well-qualified,
capable cashiers will be consi considered.
dered. considered. For interview call at Flor Florida
ida Florida Book Store, West University
Avenue. (E-52-st-c).
STUDENTS NEEDED TO ASSIST
MANAGER. QUALIFICATIONS:(I)
U of F student in good academic
standing. (2) Can work evenings.
(3) Can work 18-22 hours per
week. S4O. per week salary (S9O
on full time basis). Call Mr.
Malaghan at 8-2966 between 9:00-
5:00. (E-48-ts-c).
FEMALE HELP WANTED: Have
full time openings for waitress.
Evenings. Hourly wage. No ex experience
perience experience necessary. Apply King
Food Hosts. 1430 SW 13 St. (E (E---
--- (E--- 3t-c).
APPLICATIONS are now available
for employment next trimester as
desk assistant and game area as assistants
sistants assistants in room 108 of the Florida
Union. (E-54-st-c).
lost
. .... -1
LOST John Romain pocketbook.
Will the person who took by mis mistake
take mistake from TEP house, please re return
turn return personal items. Return to Fla.
Alligator, Fla. Union, room 9. (L (L---
--- (L---
EBB / 188
HJTtitiSt m-KHW
I a GIANT COLOR HITS I
I mtsi
# fc- Elvis Presley j|
I tun in Acapulco I
mj Debbie Reynolds fl
B SECOND TIME AROUND j

He'd take on anyone,
at anything, anytime
... it was only $ \/
a matter of who U
came first! 4AJHr
METRO GODWIN MAYER PRESENTS
SIEVE EDWARD & ANN-
McQUEEN ROBINSON MARGRET M
KARL TUESDAY
MALDEN WELD
TODAY AT 1:21 ETROCOl "
lAMiUIB 3:19 5:17 7:15 9:13
V

LOVE IS NOT A THING '^qq^oov^io
GROWS ONLY IN fJSmst<32£Ss lovingly ass/
up to be James Agee, who wrote a Pulitzer M n ; mmANn
novel about Mary Follets marriage. It is now amo I** SilfllflOHS ntet DP6Stfln|
t.on picture about all the kinds of love there are. J J
StBTl MNAT K| NG COLE STORY" ||i? tinrn^^ll

| real estate
4 YEAR OLD CBS HOUSE. Now
vacant. 3 bedrooms, large Fla.
room; on large lot. Near school.
SSOO. equity, take up payments.
Get key and move in. Call 2-3118.
(I- 51 stc).
1/4 ACRE LOT on Cat Island,
Bahamas. High and dry. Clear
title. $750. Call Sam Snedaker,
FR 6-7187. (I-53-3t-c).
-
personal
i 1
TENA FAFARD WOULD LIKE TO
inform all her friends that she is
now with Milady's Beauty Salon,
517 W. Univ. Ave. Phone 6-3802.
Evenings 378-2201. (J-48-ts-c).
GATOR ADS SELL
I BHV|i'| vIaEiNB
1 HWHU;
ITONITEj^f
| FIRST AREA SHOWING
I
I ROD ORSON *%
I TAYLOR NEUES <
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.A MIOHAFI
WB | CALLAN
INTERNS I DEAN

Get Discount Coupons
At Flo. Union Info. Desk
I TODAY! /H
I marcor
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I TOGETHER EOR Tut (V ,, n
I first time on the y M
MOTION PICTURE | A V
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IROYAL 1
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gator
classifieds
1 r
for rent
FURNISHED one bedroom apart apartment.
ment. apartment. 3 blocks from campus. Call
378-4135 for details. (B-50-st-c).
LARGE 2 bedroom duplex, air
conditoners, natural gas heat, for
3 mature persons. Quiet, close-in
area. Call 6-6494. (B-50-st-c).
50, 2 BEDROOM trailer located
in Archer Road Village. For in information
formation information call 6-0906 after 6 p.m.
(B-49-10t-c).
LARGE furnished room, central
heat, private home. For mature
student or person desiring quiet
refined atmosphere. 202 NW 12th
Terr., FR 6-5368 or 6-2100. (B (B---53-ts-c).
--53-ts-c). (B---53-ts-c).
TWO BEDROOM furnished apart apartment
ment apartment Available Dec. 19. sllO
monthly. Water is included. Call
378-4872. (B-53-st-c).
QUIE T HOME, furnished rooms for
boys double or single. Private
bath. Air conditioned. Convenient
to University and town. 105 NW 7
Terr. (B-54-st-c).
FURNISHED 1 bedroom apartment.
Call 6-4786, 1-4 p.m.(B-54-st-c).
FURNISHED one bedroom apart apartment,
ment, apartment, clean. $65. monthly sub sublease
lease sublease Available Dec. 27. 737
SE sth Ave. Call FR 8-2218.
ALSO SUZUKI, 80cc, 1964 good
condition. $225. (B-54-2t-p).
ONE OR TWO PEOPLE to take
over two room apartment for win winter
ter winter trimester. One block from
campus. Air-conditioned. Phone
8-4973. (B-54-3t-c).
ATTENTION: Male graduate Law
and Medical students. Apartment
suitable for 3 students. Available
Jan. 1, 1566. Two doors from John
Tigert Hall. $l2O (Ist and last
month rent in advance). Call FR
8-2559 between 9-5 or 6-4968
evenings. (B-54-st-c).

I I *flS"--''
im ,jr> p 'w^^KKp
, |f
igrv mjjti
808 WHITEHOUSE, IMPORT CAR DEPARTMENT MANAGER,
IS SHOWN INSPECTING A NEW MG-B TO INSURE THE
NEW OWNER'S SATISFACTION.
tSEE 808 AT TROPICAL PONTIAC FOR THE FINEST IN SPORTS
| CAR REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE.
J Tropical pontiac is your dealer for mg and austin-
a HEALEY SALES AND SERVICE.
TROPICAL PONTIAC 2ZONWBAv

FUNLAND
AMUSEMENT
CENTER
WHERE STUDENTS
MEET FOR RECREATION
GAI NESVILLES
LARGEST SELECTION
OF GAMES
1011 W. University Ave.
2 Blocks From Campus
ISI
* SELLHUi fm
US
Free to
College
Students
25 to others
A new booklet, published by a
non-profit educational founda foundation,
tion, foundation, tells which career fields lets
you make the best use of all
your college training, including
liberal-arts courses which
career field offers 100,000 new
jobs every year which career
field produces more corporation
presidents than any otherwhat
starting salary you can expeft.
Just send this ad with your name
and address. This 24-page,
career-guide booklet, "Oppor "Opportunities
tunities "Opportunities in Selling," will be
mailed to you. No cost or obli obligation.
gation. obligation. Address: Council on Op :
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11 PATRONIZE II
H GATOR iii
ADVERTISERS $;
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I SI ll I 1 1 I*J;t1*J ; t 1
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CAMPUS PACS
GOING FAST-

c a, m pus

HILLEL: Saturday, 8 p.m.,
Hillel. Listening party (football
game) followed by film Operation
Madball* and social.
ALPHA KAPPA PSI: Today,
7 p.m., M-112 Medical Center.
Demit Ceremony. Speaker: Dr.
James.
CIRCLE K: Today, 7:30 p.m.,
212 Florida Union. There will
be a guest speaker.
CIRCLE K BOARD: Today,
7 p.m., 212 Florida Union.
FOOD SCIENCE CLUB: Today,
7:30 p.m., 105 McCarty Hall. New
officers for the coming year will
be elected.
DEBATE SOCIETY: Today, 4:50
p.m., 331 Tigert Hall. Intra-
Squad Debate.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE: Today,
8 p.m., Florida Union Auditorium.
Speaker: Elbert R. Slaughter.
Topic: Where are You Going?"

Theresa Adams, 3AS, goes all the way around Fraternity Row
selling campus pacs for Dollars for Scholars. Don Mclntyre of Sigma
Chi buys his pac after a sales talk from Theresa. Sororites are selling
campus pacs this week to aid the scholarship drive. Why not call
Theresa for a campus pac at the Delta Gamma sorority house?

cal e n d jv r*
- - -

PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM: Fri Friday,
day, Friday, 4 p.m., 133 Williamson Hall.
Speaker: Dr. Raymond O. Lane,
Physicist, Argonne National Lab Laboratory.
oratory. Laboratory. Topic: Recent Neutron
Polalization Experiments at Ar Argonne
gonne Argonne .
DOLLARS FOR SCHOLARS:
Friday, after Orange-Blue game,
parking lot across from Pi Lambda
Phi house. Street dance with mu music
sic music by the Upsetters. Tickets
must be purchased in advance at
the Delta Phi Epsilon house, the
Hub, the Library, and during the
Orange-Blue game. Cost: 50?
per person.

- *** /v, *- r
~-.-5 -~-V ftp
888P > ~s3r iSfe i
: ...- M^L**,,
: JwHilf ,r ifiiiiMiiSiMM!
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/U. Jfc *£; IJP*
IPPPPBW Jf ;;^

Eunice Tall, Delta Phi Epsilon, is selling tickets, along with the
rest of her sorority members, this week in front of the Library and
Hub for a street dance after the Orange and Blue freshman basketball
game Friday night. The dance will be in the parking lot across the
street from Pi Lambda Phi House and all profits will go to the Dollars
for Scholars Campaign. Cost is 50 cents each. Greg Cottin, 3BA, is
the lucky guy.
V

Thursday, Nov. 18, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

What To Buy?

HILLEL: Friday, 7:30 p.m.,
Hillel. Speaker: Dr. Mel Her Herberg.
berg. Herberg. Topic: Public Health
Aspects of Ancient Judiusm. Ser Services.
vices. Services.
S G E R: Student Group for
Equal Rights, Friday, 8 p.m., Flor Florida
ida Florida Union Auditorium. Speaker;
S.C.L.C. Freedom Singers.
- 'i
INDIAN CLUB: Saturday, 6p.m.,
Baptist Student Center. Indian-
Indian Dinner. Tickets: $1.50 a
person; $2.50 a couple. Tickets
may be obtained from the Inter International
national International Center or from the office
bears of the club before Nov. 18.

Page 9



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i t The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Nov. 18, 1965

Page 10

CREST
toothpaste
FAMILY SIZE P
95$ VALUE W W V

i TENDER "touch 1
bath oil BY HELENE CURTISS
| FRK WITH ANY M OO PURCHASE

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ty Rights Reserved
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NI6HEST QUALITY WORK
Acceptable for Term Papers, Theses, Etc.
2 Prints for The Price of 1 on Photo Finishing
When You Pay List Price
Color or Block A White on Sizes 620, 120, 127
THIS IS A 50% DISCOUNTI
Plus tax where applicable Quantity richts reserved
2 Locations To Serve You
\

1620 W. Univ. Ave.

BRUSH ROLLERS
ALL SIZES
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hair spray full 13 oz.
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DOWNTOWN



I muswmm
H
From Page I
ram would not go into effect
V fall trimester of 1966. This
e involves installation of larg largght
ght largght poles to hold more lights,
ghan, however, feels flood floods
s floods will provide enough light,
ng installation of larger poles
cessary.
ve will wait at least a tri-
B e r to see if the floodlights
enough, he said.
lAlumni Film
I film of the University Florida
I Tulane University football
Re will be shown at 8 p.m.
rsday in the Medical Science
ding Auditorium.
ponsored by the Alachua County
mni Club, the film is complete
R narration. There is no ad adsion
sion adsion charge and the public is
ted.

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***sss
From Page I
department was very cooperative
with us and all they asked is that
each off-campus soliciting group
takes a list to them with the names
of the students before going out.
Yesterday the Lambda Chis
kidnapped all of the sorority
house mothers and held them until
$lO ransom was paid for each
one.
Were getting more money all
the time, Gardner said. Right
now were approaching the $16,487
goal and I think were going to
come close to breaking last years
$21,300 mark even though we are
not receiving $5,000 from the Ath Athletic
letic Athletic Department that they did last
year.
All sororities, fraternities, and
dorm areas are requested to turn
in the funds that they have col collected
lected collected to date for Dollars for
Scholars. Steve Gardner reported
that room 311 in the Florida Union
will be open from 7-8:30 for the
collections.

FSDF

Chorine Bares Her Goal :

By GERALD P. QUINN
United Press International
LAS VEGAS,Nev.(UPI) Penny
Keith is working her way through
college.
In the nude.
Penny, a 22-year-old product
of Oak Park, 111., and Darien,
Conn., has aspirations of becoming
a commercial artist or a college
level teacher. Presently her path
has taken her to the Tropicana
Hotel where she performs as a
nude in the Folies Bergere.
Need Money
A bright, alert, five-nine, with
measurements of 36 1/2-23-35
shaping her 130 pounds, Penny re rebuffs
buffs rebuffs any thought of a show busi business
ness business future with a flat no adding
I think I have more potential
in the field of art.

Wants A College Degree

With a year and a half of
university work behind her, last
fall Penny found herself in a sit situation
uation situation which has confronted many
a studentlack of funds. So the
o
C
(TO iplomj l
V I -v -/)
IT

Thursday, Nov. 18, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

attractive redhead departed the
University of Arizona campus in
Tucson, Ariz., landing in Los An Angeles.
geles. Angeles. A friend mentioned that
the Tropicana was looking for show
girls so she packed books and body
to the desert entertainment mecca
and got the job.
Noting that at first her parents
were a bit surprised," Penny
pointed out that when they got
to see the performance they liked
the show and thought daughter was
cute."
Herself, Penny believes as long
as it is presented properly nudity
is not vulgar."
Audiences like to see nice fig figures,"
ures," figures," she said.
'Different Breed'
Involved with the Folies' cast
of 80, composed of French, Eng English
lish English and American performers,
Penny says she has met many
interesting people in show busi business,"
ness," business," although she does feel they
are a different breed."
How does the city of Las Vegas
strike a college-bound Miss, who
hopes to save enough to be back
in school next fall?
You certainly couldn't be bored
in a town like this," she said.
They even have a university."
After working hours, which
extend into the wee hours of the
morning, Penny, who has no
ties," likes to go dancing in quiet
places" where she can relax and
enjoy herself."
When shes alone the young
performer likes to meditate about
the future," what she can do best"
and where her prospects lie.
She paints in ner apartment,
where she lives alone, makes hats
- which she models on television televisionand
and televisionand does sketches and portraits,
some of which have sold.
However, her aim of a college
art degree is a serious one. Penny
wants to go back to school to find
out whether to seriously paint,
become a commercial artist or
teach."
If she is to become a serious
painter it would have to be very
good," she said.
But as an observer pointed out,
if a girl is pretty enough to per perform
form perform as a nude in a Las Vegas
chorus line, as a teacher she would
almost be assured of total student
attention at least from the male
portion.
UF Profs Go
To Atlanta
Two representatives of the Uni University
versity University of Florida will attend the
Regional Conference on the Higher
Education Act of 1965 in Atlanta,
Ga., Monday.
Dr. E. T. York, provost of the
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences, and Dr. Lester L. Hale,
dean of student affairs, will attend
the meeting.
Purpose of the meeting is to
explain provisions of the Higher
Education Act passed by Congress
at the close of the last session.
Representatives of the U. S. Of Office
fice Office of Education are holding
meetings in nine regions this month
to explain the provisions of the
bill and discuss regulations for
the programs.
The Atlanta meeting will include
representatives from Alabama,
Georgia, Florida, Mississippi,
South Carolina and Tennessee.
Albert W. Boldt of the Depart Department
ment Department of Health, Education and
Welfare will be in charge of the
meeting in Atlanta. A team of 10
to 12 USOE officials will attend
the meeting.

Page 11



!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Nov. 18, 1965

Page 12

Far-Out Fashions:

_ I

EASTERN
Designer Holly Howard wears a
green-striped dress with black
jersey and hood. The middle middleeastern
eastern middleeastern styling with high bodice
may be worn with or without belt.

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POOR ALBERT!
Sheri Penn models a red
Nordic style A-line jumper
with Alligator boots.

A Job
As Well As
A Hobby

Far-out fashions are
a life-style and a live livelihood
lihood livelihood for Holly How Howard,
ard, Howard, 3AS. Her activities
as chief student cos costume
tume costume assistant for
Florida Players don't
seem to dim her en enthusiasm
thusiasm enthusiasm for creating
unusual and striking
clothes in what re remains
mains remains of her spare
time
Influence on the de designs
signs designs range from for foriegn
iegn foriegn countries to the
high fashion pants
look The unusual
combinations and cuts
are combined into what
Miss Howard calls
*outfits."
Since winning a sew sewing
ing sewing machine in a high
school 4-H contest
Holly has eagerly pur pursued
sued pursued the designing and
making of her entire

Photos By
Gerald
Jones

wardrobe. In produc producing
ing producing these far from
pedestrian products
she is often asked if
she also wears them
in public.
And of course the
imaginative miss cer certainly
tainly certainly does
Helping to model her
off-beat styles are
Sheri Penn 7AS, and
Joan Kuykendall. 2UC.

.gfe m
M

FOR COCKTAILS

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REVEALING
Holly wears a two-piece outfit
with bared mid-riff and leg-re leg-revealing
vealing leg-revealing pants. One vote for Holly.

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CASE OF BLACK AND WHITE
The white and wool caps provides striking contrast with the black
long-sleeve top, black stockings and black bell-bottom trousers.
Miss Howard models her own design.

Joan Kuykendall, 2UC, models a two-piece cocktail outfit. The
oajama-stvle design is of white coffan and features wide sleeves.

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_ _ 1
Burns Moy Be Also-Ran, Poll Shows!

Collins enters the Gov Governors
ernors Governors race, Haydon Burns will
be an also ran, a St. Petersburg
Times poll shows.
The Times printed results of the
poll in a copyrighted story on Page
1 Wednesday.
In head-to-head competition,
Collins a former governor
received support of 59 per cent of

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ois it
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706 W. Univ.

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I 1122 N. MAIN
B IN THE GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

those polled while Burns drew only
21 per cent. Twenty per cent went
undecided.
Last Wednesday, The Times
said, Collins, presently serving
as undersecretary of Commerce,
hinted at a possible interest in next
years race for Governor. Last
Friday evening Suncoast Opinion
Surveys put the question to 800

Blood Drive Continues
Despite Poor Turn-Out

Bv ARLENE CAPLAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Operation 1966, a Student Gov Government
ernment Government attempt to get blood for
U. S. soldiers in Viet Nam, will
continue despite a poor turn-out
in its first week.
Mike Malaghan, Secretary of the
Interior and chairman of the pro project
ject project said he feels the drive has
been unsucessful so far due to
not enough time for students
under 21 to get parental permis permission.
sion. permission.
Malaghan also said poor publi publicity
city publicity and general apathy of some
students accounts for the fact that
only 64 pints have been donated.
We have many reasons for the
drive, Malaghan said. Primar Primarily,
ily, Primarily, we want to show our moral
support for American Foreign Pol Policy
icy Policy in Viet Nam.
A letter from SG President
Bruce Culpepper has been sent
to General Westmoreland in Viet
Nam so that U. S. soldiers sta stationde
tionde stationde in Veit Nam are aware that

Florida citizens.
Interviewing was conducted by
telephone, with about 200 calls
completed in each of the four ur urbanized
banized urbanized areas of Miami, Tampa,
Orlando and St. Petersburg.
In this trial-heat ballot only
the names of Burns, Collins and
the other two most likely candi candidates
dates candidates ... former Sen. Scott Kelly

UF students are concerned about
them as well as supporting U. S.
policy.
If the blood doesnt get to Viet
Nam, he continued, it will be
used in needy local and state
blood banks.
The projects title Operation
1966 is derived from the fact
the drive will last until February,
1966, and a goal of 1,966 pints
of blood is anticipated.
In a meeting last Monday, five
members of the blood drive com committees
mittees committees representing Mens Inter Interhall
hall Interhall Council, W. S. A., Panhel Panhellenic
lenic Panhellenic Council and Student Govern Government
ment Government voted to sustain the blood
drive for three months even though
the first week has been disappoint disappointing.
ing. disappointing.
Only 11 per cent of UF students

Annual Hume Hall
Hawaiian Party
Swings Out Friday

An erupting volcano, two floor shows and free door prizes are
part of the scene of Fridays Hume Hawaiian party.
Two bands will be on hand to provide music for dancing, Me
and the Other Guys will play upstairs, while The Moderns
will provide entertainment and music downstairs.
A special authentic touch will be added to the Polynesian atmosphere
with a Hula Revue by Miss Merry Lynne Smith and four of her
Alpha Chi Omega sorority sisters.
Miss Smith is a professional Polynesian dancer and has performed
in a number of night clubs. Miss Smith taught the other four girls
the numbers they will perform.
The Revised Vanguard Singers, the winners of this years
Gator Growl talent show, will sing their version ofthel Klan and perform a special Hawaiian skit.
Hula hostesses for the evening will be coeds from Rawlings Hall.
The annual Hawaiian will be from 8 p.m. to midnight and the
dress is casual.
Price of the affair is 75 cents for Hume residents, $1.50 for non nonresidents
residents nonresidents and all girls will be admitted free. Hume is even supply supplying
ing supplying transportation to and from a girls dorm if it is needed.

' treated like a man?
Then Treat her like jjj
y -£smw& tH
THI C*Or O* TM| tOu'H


of Lakeland and Mayor Robert King
High of Miami . were men mentioned.
tioned. mentioned. It is very probable, how however,
ever, however, that by next May the list of
hopefuls will be much more ex extensive.
tensive. extensive.
Since voters in the primary
elections will be restricted in their
choice by party affiliations, the
results for all voters are given for

must donate blood in order to
reach the goal of 1,966 pints.
Officials from Air Force ROTC
are now considering having a day
off from drill so that all ROTC
participants who want to donate
blood will have time to do so.
If the drive is sucessful Mal Malaghan
aghan Malaghan said, this will be a great
contribution to enhancing the UF
image, demonstration of our sup support
port support for American Foreign policy,
a boost to the morale of U. S.
soldiers and a help to state blood
banks.
All students interested in do donating
nating donating blood should sign up in
room 311 of the Florida Union.
Permission slips for students
under 21 are available in the
dorms, sorority and fraternity
houses and the Florida Union.

Thursday, Nov. 18, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

whatever academic interest they
have. Os more concern to the po potential
tential potential candidates are the results
for Democratic voters. Os the 800
persons interviewed, 526 were re registered
gistered registered Democrats. The first
question was:
In next years primary elec elections,
tions, elections, which man ..(Burns, High,
Kelly or Collins) ...would you like
to see win the Democratic nomi nomination
nation nomination for governor?
All Democrats
Voters Only
Collins 38% 40%
Burns 15% 17%
High 14% 13%
Kelly 12% 13%
Undecided 20% 17%
The replies of Democratic vot voters
ers voters to this question in each of the
four areas spotlights Collins a across-the-board
cross-the-board across-the-board appeal with the
big-city electorate.
T. M. S.P. O.
Collins 37% 43% 52% 30%
Burns 15% 16% 14% 21%
High 9% 24% 12% 6%
Kelly 22% 3% 13% 15%
Undecided 17% 14% 9% 28%
Those questioned were next
asked to pick and choose between
the incumbent and a challenger
in three separate face-to-face en encounters.
counters. encounters. The first trial-heat pit pitted
ted pitted Burns against Collins and the
question was:
What if the election was be between
tween between Burns and Collins, which
man would you like to see win the
Democratic nomination for gover governor?
nor? governor?
All Democrats
Voters Only
Collins 59% 58%
Burns 21% 22%
U ndecided 20% 20%
When only Democrats are con considered
sidered considered and the replies are broken
down by area, its a clean sweep
for Collins with Burns making his
best showing in the Orlando area.
T. M. S.P. JO.
Collins 59% 65% 67% 44%
Burns 21% 20% 17% 28%
Undecided 20% 15% 16% 28%
Against Miami Mayor High,
Burns fares somewhat better al although
though although the net result is the same;
defeat at the hands of the
challenger.
All Democrats
Voters Only
High 45% 41%
Burns 31% 34%
Undecided 24% 25%
Considering Just the votes of
Democrats, Burns held High to a
standstill in Tampa and soundly
trounced him in Orlando. In Miami
and St. Petersburg, it was quite a
different story.
T. M. S.P. O.
High 37% 54% 48% 23%
Burns 37% 27% 23% 49%
Undecided 26% 19% 29% 28%
Burns would run his strongest
race against Scott Kelly, who fin finished
ished finished a close third to Burns and
High in last year's Democratic
primaries.
All Democrats
Voters Only
Kelly 39% 36%
Burns 29% 32%
Undecided 32% 32%
Analysis by area (Democrats
only) reveals an even split. Burns
would win handily in Miami and
squeeze out a victory in Orlando
while Kelly would easily walk away
with all the marbles in Tampa and
St. Petersburg.
T. M. S.P. O.
Kelly 50% 20% 42% 33%
Burns 25% 41% 22% 39%
Undecided 25% 39% 36% 29%
A few final words of caution.
Interviewing was conducted by
telephone, thereby those without
phones . .representing a size able
number of voters could not be
contacted. Election day is still
about six months away. In just about
very instance the undecided
vote could swing the outcome.

Page 13



Irish One Point Pick Over Spartans

NEW YORK (UPI)~ Top-ranked
Michigan State was rated a one onepoint
point onepoint underdog Tuesday for Satur Saturdays
days Saturdays battle with Notre Dame that
will help determine the 1965 na national
tional national college football champion.
The Spartans have won the big

g# ,'M '* % 1 -y 9 Hrallglliliirag
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IffMK

Don Sayet sweeps end with the ball, eluding grasp and the Orange League title with a thrilling 25-24
of diving Pi Lam defender. TEP won the game win Monday.

The Florida All i gatorj

Thursday, Nov. 18, 1965

Parseghian 'Sweats State

By ED SAINSBURY

CHICAGO (UPI) Michigan
States varied offense forces Notre
Dame to find a new approach on
defense in search of victory over
the No. 1 ranked Spartans Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday. Irish Coach Ara Parseghian
told football writers Tuesday.
Their offense really is a form
of single wing, he said, with an
unbalanced line, tight or open.
Their entire concept requires a

f Dutchman Returns
To Vikings Fold

MINNEAPOLIS ST. PAUL (UPI) Norm Van Brocklin, who
quit in despair as Minnesota Viking football coach after losing to
Baltimore, was back running the club today for as long as theyll
have me.
My characteristic always has been that of a fighter, not a quitter,
he said. The worst thing I could do is be a quitter. I want to coach
the Vikings to a championship. Maybe I wanted to get there too
fast.
The Vikings had been rated contenders before the season began
and after a slow start, they built a 5-3 record.
Van Brocklin said he thought the Vikings had a chance to /in the
National Football League title until the 41-21 loss to Baltimore
Sunday.
Van Brocklin, blaming himself, told newsmen Monday he was
resigning, wouldnt reconsider and was through with football.
Its not the fault of the players, he said. Its the coach.
General Manager Jim Finks called him greatest coach in the
game. Finks and others urged him to reconsider. Monday night
Van Brocklin called Finks, confessed hed acted hastily and asked
for his Job back.
This is the strangest thing that ever happened to me, Van
Brocklin said. Quitting is the worst thing I could have done to my
friends. I want to stay on as coach of the Vikings as long as theyll
have me.

10 conference title and have a Rose
Bowl date in California on New
Years Day. But this is the big
one for Michigan State. A victory
over the fourth-ranked Irish would
close out a perfect season for
Coach Duffy Daughertys crew.

TEP SWEEP

new approach.
Parseghian listed numerous
Michigan State players who could
give the Irish trouble, among them
quarterback Steve Juday, halfback
Clint Jones and end Gene Washing Washington.
ton. Washington.
But basically, he said, the game
will turn on rushing against
defense.
Michigan State is a fine de defensive
fensive defensive team, he said. Statis-

GATORS FAVORED BY 6

Arkansas, the No. 2 team in the
country, was 14 points better than
No. 9 Texas Tech as the Razor Razorbacks
backs Razorbacks sought to clinch the
Southwest Conference title and the
accompaning Cotton Bowl invita invitation.
tion. invitation.

Page 14

tically, I guesss theyre No. 1 in
rushing defense. But weve been
rushing well, and itll be our rush rushing
ing rushing offense against their defense.
Then weve done well against
a rush, so itll be their rushing
against our defense. Theyve dis displayed
played displayed dangerous passing, and we
have concentrated on passing so
we can keep teams from stacking
against us.
Parseghian, who said at the be beginning
ginning beginning of the season that his team
had no passing, said the Irish aer aerial
ial aerial attack had improved in the last
three games because weve been
working on it.
Weve had greatest consis consistency,
tency, consistency, and Bill Zloch is throwing
better. Then in Phil Sheridan and
Nick Eddy weve got fine receiv receivers.
ers. receivers.
Parseghian, speaking by tele telephone,
phone, telephone, said he expected his No.
1 left halfback Bill Wolski who
missed the North Carolina game,
would be ready to play against the
Spartans, but that offensive end
Don Gritter definitely would miss
the game. He will replaced by
Tom Talaga.
Spartan Coach Duffy Duagherty
also spoke. He said that fullback
Bob Apisa, suffering from an in injured
jured injured leg, would play in the game.
But he said, we wont know his
effectiveness until Thursday.
Daugherty also speculated that
while the Irish home crowd might
be an influence in the game, it
would not be a decisive factor.
Notre Dame certainly is very
enthusiastic, he said, but I think
the big disadvantage of playing a away
way away from home is breaking up
your normal routine.

SPORTS

The No. 3 Nebraska Cornhuskers
are idle, while fifth ranked South Southern
ern Southern California was a five-point
selection over seventh-ranked
UCLA in a showdown for Pacific
Coast representation in the Rose
Bowl,
Missouris Sugar Bowl Tigers,
rated eighth in the nation, were

Miami Game
An Acid Test,
Says Graves

The passingest team in the
history of the Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference and the fifth ranked de defensive
fensive defensive team in the nation will
receive an acid test from the
Miami football team Saturday.
This is what Coach Ray Graves
said Wednesday, as his Florida
team went through a scrimmage
concentrating on goal line offense
and defense and the passing game.
This is going to be a real test
for the defense especially,"
Graves said.
But Pm not worried about the
players getting up. The assistant
coaches have done a fine job all
year of getting the players up and
prepared them for the game.
But when Miami and Florida
play, the coaches dont have to
worry about the players being up.
Graves said he expects an of offensive
fensive offensive game and a lot of passes
from both teams.
The Gators have already thrown
257 times in eight games which is
enough to tie the 1947 Ole Miss
team for the most pass attempts
in any 10-game season in the lea league.
gue. league. When quarterback Steve Spur Spurrier
rier Spurrier throws his first pass against
the Hurricanes this record will
fall.
For the year so far, Spurrier
has 236 attempts, 121 completions,
1524 yards gained passing, and 339
plays of total offense, and 1711
yards of total offense.

See Whets New *
The Browse Shop
THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE... .Richard Condon
THE WITNESSES New York Times
HERE TO STAY John Hersey
LETTERS OF JAMES AGEE TO FATHER FLYE...Agee
THE AGONY OF MODERN MUSIC...Henry Pleasants
SPACE PHYSICS Harrie Massey
ANCIENT RELIGIONS.... Virginia Ferm
TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
CONCEPTS OF THERMODYNAMICS Obert
BIOCHEMICAL MECHANISMS Ingraham
METHODS OF APPLIED MATHEMATICS..HiIdebrand
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ngured 15 points better than Kan Kansas.
sas. Kansas. Purdue, ranked 10th, was 10
over Indiana.
Important games in the East
showed Syracuse a 14-point pick
over Boston College, Brown 1 over
Columbus, Colgate 6 over Rutgers,
Princeton 6 over Dartmouth, Har Harvard
vard Harvard 1 over Yale and Penn State
7 over Pittsburgh.
South- South Carolina 2 over
Clemson, Louisiana State 20 over
Tulane, Florida 6 over Miami,
Fla., Florida State 5 over Houston,
Duke 4 over North Carolina, Mary Maryland
land Maryland 9 over Virginia, West Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia 11 over George Washington,
Tennessee vs. Kentucky even and
Memphis State 16 over Wake
Forest.
Midwest Michigan 2 over Ohio
State, Minnesota 14 over Wiscon Wisconsin,
sin, Wisconsin, Illinois 6 over Northwestern,
North Carolina State 2 over lowa,
Tulsa 19 over Wichita and Toledo
10 over Dayton.
Southwest Oklahoma State 24
over Kansas State, Texas Chris Christian
tian Christian 12 over Rice, Baylor vs.
Southern Methodist even and Texas
Western 6 over Xavier.

most people buy
the SAAB
on the ground
SAAB makes both superjets
and superlative passenger
cars. SAAB is engineered to
aircraft standards. Front wheel
drive gives it jet lighter maneu maneuverability.
verability. maneuverability. Take the car out for
a test flight.
P INNA PERFORM ANCt SPF( IALISTS
1031 South Main Street
Gainesville, Florida



1 day, Nov. 18, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Cagers To Debut In Benefit Tilt

I By EDDIE SEARS
Alligator Staff Writer
I The unofficial unveiling of the
|1 965-66 editions of the University
piorida varisty and freshman
basketball teams will be held to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow night at 8 in the gym.
I The event is the annual Dollars
Ifor Scholars* basketball game that
Iwill climax a week-long campus
[drive aimed at soliciting funds for
[student loans.
Admission will be 50 cents per
person. Tickets are available.
| The game should be one of the
best ever slated between the var varsity
sity varsity and freshmen.
The frosh, with super-star Andy
Owens, a 6-6, 200 pounder from
Tampa Hillsborough, could provide
a rugged test for the Southeastern
Conference contending varsity.
Coach Norm Sloans regulars
Jeff Ramsey 6-11, Gary Keller
6-9, Bob Hoffman, Dave Higley and
Paul Morton make up a solid squad
with height and speed.
Keller was the third leading
scorer on the team last season
with 312 points and a 12.5 average.
Ramsey followed with 249 points
and set a school accuracy record

AFL In NCAA 'Doghouse

By JEFF MEYERS
UPI Sports Writer
The American Football League
resolved one problem Tuesday by
scheduling its draft of college
players for .Nov. 27, but still may

Commissioner Eckert

'Not All That Tough 1

WASHINGTON (UPI) William Dole (Spike) Eckert, the new com commissioner
missioner commissioner of baseball has sometimes been called the great stone
face. But the retired Air Forge general is not all that tough.
That's the way the 56-year-old Eckert is remembered in the Air
Force, which he left in March, 1961 after suffering a heart attack.
At the time the grim appellation was applied to him, Eckert was
wearing three stars and serving as vice commander of the Tactical
Air Command at Langley, Va.
The three stars and his position explain a lot to those who know
the Air Force, although in addition his former associates said he
does have an expression that could be described as severe along
with a desire to enforce high standards of work.
He is of only medium build, however, and now that he is wearing
civilian clothes looks much less severe, one former associate said.
Eckert's Air Force career was devoted mainly to nuts and bolts"
and management.
He was commander of the 452nd Bomb Group in Europe toward
the end of World War n, and wears the Distinguished Flying Cross
along with the Distinguished Service Medal and the Legion of Merit
with two oak leaf clusters.
Except for the World War II experience and his assignment to
the Tactical Air Command, he spent his career in logistics. He
wound up as comptroller of the Air Force.
He was born Jan. 20, 1909, and enlisted in the Indiana National
Guard in 1924. He entered West Point in 1926.
Eckert got his wings at Brooks Field, Tex., in 1930 and was
graduated from the advanced flying school at Kelly Field, Tex., in
* y 3l
After service in P&nama and as an instructor at Randolph Rield,
ex., he entered Harvard Universitys Graduate School of Business
dministration in J 938. He was graduated in 1940 with a Master's
degree.
From Harvard he went to Wright Field, Ohio, as production executive,
later comptroller.
After the big war, he went back to Air Material Command. He
as transferred to Washington in 1952 as assistant deputy chief for
r material, and went to Langley in 1956.
e and his wife, Catharine, have two children.
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Page 15

hitting .630 of his field goals.
Last year the Gators wound up
with the most wins ever recorded
by a Florida team (18), most
Southeastern Conference wins(ll),
best overall SEC record (11-5)
and highest conference record
since World War n (tied for third).
Last year Morton rolled up 112
points, Hoffman compiled 104 and
Higley scored 95.
Other varsity players who will
see action include, Ed Mahoney,
Edd Poore, Mike Rollyson, Alan
Treech, Dave Miller, Mike McGin McGinnis,
nis, McGinnis, Harry Winkler and Fred Mc-
Million.
Owens, the big gun for the frosh
at forward, was named high school
All-America by Parade and a num number
ber number of other polls.
While in high school, Owens
averaged 27 points per game.
The other freshman starters in include
clude include center Neal Walk (Miami
Beach), guard Kurt Feazel (Har (Harrisburg,
risburg, (Harrisburg, 111.), guard-forward Boyd
Welsch (Gainesville) and guard
Micker Norlander (Virginia,
Minn.).
Walk, 6-10, 210, averaged 17
points per game for Miami Beach.
He has the best moves under the
basket of any Gator freshman eager

find itself in trouble with the
National Collegiate Athletic Asso Association.
ciation. Association.
Commissioner Pete Rozelle of
the National Football League Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday night accused the rival AFL

and can hit from the outside.
Feazel stands 6-4, weighing in
at 180. He was a highly sought
player being offered more than
100 scholarships. He was also a
football player (quarterback) in
high school. He averaged 24 points
per game.
Welsch, a local standout for
Gainesville High, averaged 24
points per game last season. The
six-footer was named All-State for
the Purple Hurricanes.
Norlander, 6-1,180, averaged 16
points per game in high school.
At halftime, Dollars for Scholars
chairman Steve Gardner will pre present
sent present the first annual Bill Fleming
Memorial trophy to the campus or organization
ganization organization that has collected the
most money.
The late Fleming was an assis assistant
tant assistant to Student Body President
Bruce Culpepper and was killed in
an automobile accident this sum summer.
mer. summer.
According to Gardner, when
flowers began arriving for their
son, Flemings parents asked that
instead that money be given to
the Dollars for Scholars campaign.
Almost SSOO was collected.
Also during halftime the winner
of the Date with Miss UF Con-

of holding a secret draft of col college
lege college players. AFL Commissioner
Joe Foss, who earlier in the day
had changed the date of his leagues
draft from Nov. 20 to Nov. 27,
denied all allegations about a
clandestine meeting.
The AFL has breached the pub public
lic public trust and that of the nations
colleges with secret early drafts
at least three times in the past
five years, including earlier this
month,* Rozelle said from New
York in a prepared statement when
asked to comment on rumors of
such an AFL draft.
Milt Woodard, assistant AFL
commissioner, speaking from New
York for Foss, who was between
stops on a trip, said Were AFL
not knowledgeable of this type of
thing secret drafts. Not one player
has been contacted or coerced.
James Corbett, chairman of the
NCAA Pro Relations Committee,
who had earlier blasted the Nov.
20 draft date as a mockery,
was gratified with the resched rescheduling
uling rescheduling but struck a discordant note
concerning the alleged secret
draft.
Conflicting reports from an
AFL official source that an alleged
Nov. 2 informal draft meeting was
held by AFL implied such an act,
if true, is more serious to us
in terms of potential breaches,
Corbett said in Baton Rough, La.,
where he is athletic director of
Louisiana State.
Rozelle accused the younger
league of a secret draft after the
Pittsburgh Press and the Dallas
Times Herald reported the AFL
had held one. Foss, who was in
Kansas City, later branded the
reports false and accused the NFL
of conducting a smear campaign.
The papers reported that the
AFL already had selected such
standout prospects as linebacker
Tommy Nobis of Texas, tackle Bill
Yearby of Michigan, quarterback
Rick Norton of Kentucky, fullback
Jim Grabowski of Illinois and end
Tom Mitchell of Bucknell.
Gerald Phipps, co-owner of the
AFLs Denver Broncos, said in
Denver that league executives met
Nov. 2 but only to avoid wasting
a lot of time. We sat down and
went through a group of outstand outstanding
ing outstanding college football players. Our
responsibility was to get as much
information as possible on the ones
we were interested in, Phipps
said.

test will be announced.
Other trophies will be presented
to winners in campus pac. frat-

DICK

ASST. SPORTS EDITOR

Ballots for the 1965 United Press International all-Southeastern
Conference football team have been sent to sports editors all over
the South. With 22 positions open, both offensive and defensive
elevens, what UF players can be considered for SEC recognition?
Florida's two captains, offensive guard Larry Beckman and
defensive safety Bruce Bennett must be certainly be considered,
Beckman, 6-2, 219, is the mainstay of the seldom-heralded
offensive line. For this reason, the blonde senior is perhaps
the most underrated of the Gator stars. A strong blocker, the
Miamian experienced the offensive lineman's dream against
Auburn he got to run with the ball.
Late in the game, the trailing Orange and Blue desperately
needed all the yardage it could get. Steve Spurrier kept the ball
and ran for about 20 yards. Hemmed in, Spurrier lateralled to
Beckman. Beckman carried the ball another 10 yards, inside the
Auburn 25-yard line.
Coach Ray Graves said, Beckman is never average, always
good, and often great in the offensive line. For two years he has
consistently been a team leader."
The Gators winning TD in the 14-7 win over Louisiana State
was saved by Beckmans recovery of a Spurrier fumble on the
LSU one-yard line.
Bennett, 5-10, 173, has prevented many scores by UF opponents.
He has an uncanny knack for being in position to come up with
timely tackles and interceptions. He holds the Gator record for
career interceptions with 13. His five this season leave him but
one behind his record-tying effort of six last season.
LSUs two fumbles inside the Florida five-yard line were un undoubtedly
doubtedly undoubtedly instrumental in its defeat. Bennett recovered the first
one, and caused the second bobble at the three-yeard line with but
four minutes remaining.
Bennett Around Ball
Head defensive coach Gene Ellenson commented, Bennett comes
as close as one boy can to playing an entire secondary for you. He
is always around the ball and more often than not he covers his
position and then makes up for the mistakes of others."
All-SEC as a junior, the Valdosta, Ga prep all-America quar quarterback
terback quarterback was a pre-season choice to make the 1965 All-America
unit.
Another Gator gridder who won't need a stuffed ballot box to
repeat as an all-SEC performer is lonesome end Charles Casey.
Second team All-America last season, Casey, 6-2, 204, rated a
prime prospect by numerous pro clubs.
It was primarily Casey's superlative pass-catching prowess,
coupled with Spurrier's accurate arm, which led Graves to go
with a wide-open pro-type attack capable of scoring 51 points
in a single game.
Even on a national scale, Casey looks impressive. He ranks
seventh in pass receiving, with 47 grabs for 641 yards. This total
leaves him but five short of the all-time SEC total of 52. Os
course, Casey has two games remaining in which to also better
his UF record of TD receptions in a season -- six.
Graves relates he has confidence in the Gator end position.
The Atlanta senior is one big reason why.
For giving you a wrinkle and breaking clean Casey can match
anyone in college football," Graves contends.
Statistically speaking, there is one Florida man who bags h s
own introduction. His name is Steve Spurrier. Graves told the
Johnson City, Tenn., lad that he could throw the ball as much as
he wanted.
Spurrier Eighth Nationally
Spurrier has responded by rising to eighth nationally in passing
offense. Five of the seven quarterbacks in front of the blonde
junior have had the advantage of one more game. Spurrier holds
virtually every UF record related to passing and total offense.
Spurrier has reportedly been named to the 22-man Look
Magazine All-America squad.
Steve is the finest collegiate quarterback I've ever seen.
He runs the option well, has a great knack for spotting receivers.
He calls 95 per cent of our plays," Graves emphasized.
A second defensive standout worthy of SEC laurels is rugged
end Lynn Matthews. Matthews consistently crashes through the
line to turn opponents' play inside, and often makes the crushing
tackle himself.
He leads the team in recovering opposition fumbles, with three.
One of these averted a LSU tally. Matthews can be counted on to
throw the opposing signal-caller for big losses several times in
a typical contest.
Against Georgia, Matthews raced into the backfleld to throw
the passer for a 12 yard loss, forcing Georgia to punt. Two plays
later, Steve Spurrier and crew had a 14-10 advantage.
Mammoth defensive tackle Larry Gagner, 6-3, 246, was all-SEC
offensive guard last season, and should garner the honor at his
new spot this year. Barry Brown, 6-3, 235, should finish second
in the conference behind Casey in pass receptions. Drafted as a
future by the pros as a junior, Brown could team with Casey to
monopolize the end positions.
Last season, five of Graves* charges were named to all-SEC
berths. At least that many have a strong chance to win places in
1965. Three Gators Casey, Spurrier, and Bennett-may make
several All-America squads.

Dennis-

ernity, sorority, men's dormitory
and women's dormitory competi competition.
tion. competition.



5, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Nov. 18, 1965

Page 16

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HAL SEYMOUR
HAL SEYMOUR . Halfback ... 6-3 ... 206
. . Sr. . Starke, Fla. ... 21 years old .
Co-winner of Most Improved Back award in spring
. Could turn out to be Floridas most valuable
football player in 1965 . Has improved each year
and Florida coaches believe his senior year will be by
far his best . Very good speed (4.6 in 40) and
hands make him dangerous as pass receiver .
Averages 40.7 on 52 kicks as a sophomore, punted 11
times last year due to season-long bout with mono,
but averages 42.0 per kick . Has punted bare barefooted
footed barefooted in past, but wore shoes in spring . Attend Attended
ed Attended Bradford County High in Starke and played offensive
end. Also jumped 6-5 as a senior in high school.

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