Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida Alligator

UF Infirmary Changes Hands

Kidnaped Girl
Returns Safely

By YVETTE CARDOZO
Alligator Staff Writer
An 18-year-old UF coed, kidnaped from within a block of her dorm,
is safely back in Qainesville today after a harrowing 70-mile ride to
Jacksonville in a stolen car.
It was 9:15 p.m. Sunday when freshman Barbara Morris left the main
library to return to her dorm, Mallory Hall.
Her story told how she stopped in a construction lot near the Archi Architecture
tecture Architecture and Fine Arts Building to tell a short, dark-complexioned man
where to find a phone booth. As she spoke, he struck her in the stomach
and dragged her to a nearby car, according to police.
Miss Morris spent the next few hours in the seat of a white and blue
1963 Chevrolet convertible with two men who identified themselves
only as Jack and John. The short man who had stopped her threaten threatened
ed threatened to use karate if she made trouble, she said. The other man, tall and

M iss Morris
Criticizes
UF Lighting

By SUE KENNEDY
Alligator Staff Writer
After a night of hell," she was
surprisingly alert. Her prime con concern
cern concern was for the other girls who
must walk the unlighted areas of
the campus every night.
Barbara Morris, lUC, a resident
of Mallory Hall, was pushed into a
car in the dark area adjacent to
Walker Auditorium. Two men,
whom she described as in their
c*
early twenties, took her to Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville where they left her with
the stolen car and gave her enough
money to get back to Gainesville.
Miss Morris said it was so dark
in the area that, while she could
see their faces when they pushed
her into the car, she could not see
them well enough to have identi identified
fied identified them at that time.
The girls on this campus are
just going to have to get together
and demand lighting, she said.
Its not going to take that much
time or money, and its going to
have to be done before it's com completely
pletely completely too late.
The Walker Auditorium area is
not the only dark place which needs
light, Miss Morris pointed out.
There are areas between dormi dormitories
tories dormitories and other halls which need
light just as badly. She said she
hoped her experience could be the
smash in the nose people need
in order to realize that a situation
must be remedied.
The men, who got Miss Morris'
attention by asking directions to a
phone, told her they had talked to
four other coeds in the same place
before abducting her. It was later
learned that Miss Morris' room roommate
mate roommate was one of these girls.
They seemed to regret their
act more and more as the evening
wore on, Miss Morris said. She

See LIGHTING on P. 7

Dollars For Scholars
Drive Is On--Page 9

Vol. 58, No. 52

thin, spoke little during the ride.
Back on the UF campus Sunday
night senior Tom Hayslip dialed
campus police.
A girl had just been forced into
a car, he said. While passing the
classroom building now under con construction
struction construction near Walker Auditorium,
a girl was shoved into a car, cry crying,
ing, crying, Don't take me! Please leave
me alone!
He hadnt been able to see the
license number because the tag
light was out. The car pulled away
before he could do anything.
Two hours later, at 11:20, Mal Mallory
lory Mallory Hall counselor Mrs. Pat
Carnes, reported a girl missing.
The girls roommate, Eileen
Woodman, not only confirmed that
Miss Morris went to the library
that evening, but said she herself
talked to the same men while taking
the same route to the library.
A short man asked me where
he could find a phone booth, Miss
Woodman said. She suggested a
Yulee area phone booth but didn't
go near the car while talking.
The man didn't say anything
out of the ordinary, she added.
This occurred around 8:30 or
9 p.m.
Miss Woodman continued to the
library, where she met and talked
with her roommate, Barbara Mor Morris.
ris. Morris.
Minutes later, Miss Morris left
the library, met the same man
and also tried to direct him to a
phone booth. But unlike her room roommate,
mate, roommate, she was pushed into the car.
According to what Miss Morris
told campus police, the men at
first threatened to rape her, but
later changed their minds.
Much of the four-hour long trip
was spent in conversation, with the
short man doing most of the talking.
I just tried to adapt to the situa situation
tion situation and calm my nerves, said the
coed.
The short man talked about a
previous college career in New
York, but both Miss Morris and
Lt. Gene Watson of the Campus
Police believed it was a lie. The

See KIDNAPING on P. 7

University of Florida

m
I
ms six"
:|m

Hearing Set Tonight
On Election Petition

By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
If no one is allowed to solicit votes within 100 feet of the
voting booths in Student Government elections, then political
parties could legally go to any extreme outside of the sacred
limit.
Ed Matz, ILW, says he believes there should be no check checkoffs
offs checkoffs collected or any other political activity within 100 feet
of the polls. He started a petition asking that the Honor Court
interpret section 9.3 b of the Student Government election law.
The law reads? It shall be unlawful for any person to seek
to influence the voters in any way within 100 feet of any polling
place.
Matz asked for an interpretation that would be satisfactory
to the petitioners.
The chances are much greater for a voter not having a
slip to be influenced by seeing one party official receive slip
after slip from his fellow students and friends.
Everyone must remember that not every student has the
convictions to vote for a candidate as a party chairman or
fraternity member. Many freshmen and even upper class men
vote vecause it's the democratic thing to do and have little
idea of a candidates qualifications, Matz said.
If they see or hear fellow students checking off or are ap approached
proached approached to vote for a certain house, they may leap at a chance
for direction.
Because of the petition request, Sid Stubbs, Honor Court
Chancellor has called a public hearing to discuss the matter
at 8 p.m. today in room 306 of the Florida Union.
The representative, in collecting check-off slips, is doing
an act unauthorized and unimplied in the SG constitution. It
in no way helps the election or is necessary. Its just like
registration, Matz contends.
Section 9.3a says the voter is required to leave the area of
the polling place after he has voted. This implies that unnecessary
lingering may not be conducive to the spirit of the polls, Matz
said.

Spotlight On International Education

Latin Meeting Opens Today

(Related Story, Page 5)
A former U. S. foreign service representative
to Latin America and now a noted business con consultant
sultant consultant there In international marketing will be
the opening speaker at 8 p.m. at an International
education conference here at the Ramada Inn
Nov. 16-18.
Using the conference theme Latin America,'*
Charles McKay of McKay, Miller and Associates
will discuss the importance of those countries
to the United States. The public Is invited to
attend.
McKay is president of the Dominican-Ameri-

REITZ

Tuesday, November 16, 1965

MARTIN

can Chamber of Commerce and an international
advisor to the Latin American Times and The
International Trade Review, a Dunn and Brad Bradstreet
street Bradstreet publication.
Introducing McKay will be University of Flor Florida
ida Florida education professor Hal G. Lewis. Confer Conference
ence Conference chairman, Dr. Peter Oliva will formally
open the sessions. Oliva is in the secondary
education department at the University.
The Second Southern Regional Conference on
International Education is being sponsored by
Phi Delta Kappa, men*s education honorary, and
the Center for Latin American Studies.

Martin
Assumes
Control

By TERRY MILLER
Alligator Staff Writer
Medical Center Provost Samuel
P. Martin today assumed adminis administrative
trative administrative responsibility for the UF
Infirmary.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz
made the announcement Monday
afternoon.
Officially, the administration of
the Infirmary (Department of Stu Student
dent Student Health Services) has been
changed from the Dean of the Col College
lege College of Physical Education and
Health to the Provost of the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center.
The change was made on the
recommendation of Dean D. K.
Stanley of the College of Physical
Education, who has been respon responsible
sible responsible for the Infirmary for almost
20 years.
Stanley was chairman of a
special committee which recently
completed a study of the Infirmary
and its services. The study lasted
for several months.
Stanley requested that he be re relieved
lieved relieved of the administrative res responsibilities
ponsibilities responsibilities of the Infirmary so he
could spend more time on his other
duties as Dean of the College of
Physical Education. He would also
be able to more fully devote his
time to the teaching of interns.
At a meeting of Infirmary em employes
ployes employes Monday night, Stanley ex explained
plained explained the main reasons for the
change.
The College (of Physical Edu Education)
cation) Education) has grown so fast acade academically
mically academically and there is a shortage
of teachers. I decided to take this
opportunity to go back to teaching,"
Stanley Said.
Teaching is my first love," he
said.

Stanley said his greatest fear in
giving up the administrative posi position
tion position was that the Infirmary would
not be left in good hands. But he
said he was confident that it would
be in good hands under Ur. Martins
supervision.
Stanley told the employees that
the change came only after con conferences
ferences conferences with Pres. Reitz and Dr.
Martin.
See INFIRMARY on P. 7



Page 2

l, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 1965

News Around
The World
from the wires of United Press International

International
SUPPORTS TROOPS . Thunderous 852 s flew 5,000 miles to
rescue U. S. Air Cavalry troops pinned down on the slopes of a jungle
mountain near the Cambodian border Monday. Reports from the front
lines indicated the bombing killed an estimated 330 Communists. The
852 raid was the first of the war in support of the battle-front troops.
The 852 s unloaded over 750 bombs on the Communist positions atop
Chu Pong Mountain.
TSHOMBE RALLIES . Former Congolese Premier Moishe
Tshombe organized his forces yesterday for another political comeback.
The Congolese constitution requires parliamentary approval of a
government within 30 days of its nomination by the president. The
Parliament opened the way for Tshombes return when it voted no noconfidence
confidence noconfidence in the government of Joseph Kimba, appointed by President
Joseph Kasavubu last month.
PARLIAMENT VS. RHODESIA . The British government yester yesterday
day yesterday launched a massive legal attack on the rebel Rhodesian government.
The government asked Parliament for authority to assume direct
control of the colony and to impose crippling economic, financial and
diplomatic sanctions. The impending bill will give British Prime
Minister Wilsons government power to impose control over Rhodesian
assets banked in London, bans on credits, trade and withdrawal of
Commonwealth trade preferences.
REVOLTERS ARRESTED . More than
5,000 persons were arrested in West and Cen Central
tral Central Java who were implicated in the attempted
October Ist Communist coup, Antara, the offi official
cial official news agency, reported Sunday. Meanwhile,
President Sukarno called for top-level cabinet
meetings Monday to consider the economic
rehabilitation of the troubled country. Pay
raises for the military and civil servants were
among the topics to be discussed.
National
RE-ENTERS POLITICS . Former GOP presidential nominee
Barry M. Goldwater will seek re-election to the U. S. Senate in 1968,
William Miller said Friday night. The candidates 64 running mate
said, however, Goldwater had no intentions of seeking the presidential
nomination again. Miller thinks that both New York Gov. Nelson
Rockefeller and Michigan Gov. George Romney will run for the 6B
presidential nomination, with Ronald Reagan seeking the governorship
of California.
TALK REJECTED . The State Department revealed Monday that
the United States rejected at least one North Vietnamese offer in the
autumn of 1964 to meet for peace conference because the U. S. did not
feel the Communists were prepared for serious discussions. The
statement resulted from a Look Magazine article which quoted the late
Adlai Stevenson as saying, shortly before he died, that the U. S. had
rejected two specific peace offers by North Viet Nam. The article was
based on an interview Eric Sevareid held with the former U. N.
Ambassador prior to Stevensons death.
STRUCK DOWN . The Supreme Court declared unconstitutional
a major provision of the 1950 Subversive Activities Control law which
requires Communist party members to register with the federal
government. In yesterdays unanimous decision, Justice William J.
Brennan Jr., said the statute impairs on an individuals right to be
free from possible self-incrimination. The question of whether the
party itself must register as an agent of the Soviet Union is now at
issue in a federal court trial in Washington.
DISSOLVES RESERVES . Defense Secretary Roberts. McNamara
is pushing ahead with plans for immediate dissolution of 751 Army
Reserve units, despite a strong Congressional protest. The measure,
effecting 55,000 men, will leave the Army Reserves without any
organizations of division size. The action will accomplish one of the
major purposes of McNamaras proposed merger of the Reserves and
the National Guard, which Congress refused to approve earlier this
year.
Florida
REFUGEES ARRIVE . The second group
of Cuban refugees to come out of Communist
Cuba arrived in Key West late Sunday night.
Some of the 94 refugees said that they were
tf afraid that something might happen** to inter interrupt
rupt interrupt the sealift ** following Fidel Castro*s
speech about the machinegun attack against the
Havana waterfront which the irate prime min minister
ister minister blamed on the U. S. government and the
Central Intelligence Agency.

School Problems Grow;
Onlv Answer-More Funds

By JAMES GILLESPY

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Flori Floridas
das Floridas recent school millage elec elections
tions elections helped, but stopped far short
of solving the states growing edu educational
cational educational financial troubles.
Schools in Broward and Leon
counties face possible teacher
sanctions, six high schools face
disaccreditation, 15 Duval County
high schools have already lost ac accreditation,
creditation, accreditation, and the Duval County
school budget crisis is unsolved.
Adding to the grimness of the
picture is a statewide clamor by
school teachers for higher pay.
Voters in most counties have
approved the millage increases

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sought by their school boards, and
where the counties got less millage
it was only a slight decrease in
most cases.
The most serious problems are
loss of accreditation and teacher
pay raises. More money is the
answer to both.
The long range solution to school
financing lies with the state Legis Legislature,
lature, Legislature, which sets the state school
budget and votes the taxes to sup support
port support it.
Gov. Haydon Burns, who opposed
tax hikes in the 1965 legislative
session and initially opposed more
taxes in the 1967 session, con conrptiPfi
rptiPfi conrptiPfi last week he wouldbacka

one cent sales tax hike if th
is the only way to ge t eeto
funds for education."
Accreditation of Florida's
schools is controlled by the stat
committee of the Southern Associ*
ation of Colleges and Schools'
headed by Dr. Vincent McGuire of
the University of Florida.
McGuires committee said Nov
9 it was recommending that six
high schools be disaccredited
primarily for overcrowding
which could be solved by additional
funds for classroom construction.
Other schools were warned by
the committee to improve their
facilities or face the loss of ac accreditation.
creditation. accreditation.



Sukarno Book
Hails Kennedy

By STEWART HENSLEY
WASHINGTON (UPI) lndone lndonesian
sian lndonesian President Sukarno says his
country and the United States
might not have drifted so far
apart* if the late John F. Kennedy
had not been assassinated.
Sukarno, in an autobiography to
be published Monday, says Kennedy
was a man with a progressive
mind. When I discussed my aid
problems with him, he understood.
He agreed.*
Sukarno: An autobiography as
told to Cindy Adams Bobbs-Mer Bobbs-Merrill,
rill, Bobbs-Merrill, $6, is an extremely frank ver version
sion version of the controversial Asian
leaders life from childhood to the
present.
He admits to massive egotism
but contends that it has been de devoted
voted devoted entirely to helping Indonesia.
Sukarno is critical of former
President Dwight D. Eisenhower,
who he says twice publicly humi humiliated
liated humiliated me. According to Sukarno,
the insults came when Sukarno
paid a visit to the United States
in 1956. Eisenhower not only failed
to meet him at the door of the
White House but kept him cooling
his heels in an anteroom for an
hour, he said.
The second incident occured
Sukarho said when Eisenhower was
in Manila in 1960, practically on
my doorstep, he refused to visit
Indonesia . not once has any
American chief of state set feet

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on our soil though I have repeat repeatedly
edly repeatedly extended the invitation.
Sukarno says that his relations
with the United States are at an
all-time low and he must bear
some of the blame because he
began the name calling. How However,
ever, However, the basic problem, accord according
ing according to Sukarno, is that the United
States refuses to have anything to
do with Asian countries unless they
will meekly agree to follow Wash Washingtons
ingtons Washingtons policy line.
America tolerates under underdeveloped
developed underdeveloped Asian countries for two
reasons. One, were a good mar market.
ket. market. We pay back with interest.
And, two, she worries were turn turning
ing turning Communist. She tries to buy
our loyalties. She gives bounty and
plenty only because shes afraid.
Then if we dont act the way she
wants, she yanks back her credit
and warns, No more unless you
behave yourself.
Sukarno, who pulled his country
out of the United Nations last year,
says this was not an irrevocable
decision. Indonesia would return,
he declares, if the world organiza organization
tion organization were revised to give proper
importance to Asians and Africans
and made less subservant to the
big Western powers.
Sukarno describes himself as a
deeply religious person who could
never be a Communist. He says
there are bad things as well as
good things about Communist coun countries
tries countries but that he will accept help
from anyone who is willing to aid
Indonesia.
WHAT'S IN A NAME?
HOUSTON (UPI) Roy Hof Hofheinz,
heinz, Hofheinz, the Houston millionaire who
put up a domed stadium and then
helped persuade more than 3 mil million
lion million persons to visit it during its
first six months, has a vacation
home in La Porte, Tex.
Its nickname? Huster House.

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State Race Kept Suspended

By BARBARA FRYE
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Disclosure that
former Gov. Leroy Collins is seriously thinking
about entering the 1966 race against Haydon
Burns has thrown the Florida political world
into a tailspin.
Reaction ranged from thank heaven tosay
it isnt so.
But nobody could argue it would make next
years campaign one of the most exciting and
dramatic in modern times.
Collins announcement that he was seriously
analyzing his chances caught most of his old
supporters by surprise.
They believed he had bigger things in mind,
such as a U. S. Senate seat, a cabinet post and
eventually, the presidency.
A detour back to the governorship was not in
their minds and many have already made firm
commitments to support other candidates for
governor.
But those who havent signed up to help Burns,
Scott Kelly of Lakeland or possibly Mayor
Robert King High of Miami will hold off now
until Collins makes his decision.
This is handicapping these candidates some-

Russians Seek To Discredit
U.S.s Ambassador Goldberg

By CHET DI MAURO
UNITED NATIONS (UPI) U.S.
Ambassador Arthur J. Goldberg is
reported to have the Russians
worried.
The former Supreme Court jus justice
tice justice and Secretary of Labor is
making a name for himself in the
U. N., and well informed diploma diplomatic
tic diplomatic sources say the Soviets dont
like it.
Observers here have noted the
Kremlin envoys are taking advan advantage
tage advantage of every opportunity to under undercut
cut undercut Goldbergs remarks and
frequently attempt to bait him into
a personality tug-of-war.
Those diplomats keeping an eye
on the situation say the Soviet
attacks on Goldberg are above and
beyond the usual East-West pole polemics.
mics. polemics.
Mindful of a somewhat re remarkable
markable remarkable record set by Goldberg

during his month as president of
the Security Council, the Soviet
diplomats are fearful that there
may be a feeling engendered among
diplomats that when Goldberg
speaks, he speaks for a majority
of the members of the Security
Council.
The diplomatic sources say the
Russians are doing all they can
to dispel this notion.
Leading the attack for Moscow
is Soviet Ambassador Nokolai T.
Fedorenko.
Although it was the coincidence
of alphabetical rotation that put
Goldberg in charge of the Security
Council in September, the Council
did manage to pass four resolutions
on Kashmir all of them unani unanimously
mously unanimously approved by the big powers.
The action won Goldberg new es esteem
teem esteem and prestige.
Despite some pretty harsh words
said about him in public recently
by Fedorenko, Goldberg has a avolded
volded avolded engaging in personality
battles.
At one time Fedorenko accused
Goldberg in the Security Council
of talking too loud. And on an another
other another occasion in front of the same
body Fedorenko practically called
Goldberg a liar. However, Fedo Fedorenko
renko Fedorenko used diplomatic language,
saying that some of Goldbergs re remarks
marks remarks had been at variance with
the truth.

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Tuesday, Nov. 16, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

what in completing organizational plans.
There is a genuine movement in some circles
to draft Collins for next years race. This group
who oppose Burns and Kelly and dont think Mayor
High can win are pressing the former governor
with the argument that he is the only man with
enough of a following to defeat the incumbent
governor.
It is not believed that Collins would undertake
the race if High becomes an official candidate.
So far, the Miami mayor who was runner-up to
Burns last year and a few thousand votes ahead
of Kelly who came out in the number three
position, has indicated he plans another try
but he has not formally announced as have Burns
and Kelly.
The job of the brlng-back-Collins boosters is
to try to persuade High to sit out the 1966
campaign and throw his support to Collins.
They believe if High stays out, when the chips
are down a substantial number of Kelly people
might back off and support Collins.
But the Burns people feel just as strongly
that Collins entry might be an advantage to
their candidate, although they are certainly not
encouraging him to run.

But Fedorenko carried out an another
other another bitter personal attack on
Goldberg even before the 117-
member General Assembly.
During the debate on seating of
Communist China, Goldberg de devoted
voted devoted the major part of his re remarks
marks remarks to the long-held U. S.
positions on why the Peking re regime
gime regime should not be admitted to
the world organization.
Fedorenko followed Goldberg
to the rostrum that day and de devoted
voted devoted a great deal of this time in
berating Goldbergs logic and per personal
sonal personal speaking habits rathern than
hitting back at the U. S. stand.
The Soviet diplomat, speaking
slowly quietly and without ges gestures
tures gestures in sharp contrast to Gold Goldbergs
bergs Goldbergs explosive delivery and
finger-pointing dismissed Gold Goldbergs
bergs Goldbergs remarks as a Scholerlc
outburst and a polemic mono monologue.
logue. monologue.
The Florida Alligator Is an
official publication of the
University of Florida and
is published daily, Monday'
through Friday morning
during regular trimester and
twice weekly during summer
trimester, except holidays
and vacation periods.
Entered at U. S. Post Office
at Gainesville as second
class matter.

Page 3



Page 4

l, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 1965

EDITORIALS
crime
An innocent walk home from the library turned
into a nightmare for an 18-year-old freshman
girl last night.
As Barbara Morris walked between the Archi Architecture
tecture Architecture and Fine Arts Building and the new class classroom
room classroom building, she was kidnapped by two identified
men and driven to Jacksonville.
Later the terror-stricken girl was released, given
a car and money, and allowed to return to Gainesville.
Barbara Morris was lucky. She wasnt raped.
She wasnt beaten severly. She wasnt murdered.
The abduction was successful because Barbara
was walking in one of the many unlighted areas
of campus. The night was dark and foggy, the
shadows were deep, and those who witnessed the
abduction were powerless to help the frightened
girl.
It is obvious that the dimly-lit area contributed
to the success of the crime. But the kidnap area
was only one of many badly illuminated areas on
campus.
This situation has existed for years, and many
girls have been terrorized and molested, but nothing
has been done.
SG treasurer Steve Cheeseman reports that an
adequate campus lighting system will be installed
in about eight months.
Eight months is a long time. How many abductions
will we -witness during this time? What will be
done during these eight months to protect coeds
walking alone on campus? Why must we wait
for help when it is so desparately needed now, as
Barbara Morris* experience shows?
influence
fJT onight 10 Honor Court justices, led by Chan Chancellor
cellor Chancellor Sid Stubbs, will conduct a public hearing
to decide on a petition to remove electioneering
from polling places during Student Government
elections.
The petition is directed against the check-off**
system used in the elections by fraternities and
sororities. Under this system, independent students
turn in check-off** slips when they vote. The slips,
which list a fraternity or sorority affiliation, are
then tallied to see which house has induced the
largest number of students to vote. This is later
used as a basis for patronage by the victorious party.
Matz claims the petition is in violation of section
9.3 b of the Student Body Election Laws, which read,
it shall be unlawful for any person to seek to
influence in any way within 100 feet of any polling
place.
This is electioneering, and electioneering consti constitutes
tutes constitutes influence. Specifically, many students are in influenced
fluenced influenced by the check-off system. They understand
that if they check-off for one party, they must
vote for its candidates.
This is a clear violation of student body laws
and must be abolished. It is patterned after none
no state allows electioneering near any polling place.
We call upon the Honor Court justices and Chan Chancellor
cellor Chancellor Sid Stubbs to uphold the election laws and
approve the petition which will remove once and
for all influence from the polling places.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Bruce Dudley executive editor
Drex Dobson ...... assistant managing editor
Maureen Collins editorial page editor
Andy Moor sports editor
Gene Nail wire editor
***
Associate Editors Fran Snider (student
government), Dick Dennis (assistant sports editor),
Eunice Tall (features), Pete Cook (copy), Terry
Miller, Yvette Cardozo, Eddie Sears, Cheryl Kurit.
***
Reporters Bob Wilcox,
Susan Froemke, Jeff Denkewalter, Sharon Robinson,
Norma Bell, Judy Miller, Steven Brown, Linda
Rabinowitz, Kathie Keim, Jim Bailey, Jane Solomon,
Justine Hartman, Arlene Caplan, Mark Silow.
***
Cartoonists Ralph Knudsen, Don Wright
Photographers .... Nick Arroyo,
Sam Johnston, Gerald Jones, Ron Sherman

The
Florida Alligator
Steve Vaughn Benny Cason
Editor Managing Editor

; K&'
1 sMfl.
\\ I j J
f 1 '*

Report From Indonesia
DEAN LESTER
Hale
Whats in a name? that which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.
/|t hanging the name of something does not in and of itself change
nature. A college humor magazine by any name is still a
magazine of college humor. And humor, while easily sold, is not
easily created. It too frequently becomes base and dependent upon
obscenity rather than cleverness and is of a quality not commensurate
with the educational aims of a university.
It is not my desire to reactivate a dormant issue, but The Alligator
has specifically asked that I give my views of institutional responsi responsibility
bility responsibility in the publication of collegiate magazines.
My opinion stems from a general contention that students should
spend their out-of-class hours doing things that make some sense
towards achieving ultimate educational goals. As Snuffy Smith says,
times a-wastin*.
The opportunities and demands for an education that is truly higher
than it has ever been before requires almost all of a students energy
for related activities. If you dont believe it, stop and take a long look
at your own grade point average and compare it with time spent and
time lost and see where you come out.
Now, publishing a collegiate magazine of worthwhile content can
certainly be justified and the existence of such a magazine can be of
real value to campus culture and literary environment. But for this
to be accomplished there must be academic relationships developed
that put this effort clearly within the framework of a teaching-learning
experience.
All University sponsored activity should be derived from a teacher teacherstudent
student teacherstudent formula if our university is to become the community of
scholars about which everyone talks. All informal learning experiences
as well as classroom instruction should be a higher educational effort.
All official student publications are a very significant part of our
campus as are intramural sports and recreational and entertainment
programs. Parenthetically, humor should not be ruled out of campus
publications and certainly it is not. Indeed, good humor as the spice
of life is invaluable.
Thirty or fourty years ago the learning experiences of the curri curriculum
culum curriculum were completely separate from the collegiate life. This
period has sometimes been referred to as the raccoon coat era.
and seldom did the great student society of those days coincide with
academic pursuits. This is not true today. The trend is to merge the
two in a blend of teaching and learning and living in a total university
environment.
One of the changes this trend has required has been the reevaluation
and subsequent redirection of fraternity life. Another sign of a matur maturing
ing maturing university is the absence of a college humor magazine in its pure,
or impure, form.
On our campus whether you call it the Orange Peel, New Orange
Peel, or Old Orange Peel the impact is still the same an effort to
resuscitate a dying member of an old collegiate society that is gone
with the wind. A student magazine that makes sense in a modern
educational framework will be a welcome addition to our institution,
but a revitalized edition of an out-moded symbol has no place on
our campus.
Sex magazines and paper backs can be bought in all too many
varieties off campus. It is not the purpose nor the responsibility of
the University of Florida to contribute another rag to this already
sordid display of pornography.

Grumble
by Don Federman.
everyone knows that the Gator varsity is
111 going to the Sugar Bowl, but their antics over
the weekend did not concern me as much as the
freshman team. Im sure some of you readers know
by now that the Baby Gators lost to the Georgia

Bullpups by a 13-7 score.
What you dont know was
that the game was illegal.
Georgia had 14 men on
the field, a fact the refer referees
ees referees were unwilling to ob observe,
serve, observe, mainly because
three of Georgias players
wore stripes.
Most of the time when
you hear the gripe that refs
cost a team the game you
attribute this to sour
grapes. Most of the timej
this is the correct assump assumption.
tion. assumption. Sorry this time,
Georgia. Not to take away
from some fine individual
efforts on your teams part,
but you were given the
game.
Refs anderrs are only
human, but I cannot be
divine.

It all started with the ominous injury of Larrj
Rentz, phenomenal frosh quarterback, near the enJ
of the first half. His replacement was a converted
wingback who had no practice at the quarterback
position all week. 1
Well, Georgia tied the score in the third period
and started a drive in the fourth period. A nice pasl
to a Georgia end was good for several yards; in fac
this receiver would not be taken down by defended
Esmond Marks and kept driving, so Marks stole ttfl
ball while the Georgia man was moving diagnoalfl
and proceeded to romp for a go-ahead touchdo
except that 10 yards after he started running, tifl
ref finally blew the whistle. It seems our standi
Georgia man was down all the time. 1
Needless to say, the drive continued. And then caifi
the TD pass. The Georgia man caught it flat on A
stomach, a truly magnificent grab of a pass B
thrown on the bounce. Thats right folks it bourn
into his arms with the ref standing there, holdfl|
his arms above his head (obviously to relieve Bl
tension in his armpits). You would think that fli
Georgia bench went wild. Nope! They were B>
stunned. Maybe they didn't believe the call, eitt.
Oh well, in this game you have to get points any
you can.
Well, just as in the varsity game, Florida cJH
right back, only in the varsity contest, the
a semblance of sanity.
This Adams boy started getting hot
bombs. These, plus a couple of runs, and the Giftors
had a third and one on the Georgia ten.
Adams tried a sneak, made the first down on
8 and one-half yard line as the spotter indicato
Then the ref put the ball down ... on the 9 till
one-half. It was fourth and inches. The snap
bobbled, and the Gators lost. Now I assure you, fl
amount of practical math or logic can make tfl
8 and one-half the 9 and one-half yard line, bB
these refs (visual acuities being what they werfl
transcended this little fact. No doubt about i
Florida was a fool to think 11 men could take on lB
Guess what? WRUF is having a contest. You havJ
to pick a controversial figure and five reasons whjl
you want him to appear on the Joe Pyne showJ
Joe Pyne, in case you dont know, is a Mike
Wallace-type of interviewer who is stirring up a ;
controversy that as to whether he should be
allowed on the air. Despite the off-beat people on
his show, Pyne is the real oddball. His questions,
barbs, brashness, and arrogance (and just plain
naivete') remind one of Ed Richer, but Richer was
intelligent. More I think about it, Pyne is like The
Alligators beloved John Jenkins, only difference
being Pyne is an independent.
By the way, if you dont win any of the top prizes
like an FM radio or records, you can always win the
big fall from grace third prizes an autographed
picture of Joe Pyne (how about that be the first
on your block to have a dartboard).
Alas poor Ego I knew him well!

The Alligator accepts all letters
to the editor Due to space limi limitations,
tations, limitations, however, we are unable
to print letters exceeding 250
words Names will be withheld
upon request of the writer
A

H l HI
bL.. u
mm
jfl
-



Spotlight On International Education

| Latin Experts, Journalist!
To Speak At Conferencel

By PATRICIA WILKINSON
Alligator Staff Writer
Three Latin American education experts, a roving
Miami Herald journalist to Cuba and the Dominican
Republic, a professor and panel of six Latin Ameri American
can American students at the UF are speakers on Wednesdays
program of the Latin American conference here at
the Ramada Inn.
Open to the public without charge, the Second
Southern Regional Conference on International Edu Education
cation Education is being sponsored by Phi Delta Kappa edu education
cation education honorary and The Center for Latin American
Studies at the University of Florida.
Francisco S. Cespedes, a citizen of Panama and
director of educational affairs for the Pan American
Union, Washington, D. C., will speak at 9:30 a.m.
on the problems of Latin American education.
Formerly a professor of education at the Univer University
sity University of Panama and director in the Ministry of
Education there, Cespedes has traveled extensively
in Latin America and lectured at numerous U. S.
universities.
Following Cespedes, on the same topic, will be
Harold Benjamin, distinguished service professor
from Glassboro State College, N. J.
Benjamin, widely known educator and author with
doctoral degrees from Stanford, Drake and Pacific
Universities, was for 12 years dean of the College of
Education, University of Maryland. Best known among
his books are The Saber Tooth Curriculum and
The Cultivation of Idiosyncrasy.
A recently published book Higher Education in
the American Republics, is drawn from Benjamins
knowledge as a Latin American consultant, visiting
professor of education at the University of Buenos

<2 *W Ip* V *-*
cal e n d it r*

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DAMES: Today, 8 p.m., Univer University
sity University Womans club. Speaker: Mr. L. C. Cook, Director of
Special Services at Sunland Training Center.
ALPHA ZETA: Today, 7:30 p.m., 133 McCarty Hall. Special
meeting.
U. S. MARINE CORPS OFFICER SELECTION TEAM: Today,
all day, Hub and Florida Union. Officer Programs, Ground and
Pilot Training, for undergraduates and seniors. Will be testing
and interviewing.
DEBATE SOCIETY: Today, 4:50 p.m., 331 Tigert Hall.
Intra Squad Debate.
PI MU EPSILON: Today, 7:30 p.m., 121 Florida Union.
Speaker: Dr. W. E. Clark. Topic: How to Multiply Triplets.
STUDENT PUBLIC RELATIONS ORGANIZATION: Wednesday,
7 p.m., Winnjammer Restaurant. Fall initiation dinner and
yearbook picture.
PHARMACY DAMES: Wednesday, 8 p.m., Home of Mrs.
W. Lauter, 742 SW 21 Ave. Topic: Interior Decorating.
ENGINEERING DAMES: Wednesday, 8 p.m., University Woman's
Club. Speaker: Mrs. Lu Hadway, an Interior designer from
Home Beautiful.
LATIN AMERICAN COLLOQUIUM: Wednesday, 8 p.m., 215
Florida Union. Speaker: Dr. Murdo MacLeod, Assistant
Professor History, University of Pittsburgh. Topic: National
Character in the Andean Countries: Some Preliminary Observa Observations.
tions. Observations.
Ex-Gemini Flight Surgeon
To Show Slides Thursday

Dr. Eugene Tubbs, resident in
internal medicine at the UF Teach Teaching
ing Teaching Hospital and former flight
surgeon for the Gemini manned
space program, will present a talk
and slides on Medical Problems
in Space* Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
in room H-611 of the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center.
The talk is open to the public.
As acting chief oflaunchsite
medical operations until Sept. 1,
Tubbs worked with all the Gemini
programs astronauts during the
past two years.
His talk will include a general
orientation of the space program,
the various systems of a space

jkauf ~tAc (jotst

craft and related medical applica applications,
tions, applications, the preparation of astro astronauts
nauts astronauts for flight, some of the un unusual
usual unusual environmental problems en encountered
countered encountered by Gordon Cooper and
Charles Conrad during the eight eightday
day eightday Gemini V flight, and some
observations of the U. S. walk
in space.
The talk is being presented by
Alpha Epsilon Delta, the premed premedical
ical premedical honorary fraternity.
Tubbs received his M. D. degree
from Emory University after
undergraduate study at UF. He
returned to University Hospital
Sept. 1 to complete his residency
in internal medicine.

Aires and educational research lecturer at the
Brazilian Institute in Rio de Janeiro.
V* r --W
University of Florida geography professor Ed Edmund
mund Edmund E. Hegen will speak on The Role of Education
in the Development of Latin America at the 12:30
luncheon.
J. Manuel Espinosa, deputy director of the
Office of Inter-American Programs, U. S. State
Department, Washington, will speak at 2:00 p.m. on
educational exchange programs with Latin America.
Espinosa has been with the State Department for
11 years, until 1962, as executive secretary for the
Board of Foreign Scholarships. His travels have
taken him to Latin America, Europe, Asia and Africa.
Foreign student advisor here, Glenn A. Farris,
will be moderator at 3:30 p.m. of a panel of 6 Latin
American students representing Brazil, Guatemala,
Ecuador, Chile, Colombia and Venezuela.
A1 Burt, Latin American editor for the Miami
Herald and recipient of the 1961 Ernie Pyle award
for outstanding war news coverage of Cuba, will talk
about conditions observed while reporting in Cuba
and the Dominican Republic.
Burt was in the news last May when he was
accidentally machine-gunned by U. S. Marines as he
crossed from rebel territory into the security zone
while covering the rebellion in the Dominican Re Republic.
public. Republic. In a hospital for two months recuperating,
Burt wrote a series of stories on the crisis for the
Herald.
Burt has been in Cuba three times this past year,
for a total of nine weeks. He was arrested twice,
and on Oct. 31, obtained a five-hour interview with
Prime Minister Fidel Castro.

GLUE STICKS TO JOB
HOUSTON (UPI) Even glue
has played a part in the work of
producing oil. Petroleum scien scientists
tists scientists have used an adhesive to
bind grains of sand together when
sand clogs up a well. When the
binding is complete, spaces be between
tween between the sans gains are left to
free the oil for production.

I See Dream Diamond Rings only at I
I these Auth r ized Art Carved Jewelers I
f FLORIDA I
X City Jewelry Ston*
jfl Coral Gables
\x M I
JjuHLti Gainesville
Ci irnrSfiA I Fischer & Son
ourprisei Jacksonville Jacksonvilleyour
your Jacksonvilleyour Art Carved Diamond Ring comtl Underwood Jewelers
to you on its own precious throne. Key west
Beachcombers Jewelers
I River I
I Armstrong Jewelry Co. I
I Jacksons-Byrons Fine I
1 promise T Bute triumph Jewelry I
DIHMHIiHHPmHH A v Zjj Pompano Beach
1 H I
lotus Blossom o t,tti throne Tampa
ah styles shown /, ?h the" little thrones charmingly gift boned Beck-with Range Jewelry Co.
1 from Sl5O to SI2OO backed by the written Art Carved Vero Beach -1
guarantee and Permanent value Plan Duose Jewelry Co., Inc.
A jts, Wauchula
arved R. H. Herr Jewelers
** West Palm Beach
DREAM DIAMOND RINGS Krauss Jewelry 1
| for tree folder write J R Wood & Sons Inc ?16 E
New Parking Decals
On Sale; Costsl

Decals for parking assignments
are now on sale, with a $1 fee
being assessed for the first time
for campus parking.
The fees collected will be used
to defray costs of creating addi additional
tional additional temporary parking lots in
the orange grove area south of
Century Tower and the area east
of the Student Service Center.
The University Police Depart Department
ment Department said new decals must be on
all qualified vehicles no later than
Monday, Nov. 29.
A memorandum concerning the
parking changes has been sent to
all full-time academic staff, non nonacademic
academic nonacademic staff with rank of 111
or above and employees with sal salaries
aries salaries of $4,600 or above. Also,
dormitory residents and motor
cycle and motor scooter owners
may obtain decals.
Any qualified person who does
not receive a memorandum may
obtain a decal upon presentation
of proper identification to the Uni University
versity University Police Department.
New decals will not be issued
for vehicles qualifying for com commuter,

Ever Met A Pilot?
A Different Breed
Confident, Unusual
Able to leap tall buildings
in a single bound
MEET ONE IN YOUR MIRROR AFTER
YOUR $5 INTRODUCTORY LESSON
CASSELS IN THE AIR
y Gainesville Municipal Airport Waldo Road

Tuesday, Nov. 16, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

muter, commuter, border zone ami Flavet
Villages registrations. The cur current
rent current decals will continue to be
issued for these areas.
The new parking area will com combine
bine combine these 15 old areasl, 2,
3,4, 5,9, 12, 16, 17, 18, 20,
22, 26, and 28.

HAMLET
STATE THEATER
NOV. 21, 22,23
SI.OO
Tickets purchased
Nov. 16-19 from
Phi Mu Sisters &
Pledges all benefit
Dollars For Scholars.
Purchase Yours
NOW I

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 1965

Page 6

Igator classifieds!

I for sale
CAMPUS WARDROBE sports sportswear
wear sportswear and cocktail dresses, also
accessories. Size 8-12. Over 80
articles. Excellent condition.
Brand names include Susan
Thomas & Evan Picone. Call 376-
5616. (A-42-ts-c).
1964 HONDA 305. $275. Call FR
2-5578. (A-51-2t-c).
19 PORTABLE TV, $65; End
table, $3; 1958 VESPA scooter,
S3O. Call 372-9732 after 5:00.
(A-51-st-c),
CLARY electric adding machine,
like new, $100; Zenith blonde
console TV, excellent condition,
$75. Apply 16 SW 7 St. Phone
6-3793. (A-51-2t-c).
IVE GOT too many motorcycles.
1965 Yamaha 80 one month old,
perfect. New $396 -* now $325.
Call after 5 p.m. 372-9992. (A (A---51-3t-p).
--51-3t-p). (A---51-3t-p).
GUITARS AMPS DRUMS
All Musical Merchandise Christ Christmas
mas Christmas Specials NOW 10-20-30%
Discount to University Students.
DERDA MUSIC CO., 622 N. Main
St. (A-42-st-c).
THOUSANDS feet of lumber. Dif Different
ferent Different size and length. In old church
building. Will sell lumber feet or
part of building. Call 466-3300,
ask for Mr. Bryan. (A-52-st-c).
GRADUATING must sell: 1964
Skyline Mobile home, 10 x 52
custom, 1 bedroom, completely
furnished, central heating, air airconditioned,
conditioned, airconditioned, many custom extras.
Ideal for single student or couple.
Will bargain from $4000; financing
available. Call 376-2787 after 5
p.m. and on weekends.(A-52-3t-c).
THE
BEST TEST
for advertising
IS RESULTS
FOR BEST RESULTS
USE
THE
FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR

autos
1962 CORVAIR STATIONWAGON.
4-door, 4 speed trans., seat belts.
$995. Call 376-0213 after 6:00
p.m. (G-51-st-c).
1954 FORD, 6-cylinder, 2 door,
stick shift, overdrive (20mi/gal.).
Two new tires, brand new radiator,
no rust or body dents, mechani mechanically
cally mechanically sound. $250. 248-B Flavet
111. FR 6-3211, ext. 5317 (8 a.m.
to 5 p.m.) or FR 2-7886 (nights).
(G-51-st-p).
1965 CORVAIR MONZA conver convertible.
tible. convertible. Air conditioned, radio, auto,
transmission. $2275. Cash only.
Phone 378-1998. (G-51-st-c).
1963 JAGUAR XKE Roadster. Gun
metal grey w/red interior. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. AM/FM radio.
Good tires. Many extras. Phone
372-3266 or see at 3632 NW7Ave.
(G-52-4t-c).
PORSCHE, 1959, radial tires,
radio, never been raced. Excellent
condition. Jim Shields, FR 2-9410
- leave message. (G-52-ts-c).
help wanted
WAITRESSES WANTED FOR NEW
ITALIAN RESTAURANT. KNOW KNOWLEDGE
LEDGE KNOWLEDGE OF ITALIAN FOOD
HELPFUL. WILL TRAIN. MUST
BE OVER 21. APPLY GINO'S,
2204 SW 13 STREET. CALL 376-
1867. (E-48-st-c).
STUDENTS NEEDED TO ASSIST
MANAGER. QUALIFICATIONS:(I)
U of F student in good academic
standing. (2) Can work evenings.
(3) Can work 18-22 hours per
week. S4O. per week salary (S9O.
on full time basis). Call Mr.
Malaghan at 8-2966 between 9:00-
5:00. (E-48-ts-c).
OPENINGS FOR EXPERIENCED
cashiers. Full or part time em employment.
ployment. employment. Only well-qualified,
capable cashiers will be consider considered.
ed. considered. For interview call at Florida
Book Store, West University Ave Avenue.
nue. Avenue. (E-52-st-c).
FEMALE HELP WANTED. Have
full time openings for waitress.
Evenings. Hourly wage. No ex experience
perience experience necessary. Apply King
Food Hosts, 1430 SW 13 St. (E (E---52-3t-c).
--52-3t-c). (E---52-3t-c).
now
m~..~ Richard t
Chamberlain
Yvhte Mimieux the
gss. MokninG
rSZSZaftI thru
|slffTfc| TUES.
\ LUSTY. BAWDY
FILM!?. -WANDA HALE,
N. Y. DAILY NEWS
"MakesTOM JONES'look
a Girl Scout Movie!"
Y r ',\ \ ROBERT SYLVESTER.
\ \ V N. Y. DAILY NEWS
\\ ]D
WHITE
VCHCES
nccao tcoMcvt
PLUS
LAND OF HOMER'
I-3.5-7-9

for rent
FURNISHED one bedroom apart apartment.
ment. apartment. 3 blocks from campus. Call
378-4135 for details. (B-50-st-c).
LARGE 2 bedroom duplex, air
conditioners, natural gas heat, for
3 mature persons. Quiet, close-in
area. Call 6-6494. (B-50-st-c).
50, 2 BEDROOM trailer located
in Archer Road Village. For in information
formation information call 6-0906 after 6 p.m.
(B-49-10t-c).
TRAILER, small, quiet, one bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, twin beds. Fine for Univ.
student. Call 376-9864. (B-51-
3t-c).
MODERN one bedroom furnished
apartment. Pool, air conditioned,
all-electric. Call 378-3224. (B (B---52-3t-c).
--52-3t-c). (B---52-3t-c).
MODERN FURNISHED 1 bedroom
apartment. Air conditioned. 3
blocks from campus. S9O. month.
To see call 6-0809 anytime. (B (B---52-4t-c).
--52-4t-c). (B---52-4t-c).
personal
TO RUSS re Monday morning
My watch was even slower than
my mind. Pm sorry. (J-52-lt-p).
STUDENTS WHO FEEL THAT
checking-off at the polls exerted
an influence on them are invited
to testify at a public hearing con conducted
ducted conducted by the Honor Court Tues Tuesday>
day> Tuesday> 8:00 p.m., Room 306, Florida
Union (third floor). (J-52-lt-p).
services
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios. 372-0300. (M (M---8-ts-c).
--8-ts-c). (M---8-ts-c).
PLUS AN ALL-GO-GO CAST I
GET YOURSELF A I
COLLEGE GIRL 1
LAST COLOR I
NIGHT 2 nits I
L HKST **IA SHOWm+J
n

| wanted
1963-65 HONDA OR YAMAHA
from 90cc to 150 cc preferred.
Will spend up to S2BO. Must be
in good condition. Call Al, room
208, 6-9136. (C-51-lt-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share apt. beginning in January.
Colonial Manor. Please call after
7 p.m. Phone 378-3355. (C-52-
4t-c).
I WANT SIX (6) non-student tickets
to Florida-FSU game. Contact me
any time at 372-1355.(C-50-4t-p).
PUT YOUR BELIEFS into action
join the Quaker Weekend Work
Camp, Nov. 19-21. For information
call Mrs. Trimmer, 2-2941. (C (C---51-2t-c).
--51-2t-c). (C---51-2t-c).
real estate
4 YEAR OLD CBS HOUSE. Now
vacant. 3 bedrooms, large Fla.
room; on large lot. Near school.
SSOO. equity, take up payments.
Get key and move in. Call 2-3118.
(I-51-st-c).
GATOR ADS SELL

DUE TO UNPRECEDENTED DEMAND
We Rebooked For Two More Days
1 ROW BiVD. if I UA'Ly
(W EXCLUSIVE )U I
ENGAGEMENT /
'
*
)
% ?5 HE ROYAM
I
Aw J)| (Lt Sylphidet. Le CorMirt. 1
\/j\y y L V* l 0, Auror ** W#ddinflJ
TICKETS NOW ON SALE AT OUR
VMIBOX OFFICE- Telephone 8-2434
Jffl MATINEE 51.50 £ tjdAp/Ah, fln/1
Mr EVENING- $2.00 m
WA (TaxUch.dxi)
LO6-E 20 4 EXm&-
STUDENT DISCOUNT COUPONS AVAILABLE
AT FLORIDA UNION INFORMATION DESK.

GATOR ADS SELL
POORS OPEN 12:30 P.M. STARTS
1 P.M. COMT. SHOWS ALL OAT
Last 2 Days
1:15-3:20-5:25-7:30-9:40
ACRES ROCKING
OF CHAIR
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Polynesian Dancing Coed To Give
Hume Party True Hawaiian Touch

Merry Lynne Smith will add a
professional touch Friday night to
Hume Halls Hume Hawaiian,*
the annual social event of the year
for the mens dorm.
Miss Smith, or as her fellow-
Polynesian dancer friends call her,
Nacani, is a professional Poly Polynesian
nesian Polynesian dancer Hume Hall has hired
for its social.
She has been dancing for four
years now and has earned the high highest
est highest degree in Polynesian dancing
-- that of a professional teacher.
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Her career started in Huntsville,
Ala., her home, when she met a
man named Capt. Fortune, then
stationed at the Mississippi test
site for the U. S. Air Force. His
wife was a very well-known name
in Polynesian dancing.
I was taking lessons from his
wife, said Merry Lynne.
One night she was in an auto
accident and hurt her feet very
badly. They were crushed and the
doctors said that she might never
walk again, much less dance.
Well, she did walk again, and
then she wanted to dance, so she
asked me if I would help her by
working out with her. Thats when
I started dancing.
She has learned so well that now
she can do more than 150 dances
backwards and forwards. You
have to be able to do 150 dances
to become an instructor.
You have to have a mirror
image, said the pretty dancer.
She explained that when you teach
you have to be able to do the dances
backwards so that the students will
be able to follow the teacher when
she is facing them.
You also have to know a little
of the Hawaiian language to get your
teachers certificate, said Merry
Lynne. You dont have to know
the whole language, but you do have
to know all the different words
used in dancing and all the parts
of the body.
Merry Lynne looks like she came

straight from Hawaii or a south
sea island. She has long, black hair
and stands about 60 inches. Hike
to say 60 inches because it sounds
better than five feet. Five feet is
shorter, she said. Her height
probably has something to do with
her Polynesian name, Nacani--
which means shorty or little
one. -
She is well experienced profes professionally,
sionally, professionally, having made several
tours as a member of a troupe.
The tours remind her of many
interesting stories.
You know, before you can get
your certificate, you have to pass
certain tests as to how you will
react under certain conditions
which the audience might bring
about, Merry Lynne relates.
One of them is how you would
react if someone were to pull your
grass skirt off, or pinch you
things like that.
I had mine pulled off once. You
arent allowed to look annoyed, so
I took the mans drink, poured it
over his head, picked up my skirt
and kept dancing and smiling.
You cant be nasty about it,
though.
At the Hume Hawaiian, Merry
Lynne plans to do three dances.
An instrumental, Hula and Tahai Tahaitian
tian Tahaitian dance will be presented by
her and four of her Alpha Chi
Omega sisters.
UF Prof Named
Finance Prexy
UF Professor C. Arnold
Matthews was named president of
the Southern Finance Association
during the organizations annual
meeting in Miami last weekend.
Dr. Matthews is chairman of the
Department of Finance and Insur Insurance
ance Insurance in the Universitys College of
Business Administration. He serv served
ed served as vice president of the Southern
Finance Association last year.
The Association is a profession professional
al professional society of educators and prac practitioners
titioners practitioners of finance, most of whom
also belong to the Southern Econo Economic
mic Economic Association and/or the
American Finance Association.

Martin said there is no need
for radical changes in the Student
Health Services."
In explaining his philosophies of
administration, Dr. Martin said he
believes in being a low-pressure
administrator." He said he be believes
lieves believes one studies, one looks and
one grows in an administrative
position."
The Infirmary will not he under
control of the Health Center, Mar Martin
tin Martin said, but will be under him
personally. He will be directly
responsible to President Reitz.
In the future there are going
to be increasing needs and com complexities,
plexities, complexities, but I have no fear that
the Infirmary staff can meet any
need brought before them," Martin
said.
Our first mission will be and
must always be the welfare of the
students," he said.
Reitz pointed out that such a
transfer is part of the normal
evolution to an administrative of office
fice office in the Health Center. A similar
change was made when the physical
therapy program was transferred
a few years ago.
In accepting the recommendation
of the change as suggested by Stan Stanley,
ley, Stanley, Reitz cited him in a letter for
the splendid manner in which you
have assumed the overall responsi responsibility
bility responsibility for the Student Health
Lighting
From Page 1
said that at first they tried to
threaten her and scare her, but she
added, I just tried to adapt to the
situation and calm my nerves."
In her plea for more campus
lighting, Miss Morris said that
perhaps this would not have hap happened
pened happened had the area been patrolled
by the Campus Police.
If they're not going to put in
lights," she said, they should at
least keep a watchman or some
type of patrol over the area."
They just don't realize, she
emphasized, that there are about
500 girls in Yulee Area who use
the path by Walker Auditorium as
a short cut to the library and other
places on that side of campus.
The next girl may not return
unharmed," she said softly.

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Tuesday, Nov. 16, 1965. The Florida Alligator,

Infirmary

From Page 1

Services for almost 20 years."
Under your guidance and direc direction,
tion, direction, the Student Health Service has
moved from a very modest oper operation
ation operation to one in which we are giving
health services on a par with other
major institutions in the country.
You can indeed take justifiable
pride in your achievements," Reitz
said.
The Student Health Service is
run as an auxiliary. In carrying out
its program of services to the
students, the Infirmary can operate
only with funds allocated from stu student
dent student fees.
In addition to announcing the
change, President Reitz also
named an administrative commit committee
tee committee which will act as an advisory
board to the Provost of the Health
Center and to the Director of the
Student Health Services.
The committee will include Mar Martin,
tin, Martin, Dean of Student Affairs Lester
L. Hale, Associate Business Man Manager
ager Manager W. E. Elmore, and the presi president
dent president of the Student Body. Martin
will serve as chairman of the
committee.
Kidnaping
From Page 1
two men also said Miss Morris
was the fifth girl they had stopped
that night and that they had taken
girls like this before in other
states."
They never said why they chose
Miss Morris or where they planned
to take her, according to the girl.
At 1:30 a.m., just outside of
Jacksonville, the men unexpectedly
turned the car around and handed
the UF coed a small amount of
money. They told her she was free
to go and take the car with her.
What made them decide to let her
go and take the car, she could not
say.
The girl set out for Gainesville,
but became lost and wound up in
Callahan, a small town near Jack Jacksonville.
sonville. Jacksonville. There she contacted the
police and told them her story.
She also told them the men said
the car was stolen. It was reported
missing in Jacksonville last
Friday.
Miss Morris spent the night in
Jacksonville where police ques questioned
tioned questioned her about the night's events.
Yesterday, Lt. Watson brought her
back to Gainesville about 1:30p.m.
and afte,r speaking with the Dean
of Women, she returned to her
dorm and Immediately went to bed.
According to the coed's descrip description,
tion, description, one man was about 5-foot-6
with dark curly hair, a dark com complexion
plexion complexion and wearing dark pants
and a dark long sleeved shirt. A About
bout About the other man, she only said
he was tall, thin and quiet.

Page 7



The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 1965

Page 8

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PANTOMIME
Andi Alperstein, 2UC (left) and Susan Nacht, 3ED, act out a pantomine
from Like, An Evening, a Florida Players lab production of works
by poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Saturday night in Tigert Hall. Director
was Charles Harper, 7AS.
UF Hospital Naming
To Honor Sen. Shands
By BILL MANNING
Alligator Staff Writer
The Teaching Hospital and Clinics of the University of Floridas
J. Hillis Miller Health Center will be named for former State
Senator William A. Shands of Gainesville.
The announcement was made Monday by the Florida State Board
of Regents and UF President J. Wayne Reitz.
In a ceremony to be held at 10:30 a.m. on Nov. 27 in the Medical
Sciences Building Auditorium of the Health Center, Chester H.
Ferguson, chairman of the Board of Regents, will deliver the
principal address.
Rector of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, the Rev. Earle C.
Page, will offer the invocation and benediction at the ceremony.
The official action to honor the retired senator recognizes his
long and distinguished record of public service, as well as his
aid in the advancement of UF and its Health Center.
Serving the Florida Senate from 1941 until his retirement in
1957 Senator Shands was a spur in the conception and development
of the medical complex which now ranks among the nations
leaders in health, medical education, research and patient care.
Senator Shands is credited as a major force in obtaining the
1949 legislative authorization that the medical and nursing schools
be established at UF.
Unanimously elected President of the Senate in 1957, Senator
Shands served as chairman of the Senate committees on appro appropriations,
priations, appropriations, finance and taxation.
In 1949 he was named the outstanding legislator in a poll of his
colleagues in both houses.
The UF has recognized the senators numerous contributions
for his dedicated public service.
The UF Alumni Association in 1957 chose him for the Significant
Alumni Award for distinguished contributions to UF and in 1960
was awarded an honorary doctor of law degree for devoted service,
leadership and contributions to its progress.

Hall Os Fame Picks
Due On November 29

By DREX DOBSON
Alligator Staff Writer
The 1966 Hall of Fame will be
selected Nov. 29, according to
Beth Kraselsky, Seminole editor.
The Hall of Fame honors those
seniors or students of higher
standing considered outstanding in
service, leadership, participation
in student activities and academic
performance. The Hall of Fame
is announced each spring in the
new edition of the Seminole.
Nominees must have attended
two trimesters at the university,
Miss Kraselsky announced.
Miss Kraselsky said students
elected for the Whos Who in Am American
erican American Colleges and Universities
would not necessarily he included
In the Hall of Fame. (The Whos
Who selections are made at the
same time as the Hall of Fame.)
President J. Wayne Reitz an announces
nounces announces the Whos Who nominees
after their selection, the editor

stated.
Students for both honors can be
nominated by deans of the various
schools and colleges, members of
the selection committee and stu students
dents students may nominate themselves,
Miss Kraselsky said.
Applications are available at the
Information desk of the Florida
Union. Applications must be re returned
turned returned to the Information Desk
by 5 p.m. Nov. 22.
Miss Kraslesky noted that 31
percent of last years members
of Whos Who and Hall of Fame
submitted their own applications.
Selection committees for both
groups include: Dean of Student
Affairs, Dean of Men, Dean of
Women, Student Body President,
Florida Blue Key President, Mor Mortar
tar Mortar Board President and Seminole
Editor.
The Hall of Fame was started
in 1931 and has been sponsored
by the Seminole since its founding.

UF Gets 95 Grad Fellowships

The UF has been awarded 95
National Defense Graduate Fellow Fellowships
ships Fellowships representing $1,339,500,
Pres. J. Wayne Reitz announced
today.
Reitz said, This is one of the
most significant grants the Uni University
versity University has received. The award awarding
ing awarding of these fellowships recognizes
the University of Florida as a
major graduate center and also in indicates
dicates indicates the strength achieved in
the Universitys total programs.
The University will receive
$712,500 from the grant over a
three year period. The additional
$627,000 will be awarded the re recipients
cipients recipients of the fellowships.
Notification of the grant came to
Dr. Reitz in a letter from Pres Preston
ton Preston Valien, director, Graduate
Academic Programs Branch, in the

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Department of Health, Education
and Welfare. The original an announcement
nouncement announcement was made in Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, D. C. by Commission of Ed Education
ucation Education Francis Keppel.
The fellowships are authorized
by Title IV of the National De Defense
fense Defense Education Act of 1958.
UF colleges which will benefit
from the fellowships include Agri Agriculture,
culture, Agriculture, Arts and Sciences, Busi Business
ness Business Administration, Education,
Engineering, and Medicine.
Credit for the grant can be
attributed to a total University
effort, according to Vice-Pres,
of Academic Affairs Robert B.
Mautz. The University was re required
quired required to prepare a 750 page pro proposal
posal proposal providing a self-analysis of
every area of its programs. Ro Robert
bert Robert A. Bryan, assistant dean of the

Graduate School, served as chair chairman
man chairman of the planning committee
which directed the preparation of
the proposal.
Mautz said one of the most sig significant
nificant significant factors of the grant is
that it will enable the University
to strengthen and support doctoral
programs in the social sciences
and the humanities.

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Ransom Nets $450;
TEPs To Give $325

By KAREN VITUNAC
Alligator Staff Writer
Were still counting the ran ransom
som ransom money, says John Hume,
assistant chairman for Dollars for
Scholars.
According to Hume, $450 has
been brought in so far from the
Spurrier-Casey kidnapping.
Fraternities, sororities and
scholastic honoraries collected
money before and after the Flor Florida-Tulane
ida-Tulane Florida-Tulane game Saturday in an
attempt to raise the SIOOO
demanded in the Dollars for
Scholars ransom note.
Hume says the rest of the money
will be counted tonight, when the
Tau Epsilon Phis bring in the
$325 they collected.
Steve Gardner, Dollars for
Scholars Chairman, announced that
more money-making projects will
go into effect this week desig designated
nated designated Dollars for Scholars Week.
Campus Pacs will be sold again
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THE GREAT PURGE TRIAL Robert Tucker
GENIUS & CREATIVITY Mltlon Nahm
CLASSICAL THERMODYNAMICS A.B. Pippard
A HANDBOOK OF GREEK MYTHOLOGY.. .Rose
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A HISTORY OF PSYCHOANALYSIS IN AMERICA
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ELEMENTARY INFRA-RED SPECTROSCOPY...MeIoan
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ELEMENTS OF FINITE PROBABILITY Hodges
Campos Shop & Bookstore

in the information booth across
from the Hub, Gardner said.
Campus Pacs will be sold in
the dorm areas, and fraternities
and sororities will be working on
individual projects to raise money.
Some fraternities and sororities
have organized dinners and auc auctions
tions auctions to raise money to meet the
students Dollars for Scholars goal.
Murphree Area has organized a
raffle. The winner will get a date
with Miss University of Florida.
This years student goal, says
Gardner, is $16,487. Thats one
dollar for each of us.
Date Miss UF
Contest Begins
On Campus
By SHARON ROBINSON
Alligator Staff Writer
Its probably the dream of all
UF male studentsa date with
Miss UF. Now that dream can
come true with the Date Miss
UF Contest, sponsored by Mur Murphree
phree Murphree Area. Proceeds will go to
Dollars for Scholars Fund.
Enterprising males who would
like a date with Donna Berger,
Miss UF, may purchase tickets
for 25 cents (or 5 for $1) today
throught Friday in the Murphree
Area. There will also be tables
in front of the Main Library and
the Hub.
The holder of the winning ticket
will receive a date with Miss Ber Berger,
ger, Berger, a free steak dinner at the
General Gaines Steak House and
free tickets to a movie at the
Florida Theatre. The date will
be arranged at a time conven convenient
ient convenient with both Miss UF and the
contest winner.
Miss Berger will draw the win winning
ning winning ticket Friday night during the
half time show of the Varsity-
Freshman basketball game. The
winner does not have to be pres present
ent present at the drawing, but the win winning
ning winning stub must be presented at
the Murphree Area office by 5
p.m. Monday, Nov. 22.
Two alternate tickets will also
be drawn by Miss UF.

...... >SwSiMNMv W

UF President J. Wayne Reitz became the first campus official to contribute to
the 1965 Dollars for Scholars Fund. As Dr. Reitz signs his check, Student Body
President Bruce Culpepper, left, and Dollars for Scholars Chairman Steve Gardner
look on.

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Sorority gals Andrea Westman, right, and Sue Bateman took part in Dollars for
Scholars-oriented spaghetti dinners Sunday. Several sororities held spaghetti and
chicken dinners, with profits going to the Dollars for Scholars Fund.

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DR. REITZ SIGNS THE DOTTED LINE

SPAGHETTI TURNS INTO DOLLARS

Tuesday, Nov. 16, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

STUDENT BODY
UNIVERSITY FLORIDA
* *v *
OAINfSVIUkE
"w raaawwo November 15, lt/5
fellow Students!
for many ooorvlo than? will tx Thanksolving turkeys In
Just aiqht day*. Thoro will be reunion* with parent* and
friends, many of whom wo have not 'laon since deoartinq for
school In deptembur.
The air of Thanksgiving will lie the same in almost all
home* acroaa the land. And yof it will not to the samo.
tor Juat aa there ara oiffnrent noda of trana >ortatton to
those ISnnos, there will bo diffarMt Thanksgiving oisnen on
each and over/ table. Tala a. difference curries owor
into education ana can to Observed right tori' in our academic
community. ft is manifested in thy places where we live,
in the clotbag that wn wear, and the things that we oat.
hut what about tn collage aspirants in our hometown*
who have never oven receive! the onortunlly tc come to
acnool? how can thoan students attend college wnen there
isn't even a Thanksgiving turkey on their table.
Tho answer la YOU 1
This weak marks the tine of our annual f oliar* for
Scholars tunu urivu. Cor many montnj now, myself and my
committee have boon in preparation, trying to make this
drive better than any in the oast. d !iave sacrificed
grades, time, and cnor"y for Dollars tor dcholars 15t>5,
'*>/? because all of the drives orior to this year have
uroved successful in enablina needy students to begin and
to continue their collage education.
wince I*s*, when collars for icholars first began on
this carious, over $1,500,UU0 has been loaned out to some
<,>oo University of Florida student*.
This i* the real rnanasqivinq turkey'"*this u tne
academic tursuy. don't you sacrifice JUat some small
amount and nelp place a turkey of this typ* on tnw table
of some needy student.
ilncjwlf,
Stove Gardner, Chairman
Dollars for scholar* IV*S

Page 9



Sugar Bowl Made Gamble Good

By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Staff Writer
The cloudy atmosphere which
surrounded Floridas acceptance
of a Sugar Bowl bid has been
cleared.
Bill Braucher, sports writer for
the Miami Herald, revealed in a
Monday article just what happened
between officials of the Cotton

The Florida Alligator

Tuesday, Nov. 16, 1965

Strings Attached To Bid?

Florida's Sugar Bowl bound football team took a
break from practice Monday, but will start work
for its traditional match with Miami Tuesday.
Coach Ray Graves said the Gators would practice
Friday to make up for the lost day Monday. He
said the practice schedule was changed because of
the Saturday night game which might have some
bearing on Floridas bowl bid.
Graves refused to comment Monday on whether
any strings were attatched to the Sugar Bowl
invitation, such as the defeat of the Hurricanes.
However, the Florida coach said no official announce announcement
ment announcement of the acceptance of the Sugar Bowl bid
would be made until after the Miami game.
According to Southeastern Conference rules,
Florida could make the announcement at 6 p.m.

TEP Takes Orange Flag Crown

By 808 MENAKER
Alligator Staff Writer
Last minute heroics by TEP de defensive
fensive defensive end Billy Tucker saved
the day as the TEPs defeated the
Pi Lams for the Orange League
flag football championship, 25-24.
With 10 seconds remaining,
Tucker knocked down aJerryFur aJerryFurnari
nari aJerryFurnari extra point pass effort that
whould have tied the game at
25-25 and given the Pi Lams the
championship on the basis of most
first downs.
TEP scored the first time it had
the ball as short back Don Sayet
ran the ball over from the two.
A pass from quarterback Norman
Brooks to center Bob Segal was

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Gator Flanker Richard Trapp hauls in 78 yard bomb from Harmon
Wages, above. Picks up momentum and outruns secondary man,
below left, and scores, below right.

A GREAT CATCH

and Sugar Bowls and Coach Ray
Graves.
Reports received by the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator last Thursday that Florida
would receive a Cotton Bowl bid
following a win were entirely cor correct.
rect. correct. But, the Dallas game chang changed
ed changed its mind between then and
Saturday and inserted a condition.
No bid was to be given out

good for the extra point.
Pi Lam came right back behind
the arm of quarterback Jerry Fur Furnari
nari Furnari with a touchdown, but missed
the extra point effort.
TEP quarterback Norman
Brooks, not to be denied, threw
65 yard touchdown pass to half halfback
back halfback Ricky (Goliath) Perillo to go
into the lead again. The extra
effort was no good.
The game see-sawed back and
forth with TEP scoring on a ten tenyard
yard tenyard run by Don Sayet, and a
Brooks to Sam Harris aerial bomb.
Both extra point efforts failed.
The Lams scored their touch touchdowns
downs touchdowns on Furnari passes to Ken
Berdick and to Gene Kay. Both

Page 10

Saturday before taking the field against the
Hurricanes.
Graves said that he was pleased with the Sugar
Bowl bid and that the team members had all
voted in favor of it except two seniors.
I asked the team members Saturday night at
7 which bowl they would rather go to, and they
chose the Sugar Bowl.
"This came as no surprise to me. The teams
cheer at the beginning of the season was 10-0 and
the Sugar Bowl.
Graves said he wasnt surprised at the bowl
bid and that although some invitations might be
made too premature that it was probably because
bowl officials were looking for an exciting team
that would make a good television appearance.

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until after the Kentucky-Houston
clash Saturday night. Cotton Bowl
publicist Wilber Evans informed
Graves of the condition on Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, but both still felt Florida
would wind up in the Cotton Bowl,
according to Braucher.
When Florida had run up a 35-7
score by the half, Evans said,
A Florida-Arkansas match is the

SPORTS

extra point tries were no good.
The Pi Lams absorbed their
second heartbreaking loss in as
many days to the TEPs. Sunday,
the TEP pledges took home a
12-6 decision in sudden-death
overtime in the 12th annual Nose
Bowl.
What-No. 11?
NEW YORK (UPI) The United
Press International major college
football ratings with first-place
votes and won-lost-tied records in
parenthesis:
Team Points
1. Michigan St. (19) 9-0 326
2. Arkansas (13) 9-0 308
3. Nebraska (3) 9-0 267
4. Notre Dame 7-1 245
5. Southern Cal 6-1-1 176
6. Alabama 7-1-1 163
7. UCLA 6-1-1 119
8. Missouri 6-2-1 96
9. Texas Tech 8-1 71
10. Purdue 6-2-1 34
Second 10-11, Florida 31; 12,
Ohio State 26; 13, Tennessee 14;
14, Georgia Tech 11; 15, Prince Princeton
ton Princeton 9; 16, Auburn 6; 17, Illinois
5; 18 (tie) Kentucky, Syracuse and
Tulsa 4.
Other teams receiving points
Mississippi, Northwestern, Wash Washington
ington Washington State.
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best possible find and might well
be the most exciting of them all.
After the game, Evans called
Cotton Bowl officials and tried to
convince them to tender a bid
immediately. But, the Dallas big bigwigs
wigs bigwigs held firm on the Kentucky-
Houston clause.
Meanwhile, the Sugar Bowl,
which didnt even bother to send
a representative to the game, got
into the act.
Apparently realizing Florida had
Cotton Bowl aspirations, the Su Sugar
gar Sugar Bowl figured it had to make
a lucrative offer to get the Gators
in New Orleans. The only way
to have a chance of this was to make
a no-cpnditions offer. So, the
Sugar Bowl committee did.
Evans, feeling more miserable
with each passing moment, was
forced to repeat the condition to
Graves once more.
Evidently, this was just once too
often. Hurt by the seeming scorn
of the Cotton Bowl committee,
Graves called an emergency meet meeting
ing meeting of the squad at 7 p.m. Sat Saturday.
urday. Saturday. In what he called the
hardest speech Ive had to make,
Graves told the team of the new
developments.
The team had been most eager
Pi Kaps Win
Blue League
Grid Title
By ERNIE LITZ
Alligator Staff Writer
An inspired last second drive
propelled Pi Kappa Phi to the Blue
League football championship yes yesterday
terday yesterday with a 12-6 win over Delta
Chi.
Ken Hohla caught a 30 yard pass
from Spike Hogg over his shoulder
in the end zone with 35 seconds
left to climax the Pi Kap come comeback.
back. comeback.
The Pi Kaps opened the scoring
with a four yard pass from Hogg
to Mike Grimes with 5:35 into the
second half. The conversion was
no good.
A pass interference call and
some sharp running placed the ball
on the Pi Kap 10, where Delta
Chi quarterback Howard McAllis McAllister
ter McAllister threw in the end zone to Richard
Allison for the tying score. The
conversion was no good, but Delta
Chi had gone in front 5-4 on first
downs with only 2:05 left.

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to accept the Cotton Bowl bid.
Cries of We want Arkansas
were heard in the Gator dressing
room after the win overthe Green
Wave.
Following the speech, the
players elected to go to New Or Orleans.
leans. Orleans. Assistant Head Coach Gene
Ellenson said, Many of the boys
chose the Sugar Bowl just for
spite.
Evans learned of the Gators'
decision just when it became ob obvious
vious obvious that Kentucky was going to
lose to Houston.
Trying to be as cheerful as
possible in view of events, Evans
called himself, a bride left at
the altar.
Pondering what could be done to
come up with a decent match,
Evans said sadly, Maybe we could
schedule a match between the
Orange and Sugar Bowl winners or
maybe we can call the whole thing
off.
Evans left Gainesville a dejected
man. His bowl had let the big
one get away. In one of the big biggest
gest biggest blunders in bowl history, the
Cotton Bowl had lost the one it
wanted but wasn't willing to take
a chance on: Florida.

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Rifles Take On NCAA Champ

By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Staff Writer
The Florida Rifles go barreling
wn the road toward Charleston,
C this weekend with sights

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set on shooting down the 1964-
65 NCAA Rifle Team Champions,
the Citadel.
Major Harvey M. Dick, advisor
to the UF Rifle Squad and an alum alumnus

nus alumnus of the Citadel, leaves no doubt
as to which unit hes rooting for.
I dont care if it is my alma
mater; Id rather beat them than
anyone else, Major Dick empas empassized.

sized. empassized.
This years team has gotten off
to a quicker start than any Gator
rifle team in history. Fresh from
a 1282-1208 trouncing of the Stet Stetson
son Stetson Hatters, the group, has com compiled
piled compiled a mark of 8-0, under the
coaching of Sgt. Joe Nave.
Toby Muir was top gop gun
for the third consecutive time in
the Stetson match, firing a 264.
Sophomore Mikes Grimes placed
among the top five scorers for the
first time this season, finishing
next with 263. Consistent Lee
Young was on target for 262
points.
The top tally for Statson was 249.
UFs fourth best, Bill Blanton,
equalled this. Freshman Jay Web Webers
ers Webers 244 completed the Gators top
five. Jim Waugh, Bill Pennock,
and William Martin also shot for
Florida.
The Citadel awards rifle schol scholarships
arships scholarships and regards the activity
as a major sport, handing out
letters to those who earn them.
This gives the Charleston college
an advantage over Florida.

BRUCE
Dudley
ALLIGATOR COLUMNIST

We want Spurrier."
Oh, no, we'll never score on this drive."
Why, he calls the same plays every time he gets into the
game."
Can't he pass the ball?* 4
These are some of the mlssgivings of Florida football fans
when the Gators' second string quarterback usually takes the
field to guide the Florida game.
In fact the sophomore quarterback from Jacksonville had
even become quite notorious with other team members for
calling the same plays too often.
The Gators' number two signal-caller has also been the
target of many a joke after Jacksonville Journal Sports Editor
Jack Hairston printed a letter from the Florida back's mother
describing how she was so glad her son played for Coach
Ray Graves and how she had prayed that he would go to Florida.
Against Tulane Harmon Wages finally came through on one
play for the Gators just as he used to for Jacksonville Lee
High School.
But Wages is still in the dog house.
In the final minutes of play Wages threw a touchdown pass
to sophomore flanker Richard Trapp, running up the Gators*
point total to 51.
However, the report Is that the coaching staff had Instructed
the team to stay on the ground and run out the clock.
Didnt Follow Instructions
Wages didn't follow instructionsbut at least there was one
happy Gator in the Florida locker room after the game.
Other players stood about and mumbled to themselves (for
the most part) about the Bowl picture.
But while most players faces displayed frowns and disgust
Wages smiled.
It sure was nice to break the ice,'' he said, in reference to
the pass play.
I called the play myself. We were going to stay on the ground,
but I thought the pass would go.*'
The pass went, and Wages might have been able to make
another one go near the end of the game when he was guiding the
Gators. But this time he listened to Instructions and stayed
on the ground.
Wages probably won't play much in the Sugar Bowl. Kay
Stephenson, Florida's third quarterback, will play less.
But the ice has been broken for the man that plays in the
shadow of All-America Steve Spurrier.

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Tuesday, Nov. 16, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

44 They've got a good team teamthere's
there's teamthere's no getting around it. But
I wouldn't play the Citadel if the
team wasn't tough," Dick pointed
out. We like challenge and
schedule the best opponents we
can."
Reports originating from the
UF Rilfe Range indicate the Gator
marksmen are really aiming for
this match. The boys are des described
cribed described as eager and willing" to
avenge a setback to the Bulldogs
last year. The sharpshooters have
still another incentive, according
to Dick and Nave.
I know the best restaurant for
seafood in all of Charleston. Sgt.
Nave likes a good steak dinner,"
Dick said wryly. The team can
have both and we'll pay for them
ourselvesif we beat the Citadel."
Nave added, The Citadel had
better watch out this weekend.
We've been handicapped lately by
curtailed practice sessions due to
progress tests, but Im real pleas pleased
ed pleased with the scoring. I think we
can win if we shoot a 1346 on
the Citadel's indoor range.

Page 11

, J



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Nov. 16, 1965

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JACK HARPER
Florida coaches have long thought senior haflback Jack Harper could
damage an opponent in more ways than any other player on the team.
Proof of this was evidenced Saturday as he led the Gators to a 51-13
victory over Tulane, and for this Harper has been named Gator of the
Week.
Harpers first contribution Saturday was a twisting 28-yard touchdown
run. On a play designed as a sweep of the enemy right flank he found
his path excellently defended and it appeared a return to the line of
scrimmage was the most he could muster.
Harper simply reversed his field, came clear back across the field
and caught the entire Green Wave defense going the wrong way. With a
key block from Paul Ewaldsen to eliminate the last potential tackier
Harper went in for Floridas third TD.
Minutes later with only seven seconds left in the first half he cut down
and across the field to take a pass from Steve Spurrier and go 40 yards
for another score.
In all Harper carried 10 times for 63 yards -- an average gain of 6.3
yards per carry caught three passes for 73 yards and a TD, and
returned a punt 33 yards, missing a touchdown run by inches when an
eager blocker knocked him down as he made his cut past the last
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