Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Gators Cotton Bowl 80und...H3

if a- jPC
1
\i Texas': l
v J Trying Cotton
\. (Dallas Style)
Q n'-For~Sizi

Vol. 58, No 50

Rhodesia: Independence

JET CRASHES;
45 OF 89 DIE

SALT LAKE CITY (UPI) A
United Airlines 727 jet with 89
persons aboard crashed and burn burned
ed burned last night while landing at Salt
Lake Municipal Airport. Local of officials
ficials officials set a tentative death toll
of 45.
County authorities said 44 of the
planes passengfixgjind crew mem members
bers members were (entatively accounted for
at local hospitals. This left 45
presumed dead.
Sheriffs deputies reported the
inside of the burned plane was
full of bodies. They were badly
burned and mutilated. They were
just skeletons strapped into
seats, one city fireman said.
It was the third crash of a Boe Boeing
ing Boeing 727 in the past three months.
Mrs. Lyndon Day, Arlington,
Va., one of the passengers who
survived, described the crash:
It was like a crash landing.
There was a large thump, and
then we were engulfed in flames.
Mrs. Day told how she escaped
from the planet
When I saw the flames, I in instinctively

Wood/ Is Denied
Readmission To UF

By 808 WILCOX
Alligator Staff Writer
Oscar Woody Jr. has been denied
readmission to the UF by the Dis District
trict District n Circuit Court in Leon
County.
In a ruling by Judge Hugh Taylor,
the right of the university to dis dismiss
miss dismiss students was upheld.
Taylor said the UF was vested
with broad descretion in deter determining
mining determining the admission status of
students.

The Florida
Alligator

University of Florida Friday,

stinctively instinctively got out of my seat. The
emergency exit was next to the
seat in front of me. I pushed open
the emergency door and dove out.
I landed on the wing, then slid off
to the ground.
Officials at the airport said it
was too early to determine the
cause of the crash, but that it
could have been a collapsing land landing
ing landing gear.
A UPI reporter said the front
landing gear was up, although the
rear landing gear was down in its
landing position.
The worst damage appeared to
be in the rear of the plane, near
where the rear jets are attached.
The aircraft was nearly burned
through almost splitting the
plane into two sections.
An FBI disaster team was called
to help in identifying the victims.
Earlier this week, an American
Airlines Boeing 727 crashed near
Cincinnati, Ohio, killing 58 per persons.
sons. persons. The first 727 crash occurred
last Aug. 16 when a United jet
plunged into Lake Michigan, killing
30 persons.

Unless there has been an abuse
of this descretion or a departure
from the essential requirements of
law, university decisions are final
and should not be set aside by the
courts, the judge said.
Woody, upon hearing the deci decision,
sion, decision, said he will continue his
fight to re-enter the UF in an
appeals court.
I don't think the essentials have
See WOODY on P. 9

Florida will battle Arkansas or Texas Tech in the Cotton
Bowl New Years Day if the Gators beat Tulane tomorrow.
Highly reliable sources indicated to The Alligator yes yesterday
terday yesterday that the Gators will receive a bid to the Dallas game
immediately following a victory over the Greenies.
Felix McKnight, president of the Cotton Bowl Committee,
will be on hand to make the offer. However, the bid cannot be
officially accepted until next Saturday, due to a Southeastern
Conference rule.
If the offer is accepted, as evidence indicates, it will be
the first time Florida has gone to an out-of-state bowl con contest.
test. contest.
Arkansas is the Gators likely opponent, but the third thirdranked
ranked thirdranked Razorbacks must get by Texas Tech sext Saturday
to earn the home spot.
Several fact surrounding the story indicate Florida will be
Dallas-bound:
McKnights trip to the Tulane game.
Cancellation of reservations by Sugar and Orange Bowl
representatives to the Florida-Tulane contest.

By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Staff Writer

November 12, 1965

Extensive British
Retaliation Next
SALISBURY, Rhodesia (UPI)
Rhodesia declared its independ independence
ence independence Thursday in an act of defi defiance
ance defiance that brought immediate retal retaliation
iation retaliation from Britain.
The declaration made Rhodesia
the first colony to seize independ independence
ence independence from Britain on its own terms
since th American Revolution of
1776.
In a flat, unemotional voice,
Rhodesian Premier lan Smith
broadcast the declaration that be began
gan began almost as a word-for-word
adaptation of the United States
Declaration of Independence. But
there the similarity in the colonial
rebellions ended.
Britain had been willing to grant
independence but only if Rhodesia
agreed to drop its policy of white
supremacy to permit majority rule
by the black African majority with within
in within a few years. Rhodesia has
220,000 whites and nearly
4,000,000 Africans.
The British reaction was swift
and positive. Prime Minister Har Harold
old Harold Wilson, who had sought to stave
off the break by a pre-dawn tele telephone
phone telephone call to Smith, stood in the
House of Commons and ticked off
the sanctions that Britain intends
to impose on its former colony.
He declared Rhodesia in trea treasonable
sonable treasonable rebellion, dismissed Smith
and his ministers from their posts,
recalled the British high commis commissioner
sioner commissioner from Rhodesia and ordered
the Rhodesian commission out of
London.
Wilson also said Britain Would
strike back by banning purchases
of Rhodesian tobacco and sugar,
cutting off British aid, freezing
Rhodesian assets in Britain, and
ejecting Rhodesia from the sterling
area.
The prime minister said Britain
did not plan military Intervention
unless our troops are asked for
to preserve law and order and to
avert tragic subversion or mur murder.
der. murder.
See RHODESIA on P. 9

A smile on Ray Graves face when asked if he would
watch the Orange Bowl game from Dallas.
Head Scout John Eibners assignment to scout the
Arkansas-Texas Tech game if the Gators win Saturday.
Previously, it had been thought that Florida would go to
either the Sugar or Orange Bowl, because an Arkansas-
Nebraska match was considered likely in the Cotton Bowl.
It now appears, however, that Nebraska will meet Alabama
in the Orange Bowl, thus leaving a Dallas berth open.
The Clearwater Sun said Thursday that Florida would gain
a Sugar Bowl berth if it won its last three games and Ala Alabama
bama Alabama beat Auburn. It claimed a Florida coach as its source,
but declined to name him.
Norm Carlson, UF sports publicity director, commented
on the situation Thursday night.
I cant say anything for sure about the bowl situation,
Carlson said, but the Clearwater Sun may have made a
mistake.
Carlson admitted that Felix McKnight would beinGaines beinGainesville
ville beinGainesville for the Tulane game. H
However, he goes to see a lot of games, so theres no
reason to be presumptious, Carlson added.

FOOT(BOWL)

A Busy \\ eekend

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THE PRINCIPLES: Lesley Gore (insert) arid
The Platters.
Fund Drive Tops Mark
The United Fund drive hit its goal yesterday. ::
The goal was reached in a series of donations yesterday begin* fi fining
ning fining with a voluntary collection from Rawlings Hall which brought :£
the drive within ssl of its goal.
Later a $lO check from aUF professor in South America arrived ::
in the mail.
Finally a phone call from Bill Mcride announcing that the Inter- *:
Fraternity Council had voted to contribute SIOO pushed the fund S
over the goal.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Nov. 12, 1965

Byrd Resigns; Health, Age Cited

News Around
The World
from the wires of United Press International

RED CHINA CHARGES . Pekings supporters Thursday drafted a
resolution to seat Communist China in the United Nations that would
propose the expulsion of Nationalist China. But they did delay its
introduction in the General Assembly. Informed sources said the
resolution would have Red China take over the seat illegally occupied
by the nationalists. This, some of the sponsors felt, would win some
votes among African countries that balk at any proposal to expel the
Republic of China on Taiwan.
SUKARNO DISCUSSES . Indonesian President Sukarno met with
top military and civilian aides Thursday to discuss security as a result
of reports that armed Communist bands are still at large in the
capitol area. Sukarno, who survived a Communits-led attempt to
overthrow him on Oct. 1, met with his three defense premiers and then
talked for an hour with Defense Minister Gen. A. H. Nasution. Nasution
told the President stability and security in the country was much
improved, but added it would take some time to restore calm in the
provinces where Communist rebels are still present.
REFUSES PEACE TALKS . South Viet Vietnamese
namese Vietnamese Premier Nguyen Cao Ky said Thursday
he will never agree to peace talks with the Viet
Cong, even if the Communist guerrillas propose
a cease-fire. The Communists in Viet Nam
have betrayed our 4,000 year old civilization
and betrayed 25 million people of our country,
Ky said at a news conference in Seoul, Korea.
Ky was in Korea for talks with the South
Korean government.
REDS DEFECT . Three crewmen of a Communist Chinese Air
Force jet bomber defected to nationalist China yesterday and the
Formosa government promptly rewarded them with $140,000 in gold.
The Chinese airmen landed the Russian-built plane at a Formosa
airport. Although the plane skidded off the runway, none of the crew crewmen
men crewmen were seriously hurt. This was the third time Communists have
defected with their planes to the non-Communist island. To encourage
defections from the Communist ranks the Nationalist government has
a standing offer of a reward in gold.

INFLATION POSSIBLE . President Johnson opposed an increase
in aluminum prices because he felt it was a dramatic, symbolic
event that could touch off inflation and harm the nation's economy,
Commerce Secretary John T. Conner said Thursday. In a speech at
Northwestern University Conner said, Those who condemn the actions
of the government in the aluminum situation should remember the
actions of the President during the dock strike earlier this year.
Conner cited the importance of supplying the Viet Nam war effort as
one of the main reasons for Johnsons opposition to the aluminum
price hike.
ERHARD VISIT . The White House an announced
nounced announced Wednesday that President Johnson
will meet next month with German Chancellor
Ludwig Erhard Erhard said he will visit the
United States Dec 6 to state his reasons why
West Germany should have nuclear weapons
Erhard's demand for an end to what he termed
the Western Alliance's unjust" nuclear dis discrimination
crimination discrimination against West Germany seemed
certain to provoke fresh protests from the
Communist ranks.

MORE DELAYS ... The State Department said Thursday it is still
looking for a suitable charter vessel to sealift some 2,000 refugees
stranded at the Cuban port of Camarioca. The mass evacuation will
get underway as soon as a vessel is found. An official of the State
Department" arrived in Miami today to head up the search for an
adequate boat. The refugees had planned to leave the port by small
boats, but this was halted when the U. S, and Cuba agreed on a plan
for airlifting the refugees. The sealift was worked out to take care
of the group left in Camarioca.

International

National

Florida

By RAY ROGERS

RICHMOND, Va. (UPlj U. S.
Sen. Harry F. Byrd, D-Va., who
earned a reputation as the watch watchdog
dog watchdog of the nations purse-strings,
has resigned to make way for a
younger man possibly his son.
Byrd, 78, powerful chairman of
the Senate Finance Committee, quit
his post one week after state elec elections
tions elections and thus assured his suc successor
cessor successor who will be appointed by
Virginias Democratic governor at
least one year in the office before
a special election next November.
For months there have been
rumors in Virginia and Washington
that Byrd would step down from
office at the appropriate time and
that Harrison would appoint Harry
F. Byrd Jr. to the post.
The younger Byrd is a state
senator and is president and editor
of the family newspaper at Win Winchester,
chester, Winchester, Va., and president and
publisher of the other family news newspaper
paper newspaper at Harrisonburg, Va.
Byrd was elected to another six sixyear
year sixyear term last year. At that time,
Republicans in the state charged
he would resign if reelected so his
son could be named to the Senate.
Byrd also was a member of the
Senate Armed Services Committee
and in one short paragraph in the
congressional directory he listed
himself as a newspaper publish publisher,
er, publisher, farmer and applegrower.
Senate Is Surprised
Byrds resignation caught his
colleagues in the U.S. Senate by
surprise and their response was
praise for the lawmakers long
service.
The text of Byrds resignation
said:
It was 50 years ago this month
that I first was elected to the Sen Senate
ate Senate of Virginia. Since then through
the partiality and generosity of the
people of Virginia I have served as
governor of our commonwealth and
for nearly 33 years I have served
in the United States Senate.
The people of Virginia have
been so very good to me and I have
overwhelming gratitude for the
confidence by dedicating myself to
those programs and policies which,
in my judgement, were in the best
interest of all the people of our
state and nation. I am fully con conscious,
scious, conscious, of course, that I have made
errors of judgement, but I have
sought, as best I could, to con conscientiously
scientiously conscientiously discharge my respon responsibilities
sibilities responsibilities to the best of my ability.
Always have I tried to be frank
with the people of Virginia. During
past session of congress, which
was a long and difficult one, I found
that the burdens of office bore more
heavily on my shoulders than at any

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time in the past. I found that I tired
more easily, particularly during
the long committee sessions. In
looking toward the forthcoming
session, which starts in January,
and after consultation with my
physicians concerning the pain I
have been suffering as a result of
arthritis, I have reluctantly reach reached
ed reached the conclusion that I must give

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up the heavy responsibilities en entrusted
trusted entrusted to me by the people of Vir Virginia.
ginia. Virginia. I have concluded that the time
has come for someone younger to
bear these burdens and shoulder
these responsibilities.
I hereby submit my resignation
as a member of the United States
Senate, to become effective upon
receiDt of this letter,"



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Civil Rights: Feet Dragging?

EDITORS NOTE: This is the
second part of three dispatches
by a United Press International
reporter providing background
on the forthcoming White House
conference on civil rights.
By AL KUETTNER
ATLANTA (UPI) The racial
movement is accusing the federal
government of dragging its feet on

Ikes Condition Serious

By LEON DANIEL
AUGUSTA, Ga. (UPI) Doctors

implementation of civil rights
laws.
Focal point of the complaints
is the Department of Health, Edu Education
cation Education and Welfare (HEW), the a agency
gency agency which hands out millions
of dollars in grants to public
schools, hospitals and welfare
programs.
This agency has issued strong

said Thursday former President
Dwight D. Eisenhower is in satis satisfactory
factory satisfactory condition but warned he
could have repeated seizures of
chest pain and lapse into a full
heart attack.
Such a course is not uncommon
for patients with known coronary
disease, experts said. Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower suffered a severe heart
attack in 1955 during the third
year of his presidency.
His current difficulty has been
diagnosed as angina pectoris, se severe
vere severe pains of the chest caused by
an inadequate blood supply to the
heart. Physicians say the pain does
not constitute a heart attack, in
the usual sense of the term.
The 75-year-old five-star gen general
eral general suffered a 30-minute seizure
of chest pain early Tuesday morn morning
ing morning at the Augusta National Golf

Price-Hike Battle Over

By JOHN PIERSON
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Johnson administrations battle
with thfe aluminum industry over
its price hikes appeared to be all
but ended today with the govern government
ment government the winner.
Acting in the face of adminis administration
tration administration plans to flood the alumi aluminum
num aluminum market with surplus federal
supplies of the metal, Aluminum
Co. of America (ALCOA), the in industry
dustry industry giant, announced Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday night that its price increases,
in effect since Monday, were
rescinded as of tonight.
Reynolds Metals Co., the
nations No. 2 producer, quickly

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directives warning that federal aid
will be stripped from a vast num-
Part Two Os Three Parts
ber of programs unless they elim eliminate
inate eliminate racial discrimination.
Most local beneficiaries of
government dollars have swiftly

Club, where he had been vacation vacationing.
ing. vacationing. He appeared to be making a
good recovery from the attack until
Wednesday afternoon when the
pains hit him again with greater
intensity and for a longer period
than before.
Plans to move him to Walter
Reed Hospital in Washington Fri Friday
day Friday were immediately shelved.
It is our opinion, doctors said
in a report Thursday, that the
attack of pain which occurred yes yesterday
terday yesterday afternoon represented an another
other another episode of acute coronary
insufficiency of longer duration and
greater intensity than the episode
he experienced Tuesday morning.
Gen. Eisenhower spent a good
night without further pain or other
discomfort. He is comfortable this
morning and his general condition
is satisfactory.

followed suit, saying in a state statement
ment statement issued from its Richmond,
Va., headquarters: We have no
other recourse.
Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical
Corp. fell in line today by an announcing
nouncing announcing in a 40-word statement
that they were also rescinding
price increases. Kaiser Vice
President Ward C. Humphreys had
said Wednesday night nobody can
do anything but follow.
Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp.
which set off the round of price
hikes, was expected to follow suit.
We have no choice but to deal
competitively, Olin Mathiesonof Mathiesonofficials
ficials Mathiesonofficials said.

Friday, Nov. 12, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

promised to abide by the 1964
Civil Rights law which directed
that all discrimination be swept
aside. Racial organization claim
that many of the promises are
unfilled and also that shrewd local
officials are tricking HEW
Not Effective
The fact is that the directives
of federal agencies have not yet
taken full effect for Negroes at
the end of the registration line, at
the hospital admission counter and
at the schoolhouse door.
These are among the problems
that will be aired and tackled at
the first White House Conference
on Civil Rights Nov. 17-18. The
session will bring together several
hundred persons from government
and private organizations.
President Johnson, in announc announcing
ing announcing the meeting during an address
to students of Washingtons Howard
University, predominantly Negro,
last June, said his administrations
aim was to go beyond mere com compliance
pliance compliance with the law to fulfill
these rights, and press for real
equality of all Americans.
The NAACP Legal Compliance
and Educational Fund (LDEF), an
agency handling more than 15,000
civil rights legal cases, contends
that the South is resisting might mightily
ily mightily anything more than token com compliance
pliance compliance with the Civil Rights Law.
Problem Areas
Jack Greenberg, LDEG director
and general counsel, sums up the
problems in these categories:
Employment A total of 374
complaints were filed before Oct.
1. The chief complaint involves
maintenance of separate racial
seniority lines restricting Ne Negroes
groes Negroes to menial jobs although
they are performing highly
skilled tasks.
Hospitals In six months, com complaints
plaints complaints were filed against 126 hos hospitals.
pitals. hospitals. HEW is gravely hamper hampered
ed hampered by lack of money and man manpower
power manpower and the agency also takes
a narrow view of its powers under
the Civil Rights Act.
Schools At least 82.5 per cent
of Negro children in the South still
are segregated. A committee of
educators is being established to
study desegregation plans ap approved
proved approved by HEW while field mem members
bers members will check on whether plans
approved on paper are in fact
followed in the schools.
The Justice Department insists
it is working as fast as possible
to clear up the civil rights logjam.
We shall be guided by the dic dictum
tum dictum that the later you start, the
fast you have to move, Atty. Gen.
Nicholas B. Katzenbach said re recently.
cently. recently. The first step is to demand
compliance with the forms of the
law and to end blatantly-evasive
action.
A true gauge of the results of
school desegregation is neither
symbolic, legal or statistical,
Katzenbach said. It is the number
of Negro children who are enabled
by a better education to walk
through the gates of opportunity
to a better America.

The Florida Alligator la an
official publication at the
University of Florida and
is published daily, Monday
through Friday morning
during regular trimester and
twice weekly during summer
trimester, except holidays
and vacation periods.
Entered at U. S. Post Office
at Gainesville as second
class matter.

Page 3



Page 4

[, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Nov. 12, 1965

Candidates for the Gator Raid Raiders,
ers, Raiders, having speht two months in
training, will face their first test,
Nov. 19 and 20.
The unit will participate in a con continuous
tinuous continuous night and day two day exer exercise,
cise, exercise, with the Special Forces re reserve
serve reserve unit of Gainesville.
Thirteen regular Raiders, and
twenty-eight candidates will act as
civilian partisans, while the re reserve
serve reserve unit will simulate being air airdropped
dropped airdropped to organize the under underground
ground underground operations. Logistical sup support
port support will actually be air-dropped

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CHARGE: Raiders ready for big weekend
Photos by Nick Arroyo
Young Republicans Slate
Speaker On School Aid
Dr. Jasper Joiner will speak Monday before the UF Young Republican
Club.
His talk will be on Federal Aid to Education.
Dr. Joiner, member of the local school board, received his Bachelors
and Masters degrees from the University of Florida. He received his
Doctor of Philosophy from Ohio State.
He joined the UF faculty in 1950 and is currently with the College of
Agriculture.
In January of this year Dr. Joiner became a member of the Alachua
County School Board. He is the first university faculty member to be
elected to this position.
The talk will be open to the public at 7:30 p.m. in the Florida Union,
Room 121.

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Gator Raiders In Fightin Test

by light aircraft.
Reserves will organize and in instruct
struct instruct the underground in tnree
areas: proper crossing of rivers
and other geographical barriers,
effective use of demolitions and
foreign weapons, and living off the
immediate territory.
Setting for these operation is an
expansive tract of land northeast
of Gainesville, owned by the Con Continental
tinental Continental Can Company. This real
estate offers a realistic simulation
of unfamiliar terrain conditions.
Loosed chickens will be used in

the live off the land exercise.
Each man must catch his own
chicken, clean and cook it.
Coupled with two days of unre unrelenting
lenting unrelenting combat, the chicken ordeal
should give Cadet First Lieutenant
Jeff Ellis, and sponsor Captain
Hadjis a good idea of who qualifies
for the Raiders.
Ceremonial installation of new
Raiders is planned for December.
There is no quota. The raiders take
on the best of the candidates, in insuring
suring insuring a selective and competitive
unit.


...But This
May Be
Helpful
Fried rattlesnake, yellowjacket
soup, cabbage palm or baked ar armadillo
madillo armadillo could provide a meal if
you happen to get lost without pro provisions
visions provisions on a hunting or camping
trip.
You can survive almost indefi indefinitely
nitely indefinitely off the land if you know what
to eat, according to A. S. (Tony)
Jensen, assistant extension fores forester
ter forester with the Florida Agricultural
Extension Service.
Florida is filled with wild food
plants, Jensen said. For in instance,
stance, instance, one cabbage palm can feed
three to four hungry men, and a
healthy rattlesnake (3-5 pounds)
will serve six.
Jensen, author of several exten extension
sion extension bulletins on wildlife and out outdoor
door outdoor recreation, including Living
Off the Land in Florida and The
Use of Rattlesnakes for Food,
said the key to survival in the
wilds is staying calm.
A lot of people panic and fail
to take advantage of the land, he
said.
They hear stories of wild crea creatures
tures creatures lurking the woods and they
are overcome by fear. The truth
is, most of these stories are ab absolutely
solutely absolutely false and anyone who ex exercises
ercises exercises a normal amount of
intelligence will be able to survive
until help comes.
Jensen believes that the main
factor contributing to most of the
cases of lost persons is careless carelessness.
ness. carelessness.

NOTICE
I The Board of Student Publications is accepting applica applications
tions applications for the following positions:
I EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
I MANAGING EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
I DEADLINE for applications: Monday, November 29, 1965
INTERVIEWS will be conducted on Wednesday,
December 1, 1965
I Applications may be picked up in Room 9, Florida Union.

Ellis said he thought The
Freshman candidates are the best
I have seen in the three years that
I have been associated with the Ga Gator
tor Gator Raiders. They have desire and
good spirit.
Several combined maneuvers
with the Gainesville Reserve unit
are planned for the fall and win winter
ter winter trimesters.

PRESBYTERIAN UNIVERSITY CENTER ""
C
PROGRAM: Film, "The Ox-Bow Incident"
The Story Os Honest Men Os Action
Who Let Their Mistaken Fury Lead
Them To Violence And Injustice.
DISCUSSION Will Follow, Led By Dr. Stanley K.
Laugh I in, Assoc. Professor Os Law.
Presbyterian Univ. Center
7:30 P.M. FRIDAY
1402 West Univeisity Avenue Ph. 6-385 i
/ / : \
MI f I
Hes looking at
a sure winner.
See how much better a
Travel Agency can be.
;w House Os Travel
H 3415 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE
PHONE: 378-1601

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Service Available From
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SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
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1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.



Alligators Roam
Freely Around UF

By JO ANN
Alligator Staff Writer
Wild alligators are free to roam
this campus day and night.
According to Calvin C. Greene,
director of plants and grounds,
These gators come from Lake

VV/UIC li Ulli uaivc
our "simon legree"
boss is cracking his
whip again, and says
we've got to give you
gals more serviceSO
WE ARE.... Henceforth,
we will be...
OPEN ~
FRIDAY
NIGHTS
TIL 9
twig
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Specializing in all types
of Hair Styles
FREE HAIRCUT
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PREVIOUS WINNERS
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Rodney McG alllard
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Curtis Womble
David Burt
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W. M. Houston
A1 Fuller
Roger Blackburn
Arthur Stackpole
Earl Byrge
Alfred Friend
Bill Witte
Knute Kohmann
Ben Bond
C. W. Green
Located next to
CLUB RENDEVOUS

Alice, which is their natural habi habitat
tat habitat and move freely from pond to
pond.
Leslie Melvin, supervisor of
University grounds, stated that
these gators usually travel byway
of a canal from Lake Alice to
areas near Hume where they then
travel on land to the various
ponds.

The
Gator
Scene

are about 300 wild alligators in
Lake Alice and that these gators
of all sizes travel across this
campus.
Calvin C. Greene went on the say
however, that these alligators
could be dangerous but only after
extreme provocation.
Greene further stated, We
make no attempt to feed or main maintain
tain maintain the gators in any way. They
are a part of the natural wildlife
here at the University and exist
entirely on their own.
Contrary to what one might ex expect,
pect, expect, Albert, the Universitys mas mascot,
cot, mascot, is never chosen from the wild
gators in Lake Alice. Albert is
always obtained from some other
outside source, said Greene.
This is probably because it is too
hard and dangerous to catch a wild
gator.
According to Dr. Archie Carr,
Professor of Zoology, Our alli alligators
gators alligators may range in size reaching
a maximum of 12 or 13 feet. He
added, An alligator 9 feet long
weighs about 280 pounds and feeds
mostly on fish or turtles.
They differ from crocodiles,
he continued, in that crocodiles
have a more narrow snout and are
also more fierce.
Carr also said that though gators
wander across campus, In 30
years, I have seen an alligator ac actually
tually actually moving from Gator Pond to
Lake Alice only one time.
He added, There are very few
places in the whole world where
wild animals as big as gators live
freely in the midst of heavy pop population.
ulation. population. Most student do not even
realize theyre here.

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If I catch one
on campus,
Melvin said, I
put him back in
Lake Alice. But
within a few days
the alligator re returns
turns returns to the
same pond where
I found it.
Melvin also
said that there

.Tu S
on
il |
'ySk
mimm*. v V

Barbara Wagner, 2UC from Ft. Lauderdale, makes studying seem
WISE WAGNER almost enjoyable. Barbara is a Theta representative to Panehellenic
Council. Os all things, she likes surfing best.

No 'Teaching Machines' For Us

Teaching machines at the
University of Florida? Not on your
life, according to Jack S. Funk Funkhouser.
houser. Funkhouser.
Funkhouser, a former humani humanities
ties humanities teacher who still lectures
occasionally in the subject, was
recently appointed assistant di director
rector director of UF libraries for teaching
resources.
The library owns many movie

IBM Course 'Restricted
To Experienced Students

Demand for the IBM 360
Assembly Language course being
offered by the Computer Center has
HEAVY TAXES
ELY, Nev. (UPI) Dr. Reed An Anderson
derson Anderson complained that his tax bur burden
den burden was heavy and then proved it.
He paid his property tax
bill with 15,003 pennies, 155 nick nickels,
els, nickels, 200 dimes and 40 quarters. The
coins weighed 106 pounds.

UF PROFESSOR SAYS

projectors, record players, tape
recorders, and other audio-visual
items designed to make teaching
easier and more efficient, but up
until now there has never been a
separate university department in
charge of the equipment.
This will be the function of the
new department which, although it
Is working through the libraries
facilities, is not actually a part of

been so great that it will be re restricted
stricted restricted to experienced program programmers,
mers, programmers, according to Heniz Dinter,
manager.
Dinter said about 40 people had
signed up for the course by the
deadline yesterday. He said he is
not set up to handle that many as
the course Is intended primarily
for employees of the Computer
Center.
Assembly language is the basic
language programmers use to con convey
vey convey Instructions to the computers*
Dinter gave an example.
For Instance. he said, take
the code *TRA. This means trans transfer.
fer. transfer. The computer takes this in instruction
struction instruction and converts to a series
of numbers from which it
assembles a complete program.
The manager said the course
will be offered again if demand
warrants it.

For Your
Protection
We Use A A* f
Locked-in r J
Deodorant..
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All jrawr tkirft or* tr*ot*d with
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Friday, Nov. 12. 1965. The Florida Alligator,

the library, according to Funk Funkhouser.
houser. Funkhouser.
In addition to an expansion of
the existing audio-visual facilities
in the library, we intend to en encourage
courage encourage the use of the equipment
in the classrooms, 1 he said.
We want to extend the teacher,
rather than to replace him,** said
Funkhouser. At Florida Atlantic
University and at others, there is
a tendency to develop machines
which almost replace the teachers.
I'm opposed to this, he said.
All we want to do is to make
the teacher more efficient. Most
other universities have a major
department for this FSU has had
one for years, he said. But not
until now has the UF had such a
department."
Among the things Funkhouser
hopes to develop in the new de department
partment department are a lending library for
films for teachers use and a
method of testing new audi- visual
techniques for teaching.
The department will definitely
be teacher-oriented," he said.
This was one reason I was chosen
for the job, rather than one whose
background was more technical and
theoretical."
Funkhouser will also be in
charge of the record room on the
fourth floor of the library, where
students may listen to or may
borrow about 2,000 records. He
says he hopes to make some
changes in this department, too.
The five listening rooms we
have are not enough for a school
with 16,000 students," he said.
We want to make it easier to
borrow records, and we hope for
some kind of efficiency study to
show us how to re-arrange our
listening facilities."
Although he said he was not
rushing into a solution," Funk Funkhouser
houser Funkhouser said one possibility might
be listening facilities which do not
require rooms -- private ear earphones,
phones, earphones, for instance, which could
be set up in the fourth floor lobby.
Another problem the department
has, said Funkhouser, is the care
of records.
It seems as if we put a record
out for student and faculty use, and
after it*s been played about twice,
it becomes terribly scratchy," he
said.
One possibility is the Increased
use of tape machines for students
who want to hear a work all the
way through, instead of listening to
individual parts repeatedly,"
Funkhouser said.

Page 5



EDITORIAL
dollars

ts hot in the stands during
Saturday afternoon football
games.
The scorching sun beats down
on students, faculty and alumni
alike.
A 25-cent game Coke tastes
good.
Profits from the sale of the
drinks to thirsty Gator fans go into
the bursting Athletic Association
treasury, to be diverted for ath athletic
letic athletic scholarships.
We feed the boys with this
money/ said Percy Moore, Ath Athletic
letic Athletic Department employe who
directs the concessions.
Apparently it takes all the money
made on the concessions to feed
the boys/* because the Athletic
Department refuses to donate
even one-tenth of the profits from
this Saturday*s game to the Dollars
for Scholars fund-raising drive.
Athletic Director and Head
Coach Ray Graves said yesterday
no money could be given this year,
although the department contri contributed
buted contributed $5,000 last year.
We forgot to budget the funds
this year,** the Bull Gator said.
It would take a special meeting
of the Athletic Board to change
it -- and it might even require a
constitutional change.**
Last year $5,000 was budgeted
for Dollars for Scholars. This
year, nothing. And nothing can be
done.
So the Dollars for Scholars
drive, with a goal of one dollar
for every student, is short $5,000
this year.
Bui nothing can be done.
Assistant Athletic Director Per Percy
cy Percy Beard said he wouldnt favor
parting with a percentage of the
profits for Dollars for Scholars.
Moore said all the money the
Athletic Department receives from
the sale of the infamous 25-cent
Coke is needed.
The team gets five cents from
each drink,** he said.
We need the money,** Moore
added.
Graves said the Athletic Depart Department
ment Department collects $25,000 to $35,000
every year from game concessions
and cant part with any of it --
even a paltry $5,000 -- this year
for Dollars for Scholars. A $5,000
contribution would mean a total
of $50,000 for scholarships after
the federal government has con contributed
tributed contributed its matching funds.
But it cant be done, they say.
Theres no time,** they say.
We*re sorry,** they say.
We*re sorry, too, that the Ath Athletic
letic Athletic Department cant and doesnt
have time to contribute money to
Dollars for Scholars.

Page 6

The
Florida Alligator
Steve Vaughn Benny Cason
Editor Managing Editor

DOLLARS Ejy g DOLLARS £|
Scholars S scholars aJ
\Ascr MACHINE ttACB
OfKOP Dollar jjMj j fl^f
I ><

JOHN JENKINS WRITES
Frankly

A few years ago the gravity of the political situation confronting
Diems government in South Viet Nam was dramatically em emphasized
phasized emphasized when Bhuddists, in protest of discrimination on the part of
Diem's regime, immolated themselves in the streets of Saigon.
Now, within the past seven days America has witnessed the self selfimmolation
immolation selfimmolation of two of its citizens in support of the movement to end
the war in Viet Nam. It would be well to note that both of these men
were of deep religious convictions and were outspoken in their op opposition
position opposition to war in general, and the Viet Nam war in particular.
Norman Morrison, the first victim, was a Quaker, and according to
friends was very preoccupied with the Viet Nam war. In fact, he made
people uncomfortable at times with his vehement opposition to it.
Similarly, Roger Laporte, the latest victim, was a Catholic. He had
at one time attended a seminary, but of late had been working with the
Catholic Worker, a pacifistic organization. Both men gave as reasons
for their acts their opposition to this and all wars.
Probably the first question that comes into ones mind upon hearing
of such occurences is why they did it in the first place. Rather than
idly dismissing these acts as martyrdon for any cause, we ought to
examine the depth of feeling which these two gentlemen allegedly
possessed.
They looked upon the war in Viet Nam, not with a view to moralizing
about our involvement there, but with the realization that people were
dying: men, women, children as well as soldiers. They saw not the
ideological and political struggle for the people of Viet Nam, but
rather a higher moral wrong in the ruthless and senseless slaughter
of human life.
The fact that they actually believed this might help to explain why
they even considered taking the action they did. However, it is ironic
that they who were so vehemently opposed to the taking of human life
should take their own lives merely to register a protest.
But even had their deaths not been marked by the irony mentioned
above, I believe they would have died in vain. For war is very defi definitely
nitely definitely a human problem, one that must be solved by earnest con conscientous
scientous conscientous people living people. And for one to remove himself
from the world of the living only complicates the situation. But
anything in this world is possible, even the abolition of war, and had
these two gentlemen chosen to remain alive it is not inconceivable
that they could have been instrumental In bringing about a world re revolution
volution revolution against war. However, death now has made their participation
in any such revolution impossible.
One has to respect these men for ue Beliefs they held, and can
only speculate as to the outcome if all peoples of the world held these
same beliefs. But, there are just too many people in this world who do
not share with these gentlemen their belief in any intrinsic value of
human life, and the concomitant waste in the destruction of it. So,
until the day comes when all of the peoples of the world do share in
that belief, we must be prepared to deal with other peoples by what whatever
ever whatever means necessary. However, I do not include suicidal protest
as a necessary means.

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Nov. 12, 1965

thinking
out loud

By JIM MOORHEAD H
I have to swallow hard when I think of it. but
about my favorite eating place in this town i
that doesnt cater to the University, wont adverfli
in The Alligator and could care less.
It sports hard wooden booths and advocates 6
as a good time to begin serving breakfast.
waitresses wouldnt know a fraternity man
campus cop, and you can use all the napkins you nelll
there at no extra charge.
The name of this jewel, according to what
be the original neon sign, is Tims Grill, a nd iflH
run, appropriately enough, by a pleasant pleasantgentleman
gentleman pleasantgentleman named Tim something-or-other. ChubSl
Tim might really be movie actor Lloyd Nolan witflK
out his girdle, but I doubt it because he
entirely too much time behind his grill.
Tim maintains his establishment right
SE First Street from Mikes Bookstore and isnt
least bit concerned that hes a prohibitive distancM
away from the UF campus. He told me one
that he and the students just didnt keep the samH
hours anyway, so there was no point in catering tH
them.
That was an understatement if I ever heard onel
Tims getting up about the same time some of thfl
late studiers hereabouts are going to bed. Further!
more, he doesnt like to open Sundays. Take you!
hangovers somewhere else. I
Tims trade is, one observes, a cross-section ofl
downtown Gainesville. Smart-looking professional
men, pretty young secretaries, weary shoppers,
Khaki-clad laborers and hurried merchants all belly!
up to Tims ample tables and counter. 9
Plate lunches are the specialty of the house, and I
the uninitiated UFer, try though he may, cant!
possibly spend more for a meal than he would in
University Food Service. Thems pretty fair prices,
as one of Tims less literate chowhounds might say.
Its real country cookin, too, the kind I was
raised on. But the beauty of Tims, for me, is that
its a wonderful holdover from an earlier day when
restaurants were less fancy, menus less pretentious
and you didnt give a tinkers dam what the price
looked like as long as it was clean, with prompt
service and food pretty much up to your family
standards.
Tims is a real anachronism in a day of shiny
fixtures, two-way radio ordering, gaudy ornaments,
chain-store operation and grub that has pretty much
the same tasteless quality no matter where you go.
About the only modern touches that greet the eye
at this little hole-in-the-wall are formica table
tops, a tile floor, sometime air conditioning, juke
box music (turned so low you can hardly hear it,
thank God) and a stainless steel steam table.
These arent enough to mar the beauty of the
screened front doors, the gigantic wall mirror (an
old-fashioned, thinly disguised attempt to make the
place appear twice as large), the outdoor awning,
the rickety stools, the positively cast-iron sugar
bowls, and the tiny covered lamps on the wall side
of each booth.
The most marvelous touch of all is the perfectly
atrocious paintings over the back bar. They look
like BAD post cards, blown up, and theyre hideously
wonderful.
For a finisher, the toothpick dispenser next to the
register is a 62-year-old tarnished silver cup that
somebody once won in a Presbyterian Sunday School
competition.
About the only thing really lacking is a set of
overhead paddle fans.
All of this is a nostalgic throwback to the little
case my folks once ran--now long since disappeared
from the scene. The ones which survive arent long
for this world, I fear, so its sentimentally rewarding
as well as gastronomically satisfying to visit the
little cigar store Indian called Tims Grill.

EDITORIAL STAFF

Bruce Dudley executive editor
Drex Dobson assistant managing editor
Maureen Collins editorial page editor
Andy Moor sports editor
Gene Nail wire editor
***
Associate Editors Fran Snider (student
government), Dick Dennis (assistant sports editor),
Eunice Tall (features), Pete Cook (copy), Terry
Miller, Yvette Cardozo, Eddie Sears, Cheryl Kurit.
***
Reporters Bob Wilcox,
Susan Froemke, Jeff Denkewalter, Sharon Robinsbn,
Norma Bell, Judy Miller, Steven Brown, Linda
Rabinowitz, Kathie Keim, Jim Bailey, Jane Solomon,
Justine Hartman, Arlene Caplan, Mark Silow.
***
C artoonists Ralph Knudsen, Don Wright
Photographers Nick Arroyo,
Sam Johnston, Gerald Jones, Ron Sherman



H euo, HR sag:-.
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OPR SHOW VOyGs K
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By FRAN SNIDER
AlHgator Staff Writer
lbert IV was killed by a
coward. That was last week.
This week, it was suggested that the
UF act in a cowardly manner and
turn our new mascot loose in Lake
Alice to safeguard him from FSU
treachery.
At Tuesday nights Legislative
Council meeting, George Blaha,
secretary of legislative affairs,
delivered a message from SG
President Bruce Culpepper. Cul Culpepper,
pepper, Culpepper, the Florida Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission and
Homossassa Srings, urged that Al Albert
bert Albert be turned loose in Lake Alice
for his own safekeeping. Albert
would be tagged and the Commis Commission
sion Commission assured UF of his safe return
after the FSU game.
During the same meeting, Skip
.Haviser, minority floor leader,
commented on this proposal. He
criticized the plan becuase it is a
cowardly retreat before the threat
of FSU.
Should Albert and the UF take to
the woods for the FSU game? No.

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fromJheJSAs^g

We are capable of defending our
mascot and Albert should be on
campus to celebrate our victory
over FSU on November 27.
If you consider the history of the
state of Florida, it is inevitable that
the UF will win. Long ago, there
were many Seminoles and many al alligators
ligators alligators in Florida. There still are
many alligators. What has happen happened
ed happened to the Seminoles? They have
been reduced to curiosity exhibits
in small huts on the Tamiami Trail
in Miami and in tourist attractions.
The squaws dress up in brightly
colored costumes and sew, while
the men wrestle docile alligators.
We are not docile as FSU will find
out soon.
The whole rivalry reminds me
of a childhood fable of the Ten
Little Indians. It starts out Ten
little, nine little, eight little
indians and ends up -- No little
Indian boys. There are eleven
little indians on the FSU team, but
squaws dont win football games.
We will chase them back into the
swamp where they belong.
There is still the possibility of

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immature pranks being played on
our mascot. To prevent this, an
Alligator Guard must be establish established.
ed. established. The Interfraternity Council
should take charge of this project
and make sure that several fra fraternity
ternity fraternity boys are stationed by
Alberts cage 24 hours a day from
now until a few days after the Ga Gators
tors Gators beat the Seminoles.
Albert TVs death proves it is
not too soon to start the guard
and FSUs vindicative nature ne necessitates
cessitates necessitates continuing the guard for
a few days after the game.
The Alligator Guard (as distin distinguished
guished distinguished from the Gator Guard)
would both safeguard Albert and
show the UFs spirit to FSU.
There are, of course, reasons
why Albert should not be turned
loose in Lake Alice besides FSU
dangers. There have been in instances
stances instances of alligators in the lake
being shot by poachers who ille illegally
gally illegally desire the animals skins.
This is punishable in Florida by
a large fine, but the chances of
getting caught seem fairly slim.
Where is the person who shot

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Albert IV? Also, what are the as assurances
surances assurances of getting back our alli alligator?
gator? alligator? Once Albert is turned loose
in Lake Alice, he'll never want to
return to captivity on the UF cam campus.
pus. campus.
Culpepper told me last week that
he specifically ordered a big,
mean alligator to be our mascot."
Albert V is a symbol of the UF. He
should brave the dangers oftheUF
campus and the FSU squaws and
stay for the students to visit be between
tween between classes and to give spirit to
the school.

Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship
OF GAINESVILLE
SUNDAY, Nov. 14, 11 a.m., Rm. 324, Fla. Union
SPEAKER: Geoffrey Steere, Dept. of Social Sci ences
TOPIC: Changing Values & Child-Rearing Practice
EVERYONE INVITED 324 FLORIDA UNION I

Friday, Nov. 12, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

\Acard
\r cejjee house
This Weekend Features:
FridayDr. "J" Allen
Classical Guitarist
SaturdayPoetry Night
OPEN 9 p.m.-l a.m.
1826 W. University Ave.

Page 7



Page 8

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Nov. 12, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

autos

1960 AUSTIN nEALY 3000. Mech Mechancially
ancially Mechancially sound; body In excellent
condition. White; wire wheels.
Asking SI2OO. Call Tony at ext.
2281 or 372-4973. (G-47-4t-p).
1959 STUDEBAKER LARK 6
Stationwagon. $175. See at 3117
NW 6 St. (G-50-lt-c).
1962 VOLKSWAGEN transport.
Excellent condition. One owner.
Undercoated. Very anxious to sell.
Phone 376-6595 or see at 2024 NW
31 Ave. (G-47-st-c).
PORSCHE, 1959, radial tires,
radio, never been raced. Excellent
condition. Jim Shields, FR 2-9410
- leave message. (G-49-2t-c).
1961 FALCON, 4-door sedan.
Automatic transmission. R & H.
Air conditioned, one owner. Call
372-4573 after 5:00. (G-49-3t-c).
1961 ALFA ROMEO. A real fun
car. Wood rim steering wheel.
Needs grill panel. Must sell. Best
offer. Call FRB-1930.(G-34-tf-c).
SACRIFICE! 1962 Fiat 600D.Good
condition. Call 376-8727 after 6
p.m. (G-48-3t-c).

wanted

TUTOR or A student for CY 215
(Chem) and CBS 262 (Bio) to assist
male student. Ext. 2181, E. Wil Williams.
liams. Williams. (C-48-3t-c).
I WANT SIX (6) non-student tickets
to Florida-FSU game. Contact me
any time at 372-1355.(C-50-4t-p).
CYCLE CAPABLE of making trip
to Orlando. 150 cc or bigger. Call
Skip Hardy, Rm 314. 372-9142.
(C-49-2t-p).
TWO (2) non-student tickets to
Fla-FSU game. Call 376-0749. (C (C---49-2t-p).
--49-2t-p). (C---49-2t-p).

real estate

BRICK HOME near Metcalf School.
Flexible down payment. sll6. per
month including taxes and insur insurance.
ance. insurance. Air conditioned. 3 bedroom,
2 bath. Owner leaving town. Call
for appointment. 372-6861. (1-49-
3t-c).

I PATRONIZE I
advertisersl
I THEY RE A I
I GOOD GROUP!

personal

WERE THE GAMBLIN SORT.
Youre on. 10 to 1, the Kid writes
shipbuilder. 10 Homecoming ban banners
ners banners or even 10 Spirit hats. (3-
50-lt-p).
GYRATING MOMMA for party plus
game tomorrow. Desired height
5-5. Call cool J. 0., 2-9307. (J (J---50-lt-nc).
--50-lt-nc). (J---50-lt-nc).
WANTED: Missing Presidents^
trophy by the Singing Troubadours
of Lambda Chi Alpha. (J-50-lt-p).
FRIDAY IS HERE and now that
its done lets go out and
have fun, fun, fun!
(J-50-lt-p).
CLASSICAL GUITARIST fans! The
Bent Card coffee house features
Dr. **J Allen, Friday night. Sat Saturday
urday Saturday is POETRY NIGHT. Open
9-1. 1826 W. University Ave. (J (J---49-2t-c).
--49-2t-c). (J---49-2t-c).

for sale

COMPLETE SETofW.F.L.drums
with case. $295. Phone 6-6028.
(A-47-st-c).
CAMPUS WARDROBE sports sportswear
wear sportswear and cocktail dresses, also
accessories. Size 8-12. Over 80
articles. Excellent condition.
Brand names include Susan
Thomas A Evan Picone. Call 376-
5616. (A-42-ts-c).
FENDER JAZZMASTER GUITAR
with sunburst finish and hardshell
case. Must sell. Sacrifice. Call
Eddie, 378-3124 or 378-4205. (A (A---49-2t-c).
--49-2t-c). (A---49-2t-c).
SKYLINE house trailer. 8 x 36,
1955 model. sllsO. Good condition.
Carpeting throughout. See at Chi
13, 3620 Archer Rd. (A-49-2t-c).
1960 ZUNDAPP 250 cc. Black.
Good condition. $225. 378-1277,
after 5 p.m. (A-49-2t-c).

Love is more than
a good night kiss!
Morning
METROCOLOK
rkwo chamber iain
YWmMIMIEUX
1:20,3:23,5:26, 7:29,9:32

for sale

GUITARS AMPS DRUMS
Al' Musical Merchandise Christ Christmas
mas Christmas Specials NOW 10-20-30? c
Discount to University Students.
DERDA MUSIC CO.. 622 N. Main
St. (A-42-st-c).
1965 HONDA SUPER HAWK. 6500
mi. Perfect condition. 6-2709, 6
to 8 p.m. (A-48-3t-c).

help wanted

WAITRESSES WANTED FOR NEW
ITALIAN RESTAURANT. KNOW KNOWLEDGE
LEDGE KNOWLEDGE OF ITALIAN FOOD
HELPFUL. WILL TRAIN. MUST
BE OVER 21. APPLY GINOS,
2204 SW 13 STREET. CALL 376-
1867. (E-48-st-c).
STUDENTS NEEDED TO ASSIST
MANAGER. QUALIFICATIONS: (1)
U of F student in good academic
standing. (2j) Can work evenings.
(3) Can work 18-22 hours per
week. S4O. per week salary (S9O.
on full time basis). Call Mr.
Malaghan at 8-2966 between 9:00-
5:00. (E-48-ts-c).
CARRIER NEEDED. Position open
for Alligator Circulation Carrier.
Must have car and be free Ist and
2nd period each day. Pay $lO
per week. Contact Bruce Matza,
Univ. ext. 2832 or 8-4052. (E (E---50-3t-nc).
--50-3t-nc). (E---50-3t-nc).

IwHr CMON OUT! V
Jafil |J lif j 111 W joi in Inn IP
j Hits?
2480 HavHerm strs Os. 20 fftoo. FR 6-SOll I m first SHOWING I
rgret

lost&found

LOST MONDAY Ornate sterling
silver charm bracelet without
charms. Sentimental value. Please
contact Judy Moore, 1076 Raw Rawlings.
lings. Rawlings. Phone 2-3621. Reward. (L (L---50-2t-p).
--50-2t-p). (L---50-2t-p).

services

TYPIST AVAILABLE for thesis,
dissertation or general typing.
Call 376-0976. (M-50-lt-c).
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios. 372-0300. (M (M---8-ts-c).
--8-ts-c). (M---8-ts-c).

for rent

FURNISHED one bedroom apart apartment.
ment. apartment. 3 blocks from campus. Call
378-4135 for details. (B-50-st-c).
LARGE 2 bedroom duplex, air
conditioners, natural gas heat, for
3 mature persons. Quiet, close-in
area. Call 6-6494. (B-50-st-c).
FURNISHED 4 room apartment.
Convenient to University and
Norman Hall. Available Dec. Call
6-5043. 1241 SW 4 Ave. (B-50-
2t-c).

for rent

50*, 2 BEDROOM trailer located
in Road Village. For in information
formation information call 6-0909 after 6 p.m
(B-49-10t-c).
2 BEDROOM HOUSE FURNISHED,
air condition, heated, 6 minutes
from campus. S9O mon. Nov. rent
free. Call 378-3446 or 378-3603.
(B-46-st-c).
MARRIED COUPLES & students:
New 1 bd. A/c,c.h., fully furnished
apartment. 4 min. from campus
on U. S. 441. Call 376-5859 or
376-7451. (B-48-3t-c).
FURNISHED 2 room apt. for 2
males. One block from campus.
slls. per trimester per person.
Call Jim Hodge at FR 6-9345 or
see at 1602 NWI Ave.(B-47-4t-p).

GAINESVILLE
GOLF DRIVING
RANGE
U.S. 441 N. & 51st Ave.
OPEN
Weekdays, Sun., 1-7
Saturdays All Day
Mornings & Evenings
By Appointment
Ph. 372-7066



folk music most popular

Dylan,

If you had to pick the most popu popular
lar popular music on campus, what would
you pick? Rock-n-roll? Jazz?
Folk? Classical?
If you picked folk music you're
almost right.
Rock is the basic beat, but the
basic trend (in music) is folk
rock," said Bob Novogroski, co coowner
owner coowner of Top Tunes Record Shop,
1119 W. University Avenue.
Chuck Ansell, owner of the Re Record
cord Record Bar, 923 W. University Av Avenue,
enue, Avenue, agreed with Novogroski that
folk music is big on the UF campus.
Artists like Bob Dylan and Joan
Baez are bothbig sellers," he said.

bw i gteri Ten...
vj^UyJpLJkliuLij^U
DOORS OPEN 12:30 P.M. STARTS
1 P.M CONT. SHOWS ALL DAY
NOW*
NO ONE MAY
ENTER THE
THEATRE
AFTER
JAM
-K ......
THE MIRISCH CORPORATION P-pfwS
*J LEE THOMPSON Poducton I
STARRING
MAXIMILIAN I SAMANTHA I INGRID
SCHELL I EGGAR ITHULIN
Ashes
A Jowmey Into The DiabaKcal!
1:15-3:20-5:25-7:30-9:40
ACRES ROCKING
OF CHAIR |
FREE SMOKING
PARKING LOGE
SATURDAY' MORNING
ONLY
FROM 10:30 to 2 P.M.
2 HITS I +
THE |
GIANT* KILLER I
W And Cartoons W
CHILDREN WILL NOT
*1 PERMITTED TO STAY
AFTER TEEN SHOW.

Baez Big Sellers

Both record stores cater to
mostly university students.
Between 70 and 80 per cent of
our regular customers are college
students," Ansell said.
"The young market accepts and
sets the trends," said Novogroski.
He estimated that his biggest per percentage
centage percentage of customers are in the
16-26 year old age bracket," and
added that he "wouldnt have are-

Rhodesia
From Page 1
Wilson thus touched on two of
the far-reaching and serious im implications
plications implications of the declaration that
cut the south central African
country off from the motherland.
In his warnings against a
Unilateral Declaration of Inde Independence
pendence Independence UDI during negotiations
over the last several weeks, the
Prime Minister had said that it
might touch off African uprisings
leading to bloodshed and wide widespread
spread widespread killings. But in Salisbury
officials saw little chance of a
Congo-like period of chaos because
most nationalist leaders are under
detention, the black Africans are
segregated, and the Rhodesian
army is strong, expertly trained,
and well armed.
On the international scene the
Rhodesian action drew condemna condemnation
tion condemnation from most of the world in including
cluding including the Soviet Union which has
threatened to lend support to
nationalist movements within an
independent Rhodesia. Such action
could turn the country into a new
cold war testing ground.
In the capital of Salisbury, a city
of modest sized skyscrapers,
roomy tree-lined streets, and
314,000 persons the independence
declaration was accepted calmly.
The streets were nearly de deserted
serted deserted as people crowded into
homes, shops, cases, and bars to
listen to the premier make his his historic
toric historic declaration that ended with
the words, "God save the queen".

A modern legend of love, passion and violence
amidst the splendor of Carnival in Rio!
I IfIJMSTOTei
HUSiIjZIJH ends"sat, 1
1,3,5,7,9
Plus
ORANGE
(S'K £o & BLUE
I USnUNCOUM
Storis//'*/
CnnilaU iT "Makes'TOM JONES'look /[
J UIIQ Os i like a Girl Scout Movie! (
" R 6 ERT SYLVESTER, £?*&*
I*O C kg* N. Y. DAILY NEWS £
7 9 £#-- "THE SEXUAL
"land"of \\ FIT )f
I HOMER. /\, // THICK AND FAST! sit
~|V
I FILM!" WANDA
MR* N Y DAILY NEWS
| *** 0 'Jf
| PAOLO FERRARI ANOUK AIMEE GRAZIELLA 6RANAIA SANDRA MILO

cord shop in any town other than a
college town."
Just how big the trend to folk
rock is at the UF can be roughly
estimated by the sales of both
stores.
"Our sales are divided mostly
between rock, international and
classics," Novogroski said "with
the major emphasis on folk rock,
or the currently popular protest
songs."
"Jazz, however, is on a steady
decline. Many promising and
talented artists are coming along,
but due to a lack of proper exposure
they don't make it," he said.
Ansell estimated that "one-third
of our sales is folk rock and one
third classical," but he disagrees
with Novogroski concerning the
trends in jazz.
"Eight to twelve per cent of our
sales and one third of our stock is
jazz," he said. "Jazz is still going
strong. If it wasn't, we wouldn't
stock so much."
What makes or breaks and artist
and a new album?
"It's the exposure the artist re receives,"
ceives," receives," Novogroski said, and the
ability of the stores to detect a
trend and meet the demands of the
individual."
"It depends on several things,"
Ansell said, "the cover of the al album,
bum, album, the attention or build-up of
the new artist and, mostly, the
music.
"For instance, the Simon and
Garfinkle album suddenly caught on
in Gainesville this summer and
people started buying it, but it had
been introduced over a year ago.
It just had to wait for the trend to
catch up to it."
For the die-hard fan who asks,
"What about the Beatles?" Ansell
and Novogroski both agree that the
Beatles still maintain their high
sales.
Although the Beatles continue to
occupy their sales status the trend
is definitely towards folk rock.
But after folk rock wears out its
welcome, who knows what is next?
Anyone for Bach?

'4-Legged Type 9 Pigs\
Really Intelligent j

Actually pigs are quite Intelligent. They're pretty smart but can
be outsmarted," explains Dr. Harold D. Wallace, professor of animal
nutrition and head of swine research in the School of Agriculture.
Yes, they have a personality but it's mainly concerned with eating.
They'll do anything for food but once tamed they're nice pets."

WALLACE

For the past 16 years, he's been employed at the UF teaching animal
science and specializing in swine production. Animal science involves
the feeding and management of animals.
It is much more involved than it appears on the surface being a
broad field entailing all areas of agriculture. At UP' were mainly
concerned with giving farmers the techniques to produce and raise
animals properly."
Besides teaching, Dr. Wallace engages in swine research. In 1962
he won the Feed Manufacture Award presented by the Feed Manufacture
Association based on his three years of research in swine nutrition
concerning different feed mixtures. Occasionally he and his colleagues
advise representatives from feed companies.

Woody Refused

From Page 1
been considered. All the court did
was reaffirm the university's right
to expell me. It should have looked
deeper into the reasons I was ex expelled,
pelled, expelled, Woody said.
Eugene E. Grissom, head of the
Art Department, expressed con concern
cern concern over the decision given the
former Art student.
If this case had been decided
the other way, the whole structure
of university administration would
have been upset, Grissom said.
This gives us a feeling of relief
in dealing with cases such as
these, he said.
Acknowledging Woody's wish to
appeal the decision, the Art De Department
partment Department director said, Woody
has every right to appeal. We'll
have to wait and see about that.
Richard Wilson, Woody's attor attorney,
ney, attorney, said he thinks Woody has a
good chance on appeal.

TONIGHT AND SATURDAY*
OUTSTANDING*
COLOR hits:!
I HIT #1 John Wayne
Sophia Lorenl
1 LEGEND OF THE LOST
I HIT #2 Tony Curtis
I Frank Sinatra
KINGS GO FORTH
I HIT #3 Sylvia Symsl
| Louis JourdanH
I AMAZONS OF ROME**
| STARTING SUNDAY 1
1 John Wayne Dean Martin
I SONS OF KATIE ELDER
I plus I
I GET YOURSELF I
I A COLLEGE GIRL H

Friday, Nov. 12, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

By SUSAN FROEMKE
Alligator Staff Writer

Reared on a small farm in Illi Illinois,
nois, Illinois, Dr. Wallace has always been
conscientious of an agricultural
atmosphere. Im from a big
family where everyone had to work
lve milked plenty of cows.
It was the 4-H Club and Future
Farmers of America which en encouraged
couraged encouraged me to work in agriculture
and stay in school. For farm kids
in small communities, the 4-H is
a wonderful opportunity for them
to make outside contacts through
fairs and conventions. Its training
broadens a persons background in
a field."
After high school, Dr. Wallace
attended the University of Illinois
earning a B. S. in agriculture and
M. S. in animal science. Following
three years of Navy service at
Pearl Harbor, he went to Cornell
and received his Ph.D. in animal
nutrition and biochemistry in 1950.

I feel Judge Taylor made an
error in his ruling, Wilson said.
Woody's expulsion came from a
faculty disciplinary committee's
ruling that was backed up by the
Board of Regents and the Board
of Education. Wilson explained that
the original reasons of Woody's
dismissal have not been reviewed,
only backed up.
Wilson said the university de defines
fines defines unsuccessful academic
achievement as punishable only
after the student has had one tri trimester
mester trimester after the unsuccessful
term to better his progress.
University authorities said
Woody was dismissed after failure
to take a prescribed course prompt prompted
ed prompted his college to enter unsatis unsatisfactory
factory unsatisfactory academic achievementon
his record.
In the ruling, Taylor points out
that Woody was not heard before
the Faculty Committee of the Col College
lege College of Architecture and Fine Arts,
but he was heard before the Board
of Regents and the Board of Edu Education.
cation. Education.
This affords ample adminis administrative
trative administrative due process of law, the
judge said.
Considering Woody's alteration
of a registration card, Taylor said,
Forgery is a serious offense.
It requires little imagination to
visualize the demoralizing effect
of a holding that a university is
powerless to punish by expulsion
those persons who engage in such
conduct, his decision reads.
Wilson agreed that the university
must have the right to expel those
who depart from requirements of
law, but Woody was not present
at the disciplinary committee's
meeting and therefore had no
chance to defend himself,''he said.
Woody, who had been trying to
re-register since 1963, brought the
court action against the UF this
summer. He now works in Pensa Pensacola
cola Pensacola and plans to go to the U. S.
Supreme Court in his effort to
attend the UF if necessary.

Page 9



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Nov. 12, 1965

Page 10

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MICROWAVE: Signal to
Jax.

By WINIFRED K. VASS
Alligator Staff Writer
Big noises come from Florida
Field even on days when theres
no football game.
The voice of WUFT Channel 5,
housed in the Stadium Building, can
be heard in 11 Central Florida
counties as well as in Jacksonville,
byway of a Commission-built mi microwave
crowave microwave unit.
The state-owned, university universityoperated
operated universityoperated television station is the
only television station within its
primary coverage area. Counties
in this north central Florida area
receive commercial television but
they are not in the primary ser service
vice service area of any commercial
station.
WUFT is also unique in its or organization
ganization organization which is an unusual
Faculty-Staff combination. At
present this staff of 10 is under
the direction of Dr. Kenneth A.
Christiansen, former Program
Manager of the National Educa Educational
tional Educational Television and Radio Center.
Each member of the staff is res responsible
ponsible responsible for teaching as well as
for performing a television staff
function. The staff includes Pro Producer-Directors
ducer-Directors Producer-Directors and Directors of
Film, News and Information, all
of whom teach courses in Radio
and Television production and
Radio/TV News, Writing, Adver Advertising
tising Advertising and Programming.
Air time has increased greatly
over the years since the station
first signed on the air on Nov. 10,
1958. Two courses, French and
Survey of Mass Communica Communications,
tions, Communications, were offered the first year,
with the first short course on
Teaching through Television
taught during the summer.
In 1959-60 air time covered 42
hours of programming per week.
A Ford Foundation Grant of
$52,000 freed professors for full fulltime
time fulltime television lecturing. A video videotape
tape videotape grant of SIO,OOO from the
Minnesota Mining and Manufactur Manufacturing
ing Manufacturing Company combined with 281
hours of tape from the Educational
Television Commission made
WUFT the largest broadcast user
of videotape in the Southeast.
Recent figures giving the num number
ber number of UF students benefiting from
closed circuit television classes
show that during the third tri trimester
mester trimester of 1963-64 a total of 173
students attended such classes.
During the first trimester of 1964-
65, the total was 2,287. Now in the
first trimester of the 1965-66
school year, 2,311 students are
currently in closed circuit tele television
vision television classes in Journalism,
Library Science, Mathematics and
Botany.
McCarty Hall, Norman Hall, and
P. K. Yonge are tied to WUFT
facilities by coaxial cable.
A recent study made by Mathe Mathematics
matics Mathematics professor Dr. William A.
Gager shows that $36,459 has been
saved by the use of television in instruction
struction instruction of Mathematics 205 and
109 during Trimester I, 1964, and
Trimester n, 1965.
In the public school system,
20,000 elementary school students

Wuf t

in five counties of the WUFT
broadcast area benefit by class
instruction by television in
Spanish, Arithmetic, Science, Phy Physical
sical Physical Education, Reading and Art.
High School Social Studies are
being taught in addition.
A quarter-hour report of news,
sports and weather each night of
the week provides the Gainesville
area with its only localized tele television
vision television news service.

The Station With^^^^^H
The
Stadium Studio

nj
HI IHI
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1111 l fff JH
ii 11 ij
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THE STARS: Ted Burrows.(L), Bob Estes
; a wr UIR
jsplXk. wrsmr
I HMHHP
CONTROL ROOM: Bernadette Castro
VIDEO TAPE: Wayne Stephen adjusts

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iiiiili Tgn m w X
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Wm up
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CAMERMAN: Bob Diambrose, 4JM

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LADDERMAN: Gene
Blackwood eyes from the
sky



Woung Coeds Beware
I UF Male 'Wants You!

By BRAD SAWTELL
Alligator Staff Writer
If a Florida man needs no intro introuction,
uction, introuction, how does he meet the
[weet, young coed he seems to be
ionstantly talking about?
Houdini and his bag of tricks

I Village Square
I COIN LAUNDRY
I GAINESVILLES ONLY LAUNDRY THAT'S
I NEAR CAMPUS ON THE SOUTHWEST SIDE
I FEATURING
6E Washers Double Washers
I New Moisture-Matic Dryers
I SAFE FOR ALL FABRICS
I Open from 6 a.m. to midnight. Attendant on duty
I from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Village Square Coin Laun-
I dry is southwest of town at 2411 SW 13th (U.S. 441)

l / Jm vTSfShv n <£f
YJSsIP
I,>T' : JpUbL \ v iw--t
*- j jjtff i ": x 4|)
? # : v* v --A?i
T F
: I S\ /~f 1 : ;
inSi en I \ \ /Created with love
marine, g j > for those in love ..
f DREAM DIAMONDS 1
V Mfe&C'nC ''vywMz/ty/. '<' \ \-afl

/*.?" .' "J dumurj UU .<.)*;' .' '- X *'- \
since IHSO.
So lovely so NEW just
the ring for you 1 See
f CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE
m 4
I# FOR THOSE WHO CARE .
tIT I I I I PHONE 376 *2655
|| 1,1 L n m IK H h 103 WEST UNIVERSITY
b IyILLTUinJiuUDUX avenue
, >ic .** <£.* .' v ~:/ Authored Je-eier >: ; "'' *' '^ -''

has nothing on the average UF
male. The Florida man has a ware warehouse
house warehouse of tricks designed to ensnare
the choice coed.
Church work seems to fill a
romantic as well as a religious
need for the Florida male, accord according

ing according to Joseph G. Pace, 2UC. Pace
says that church youth groups are
good mixers and allow coeds and
men to meet each other without
anyone appearing forward."
In the opinion of Ronald G.
Darner, 7EG, Getting fixed up
with a blind date is a good way to
meet a girl but you have to trust
the person getting you the date."
*l wouldn't let just anybody fix
me up. It's too easy to get stuck
with a real loser," Darner ex explained.
plained. explained.
Tim A. Johnson, 3AS, says that
he meets many girls through poli politics
tics politics and working on student govern government
ment government projects.
Just the other day at the booth
where we were selling Campus
Pacs I met two really tough girls,"
Johnson said.
Fraternity socials with soror sororities
ities sororities are prime hunting grounds,
according to Walter R. Farrar,
lUC.
When you have a good selec selection
tion selection of sharp girls over at the
house, it's practically Impossible
not to make some good contacts
unless you lock yourself in a closet
or something," Farrar said.
One of the more popular methods
of meeting girls is to become ac acquainted
quainted acquainted in class. Some men notice
a girl in a class and then check
the role to find out her name.
After that, the enterprising male
looks up the girl's name in the
student directory and calls her for
a date.
Robert W. Mead, 3AS, claims
that this tactic is very successful,
and has really some interesting
results."
Neil F. MacMillan, ILW, says
that he has good luck meeting coeds
at the bars.
Everybody has had a little to
drink and all the stiffness and for formality
mality formality is gone. Its much easier
to make friends under these cir circumstance,"
cumstance," circumstance," MacMillan grinned.

fratepnally
peaking

A candle-light service was the scene as the Alpha Epsilon Pi's
installed their first group of Little Sisters of the Golden Lion"
Monday night. This is the first Jewish fraternity to have a little
sister group. The advisor for the group is Matt Schneider.
According to Schneider, the purpose of the group is to add
warmth and femininity to the house. Each girl will be assigned
a pledge they will be big sisters to. The girls will govern their
own group.
The little sisters are: (DPhiEs) Peggy Rabinovitz, Susan
Mazur, Maddi Levine, Lois Parks, Sandy Levitz, Barbara Tepper,
Janie Phillips, and Linda Rabinowitz. (AEPhi's) Happy Arkln,
Bev Setzer, Sherry Segerman, Ann Jarrett, and Sandy Lefkoff.
Linda Ullrich (Zeta), and Kandee Nash, Andra Aronowitz, and
Andrea Jantel, non-affiliated.
The Sigma Kappa's took fruit baskets to the Odd Fellows Home
Sunday. They defeated AChiO to win the sorority volleyball
championship for the second year. Tuesday night was Founders
Day where alumnae were invited to dinner.
Pikes are having date night tonight when their probation is
ended. Saturday night they feature the "Trademarks" after the
game and at their party later in the evening.

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Four sororities are throwing dinner parties Sunday to raise dollars
for scholars. Above Pam Ohman, ADP; Gigi Gaztambide, KD; and Sue
Dygon, DDD, vie for a ticket sale with Pres. J. Wayne Reitz. KD, DDD,
and KAT will serve spaghetti dinners from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. for a
dollars. ADP will deliver Kentucky Fried Chicken all day for $1.25;
the number to call is FR 2-9489.

Reserve Open House Sunday

Open House will again be observed at Gainesvilles U. S. Army
Reserve Armory, Sunday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Members of the 3396th Reception Station will be busy preparing
for a visit Monday night by Fourth Reserve Corps Inspector General
representative on his annual appraisal of the units organization and
performance.
But members of the unit recruiting team, headed by Capt. Bill
Fleming, will be available to talk with young men between the ages
If 17-1/2 and 26, interested in the Reserves 4-6-month active duty
program.
With draft calls on the upswing, Interest in the program has surged
recently, particularly among college students and married men.

Night
FRIDAY All Tha Fi*
. You Con Eat,
OLD-FASHIONED Hu* Fuppi>,
FISH NIGHT Cola Slow 97<
5 PM 9 PM
Fra* Codor Kay Fl*
LARRYS
Restaurant
1225 W. Univ. Avm. 372-6666

Friday, Nov. 12, 1965, The Florida Alligator.

By JUDY MILLER
Alligator Staff Writer

Page 11



Page 12

2, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Nov. 12, 1965

Joy in the Morning should be followed by a sequel movie,
Asinine in the Afternoon.
For indeed it is asinine to take a viable dramatic situation and
render it helpless. The plot revolves around the problems of Rich Richard
ard Richard Chamberlain, boy college wonder, who must simultaneously go
to school, get married and keep innumerable part-time jobs to
support all of this.
Many college students today face this very real situation. Set
in the 19205, this picture could have been even more dramatic than
some of todays campus marriages. At that time a students tak taking
ing taking a bride was almost tantamount to dismissal.
As Chamberlain engages Yvette Mimiuex in Holy Deadlock, there
runs through it all a feeling that somehow it will be all right in the
end.
Great Posideon! Can you believe it. Yes, wading through all the
triteness and sentimentality they make it. In one of the most ludi ludicrous
crous ludicrous endings ever filmed, the audience really gets ,a chance to
laugh. Riding down mainstreet are husband, wife, the town fairy
and singing the title song. In real life things would get worse be because
cause because babies cost money. Not in this picture. Evidently this baby
is going to earn his own keep.
Audiences have grown up, for the most part, but Hollywood
hasnt. This once-in-a-million flic is taking money from anyone
showing up at the Florida Theater.

Buck Named 'Specialist
For Agriculture Service

Doug Buck, Channel 12 newscaster, Jacksonville, today was appointed
television specialist with the Florida Agricultural Extension Service.
Dr. M. O. Watkins, Extension director, announced the appointment
which was approved by Dr. E. T. York, Jr., provost for agriculture,
and Dr. J. Wayne Reitz, University of Florida president.
Buck will head up the University of Florida Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences television programs, according to Dr. Hervey
Sharpe, editorial department chairman.
Buck will continue Sunshine Almanac produced jointly by the Agri Agricultural
cultural Agricultural Extension Service and the Universitys WUFT-TV, which is
shown on commercial stations in Daytona, Miami, Tampa, Orlando
and St. Petersburg, Sharpe said.
Sunshine Almanac is a rural-urban program aimed at informing over
one-half million viewers weekly. The program is of interest to con consumers,
sumers, consumers, ranchers, growers and home-owners.
Buck, as an assistant professor, will hold television workshops with
county and home economics agents, Sharpe mentioned.
Buck is a 1960 University of Florida communication graduate anri a
graduate of Daytona Seabreeze High School. He has commercial televi television
sion television experience in Jacksonville and Savannah, plus radio and newspaper
experience in Daytona and Gainesville.
He is a member ofSigmaDelta Chi, Radio-TV News Directors Assn.,
and National Press Photographers Assn.
Buck is married to Anita Herrmann and they have two sons: Douglas,
11, 5-1/2 years, and Paul, 4 years.

| <3 m va
e a 1 it d

PHOTO DISPLAY: Thru Nov. 15, 2 floor, Main Library.
Exhibit: OrchesisThe Dance.**
ENGINEERING DAMES: Nov. 17, 8 p.m., University Womens
Club. Speaker: Mrs. Lu Hadway, an Interior designer from
Home Beautiful.**
HILLEL: Sunday, 11, Breakfast at Wolfies. Speaker: Dr.
Funknouser. For reservations, call Hillel.
WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP: Today, 6 p.m., Presbyterian Youth
Center, West University Ave. Dinner and movie.
HILLEL: Today, 7 p.m. Speaker: U. R. A. Representative. Follow-

ed by group going to Frolics.
HILLEL: Sunday, 11 a.m.,
Breakfast at Wolfies. Speaker:
Dr. Funkhouser. For reservations
call Hillel.
GATOR AMATEUR RADIO
CLUB: Monday,. 8 p.m. 527, En Engineering
gineering Engineering Building.
PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM: Today,
4 p.m., 133, Williamson Hall.
Speaker: Dr. David T. Williams,
Professor Aerospace Engineering
and Physics, UF. Topic: The
Terminal Shapes of Oblating Ob Objects/*
jects/* Objects/*
GAINESVILLE PISTOL CLUB:
Sunday, 1:30'p.m., SE 15 St. Range.
Will have pistol match. Call FR
2-2481 for information.
LABORATORY THEATER: Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, 7:30 p.m., 239, TigertHall.
Like, an Evening* of poetry, film
and panto mine by Ferlinghetti. Ad Admission
mission Admission is free.
FLORIDA UNION CRAFTSHOP:
Monday, 7:30p.m., 120, Craft Shop.
Demonstrator: Mrs. Olive Briggs,
a local Gainesville potter. Demon Demonstration:
stration: Demonstration: Wheel throwing.

film notebook
Gerald Jones

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IB

GATOR BAND: the show goes on

Gator Band To Salute Press

The 170-piece Fightin Gator
Band will present an All Re Request
quest Request half-time show this Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday. Special salutes will be given
to several worthy organizations
and programs.
The news medium will be the
first salute recipient as the Band
forms the letters N, E, W, S at
the four points of the compass
and marches them together to
spell out NEWS while playing the
current hit favorite Downtown.
In position in the word NEWS, the
band will play The Broadcasters
March.
Dollars for Scholars receives
the next salute as the band reports
current news on the drive progress
while in the NEWS formation with
I Got Plenty of Nothin , But
good news soon follows as the band
transforms NEWS into NEW $ and
appropriately plays Good News.
The Disneyland Holiday March Marching
ing Marching Band contest is the last worthy
salute recipient. This program is
a high school band contest spon sponsored
sored sponsored by Walt Disney in which
bands submit films and tapes of a
half-time show built around the

M iss Prefers Jail

To Moving House

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (UPI)- Miss
Sarah Elizabeht Dorris, 65 has
been in jail since February because
she refused to move her house from
a restricted subdivision where she
bought two acres of land.
I will stay in jail until the day I
die if thats what it takes,* the di diminutive
minutive diminutive red-haired woman said.
She has been in jail since Feb. 4 on
contempt of court charges.
Last January, Miss Dorris al allegedly
legedly allegedly ignored a court order and
moved her home onto a lot she pur purchased
chased purchased in the Holiday Hills subdi subdivision.
vision. subdivision.

popular movie, Mary Poppins.
Judging begins this weekend for the
top prize of an all expense paid
trip to Disneyland for the entire
winning band and many other
prizes.
Special Walt Disney representa representative,
tive, representative, noted band composer, Alfred
Reed, will be a guest conductor of
the Gator Band and will direct
Supercalifragilisticexpialidoci Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious.
ous. Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. Mr. Reed is meeting on the

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At the Gainesville Livestock Market
500) N.W. 13th St.

campus with a panel of judges con consisting
sisting consisting of Harold B. Bachman, Dir Director
ector Director Emeritus of the Gator Band,
Reid Poole, U.F. Department of
Music Chairman, Richard W.
Bowles, Director of the Gator
Band, Fred McCall, and Otto J.
Kraushaar, from the University of
Miami.
Alma Mater and Dixie fol follows
lows follows as the Gator Band marches a
huge UF monogram off the field.



Kators Better Than Tulane
According To Coach Graves

By BRUCE DUDLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Florida has a better football team and expects to
bt Tulane Saturday.
[This is what Coach Ray Graves said Thursday
|er his team finished what he termed a hard
leks practice.
lve got no idea if were ready to play Tulane,
I weve got a better team, he said.
We have the problem of looking ahead to our
Lditional rivals of Miami and Florida State, but
[lane will be looking ahead to Louisiana State, too.
kWeve been pushing hard this week, but I cant
Lily tell if the boys are up or not.
braves said he would start the same offensive
keup against Tulane as he did against Georgia.
Fullback John Feiber will dress out for the game

i lie Florida Alligator^

Friday, Nov. 12, 1965,

Frosh Tackle Georgia Bullpups

By RICK BROWN
H Alligator Staff Writer
HFloridas Baby Gators meet the
Borgia Bullpups at 2 p.m. today
Florida Field. The frosh have
In two of their three games so
H~ this season, losing to Florida
Hite 13-7 while beating Auburn
H-9 and Miami 34-27.

Uniteb Chupch of Gainesville
(United Church of Christ: CongregationalE. & R.)
extends to students and faculty
A New Adventure
an Invitation to . ..
ln Christianity
Sunday 10:00 a.m. Worship
and Sunday School
Florida Union (temporary meeting place)

f
I I :op CUEHS FAU.S.NV; \I \
V\ flb mi]* without the label its not a J I
McMullen blouse! J j
l3 West University / bJa!

This years team is led by two
high school all-America stars,
Larry Rentz and Larry Smith. In
the Miami game Rentz scored four
touchdowns. Another fine back,
fullback Tom Christian, broke a away
way away to set up two of the frosh
touchdowns at Miami. At wingback
Bill Gaisford and Lewis Robles

but isnt scheduled to play. Feiber hasnt practiced
all week.
The Florida coach admits that the Gators are
faced with another team that can drop the bomb
with Tulane, but he thinks the Gator defense will
be able to hold the Greenies.
Defensive Coach Gene Ellenson is also expecting
a good game Saturday.
I think we can have a good defensive game
against Tulane, Ellenson said.
Its Miami the next week that bothers me. Miami
will pass a lot and theyre bound to get some yard yardage.
age. yardage.
Florida is currently the number one defensive
team in the Southeastern Conference and is ranked
eighth nationally.

Page 13

SPORTS

will alternate throughout the game.
The freshman line averages 220
pounds led by two big tackles,
Terry Morris, 225, and Guy Den Dennis,
nis, Dennis, 250. At the guard positions
are: Eddie Foster and Jeff War Warren.
ren. Warren. Dave Bernhart handles the
centers job.
Jim Yarbrough and George Dean
were handling the end positions
but both players were injured a against
gainst against FSU so Nelson Davis and
Tony Grovekar will most likely
begin at offensive end. Yarbrough
might make the game, but has an
injured arm.
This year Coach Dave Fuller is
running a two platoon system. At
defensive backs the Baby Gators
have John Gasque, Esmond Marks,
John Slaton, and Rick Brown.
Larry McQuinn will man the mon monster
ster monster spot, while Bernie Byers and
Mike Santllle play at linebacker.

Moor

No one would have predicted it before the season began, but
the Tulane game appears more and more to be the most
important of the season.
Why?
Because four of the six major bowls will have representatives
in Gainesville to watch the Gators play. An exceptional showing
would gain Florida a bowl bid immediately following the game,
although it wouldnt be declared official until the season's end due
to a reactionary SEC rule.
No one has any doubt that the Gators will defeat the Greenies,
Bobby Duhon or no. The question is: can they put on the offensive
show everyone knows they're capable of. If so, the biggest bowl
bid in the school's history will be extended.
Just which bowl will Florida go to?
Reports all along have been that the Gators would go to the
Orange Bowl if they finished with an 8-2 record. However, the
Birmingham News has reported that Nebraska and Alabama will
play in the Miami Classic. This isn't the first time the News has
made such a prediction. Last year, it reported the Alabama-Texas
match two weeks before it was officially announced.
Actions of Orange Bowl spokesmen have added weight in favor
of the News' story. When questioned point blank on the matter, all
public relations director Norris Anderson would say was, We
aren't ready to announce anything official yet.''Another noteworthy
fact is that no Orange Bowl committee members have requested
tickets to the Florida-Tulane game.
Maybe this is all coincidence, but if I were to bet, I'd have to
say that Alabama and Nebraska will meet in the Orange Bowl.

Throughout the season, Gator players have shown a preference
for the Sugar Bowl. They would all like to be members of the first
Gator team to leave the state for a bowl game. Nothing has happen happened
ed happened to change this feeling.
However, there is more than just the name of the game to con consider.
sider. consider. Also important is the opponent. Much more could be gained
by playing one of the nation's top five. For this reason, the Cotton
Bowl looks more appealing than the Sugar.
There, the Gators would meet Arkansas, the team with the na nation's
tion's nation's longest unbeaten string. The Hogs have to get by SMU and
Texas Tech to finish their second straight unbeaten season. If
Notre Dame should upset Michigan State next week, the Razorbacks
could well be the national champions.
In the Sugar Bowl, Florida would face either Missouri or Texas
Tech, if things go according to plan. Neither of these matches
would offer half the challenge that a game with Arkansas will.
From different but reliable sources, it has been learned that
Florida will receive bids from both the Sugar and Cotton Bowls
following a Tulane win.
Because of the opportunity to meet Arkansas, the Gators will
go to Dallas Jan. 1.

Gators Stomp Greenles

As for the Tulane game, the Gators will be fired up more than
at any other time this year because of the presence of bowl people.
They will stomp the Greenles by about 35-7.
Other big games In the Southeast Include: Ole Miss vs. Tennessee
at Memphis, Mississippi State at LSU, Miami at Vanderbilt, FSU at
N. C. State and Auburn at Georgia.
Tennessee, the biggest surprise In the Southland, meets hungry
Old Miss. The Vols can still win the SEC title by their lonesome
with victories over their final three conference opponents. The
Rebels, already out of the race, have blood In their eyes following
an upset loss to Houston. Ole Miss will upend the Vols and cast a
shadow on Tennessee bowl hopes. Mississippi 20, Tennessee 14.
LSU, wounded and without Nelson Stokley, finds itself in friendly
environment at night in Tiger Stadium -for the first time
in three weeks. Mississippi State has made good efforts in the
past two weeks, losing to Alabama and Auburn In games that could
have gone either way. In the Tigers' unluckiest year yet, theyll
bow to the Bulldogs, 14-10.

Miami, the up-agaln down-again crew to our South, takes on
defense-minded Vandy at Dudley Stadium, Nashville. Since this Is
the Hurricanes' down week, Vandy will win 10-7.
FSU travels to meet N. C. State Saturday in a battle of the reju rejuvenated
venated rejuvenated elevens. The Wolfpack has rebounded from Its loss to the
Gators to wallop three formidable opponents by a combined score
of 63-7. The Seminoles finally found their offense against Wake
Forest last week In winning 35-0. However, the Wolfpack has- the
home field advantage and should squeak by the Seminoles in a
defensive battle 7-3.
Auburn still can win theSECcrownanda bowl bid with victories
over Georgia and Alabama. The Tigers will want this one badlv.
They also have Alex (the bomb thrower) Bowden, an offensive wea weapon
pon weapon to which the Bulldogs have no equal. Auburn 21, Georgia 10.

G A y GA rc>iIADS SELL ***(4 I
|

SPORTS EDITOR

Prefer Sugar Bowl

Vandy To Upset

L H K J



Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Nqv. 12, 1965

QB Duhon Key To Greenies 1 Hopes

A quarterback who started the
season at defensive safety and a
linebacker who combines brain and
brawn look to lead the Tulane
Green Wave against the Gators this
Saturday. The Greeniessporta2-6
overall mark this year.
Sophomore signal caller Bobby
Duhon started the first two games
this season at safety for the Green Greenies
ies Greenies of New Orleans. Against Miami
in the third game of the campaign,
the 6-0, 190-pound lefthander came
in at quarterback and led the Green

Alligator Staffers Pick The 20 Toughest
Benny Jelt Den- Glenn Dick Ron Bruce Fran Eddie Don Fed- Steve Andy Cheryl
Cason kewaiter Laney Dennis Spencer Dudley Snider Sears ermun Vaihn Moor Kurll Consensu
riCKerS 106-48-G 99-55-6 98-56-6 96-58-6 96-58-6 95-59-6 94-00-6 94-60-0 94-60-0 93-61-6 91-03-0 82-72-0 95-51-0
.687 .043 .636 .623 .023 .617 .610 .010 .CIO .604 .592 -333 .051
Tulane-Florida FFFFFFFFFFFFF
T ennessee-Ole Miss M TTMT MT M T T M M
Auburn-Georgia G AAGGAA G A G A G ~
Miss. St.-LSU LLLLLLMLLMMLL
Wyoming-Army WWWWA WWWWA A WW
FSU-N.C. St. N N N N FNFFFNNFN
Navy-Penn St. PPNppppN ppppp
Calif-Oregon 000 COOOC OOC CO
Syracuse-W. Va. SSSSSSWS SSS S S
Ore. St.-Wash. WWWWOOWWWWW OW
Okla.-Missouri < MMM MMMMM MMMMM
Minn.-Purdue P PPM PMPP PP P PP
Miami-Vandy MM MM M M M M V M V MM
Kansas-Colorado C C C C C C C C CC C CC
Baylor-Texas Tech T TTTT TTT TT T TT
TCU-T exasit T T T TT TTCT TT T T T
Clemson-Maryiand MCCCMCCCCCM CC
Michigan-Nwur M M M M M MMM MMM MM
UCLA-Stanford SUUUUUUU UUSUU
Pittsburgh-USC UUUUUUUU UUUUU

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Wave to their first victory by a
24-16 score.
Statistics compiled through the
first seven Greenie contests show
Duhon hitting on 57 passes out of
127 attempts. Five of his comple completions
tions completions have gone for touchdowns.
Duhon has amassed 155 rushing
yards and 737 yards through the
air routes. He wears number 13
jersey with no ill-effects so far.
Linebacker Bill Goss captains
the Green Wave eleven. The sen senior,
ior, senior, two-year letterman, stands

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*
.!* H! \' : a,}\ '> \ XUX 5* -: '<**
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*******.

6-3 and weighs 200 pounds.
Goss was voted Southeastern
Conference (SEC) lineman of the
week by AP and UPI wire services
for his performance in the Miss.
State contest. Against Vanderbilt
two weeks ago, Goss made 18 un unassisted
assisted unassisted tackles.
Texas coach Darrell Royal said
after the Texas-Tulane game this
season, Goss would be a sure surebet
bet surebet all-America choice if he played
for a large school.
Tulane mentor Tommy OBoyle

(C/tmcutoij)
MjCOR O+S

called Goss, the greatest line linebacker
backer linebacker in college last year.

r I i
Jilt .'
ifiUK Inf
BOBBY DUHON: Tulane
Ace

Nose Bowl Slated Sunday

By DAN DAVIS
Alligator Staff Writer
Phi Lambda Phi streaked to its
fourth consecutive football victory,
24-12, Wednesday afternoon a against
gainst against Sigma Phi Epsilon and now
stands ready to challenge the Tau
Epsilon Phi's in Orange League
finals Monday afternoon.
The Pi Lams were led by their
AU-Campus quarterback Jerry
Furnari. Wingbacks Glen Block and
Jim Teper caught Furnaris passes
and marched the team up and down
the field.
Monday afternoons game at 4:45
on the upper Drill Field will follow
a heated battle Sunday afternoon at

Goss is a pre-med major at Tu Tulane
lane Tulane and was first team academic
All-SEC choice last season.

Junior end Jerry Colquette is
Duhons favorite target for the
pass. The most recent statistics
show Colquette is second in recep receptions
tions receptions in the SEC behind Floridas
Charlie Casey. Colquette has
latched onto 29 aerials for 366
yards. He stands 6-1 and tips the
scales at 195-pounds.
Lanis OSteen is Duhons fa favorite
vorite favorite deep receiver from his end
position. Against Miami, OSteen
grabbed a 71-yard bomb for the
winning six points. He has caught
17 passes for 252 yards to rank as
Tulanes second leading receiver.
OSteen attended Jacksonville
Lee High School and stands 6-0 and
weighs 190.
Carl Crowder, also from Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville Lee, runs out of the tail tailback
back tailback spot for the Greenies offense.
The 5-11,183-pound senior has car carried
ried carried the pigskin 82 times for 275
yards this year to lead the Tulane
rushing corps.

2 p.m. when the Pi Lam and TEP
pledges meet in the annual pledge
game, the Nose Bowl.
The game, scheduled for P. K.
Yonge Field at 2 p.m., has an 11
year history with the Baby Lams
out in front six to five. The pledge
game, always a spirited event, is
more intense this year because of
the proximity of the two games.
Approximately 700 people are
expected to attend the competitive
event including alumni, relatives,
students and faculty.
The game is played as a regula regulation
tion regulation flag football match with 48
minutes in the game.

m
kmmm



Rebel-Vol Clash Tops Slate

By DAVID M* MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA (UPI) Dont waste
ime trying to sell the Tennessee
sols on the value of statistics,
heyve given up more yards than
heyve gained but boast the Souths
>nly major unbeaten college foot football

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ball football team.
The only statistic that interests
the Vols is points scored. In this,
they have few peers giving up
only 38 enrouteto a 4-0-2 record.
The ninth-ranked Vols are in the
thick of the tough Southeastern
Conference race and are being

closely watched by the bowl scouts.
But a rough four weeks lie ahead.
The Vols meet unpredictable Ole
Miss Saturday at Memphis, then
play lOth-ranked Kentucky, defen defensive-minded
sive-minded defensive-minded Vanderbilt and
seventh-ranked UCLA.
The Vols have victories over
Army, South Carolina, Houston and
Georgia Tech and even more
notable, ties with conference conferenceleading
leading conferenceleading Auburn and sixth-ranked
Alabama.
The Vols cant afford to let up.
The dont dare judge Ole Miss by
its 4-4 record. Every time this
season it appeared the Rebels were
on the ropes, they bounced back to
beat an unsuspecting foe.
The Vols havent beaten the Re Rebels
bels Rebels since 1958, when they pulled
out an 18-16 upset. In six straight
wins since then, the Rebels have
outscored the Vols 154 to 26, in-

McVeas On The Move

By PAUL FREEMAN
United Press International
HOUSTON (UPI) After a fal faltering
tering faltering start as one of college foot footballs
balls footballs most publicized players, the
flashing little feet of Warren
McVea may be on the track to an
outstanding college career.
The 173-pound sophomore speed
specialist made a disappointing
start this year in his first varsity
season for the University of Hous Houston.
ton. Houston. Playing against Tulsa in the
ultra-modern domed stadium be before
fore before a national television audience
McVea fumbled four times and
said I lost the ball game. McVea
was then taken out of the Cougar
starting lineup due to his ner nervousness
vousness nervousness and to a couple of leg
injuries.
Moving from running back to
split end for Saturdays game a against
gainst against the University of Missis Mississippi,
sippi, Mississippi, McVea fought off his ner nervousness
vousness nervousness and snatched six passes
for 201 yards. Two of his catches
went for touchdowns of 80 and 84
yards.
University of Houston football
coach Bill Yeomen was ecstatic
about McVeas performance. He
was doubled on at first ... He
just went whoosh! Yeoman said.
McVea came to Houston after
rejecting scholarship offers from
70 schools across the nation. He
picked Houston mainly because it
is near his San Antonio, Tex.,
hometown.
McVeas high school football at
San Antonio Breckenridge was his history-making.
tory-making. history-making. McVea, a 9.5
sprinter in the 100, gained 1,332
yards in 127 carries as a senior,
scoring 46 touchdowns and run running
ning running for 78 extra poin' i.

eluding last years 30-0 thrashing.
The conference race probably
wont be decided until Alabama and
Auburn tangle at Birmingham on
Nov. 27.
Auburn, 3-0-1 in the conference
but only 4-3-1 overall, will be at
Georgia this week. Auburn could
lose to Georgia and still win the
title by beating Alabama which is
5-1-1 in league play and meeting
outsider South Carolina Saturday.
Its a real tangle. Tennessee
must beat its three remaining con conference
ference conference foes or be eliminated.
Auburn must beat both Georgia
and Alabama to be sure of the
crown but needs to beat only Ala Alabama
bama Alabama if the Vols lose a game.
Alabama must beat Auburn and
even then would finish second if
Tennessee gets its three victories.
The rest of the league can relax.
Kentucky, Florida and Georgia are

His senior year the all-state
ballots from the Texas Sports
Writers Association read:
Select McVea and 10 others.
The only Negro on the Univer University
sity University of Houston squad, McVea says
he hasnt been uncomfortable.
The fellows couldnt be nicer
to me, McVea said, and his team teammates
mates teammates tried to keep my spirits
up earlier this season when the
going was rough.
He had made himself ready for
possible racial slurs before the
Mississippi State game but they
failed to come. Mississippi State
was the cleanest team we played
this year, McVea said. They
talked to me during the game and
were real nice.
A physical education major,

Pro Leagues Battle
Over College Draft

NEW YORK (UPI) The Amer American
ican American Football League took the Ini Initiative
tiative Initiative Wednesday in its signing
war with the National Football

Devaney Hints
Huskers Will
Go To Miami

MIAMI (UPI) Apparently It's
going to be Nebraska and Alabama
in the Orange Bowl game next New
Years night.
Nobody will say so officially,
but unofficially the secrets out.
The first official word is likely
to come this Saturday after Ne Nebraskas
braskas Nebraskas game with Oklahoma State
at Stillwater, Okla. Orange Bowl
Committee President Robert C.
Hector and scout Jim Llewellyn
are scheduled to be at the game
and Cornhuskers coach Bob De Devaney
vaney Devaney has indicated something
will be said if Nebraska wins.
Second-ranked Nebraska is fa favored
vored favored by four touchdowns.
Its known that the Nebraska
players, led by seniors who liked
the trip when the team came here
for the 194 game and beat Auburn,
have' already voted to accept an
Orange Bowl invitation.
At Alabama, school officials had
no comments on the reports that
sprang up in several newspapers
Wednesday morning naming the
Tide. It is a rule of the South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference, however, that
schools may not announce any bowl
aspirations until Nov. 20.

Friday, Nov. 12, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

locked in a three-way tie for fourth
place with 3-2 conference marks
and there's no way any one of
them can make it to the top now.
Kentucky, eagerly seeking its
first bowl bid in 14 years, goes
Saturday night to Houston, which
upset Ole Miss last week and
Florida will be host to Tulane.
In another conference game,
fading Louisiana State will be host
to fading Mississippi State with
the loser dropping into a tie for
last place.
Elsewhere, Vanderbilt will be
host to Miami, Florida State will
be at North CarolinaState,Georgia
Tech will be host to Virginia with
a bowl bid for the independent
Yellow Jackets probably riding on
the outcome. Memphis State will be
at North Texas State and Southern
Mississippi at Louisiana Tech.

McVea had a "C" average his
freshman year. He is the only one
of five male children in his family
to become a college athlete, and
comes from middle-class San
Antonio parents.
McVea now ranks fourth in pass
receiving on the Houston team,
with 11 catches for 289 yards and
three touchdowns. He didn't carry
the ball from scrimmage against
Ole Miss and his 3.0 yards per
carry average was made earlier
in the season when the going was
rougher, and before he was
switched to split end.
Before the Ole Miss game McVea
came into the training room and
began tearing the tape from his
injured leg. I feel better now than
I have all season," he said.

League when Commissioner Joe
Foss announced the younger cir circuit
cuit circuit would hold its annual draft
of college players on Nov. 20.
The date was one week earlier
than the AFL conducted its draft
a year ago. Both the American
and National Leagues had held their
drafts on Nov. 28 of last year, the
final big Saturday of the college
season.
The rival NFL has reached no
decision as yet on the time and
place of its draft session.
We are tentatively planning to
draft on Saturday, Nov. 27, in ac accordance
cordance accordance with the wishes of the
colleges and universities, said
NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle.
However, we may be forced to
draft much sooner if others fail
to honor the request.
Foss, in announcing the AFL
decision, said that he would strict strictly
ly strictly enforce all points agreed upon
by the league with the National
Collegiate Athletic Association re regarding
garding regarding the signing of players.
The AFL draft, which will con consist
sist consist of 20 rounds of selections
from the ranks of college seniors
and a separate 10 round draft of
red shirts, players with another
year of eligibility remaining al although
though although their original class grad graduates
uates graduates next June, will be held ear earlier
lier earlier this year for two very valid
reasons.
First, it is the day on which a
majority of the college teams com complete
plete complete their schedule, Foss noted.
And, further, I personally feel
that drafting on the 20th will go a
long way toward eliminating so socalled
called socalled baby-sitting practices
which have sprung up in the last
two years.

Page 15



LAMBSWOOL THOROUGHBREDS ... FROM ENGLAND W Vk
\m\ The Harmon Football Forecast
mmmm top 20 teams (Forecasting Average: 1,033 Right, 334 Wrong 756) I 0
mHUR 1-MICH. STATE 6 ALABAMA 11-MISSOURI 16-TEXASTECH /\IW YOU \jOltlCl
ya&tf / T u -- Pmmm 2 -notre dame 7 -Kentucky 12 -Georgiatech 17 -tulsa IJ
'Jmfp / 3-ARKANSAS 8-U.C.L.A. IS-OHIO STATE It-MIOURN
rtmtJ. $' liWmr 4-nebraska 9-tennessee m-syracuse 19 -Floridastate r |/Tf*pC/
y |,j 5 SOUTHERN CAL 10-FLORIDA 15 -PURDUE 20-GEORGIA I IMVW
/ : Auburn 22 Georgia 21 Two big gridiron stages are getting set for what ___ B
! y Boston u" eS *4 oe'awTre & Ma,V r could well be the two of the finest football games | flOf'C
y# I |sSija 6 I? Colorado state u ,S of the 1965 season. The big finale in the Pacific | fIC A? MCD
/ £ m Cincinnati 35 South Dakota u. o Athletic Conference between U. C. L. A. and
/ WTT/' f a Colgate" 21Buf7ai a ando nd 15 Southern Cal is two weeks away, and so is the
/ JIP I H Colorado 17 Kansas 8 meeting of two national powers, Michigan State I I
/ Wn Dartmouth 16 Cornell 7 XT 7 K LiULI
I f V ffmfWrifii-- / Duke 21 Wake Forest 9 and Notre Dame. *7 VM H IWI W
_ I East Carolina 20 George Washington 14 The sth-ranked Uclans have a small matter
- 11 Florida 23 Tulane 7 ...
g Florida State 21 North Carolina State 17 of a few Stanford Indians to scalp first and g /% I
~ <|f\ Fmrnan State 14
<~k \ Georgia Tech 21 Virginia 6 pick is U. C. L. A. by 11 points. And the Trojans FMlWeeee
/T) rc\ \ Hofy* Cross 25 Rogers 13 of Southern Cal, #5, will trim Pittsburgh by 27
W~J| H Iowa State 24
I Kent State 15 Marshall 8 state has all but wrapped up the Big Ten title and
rvAXim AMV Louisville 21 Drake 14 Rose Bowl bid with Indiana the only remaining
DUNKjAINj IS^Fllhda 6 17 VanderbHt aS 6 hurdle The Spartans will club the Hoosiers
a Miami, Ohio 24 Dayton 6 Saturday by about 31 points. Notre Dame moved 1
Jl-L . -i Michigan State .. 31 Jnd^ar^**^* 1 ... o ahead of Arkansas in the Top 20 to take over the
IT Mississippi State 15
Na^ Un 21 Penn state 20 for November 20th, the Irish will make life
New"*Mexico 20
Notre Dame 41 North Carolina 7 still up for grabs is the championship of the ...
1 123 W. UNIV. AVE. Oregon*** 6 17 CaHfornia 14 Southeastern Conference with Auburn, Alabama, 615 W. University Ave.
, D?£"in ania 30 Columbia l 7 and Tennessee all within reach of it. While
Purdue 20 Minnesota 15 6th-rated Alabama is a three-touchdown favorite I
VI /I || si? Jose Statei ........ 21 Montana *6 over South Carolina in a non-coference game, i \JxO JjQTj£ \
HA f AllOflA lit A Southern Cal .34 Pittsburgh 7 Auburn, #lB, is favored by the lacing of a football / CJ
inc VVUVfV Life !;S?SS PP 21 W'*viV ? over Georgia, #2O. Sth-rartted Tennessee will stay & -Qrg 0 TlT) i
C||||#|||||| Ff||*Aff|Ci Tennessee 15 Mississippi 14 undefeated with a one-point win over Mississippi. p
Texas Tech 17 Bayior 10 Two other conference titles appear ready to be J 1 I
Uta C h L A : 17
Utah state 32 h |Jf tJlrtA| J will whi P s M U. by 20 points to clinch at least 1 ]]
VP'll 25 vilianova 8 a tie in the Southwest Conference. Nebraska, #4, w
** M wnhloSon state 23 &s ? has Oklahoma State and Oklahoma remaining be- f'£ c
west Texas 17 Lamar Tech 7 fore it can claim the Big 8 title. The Cornhuskers ffi \ J From the
Wyoming MiChian 20 K*" 8 8 are 29 points too potent for the Cowboys this JLrV sandwich
EAST (small colleges) Say, how about the old crystal ball last week!
Bridgeport lo Tmnt^ S Ha d the Harmon kids working round the clock ( C himself...
Bucknen 27 Lehigh 8 on 8-hour shifts polishing it .. first time its i O
- cfassbom o been clear this The picking percentage V J Jk I I
Clarion State 14 Slippery Rock 7 pleasantly popped to .756 as weve had 1.033 #1 IflM
T U r rA wrr Cort?and' CUt 15 Mimciair ,and 12 winners out of 1,367 games so far this season. i
IHt CjAMbb
Franklin & Marshall 13 Muhienburg 7 Coast Conference with just one loss .. theyre Iwlle# I Ell
Florida vs. Tulane HmsO.l. M Shippsenbur, 7 favored over Maryland Saturday by 2 points. nUKIIIirU
FSU vs. North Carolina State Indiana State 20 Lock Haven 14 West Virginia, 3 and oin the Southern Confer-
Miami vs Vanderbilt Massachusetts 45 New Hampshire 0 anrfl n-ot k , if
Miami vs. vanaermu Miiiersviiie 20 Brockport 18 ence, will get the bounce from 14th-ranked f iiah 4
Minnesota vs. Purdue Rochester 20 R. p. i. 6 Syracuse by 14 Doints -rtC-
Arkansas vs. SMU
Auburn vs. Georgia W. 21 o.n,ur. 20 will beat Houston by 13 ... loth-ranked Florida S.
LSU vs. Mississippi State Tufts 27 Susquehanna 12 is 16 too tough for Tulane .. and Missouri a ffV