Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Vol. 58, No. 35

Orange Trees Going
Auto Lot Coming

By EUNICE TALL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Orange Grove behind the
Century Tower and the area east
of the Hub are being renovated into
campus parking areas.

$ /
4 f
When it will be completed de depends
pends depends on the grounds departments
removal of the trees and refilling
the holes. Maybe in about two or
three weeks, estimated Police
Chief Audie Shuler.
The orange groves were not be being
ing being used, said Shuler, because of a
freeze several years ago.
. Drivers are already using a por portion
tion portion of the area. Approximately 140
or 150 spaces may be created,
estimated Shuler.
Shuler said that for the 12,000
cars registered at the UF only
4,800 spaces are available includ including
ing including those surrounding the campus
and near fraternities.
Last month 3,100 tickets were is issued
sued issued for illegal parking and other
traffic violations on campus.
It is my understanding, Shuler
said, that the new parking areas
will be just dirt surfaces of a tem temporary
porary temporary nature. Theyre the only
open areas where there are no
buildings.
Don Wilcox, chairman of the
Traffic and Safety Committee, says
he doesnt know what the next move
iPhone Books J
| Going Once! |
vs Distribution oi the UF 1965 £
£ telephone directory for off- £
>: campus students is slated for
>: today at the Information Booth £
y. across from the Hub. £
£ Today is the only time the £
| books will be distributed to £
:> off-campus students. Distri Distri£
£ Distri£ bution is slated from 9 a.m.

Tlie Florida
Alligator

University of Florida

will be.
Soon were going to redecal the
front areas of campus to update our
records and clean out a lot of dead
wood, he said.

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CHOP, CHOP: Orange classes must find new meeting place

JUST A SKIRMISH PROF

UF Wins Battle In Budget War

By BARBARA ALLEN
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF has won the skirmish
but not the war, Dr. Ernest R.
Bartley, professor of political
science, of the present Florida
Budget Commission controversy.
On Tuesday the Budget Com Commission
mission Commission restored three previously
cut salary raises in a move that
seemingly mellowed the heated
controversy surrounding UF Pres President
ident President J. Wayne Reitz and Governor
Haydon Burns. The action followed
the recommendation of the State
Board of Regents.
Bartley referred to the budget
controversy as the break that those
opposing Governor Haydon Burns
road bond proposal had been look looking
ing looking for before the Nov. 2 state-wide
vote.
The only thing Burns under understands
stands understands is force. The only reason
he is backing down is his road
bond issue, Bartley^Jaid.
Due to the upheaval the budget
commission is drawing in its horns
by re-evaluating its salary cuts,
he said.
Bartley referred to the news newspapers
papers newspapers as the educators great greatest
est greatest ally by keeping the contro controversy
versy controversy hot.
Burns biggest mistake was

Friday, October 22, 1965

The new decals, will consist of
special bumper stickers he said.
Theyre on order now. As soon
as they come in, well give them
out.

coming to the University to speak
as his visit created more furor
when the situation was dying
down, said Bartley.
Bartley cited Florida as the only
state in the union with budget com commission
mission commission autonomy.
Florida is running an ox-cart
rural government in a state that
is now urban, he reiterated.
Bartley pointed to the possibility
of the UClosing accreditation un under
der under the present autonomy violation
of the Association of Colleges and
Schools.
He said Massachusetts was the
last state to use a separate agency
to control a university budget. To
TAKE THAT: An un unexpected
expected unexpected part of last
Friday*s homecoming
parade was the custard
pie fight in front of the
Pike House. The fight
extended on down Uni University
versity University Avenue .

I AUGGGGGGG! 1

see page 13

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forestall disaccredltation, the
Massachusetts Legislature had to
meet in special session to reno renovate
vate renovate the matter.

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Teachers
Taking
Action
JACKSONVILLE (UPI) The
Duval County Teachers Associa Association
tion Association met today to consider possible
sanctions if a proposed $8 million
school budget cut is approved.
The meeting came as the Na National
tional National and Florida Education
Associations resolved to support
any action by the Duval teachers.
And in Tallahassee, the presi president
dent president of the state association cited
the problem in Duval as well as
in Leon and Hillsborough Counties,
as examples of why the FE A called
the national association into the
state to investigate the effect of
politics on education.
Members of the PTA here plan
to march to the county courthouse
today to protest the budget com commission's
mission's commission's proposed $8 million cut
in the school boards $50.7 million
minimum budget.
The Budget Commission, faced
with a storm of protests over the
cutback, called a public meeting
Nov. 19 to decide whether to make
the action final.



Page 2

5, The Florida A1 igator, Friday, Oct. 22, 1965

News Around
The World
from the wires of United Press International
International
PLANS CHANGE . What had been planned as an anti-American
protest by hundreds of Moslems in Jakarta turned into a denunciation
of Red China and the Indonesian Communist party Wednesday. The
protest was only one of many that have erupted in the nation since the
attempted overthrow of President Sukarno on October 1. Reports have
indicated that Russia and Red China, who was formerly Sukarnos
firmest ally, are growing restive over the number of protests against
the Communists since the abortive coup.
PASSES SUN . Comet Ikeya-Seki reached
its closest point to the sun Thursday in the
course of its fiery loop through the heart of the
solar system. In what was called the greatest
spectacular of the century the comet and its
10-million mile tail of glowing gasses streaked
through the sky setting off celestial fireworks
which elated scientists watching throughout the
world. It was sighted as near as 800,000 miles
from the sun as it made the hairpin turn around
the sun at more thanl million miles-per-hour.
SEIGE LIFTED . A rescue force of Vietnamese Rangers and U. S.
advisors dropped by helicopter Thursday relieved an American Special
Forces camp that had been under heavy Communist fire for three days.
As the rescuers fought their way into the camp to break the seige, they
found nearly 100 Viet Cong bodies. Others were believed killed in the
fight that began Tuesday night, but their bodies were carried away by
the retreating Reds. No casualities from the American camp were
announced.
National
ALSO REFUSES . The Grand Dragon of the North Carolina branch
of the United Klans of America, Inc., James Robertson Jones, Thursday
continued to invoke the Fifth Amendment at hearings on the Ku Klux
Klan. Returning for the third day, Jones refused to answer any questions
about the activities of the Klan as had Klan Leader Shelton. The ques questions
tions questions asked Jones dealt with the Klans soliciting funds from members
at rallies, and top secret appeals to businessmen who might find it
difficult to join the Klan or publicly contribute to it.
MORE WINNERS ... Two American scientists and a Japanese, whose
research contributed to the development of electronic computers,
Thursday won the Nobel Prize for Physics. Another American won the
prize for Chemistry. The Physics winners were Prof. Julian Schwinger
of Harvard, Richard Feynmen of the Calif. Institute of Technology in
Pasadena, and Prof. Sin-Itiro Tomonaga of Toyko. Prof. Robert Burns
Woodward, also of Harvard, won the prize for Chemistry.
RULING ASKED . .The Justice Department
in anunusual move Thursday asked the Supreme
Court to rule on the Constitutionality of the 1965
voting rights act. In the briefs filed with the
court the Justice Department sought injunc injunctions
tions injunctions against three southern states to end ob obstruction
struction obstruction of the law's implementation. The suit
would also seek to nulify orders by the state
courts against registration of voters who have
been listed by the Federal examiners as qua qualified
lified qualified for the voter rolls.
ATTACKS POLICY . General Curtis E. Lemay, former Air Force
Chief of Staff, said Thursday America is doing too little too late in
Viet Nam. Were getting people killed who shouldnt be killed, he
said. Lemay said that it was time to turn loose air power against targets
in North Viet Nam whose destruction would really hurt the Hanoi
government. The General made the speech after being awarded the
Collier Trophy for the greatest achievement in aviation in 1964.
Florida
BLAST-OFF CLEARED . Weather experts Thursday signaled a
tentative Ul all clear to Americas planned attempt to launch Gemini
6 astronauts Walter Schirra and Thomas Stafford on a space chase
into orbit next Monday. Meteorologists predicted good weather for the
scheduled blast-off and probably for the entire flight. If completely
successful, the flight will produce an historic first link-up with another
satellite in space.

STUDY EXPLAINED ... In a speech in Tampa Thursday, Gov. Hay Haydon
don Haydon Burns took a break from his Road Bond campaign to discuss the
purpose of a new tax study. The two-year study authorized at the
Governor's urging, was aimed at making every Florida citizen assume
his share of the government financial burden. A commission was es established
tablished established to make a detailed study of taxes on the state, county, and
city level. This commission was not created to find additional sources
of revenue. It will be more concerned with revamping the existing tax
structure, Burns said.

Rhodesian Crisis Ebbing?

By LAURENCE MEREDITH
United Press International
LONDON (UPI)- Prime Minister
Harold Wilson today sent to Rho Rhodesian
desian Rhodesian Premier lan Smith his pro proposals
posals proposals to block a unilateral
declaration of independence by the
white-ruled African colony and
avert the bloodshed he fears it
would bring.
The British Cabinet approved
Wilsons terms at an urgent meet meeting.
ing. meeting. Wilson then sent his message
to Rhodesian High Commissioner
Jack Johnson in London for relay
to Smith in Salisbury.
The possibility of more talks
eased temporarily the crisis over
independence for Rhodesia, ruled
by a white minority government.
There are about 220.000 white
settlers in the colony compared
to almost 4 million blacks.
There were reports that Wilson
might fly to Salisbury for fresh
rounds of negotiations with Smith.
Wilson drafted a reply to
Smiths message Wednesday in
which the Rhodesian leader offer offered
ed offered to sign a treaty guaranteeing
the political and social advance of
the colonys black if independence
could be agreed upon.
Educate By Need,
Christian Says
ORLANDO (UPI) Florida
should not be satisfied until it has
guaranteed every student with the
capability, desire and need, a col college
lege college education, state School Supt.
Floyd Christian said Thursday.
Christian, in an address pre prepared
pared prepared for delivery to the State Stu Student
dent Student Scholarship and Loan Com Commission,
mission, Commission, said he did not advocate
a college education for everybody.
But I am advocating a college ed education
ucation education for all who do need it and
for all who can profit by it.
The new superintendent, who
took office this month, said the
state should provide for higher ed education
ucation education for students with the cap capability,
ability, capability, desire and need by provid providing
ing providing efficient schools, by tuition
loans or by outright scholarships.

i,
WOOO \JoUmHv
l 1 N G E R | E lUr

COMPROMISE IN WORKS

Disagreement remained on the
timing for eventual government by
Rhodesias majority of almost 4
million blacks and an end to racial
discrimination.
The effective reins of govern government
ment government now rest with 220,000 white
Rhodesian settlers who are given
preferential voting rights by virtue
of income and educational require requirements.
ments. requirements.
Smith has been vague about the

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timetable for improving the
of the black population.
The British government wants
the program to get underwa
quickly. ay
In his message Wednesday
Smith suggested that he had m a up his mind, with the approval of
the Rhodesian cabinet, to break
away from Britain, but he withheld
an immediate unilateral declara declaration
tion declaration of independence.

Wvm



By BILL MANNING
Alligator Staff Writer
A machine, an IBM 1620 elec electronic
tronic electronic computer will not only talk
and play music to you, but will also
let you play the slot machines for
money.
The IBM 1620, located on the
second floor of Matherly Hall in

if she doesnt give it to you...
get it yourself!
JADE EAST*
After Shave, 6 oz.. $3.50 W
Deodorant Stick, $1.75 g
Buddha Cologne Gift Package, 12 oz., $8.50 g
Spray Cologne, $3.50 11==-...-
Buddha Soap Gift Set, $4.00 -==-
Cologne, 4 oz., $3.00
After Shave, 4 oz., $2.50 swank, new yomk sole distahuto*

I PSSST... I
I feelthy I
I They are, instead, pictures that are charming, I
I suave, debonair, beautiful...ln short, I
I PICTURES OF YOU! I
I THEYRE SEMINOLE PICTURES I
I AND THE LAST WEEK IS COMING UPI I
I NEXT FRIDAY IS THE LAST DAY. I
I HERES THE SCHEDULE: I
I NEXT MONDAY THRU WEDNESDAY: I
Zeta Tau Alpha, Sigma Kappa, Kappa Delta, AEPhi
I NEXT THURSDAY AND FRIDAY: I
Phi Mu, Kappa Alpha Theta, Delta Gamma, AChiO
I MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY I
Colleges of Law and Medicine
HHH >. /' ..
I PLACE: Rm. 200, Fla. Union; TIMES: 9-12 and 1-5; I
I DRESS: Girls, Blouses; Boys, Coat & Tie; PRICE: $1.50 I
1 IMPORTANT No one will have his (or her) picture in I
I the yearbook unless taken by the SEMINOLE photographer. 1
I ATTENTION, LATECOMERS: If you missed an earlier I
I appointment, come in next week. We'll try to work I
you in somehow.
I I

It Talks! It Sings! It Gambles, Too

the computing laboratory, is offer offered
ed offered for use to students in the college
of business from 7 to 9 p.m. Mon Monday
day Monday thru Thursday.
I am a solid state, fully tran transistorized.
sistorized. transistorized. I am reading this in information
formation information from punched cards at
the rate of 250 cards per minute,
333 characters per second, said

the IBM 1620.
The machine, capable of typing
10 characters per second, can
punch IBM cards at the rate of
125 per minute.
I can do additions and sub subtractions
tractions subtractions at the rate of 1,780 per
second (five digit numbers).
*l can also do multiplications
at the rate of 200 per second
(five digit numbers by five digit
numbers), the machine continued.
Quite lacking in modesty, the
IBM 1620 went on describing itself.
I have 20,000 positions of core
storage (place for information and
facts) and can be expanded to
100.000.
I do an odd bit parity check on
all input data, internal data move movements,
ments, movements, and output data. Reading,
computing, and punching can pro proceed
ceed proceed simultaneously, the machine
went on.
Da'e Moody, interim instructor
of management and manager of the
computing laboratory, explained
that an odd bit parity check is
nothing more than an odd number
of characters magnetized.
Moody demonstrated the
machine by having it behave as a
slot machine.
In addition, Moody placed a por portable
table portable radio in front of the IBM
1620. Then Moody placed a stack
of IBM cards in a slot.
The machine played the Gavotte
from unaccompanied Cello Suite
number 6 in D Major by J. S.
Bach through the radio.
Also the computer played Jingle
Bells, The Halls of Montezuma,
and Anchors Aweigh.
We havent touched the surface
of what the computer is capable

TO Ft AT FOR NICKELS, TURN ON SWITCH t"
TO PLAY FOR DIMES, TURN ON SWITCH 2.
--TCT-PtftY FOR QUARTERS. TURN ON SWITCH 3.
TO PLAY FOR HALVES, TURN ON SWITCH 4.
TO SPIN THE WHEELS, PUSH START WITH GREAT VIGOR.
(5 <
+ $ + +
* + YOU WIN SI.BO
s * s YOU mu
+ YOU WIN $7.20
YOU WON $4.50
CHECK SWITCHES FOR YOUR OET.
TO WHE-EtS--,PUSH START WITH GREAT \HGOR.
= + (x
# + YOU WIN $1.30
WITH GREAT VIGOR: Spin the wheels

of doing. Moody said.
Everything the machine does
is in the language ofFortran,* one
of the languages used in computer
programming, Moody added.
The IBM 1620 works on a wave
length principle. All this is elec electronic,
tronic, electronic, continued the laboratory
manager.
I can be obtained as a paper
tape system also -- I would read
tape at the rate of 150 characters

c m p u s>
f km... i i 1 -I
' 5 T T
cal end a r*

COEDIKETTE: Pick up appli applications
cations applications in Dean of Womens Office,
Tigert Hall. Deadline is Nov. 1.
HILLEL: Brunch, 11 a.m.,Sun a.m.,Sunday.
day. a.m.,Sunday. Tonight, 7:30 p.m., Succath
Celebration and Oneg Shabbat fol following
lowing following services.
Fraternity
Rush Tagged
Successful
The fraternity rush program this
fall has been a very good one,
according to the IFC.
James A. Hauser, IFC president,
said the number of men pledging
fraternities this fall was up 10 to
15 percent over the same period
last year.
IFC figures show that 1,148 men
pledged UF fraternities during
rush this trimester. Individual
pledge classes ranged from 85 to
eight.
Although the number of men
pledging is up, Hauser said,
the trimester system and the stif stiffening
fening stiffening of entrance requirements
have made prospective fraternity
men more grade conscious and in increasingly
creasingly increasingly reluctant to pledge.
The IFC president said 20 to 25
per cent of the male student body
belong to fraternities.
The largest fraternity on campus
is Alpha Tau Omega. The smallest
is the newest, Phi Kappa Psi,
chartered here two years ago.
Hauser said Florida has some of
the largest fraternity chapters in
the country. He reported sixteen of
the twenty-seven UF fraternities
have over 100 men.
The Florida fraternity system
Is also one of the strongest in the
country, Hauser added.
Hauser said there is currently no
plan to invite another fraternity to
colonize at the UF.
It should be at least three or
four years before such a move is
contemplated."

Friday, Oct. 22, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

per second, and punch tape at 15
characters per second, the com computer
puter computer interjected.
As Moody turned toward the door
to leave the machine spoke.
Thank you for coming to see
me.
In the same room, the comput computing
ing computing laboratory, a secretary reads
a novel while her typewriter auto automatically
matically automatically types from letters.
Machines have taken over!

CAMPUS PACS: Sales continue
through Friday. Goal $16,487. $1
from every student. $9 value sell selling
ing selling for $3. Open at information
booth across from Hub, 8:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m.
SPEECH SCREENING TEST:
Room 214, Matherly Hall, by ap appointment.
pointment. appointment. Required of all under undergraduate
graduate undergraduate students in the College
of Business Administration.
AIME: Movies and a speaker
Nov. 1 at 7:30 p.m., Room 319 of
Engineering Building.
PRE-COUNSELING OF U. C.
STUDENTS: Please check the
orange and blue bulletin and/or the
bulletin board in your dorm for the
schedule of pre-counseling ap appointments
pointments appointments which begin Oct. 25.
DELTA SIGMA PI: Mondaynight
meeting at 7:30 in Room 123 of
the Florida Union.
PHYSICS COLLOQUIM: Today
at 4 p.m. in Bless Auditorium,
Williamson Hall, Room 133. Speak Speaker,
er, Speaker, Dr. Keith Johnson, postdoctoral
Fellow, Department of Physics,
U.F. A Report on the Paris Con Conference
ference Conference on the Electronic Struc Structure
ture Structure and Optical Properties of
Metals and Alloys. Tea will be
served at 3:30 in Room 132.
ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA:
Pledging ceremonies at 4:30 today
in Johnson Lounge, Florida Union.
DANCE: Tolbert and Jennings
Halls, tonight from 8:30 p.m. to
12:30 a.m., featuring the Dynamic
Interns. Free. Jennings Rec Room,
The Florida Alligator is an
official publication of the
University of Florida and
is published daily, Monday
through Friday morning
during regular trimester and
twice weekly during summer
trimester, except holidays
and vacation periods.
Entered at U. S. Post Office
at Gainesville as second
class matter.

Page 3



1, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 22, 1965

Page 4

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TO GAINESVILLE WITH LOVE
Jeanie Maynard, 3PE from Tallahassee, pauses lor a second at the
Kappa Delta doorstep with a handfull of spirit hats. Jeanie is the Army
Sweetheart and Sigma Chi Derby Queen. Oh yes, shes also in charge
of selling spirit hats!

Engineering Department Plans
To Develop Sub Generators

The University of Floridas Nu Nuclear
clear Nuclear Engineering Department is
helping to develop power genera generators
tors generators for submarines and supply
stations in space or on the moon.
Dr. Richard T. Schneider, as associate
sociate associate prof, of nuclear engineer engineering,
ing, engineering, is heading a project inplasma
spectroscopy.
This project is a vital link in the
development of a practical closed closedloop
loop closedloop power system. This system
uses a stream of hot gas and nu nuthe
the nuthe
almanac im
The Almanac
By United Press International
Today is Friday, Oct. 22. the
295th day of 1965 with 70 to follow.
The moon is approaching its new
phase.
The morning star is Jupiter.
The evening stars are Mars. Ve Venus
nus Venus and Saturn.
In 1836, Gen. Sam Houston was
sworn in as first president of the
Republic of Texas.
In 1883, the Metropolitan Opera
Rouse in New York City celebrated
its grand opening with a perfor performance
mance performance of Faust.
In 1953, representatives of
France and the Indochinese state of
laos signed a treaty giving Laos
its independence.
In 1962, President Kennedy an announced
nounced announced an* arms blockade of Cuba
alter Soviet missiles were dis discovered
covered discovered on the island.
A for the day -British
playwright George Bernard Shaw
said: There is only one religion,
though there are a hundred ver versions
sions versions of it.

clear energy.
The power generation system is
called Magneto-hydrodynamics
or MHD as it is understandably ab abbreviated.
breviated. abbreviated. In this process, a
stream of very hot gas passes
through a magnetically charged
field and electricity is produced.
In closed-loop MHD, the gas that
passes through the field is saved,
heated by a nuclear reactor and
used again. This type of power gen generation
eration generation would be useful in places
like submarines, space, the moon,
and other areas where constant re refueling
fueling refueling is unfeasible.
Dr. Schneiders plasma spec spectroscopy
troscopy spectroscopy research attempts to

WERE COOLING IT
and well soon be
POOLING IT at

Well also have
brand new units
available late Oct:
FOR INFORMATION, CALL 376-6720

Ticket Increase 'Needed

The increase in price from $2.50
to $2.60 for student date tickets
for the UF football games was ne necessitated
cessitated necessitated by the state sales tax,
according to Charles Goodyear,
assistant general manager of the
Florida Athletic Corporation.
We couldnt absorb the loss
in taking the price down to $2.48
and paying the balance to the
state, he said. So we made it
an even 10 cents to add to the
price so we wouldnt have the prob problem
lem problem of working with pennies.
Goodyear said the change in
price had been approved by the
Florida Athletic Corporation in its
normal course of business.
The three per cent increase was
also indicated by the new $5.15
price for general admission and
$1.05 for public school tickets,
which are for school football
teams.
Overcrowding of the student sec sections
tions sections will continue to be a problem
this year, Goodyear said. Part of
the reason is the date ticket sys system,
tem, system, he added.
In 1947, when the university be became
came became co-educational the ratio of
men to women was about 10 to one.
Since then the numbers have ba balanced
lanced balanced out, though we have retained
the same system for distributing
date tickets. Many of the married
students get their date tickets and
distribute them to others. Many of
the people in the student section
dont belong there, he said.
Other schools in the South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference dont have the
problem, Goodyear said.
At Louisiana State University
they have no date ticket system,
for example. Married male stu-

measure plasma density and tem temperature
perature temperature as well as find the plasma
properties needed in MHD re research.
search. research.
Dr. Schneider is new to the Univ University
ersity University of Florida, having come here
this September from Allison Divi Division
sion Division of General Motors in Iniana Inianapolis,
polis, Inianapolis, Ind.
The Allison Division under the
direction of Dr. Schneider built
the largest closed-loop MHD power
plant in the world. There are only
four of these power plants inexist inexistence.
ence. inexistence.
In addition to his research, Dr.
Schneider is teaching a course in
Thermonuclear Theory.

FOOTBALL PRICES UP

dents can spend S2O a season for
spouse tickets. Georgia Tech
offers its seniors date tickets, but
they must buy them in the summer
-- and the school keeps the tickets
until fall.
However, the crowded conditions
will probably be alleviated next
year. Anderson said. The student

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side is set for a 10,000 seat
crease.
This should help the crow*
situation for three or four years
he said. Popularity ofthefootba
team also is a determinant of tl
number of students that wa
seats.



UF Leader Eyes Peace Corps
And Later Career As Senator

By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
The man who decides big issues
by drawing pennies, wants to be a
politician.
Mike Malaghan, 4BA, is secre secretary
tary secretary of the interior for student gov government.
ernment. government. One of his responsibilit responsibilities
ies responsibilities is handling campus elections.
When the time came to decide which
political party would occupy which
spot on the greenboards, Malaghan
decided to be fair about it and had

United Chupch of Qainesville
(United Church of Christ: CongregationalE. & R.)
extends to students and faculty
A New Adventure
an invitation to
ln Christianity
Sunday 10:00a.m. Worship
and Sunday School
Florida Union (temporary meeting place)
I £ocrgtfiing Bodu
C i
oimutum
I voted most likely to succeed ...
I \ M M
'' N \ \\ > /
I -a V V /
I "... ?//
I the saddle shoulder
I tambswoot pullover
I The greatest look for the classic pull
I over in years ... the saddle shoulder.
I Smart looking, easy to wear, new!
I And then, there' s lambswool. Light Light|
| Light| weight yet warm, so soft to the touch.
1 What a combination! What colors!
I See them now ...from $10.95
I Orion Turtle-Neck Dickey
I (as shown above) available
I in five colors. .. $2.50
I
Parking on Huge Lot at

the party chairman draw pennies.
When Freedom Party won the
draw, they were so shocked they
had to ask Action Party people
which side to put their posters on.
Then they asked an Alligator re reporter
porter reporter who responded, The left,
Malaghan said.
Working in student government
has serious sides as well. Mala Malaghan
ghan Malaghan has helped establish a tutorial
service for underprivileged chil children
dren children in the Gainesville area.

The pilot program of the tutorial
plan included 31 UF students who
tutored over 100 underprivileged
children last summer.
I think its one of the most
worthwhile projects SG has. Its
non-political and has only cost sls
to date, but it demonstrates to the
community that UF students take an
interest in Gainesville. Malaghan
said.
He has also become interested in
working with the insurance pro program
gram program and has set up three types of
insurance for the UF campus next
fall.
Malaghan, Director of Elections,
Liz White, have already started
work on the spring elections. They
i jfl
adillP
MALAGHAN
plan on sending the ballot bids out
next month to try to save SG some
money.
Considering the mild elections
this fall Ill probably hid out in
some hotel during the spring elec elections
tions elections so no one can reach me after
12 p.m. That seemed to be the
favorite time for the party chair chairman
man chairman to call me.
This summer SG put up trash
cans around campus. Malaghan re recalled
called recalled somebody noticed there
were 16 trash cans on campus and
only 13 cabinet officers. They
asked what we were going to do
with the extra three trash cans.
Malaghan plans to enter the
Peace Corps after he graduates in
June. Ive been accepted into
Peace Corps training in August.
I feel that Ill spend most of my
life trying to make as much money
as I can, so I thought Id like
to spend at least two years of it
helping someone else get a decent
start.
Malaghan wants to go to law
school and then into politics. He
hopes to be a member of the U. S.
Senate sometime during his life.
Malaghan has been active in stu student
dent student government since his sopho sophomore
more sophomore year when he was an under undersecretary
secretary undersecretary in the department of the
interior. He was secretary of labor
last year.

YmmmmmmmmammmmmmmmmmmmKmmmmmmmmmmmmmtmmmmmmmmmm
AOS SELL! I p
G K *
%
d
Change Our Line?
Never! cause we know o good thing when
we see it. So do our advertisers.

k V >:
Homecoming Appearances!
I Begin Reign Os Mrs. UF |

By CHERYL KURIT
Alligator Staff Writer
x The reign of Mrs. Cindy
x Eden as Mrs. UF for 1965 got
x under way this past weekend
$: with Cindy appearing inHome inHome£:
£: inHome£: coming activities.
The Homecoming parade,
X; presentation at Pre-Gator
xj Growl, hostess at the Florida
S Blue Key Alumni Breakfast,
:£ and other activities kept the
;X dark-haired beauty 1 sponsor sponsored
ed sponsored by Sigma Nu Fraternity,
busy the entire weekend,
x As if her reign doesnt keep
her busy enough, there is her
one year old daughter,
Jennifer Shaun, and husband
Nathan, to keep her on her
toes.
X- Cindy, who is from Daytona
Beach, has worn two other
jjj: crowns prior to the Mrs. UF
contest. In 1960, Cindy held
the titles of Miss Volusia
V.
|: : : County, and Miss Ormond
ji|: Beach, and from 1960-61 she
X; modeled for Mary Woods
Modeling of Daytona Beach.
X A graduate of Seabreeze
x High in Daytona, Cindy enter entered
ed entered the UF in the fall of 1963
as a journalism major, and
during her freshman year
X pledged Chi Omega Sorority.
£: It was during her first year
$: at the University that she met
$ her husband Nathan, a grad graduate
uate graduate of Key West High School,
and presently a senior in
xj English with intentions of at at:j:j
:j:j at:j:j tending the UF Law School
xj upon graduation.
Cindy is presently employ employed
ed employed as a secretary for the UF
x Speech Department.
The prizes Cindy received
X; in the contest were an en en:v
:v en:v graved sterling silver tray,
and photo-portrait presented
x' by Johnson Studio.
Os all the contests Ive
x competed in before, I enjoyed
x this one the most. The at atmosphere
mosphere atmosphere was pleasant and the
women so nice it made the


Sigma Pi Sigma Officers Elected

Sigma Pi Sigma, honorary phy phymsics
msics phymsics society, announced recently
the elected student officers for the
1965-66 college year.
Joe Butler was elected president
while Mike Swisdak was named
vice president. Elected to the post
of secretary was Don Silversmith
and Juan Ramirez was elected
treasurer.
No definite plans have been
made thus far for Sigma PiSigma,
said Dr. James B. Conklin, faculty
adviser.
Dr. Conklin said he thought that
the society would probably have
one lecture by a noted scientific
speaker and have a monthly stu student-faculty
dent-faculty student-faculty lunch just to talk
about things.

Friday, Oct. 22. 1965, The Florida A1 igator.

aS
§
|
$
V
!;!
>!;
v!
V
I
V
x*
I
1
|
I
I
s
CINDY EDEN |
i
contest very enjoyable, com- g
mented Cindy. X
Winning the title of Mrs. x
UF entitles Cindy to compete £
in the Mrs. Florida contest x
later this year.

He said that the trimester had
dampened the spirit of most of the
members.
The society is open to male and
female students majoring or min minoring
oring minoring in the field of physics, math
or science.
The main qualification is a sin sincere
cere sincere interest in physics, said Dr.
Conklin.
However, students are also re required
quired required to be enrolled in at least
one 300 level physics course and
in addition, be in the top third of
their class.
At the moment, there are ap approximately
proximately approximately 30 members. Most of
the members are seniors and grad graduate
uate graduate students, Dr. Conklin said,
because of the 300 course level
requirement.
Almost all the physics faculty
and some of the math faculty are
active, he said.
Sigma Pi Sigma is a member of
the Benton Engineering Society and
was founded in 1957.
12 Donkeys
Equal Car ?
BYFLEET, England (UPI)
Used car dealer Noel Roscoe Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday accepted 12 donkeys as partial
payment on a trade-in for a new
station wagon. They were worth
35 pounds (S9B) a head, he said.

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 22, 1965

Page 6

EDITORIAL
politics?
1C
TJIROM THE SWEETNESS and light that pervaded
relationships between elected officials and university
administrators at the University of Florida Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming last weekend, no one would have guessed how
bitterly they had been arguing over higher education
salaries for two weeks.
The explanation of the sudden change came Monday
and Tuesday as the Board of Regents first announced
75 academic positions involved in the dispute had
been granted pay raises within the budgets of the
institutions and recommended 15 top administrative
jobs for increases of from S3OO to $2,000 per year,
and then Governor Burns and the other members of
the Cabinet Budget Comn.ission approved them all.
Chancellor Broward Culpepper told the Budget
Commission and the Regents these would be the
final changes in salaries for this fiscal year, which
runs until next June 30.
But the issue is not dead, it has only been put to
sleep for a while.
CULPEPPER and the Regents admitted as much.
The Chancellor told the board it is imperative that
the next Legislature make the university budget sys system
tem system less cumbersome, and the board directed him to
meet with university and Cabinet officials and legis legislators
lators legislators to develop appropriate measures to submit
to the 1967 session.
Surely some simplification is needed. Yet the
problem appears less legislative than administrative.
There is nothing in the Florida Constitution nor the
statutes which requires the present 40 operations
needed to grant a pay raise to a university faculty
member or staff employe.
The statutes do require the Regents and institutions
to live within their budgets, and within work prog programs
rams programs approved by the Budget Commission. But they
also provide that the head of any state agency may
revise his work program quarterly within the overall
confines of his annual appropriation, and submit it
to the Budget Commission which, if it deems the re revision
vision revision advisable, may approve it.
Neither Regents nor universities can function as
they should, however, when regulation-ridden proce procedures
dures procedures take every detail of their spending up to the
highest level, the Budget Commission which can say
yes or no, says no just to prove once again it can.
In the most striking case involved in the present
dispute, the Commission had pulled the rug from
under University of Florida President J. Wayne
Reitz. He and the Regents requested that he be
permitted to pay $22,500 a year to a new adminis administrative
trative administrative vice president with whom he was negotiating.
After the Regents approved the figure, Dr. Reitz
apparently used it as a firm offer; when the Budget
Commission cut it back to $20,500, he reportedly
threatened to resign.
That he now has the $22,500 approved shows the
Commission could have granted it in the first place.
If his threat brought the Commission around, it is a
shame he had to resort to such tactics. But it is an
even greater shame that the Commission feels im impelled
pelled impelled to display its power over a $2,000 item (or
S3OO item) in the more than $lO5 million budget
allotted to the Regents for the universities.
THE KEY to the issues solution lies in an obser observation
vation observation Thomas Jefferson made in 1789: The exe execution
cution execution of the laws is more important than the making
of them.
Surely, somewhere between handing the Board of
Regents and the university presidents a blank check
and involving the Governor and Cabinet with such
petty decisions as S3OO spending changes, there is a
middle ground which can permit the Regents and their
administrators to run Floridas system of higher
education as it should be.
Until Floridas Governor and Cabinet are willing to
provide this flexibility in executing the laws, no
statutes the Legislature can adopt in 1967 or there thereafter
after thereafter will solve the problem. The issue swept under
the rug Monday and yesterday will continue to recur
- each time to the detriment of higher learning in
Florida.
The Tampa Tribune
I EDITORIALS STAFF
Drex Dobson assistant managing editor
Bill Lockhart editorial page editor
Andy Moor sports editor
Eunice Tall features editor
Gene Nail wire editor
Fran Snider student government editor
Peggy Blanchard coed editor
Judy Miller greek editor
Scott DeGarmo .' copy editor
Associate Editors: Bob Wilcox, Bruce Dudley,
Teury Miller. Yvette Cardozo. Justine Hartman,
Cheryl Kurit, Eddie Sears. j e ss uenke^lter
Norma Bell jim Bailey Susan Froemke
Sue Kennedy Leslie Marks Steven Brown
Elaine Fuller Mike Willard Kathie Keim
Kristy Kimball Judy Knight Jane Solomon
Suzi Beadleston Sharon Robinson Howard Rosenblatt
Dick Dennis Arlene Caplan Linda Rabinowitz

The
Florida Alliga tor
Steve Vaughn {gg
Editor
thinking |£|
out loud ..
By JIM MOORHEAD
omecoming, appropriately enough, was a time for seeing old faces
V\ which were once as familiar a part of my day as my toothbrush,
but which are now rare treats, like childhood trips to grandmas. And,
like those trips, the faces -- or at least the persons who go with
them have lost none of the charm, the attraction, the excitement
that marked them from their earliest days.
When youre with an everyday friend, youre thinking about the
subject at hand, and maybe about whats coming up tomorrow between
you. Recollection with a present friend is a sometime thing, and
reminiscence is reserved for an occasion which demands it.
But with a friend of a bygone day, reminiscence permeates the
meeting from the moment you warmly shake hands until you reluctantly
repeat, See you later.
The unexpected encounter with an old friend is one of Homecoming
Weekends special bonuses, subject to occur at anytime. This year,
just a few minutes before game time, I spotted a fraternity brother
from I-wont-say-how-far-back standing on the corner near the sta stadium
dium stadium hand upraised, with a pair of tickets tightly clamped between
thumb and forefinger.
> HE LOOKED AMUSINGLY desperate in any case, but what made the
sight particularly funny was the fact that hes the guy I particularly
remember for returning to campus on at least two past homecomings
and searching me out to see if I could accomodate him with a couple
of tickets for himself and the wife.
This always occurred about 20 minutes before kickoff and somehow
I or someone always seemed to come through for him. Last Saturday
was poetic justice, but with his dumb luck Im sure he shed those
extra tickets at a profit and was in his seat in time to ogle every
Gatorette on the field before the teams even came out of the gym.
A wide-open party late Saturday night was the occasion for seeing
more old friends and acquaintances, plus getting the word on others
who couldnt make it.
ONt, GIKLi more pioperiy a young woman now, I suppose --
looked disturbingly different. Only her voice seemed the same. Her
hair struck the eyes less softly, her pallor looked as though the sun had
been ordered out of her life. Then I learned the truth: an accident some
months ago; third degree burns; fearful shock. It had all left its mark
It will be good to see her again next year. She will look much better.*
One friend, younger but far wiser than I. had a little more pot around
the middle and perhaps a strand or two of grey near the ears. But his
keen observations never had a finer edge, and his sharp tongue was
still a dagger that drew my dumb admiration.
WE TALKED OF POLITICS, and I remembered what a saddle burr he
had been for many a compus politician who thought himself comfortably
seated along UFs easy street in days past. We talked of campus publi publications,
cations, publications, of daily Alligators, of deadlines every afternoon and evening
And I remembered the endless hours he spent in the Union basement*
laboring with love over the two editions weekly, laboring far longer than
many men in their regular jobs, trying mightily to make each paper
bear the stamp of his personality, his philosophy, his beliefs. That kind
of personal journalism is as dead here as 30-persons-to-a-chs
We even spoke briefly of the football team, and I reflected for m
instant on how unfanaticalbut loyal a fan hes always been. \ Kam
a game is a game ... but the weekends the thing. e 16
Homecomings, God blessem! Theyre a rat race! a headache a era
whirl of too much in too little time. But theyre friends-gone-bv I
have another one. y s

JOHN JENKINS WRITE!
FranklJ
Any writer is receptive to constructive criti
I read and consider very carefully all B
regarding my column, and there are a few thfl
would like to clear up.
I HAVE BEEN accused of not being objective |
first column. I will be the first one to admit td
body that I am most subjective, and I deny thfl
student can discuss issues of importance tostd
without being so. In writing this column I nJ
claims to objectivity, as I feel very strongly"*
what I write. Furthermore, it must not be id
that my critics, by attacking my subjectivity*
therefore objective, for it just is not so. I
It would seem, from the general tone of thd
ponse to this column, that a few people bed
would control the wind if I could. I do not td
this is a fair assumption from what I have vd
I do not seek to silence disagreement but 1 d
mand, as all citizens should that attacks andod
indictments of our countrys policies be sud
tiated, if not by facts, then by competent logl
sound reasong. If my critics are unable to offed
sound reasoning, or are unable to corroborate*
statements by facts, then I do not believe std
should be subjected to their constant drivel. 9
NOW, YOU WILL ASK, what evidence do I id
claim that the radicals on this campus have*
illogical arguments, or have neglected certain*
in presenting their case? I will use some exar9
from The Alligator. First, ina letter entitled, I
Quit, in the Sept. 30, issue, a writer bases p 9
his argument for our withdrawal from South Vie 9
on the assumption that were we to do so, the I
namese could shape for themselves withou
foreign interference, a destiny that is in accod
their traditions and experience .. . I seril
question the validity of such an assumption, al
does a one time Governor-General of India, al
sonal friend of Ghandi Dr. C. Rajagopalacl
IN A LETTER to the New York Times of J J
1965, he said, There is not the slightest doubl
if America withdraws and leaves Southeast Asl
itself, Communist China will seize the continl
Mr. Robert Martin, a writer for U. S. News and vl
Report, a man who witnessed the Com n. mist take!
in China, the Chinese intervention in the Kcl
conflict, the French loss in Indo-China, and the!
American advisors working in Viet Nam, when*
what might have happened had not the U. S. be<|
involved in Asia, answered, By now, all ofSoutll
Asia would have been under direct or indirect Chil
control. There are innumerable reports fromkl
ledge people about the situation, who concur onl
point. It would seem the writer of the letter has I
lected to consider these analyses.
ANOTHER WRITER in the October 5, issue, wil
Our refusal to recognize the legitimate aspiral
of emerging nations will, I fear, cause them to rel
us as an enemy of change and reform. The w|
correlates the terrorist attempt of the Viet Col
overthrow the government of South Viet Nam I
legitimate aspirations. He views the VC as the poJ
revolutionaries. I doubt whether popular re\
tionaries would find it necessary to resort to mu
and terror to gain support of the populace. Ber
Fall, a source quoted by the first writer i
argument, relates how perhaps 13,000 smal vi
and hamlet chieftains have been murdered in S
Viet Nam to insure the support of the villages so
Viet Cong. Clifford Somers, in his article o
October, offers first hand evidence of the
ularity of these revolutionaries.
A third writer, in his weekly column in The i
gator, is stil looking for . . one cry of out
over U. S. aggression in South Viet Nam .
afraid he will be looking for quite some time
once again facts damaging to his thesis have
ignored. Was it America that invaded North Ko
America that devoured Tibet, America that b
barded Quemoy and Matsu? I think not, but m
this writer ought to ask the South Koreans, oi
Tibetans, or the Nationalist Chinese.
MAY I REITERATE to those few who still f<
desire to suppress expression of disagreement
I welcome discussion and criticism of our gov<
ments policies. But if the dissenters must re
to such tactics as outlined above to give credib
to their arguments, if they cannot let their pr
sitions stand on their own two feet without prop
them up with false assumptions, then I for om
going to take them to account quite FRANK

The Alligator accepts all l^ e
to the editor. Due to space lift
tations, however, we are unab
to print letters exceeding 2'
words. Names will be withhe
upon request of the writer.




AVAILABLE WEEKLY IN FIVE OR SIX COLUMN SIZE
For Release Week Beginning Sunday, October 3, 1965
eeDueMeD.rrSTtMe mmeFACT6eme- eeWLeneilw stpu>
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immature |
x& Editor:
I think that your Letters column is one of the
finest repositories of infantilism I have ever en encountered.
countered. encountered. Frankly I find such articles as Little
Orphan Annie, Dag wood, Henry, etc., far more in ins:&:
s:&: ins:&: tellectually stimulating, which of itself, leaves me
wide open for more of this columns attack. But, I *:s:
x-x assure you that I have no intention of rebutting, and >|:s:
thus match wits with idiots.
I would love to pick up The Alligator and read, £:*
:£:j: just once, some stimulating discourse or well de- >s:|:
veloped, invigorating controversy. Instead, I find
children bickering over kindergarten politics, and g:-:;
even the pseudo-critics i.e., Name Withheld of
>*s Oct. 19th, cannot divorce themselves of partisan
sentimentality. gx;
This problem evidentally exists in every school
>:*: newspaper, as it was most prevalent in The Navigator
of Jacksonville University. They, too, could not rise
:§:£ above the muck and mire of petty prejudices and
party popularity contests.
:X;X Frankly, I dont give a damn about any of your
school politics because you have, by your editorial
manifestations, painted a picture of babies running
viv: around as babies will calling names and snickering
jxjij: like a bunch of little girls, in order to gain the -jjg
£\v attentions and affections of little boys, i.e., your
adherents or constituents, as you choose to call them.
:*:£ Stop playing at politics, which is apparently what
5:?: you are doing, for obviously, it is a game, the rules jv*
>:*: of which you are not mature enough to handle and : : : : : : :
manipulate with any degree of outward finesse.
>£>: Grow up Alligator, then maybe I wont have to
*:s: stoop to your level of comprehension to make my :j*j:
point.
Robert J. Lamb, ILW
# If we were a judge, Law Student Lamb, youd lose
your case. Youve touched on plenty of generalities
:*& but fail to make your point, whatever that is. x ; x
x|g EDITOR gx
Xy**X*X X # X X X*X*X*X*X # X' X*X*I*X*Xx X*X XvXvXvXvXvX*I%v#XvXvX X*X X X # X XvX *
patriot
Dear Editor: . ..
After reading Mr. Somers article of Monday, Oct. 18, I came to the
conclusion that Mr. Somers was a real American patriot but a rat r
poor logician. . D
His three basic premises regarding the Vietnamese crisis: (1) Red
China is supplying the war; (2) "We are not aggressors; and
(3) The Red Chinese are the aggressors, are all unfounded.
Ive studied reports from newspapers, magazines. TV, and radio, ana
have found no mention of Red China. (If the reader will reflect, he 11
notice this to be true.) There is virtually no Chinese aid given either
in troops or weapons. (At least half of the Viet Cong armament s
captured American weapons.) Yet, Mr. Somers claims that China is
supplying the war.
i The 2nd and 3rd premises can be taken together. Although we are
not aggressors, we have approximately 140,000 troops in Vtet Nam.
Although we are not aggressors, we hold bombing s a y
throughout Viet Nam. And, although we are not aggressors American
soldiers and airmen kill thousands of people monthly. Na urally we
only kill Viet Cong; but the Viet Cong includ women and children, and
any other Vietnamese killed accidentally.
When this tremendous American influence in Viet
the virtual Impotence of Red China la realized It seems rather fMIWi
to saywe are not aggressors and the Red Chinese are
I personally feel that the U. S. Is an aggressor In Viet Nam, but Oils
Is aXoot point. But Pm not mistaking Chauvinism for reason. Follow
the example, Mr. Somers. Davld Newman 3 AS

honorable?
Editor:
I am writing in reference to your article of October 7, 1965, con concerning
cerning concerning Pfc. Winstel R. Beltons sentence, etc., in the Viet Nam case.
I do not object to the pretrial agreement, which several of your
readers would not understand, made by the Commanding General,
Lt. Gen. Robert H. Colglazier, USA, in which Belton received a guar guarantee
antee guarantee for a maximum sentence of one year in prision, a bad conduct
discharge, and a loss of pay... in return for Beltons plea of Guilty
at the trial thus saving great time and expense of an enlongated bitter
trial.
What I do so object to most vehemently is the chain of events which
followed. It is extremely difficult for me. after having served six years
in the service, to understand how tradition, procedures, and precedents
in the service could be so cal ously not only disregarded, but com completely
pletely completely thrown aside in the suspending action whereby the sentence .
the entire sentence of both the court and the pretrial agreement sen sentence
tence sentence . has been negated to nothing and further making it possible
for Belton to become Honorably Discharged, without a blot on his
service record.
Is this some sort of extension of pressure groups because Belton
is a Negro? I suppose that I am as neutral as one might be on the Negro
rights problem, having attended schools with them (grammar through
high school and college), competed with them in sports, and served
with them in the service. What difference is there if I am white, yellow
or black if I violate a law, an order, a statutue, an ordinance, or a
regulation?
Are we to have one set of laws, etc., for one race and an entirely
different set of laws for each other race? Are we to remove the blind blindfold
fold blindfold from the traditional symbol of justice so that she might be per permitted
mitted permitted to see the color of the skin of those who come before the face
of justice?
What has our nation come to when anyone, regardless of color, race
or creed, can do such a gross act with total disrespect to our nation,
its laws, its government, and its principles and then be treated in the
same manner as those who have not committed even a so called trivial
offense, but have honorably upheld these same laws, traditions, and
government even to the extent of serious injury and grave peril to
life and limb.
Just how much does this action cheapen the honorable discharges of
the hundreds of thousands of servicemen who have so nobly and valiantly
served this great country. Just how much does this cheapen your own
honorable discharge. You students of the University of Florida on the
campus now ... I urge all of you who have served in the service and
have similar feelings to write your congressman, as I shall.write mine,
for an Investigation and explanation of this blot upon the services and
all honorable discharges brought about by this Incident.
Samuel D. Cox, Freshman Law
ZENITH TV
NOW AS LOW $99.95
SEE NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA'S LARGEST
DISPLAY OF ZENITH TV
PERFORMANCE GUARANTEED BY
COUCH'S FINE ZENITH TECHNICIANS
"ASK YOUR FRIENDS OR NEIGHBORS"
608 N. COUCH'S MAIN ST.
SELLING AND SERVICING SINCE 1933

Friday. Oct. 22, 1965, The Florida Alligator,


Neither rain
nor snow
norheat
nor Liz
.V *.
]
can ever
wrinkle
his
Press-Free
Post-Grads
Nothing puts a crease in
these pants where a crease
doesnt belong. They hold
their crisp, neat look hour
after hour. No matter how
often they get washed, they
never, ever need ironing.
Trimly tapered with belt
loops and cuffs. Colors and
fabrics for casual and dress
wear. 65% Dacron* polyes polyester/35%
ter/35% polyester/35% cotton, $6.98. Flan Flannels,
nels, Flannels, hopsacking, reverse
twists, Acrilan*acrylic, $7.98.
(Slightly higher in the West.)
Headquarters in Gainesville
For
h.i.s.
SPORTSWEAR
Belk-
Lindsey
THE STORE WMM MORE
GAINESVILLE
Shopping Center
Use Your Charge Card
.Open Evenings 'til 9 PM

Page 7



t, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 22, 1965

Page 8

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
1964 LAMBRETTA TV 175 motor
scooter. Book price $365 make
offer. Call Ray Crockett 2-9284.
(A-34- 3t-c).
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, maho mahogany,
gany, mahogany, excellent condition, reason reasonable;
able; reasonable; TRAILER for sale or rent.
20x8. Clean, comfortable, cozy.
Cheap. Cool bachelors pad. On lot.
378-3463. (A-33-3t-c).
LIMITED MEMBERSHIPS are now
available in Triangle Flying Club.
Buy a part of 2 modern airplanes
and learn to fly at worlds lowest
cost. Call Bill Burwell at 372-3563.
(A-33-3t-c).
VIOGTLANDER VITOMATIC 11,
33 mm. camera with built-in light
meter. Heiland flash unit and case.
Original cost $125, will sell for
$75. Ken Deen, 266 Sledd A, 372-
9252. (A-33-3t-c).
ENGAGEMENT RINGS at whole wholesale
sale wholesale cost plus 10%. SBOO ring would
cost $440. Can get any style, size
or price. Call 2-1076 or see Joseph
Reda in apartment over Teds Ta Tavern
vern Tavern on NW 13 Ave. (A-33-3t-c).
GIBSON SOUTHERN JUMBO flat
top Guitar, S2OO. Gibson B-45 12
string, $250 with cases. John
Schwulst, 450 Murphree C.
372-9435. (A-32-4t-c).
NEW HONDA, 50 cc. Electric
starter, fully equipped. Sells new
for $279, will take $250. Only 35
miles. Call 6-8085 after 6:00. (A (A---32-ts-c).
--32-ts-c). (A---32-ts-c).

for sale
MOVING. Will sell baby playpen playpenbed;
bed; playpenbed; iron; baby bath. Call 372-
7627. (A-35-3t-c).
LAWN MOWER, used one year.
$lO. Call 376-8660 after 5 p.m.
(A-34-3t-c).
GIVE AWAY $143 equity in set of
Colliers Encyclopedia. Assume
sll. payments. 24 vol. 10 Junior
Classics included free. 210-C
Flavet 111, FR 6-0693. (A-35-
lt-c).
LARGE BABY BED, sls. Can see
at Pinehurst Trailer Park 3530
SW 24 Ave. Lot #75. Phone 376-
2306. (A-35-3t-p).
SONY tape reorder, model 521,
two AKAI speakers, 1/3 original originalcost.
cost. originalcost. Cannon movie camera 1/2
cost. Call Allan Wright, 372-6474.
(A-34-2t-c).
help wanted
DELIVERY OF St. Petersburg
Times; NW 8 Ave to NW 45 Ave,
13 St to 34 St. Call 376-1408 if
interested. (E-35-ts-c).
WAITER WANTED: 5 days, 4-8
p.m. Apply Larrys Wonderhouse,
14 SW 1 St. (E-34-ts-c).
WAITRESS to work evening hours
(5-12). Hourly wage. No experience
necessary. Prefer student wife.
Apply Kings Food Host, 1430 SW
13 St. (E-33-3t-c).
GAINESVILLE'S LUXURY THEATRE
Doom Open Doily 12:30 P.M.
Cont. Shew* All Dov StR. \ PM.
HELD OVER!
A MOVIE THAT YOU
SHOULD NOT MISS!"
AH -JUDITH CRIST,
on NBC-TV TODAY show
josefh 6 ievne w***
lauimeHaiMiwroe
juuecrae
HarliiM"
an em sassy pinrures release 9w
NO CHILDRENS TICKETS SOLD
FOR THIS PERFORMANCE
Smoking lounge with
I SATURDAY* MORNING
I FROM 10:30 to 2 P.M.
2 HITS!
MAGIC SWORD I
CHILDREN WILL NOT
BE PERMITTED TO STAY
AFTER TEEN SHOW.

Ihelp wanted]
CONTROLLER. Men to train for
controller assignment which offers
excellent opportunity for those
qualified. Age 25-38. College edu education,
cation, education, major in business adminis administration
tration administration or accounting. Experience
would be advantageous but not ab absolutely
solutely absolutely essential. Many outstand outstanding
ing outstanding employee benefits. Apply
Personnel Dept., Sears, Roebuck
and Co. 1420 NW 23 Blvd. Gaine Gainesville,
sville, Gainesville, Fla. (E-28-10t-c).
STUDENTS NEEDED to assist
manager. QUALIFICATIONS: (1)
U of F student in good academic
standing. (2) Can work evenings.
(3) Can work 18-22 hours per week.
$35.00 per week salary (S9O on
full-time basis). Call Mr. Malag Malaghan
han Malaghan at 8-2966 between 9:00 5:00.
frV3l-tf-c).
wanted
MALE ROOMMATE,broadminded,
to share 10 x 48 2 bedroom house
trailer. Well located. Complete
privacy. Phone 8-1776 after 5 p.m.
If no answer, keep trying. (C-33-
st-c).
WANTED: Someone to share our
maid in our home. Excellent care.
One child $lO, two children $lB
per week. Call 2-3788 Flavet 111,
anytime. (C-32-3t-c).

WfWlftHM Marti lonite
O p- M t. ,. 300... I

wanted |
RIDE NEEDED to New Orleans on
the weekend of Oct. 29th. Will share
expenses. Call Sandy, Jennings 2-
6381 room 2031 or 378-3586. (C (C---34-2t-c).
--34-2t-c). (C---34-2t-c).
for rent
WILLIS TON MOTEL: Rooms by
week or month. Single or double.
Students rates, television, phones,
and daily maid service. Rooms
available for all University events.
Phone Williston 528-4421. (B-35-
1 t-c).
PRIVATE HOME, furnished room
for boys. Double SSO, single $35
monthly. Convenient to Univ. and
town. Phone 2-0809. (B-35-6t-c).
EXCEPTIONALLY NICE 3 bed-
bath home. Central heat
and air, built-in kitchen, screened
lanai patio. Lovely residential area
in NW section. Available Nov. 1.
Will rent on lease or option to buy
$165. mon. to responsible family.
Call 376-7910. (B-35-3t-c).
TRAILER. One bedroom, furnish furnished.
ed. furnished. $45. monthly plus utilities.
FR 2-0421. (B-34-ts-c).
ONE BEDROOM UNFURNISHED
apartment. Kitchen equipped. 409
NW 12 Dr. S6O. monthly. Call
McKinney-Green, Inc., Realtors.
FR 2-3617. (B-33-ts-c).

for rent
SHARE MODERN 10 x 50 2 bed
room trailer with male graduate
student. Utilities included. $45 mo
Call Ken Rymal, ext. 2991 or 37/
5248. (B-35-st-c).
NEW APARTMENT to share with
male or 2 people to sub-let. Fur Furnished.
nished. Furnished. sllO per month. Call 378.
4718, 3500 SW 24 Ave., Apt l
(B-35-2t-c).
real estate
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom, 2 bath
house. Central heat, built-in
kitchen, newly painted. Carport
and storage area. Small down
payment. 372-3826. (I-24-ts-c).
services
ANNOUNCING OPENING of Horse
Haven Riding School. Instruction in
beginners- Hunters- Jumper Jumperclasses.
classes. Jumperclasses. Horses pastured. Rt. 26
west of Gainesville. Call 6-3494.
(M-35-2t-c).
IRONING DONE IN MY HOME.
Call 6-4086 after 5 p.m. (M-34-
st-c).
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios. 372-0300. (M (M---8-ts-c).
--8-ts-c). (M---8-ts-c).



gator classifieds

autos
1962 PORSCHE, blue super coupe
with Borsch exhaust system. 376-
4706. (G-35-st-c).
1965 VALIANT, fully equipped with
air conditioning. S3OO. and assume
payments. FR6-5272.(G-35-3t-c).
1964 TEMPEST, 2 door, stick,
radio and heater. 12,000 miles.
Take older car for equity. Assume
$48.11 payments. Call 6-0693.
(G-35-1 t-c).
1960 AUSTIN HEALY 3000. Mech Mechanically
anically Mechanically sound; body in excellent
condition. White, wire wheels.
Asking SI2OO. Call Tony at ext.
2281 or 372-4973. (G-34-2t-p).
1961 ALFA ROMEO. A real fun
car. Wood rim steering wheel.
Needs grill panel. $875. Call FR
8-1930. (G-34-ts-c).
1961 RENAULT 4-dr sedan(4-CV),
$195. Radio, seat belts, runs well,
good tires. 376-0036. (G-34-3t-c).
1963 CHEVY II; 6 cylinder, stan standard
dard standard shift, heater. Good shape.
SI2OO. Call 6-8806 evenings. (G (G---30-ts-c).
--30-ts-c). (G---30-ts-c).

MARLON BRANDO YIARRYNNEH YIARRYNNEHiPfIigI
iPfIigI YIARRYNNEHiPfIigI A daring master spy...
a case-hardened
Nazi captain
| ...a girl who despised
but offered herself
; l|gi_S so they could live.
1:00,3:12,5:24,7:36,9:48 dcW
tasMA (i)
W
OPERA COMPANY
presenting Puccini's immortal
fLA BOHEHEI
b J
AN ACTUAL PERFORMANCE IN TECHNICOLOR
n6w" '\ /^MTI NEE
' ON SALE! f ALL SEATS $1.50 \
V Only Capacity ( EVENINGBf.M. J
Be Sol^^ Vs ->A!: L SEATS

autos
1960 CHEVROLET IMPALA hard hardtop,
top, hardtop, white, radio and heater.
Powerglide 283. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Want SBSO or best offer.
Call 378-1187 or 378-4380. (G (G---28-ts-c).
--28-ts-c). (G---28-ts-c).
1957 PLYMOUTH, 2 door, 6
cylinder, stick; first S2OO takes
it. Its a sacrifice, but I want a
cycle. Call Dan 8-2286 anytime
before midnight. (G-32-st-c).
(f
1964 VOLKSWAGEN, light beige,
heater. Owner going abroad. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Call 372-7627.
(G-32-st-c)
lost&found
LOST: Diamond wrist watch, be between
tween between Frat. Row and Univ. Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium. Reward. Call 378-4029.
(L-35-st-c).
LADIES BLUE RIMMED glasses,
lost between McCollums and Leigh
Hall. Please call 2-5944 after afternoons.
noons. afternoons. (L-35-lt-c).
LOST: Black wallet, S2O reward.
Call Louis R. Jaeger, 376-9158.
(L-33-ts-c).

j " &
GET YOUR HOT CAMPUS PACS: At Information Booth
PRICES 3

Campus Pacs Still On Sale

If you havent yet bought your
$9.28 value for $3 you can still do
it, says Tim Johnson Campus Pac
Chairman for Dollars forScholars.
Campus pacs will be on sale
today and Monday through Friday
from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
information booth across from the
hub.
The proceeds from the sale go to
the Dollars for Scholars Fund. For
every dollar in this fund, the gov government
ernment government puts up nine dollars for use
in student loans.
Both mensand womensCampus

He!s a special kind of spy... ft
he doesnt know enough 0^
COme *"^ om \ Y
[ BKHT t
SIAMINt
3.5. DtRK BOGARDE SYLVAKOSCIIU
7. ?. ROBERTMORLEY LEOMcKERN
IN COLOR
PLUS* Al6-Minute Jaunt Thru Greenwich Village :
BIG TOWN VILLAGE
I v^tt i
I LAST TIMES TONIGHT I
I fcr mMmjmm nun NEWMAN I
I WILLIAM JOANNE WDODWARO I
I znew I
I fITjJ KIND OF LOVE 11
I SATURDAY ONLY # 2 I
J HIT #w one eyed jacks I
|_Color Morion Brando J

Pacs contain a toothbrush, two bars
of Palmolive soap, a giant tube of
Cue toothpaste, Lustre Cream
shampoo, and Green Mint mouth mouthwash.
wash. mouthwash.
The MensCampus Pac also con contains
tains contains a can of Tackle spray deodor deodorant,
ant, deodorant, Old Spice after shave lotion and
hair cream, a can of medicated
shaving lather, and Monsieur Lan Lanvin
vin Lanvin Cologne.
The Womens Campus Pac, in
addition, has a large can of Lustre
Cream Hair Spray, Tussy Eye

Friday, Oct. 22, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Makeup Remover, Dermassage
Skin Cream, andSunn FunSunTan
Cream.
Christian
Gets Warning
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) -- Eleven
year old Daniel Champion of Crys Crystal
tal Crystal River served notice Tuesday
that State School Superintendent
Floyd Christians job was in dan danger.
ger. danger.
When I grow up I will be
superintendent of public in instruction,
struction, instruction, the young schoolboy
wrote Christian in a letter con congratulating
gratulating congratulating the new superintendent
upon assuming the high post.
Daniel was just one of several
children from the sixth grade class
of Crystal River Elementary
School who wrote letters to
Christian. Another child, Rita
Ison, admonished the school chief:
work hard.
Christian has to run for office
next year, but it isnt likely he
will get much Immediate opposition
from young Champion. The con constitution
stitution constitution says you have to be 21
years of age to hold the office.
\
WE6OT
SO BIG
'CAUSE WE |
CHARGE SO IITTLE |
r rent a car from ,1
mcoMO-cjuf\
m.*o
We feature Valiants A other
CHRYSLER built cars Gas Gasoil
oil Gasoil insurance- all included!
PHONE 376-3644

Page 9



I, The Florida Alligator. Friday, Oct. 22, 1965

Page 10

fraternally
speaking

By JUDY MILLER
Alligator Staff Writer
The Inter-Fraternity Council handed down a requested, self selfimposed
imposed selfimposed social probation on Pi Kappa Alpha, according to Pike
president, Mike Neil.
The probation will be ineffect until November 12, the day before
the Tulane game. There will be no parties, no rushees, no girls
in the house and no socials with sororities.
Neil said there were many minor incidents which led to a bad
attitude in the fraternity, and that the emphasis on grades was
not strong enough.
Everybody got the idea that all fraternities were for was to
have a good time. Being a social fraternity means more than just
having a good time, it includes service, too. To begin this new
effort towards service, the Pikes are going to the local Boys Club
this Saturday afternoon.
The Kappa Alpha Thetas are holding a social for the Kappa
Alpha fraternity on Sunday afternoon as a special thanks for the
KAs helping on the sororitys float. A special present will be
given to Larry Burnette for his special assistance. On Halloween
eve the KAT pledges are dressing up and going to the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center with candy for the children in the pediatrics
ward.
The new Phi Epsilon Pi Dreamgirl is Cheryl Gorsettman, 20,
from Miami.
Phi Gamma Delta (Fiji) took the Gainesville Boys Club to the
Homecoming Parade for the second consecutive year. Afterwards
the boys were taken to the Fiji house for refreshments.
In keeping with the theme for homecoming and cheering 400
times, the Chi Phis were entertained by Miss Peggy Sarg, an
AGo Go dancer from the Stage Lounge in Tampa. Miss Sarg put
on two shows in her cage and later judged an A Go Go contest
between the Chi Phis and their dates.
The Tau Epsilon Phis had the Newbeats and James Brown and
the Sensations for their Homecoming attraction, and a special
performance was made by Howard Vogel, a pledge, who displayed
exceptional dancing ability.
The Alpha Tau Omegas held a social Wednesday night for
Delta Phi Epsilon sorority.
A special mention goes out to Abby Drue of Alpha Epsilon Phi
sorority who designed the first place sorority winners float for
the Homecoming Parade.
All fraternity and sorority news is welcome.
Deadline is Wednesday prior to publication.
For pictures Tuesday prior to publication on
Friday.

Remedy For Sniffles Tangerines

Have the sniffles? Try eating a
tangerine!
Tangerines have recently given
the citrus researchers of the Flor Florida
ida Florida Agricultural Experiment sta stations
tions stations a pleasant surprise. They
contain in natural form a well wellknown
known wellknown decongestant compound
called Synephrine.
Doctors have long recommended
citrus fruits, so plentiful in Vita Vitamin
min Vitamin C, as effective in helping the
body to resist the common cold.
Now it appears that citrus fruits,
especially the luscious tangerine,
may prove effective in the relief
of one of the most unpleasant of
cold symptoms the sniffles.
Gitrus Station scientists Drs.
T. A. Wheaton, W. F. Newhall,
Ivan Stewart and George J. Ed Edwards
wards Edwards have discovered in plants
this compound, known up until now
in its man-made form. Five other
related new compounds have been
discovered as well.
The making of Synephrine as a
synthetic compound was first re reported
ported reported in a German Laboratory
in 1927. Doctors have since found
it useful as both a decongestant
aAd a stimulant, in treating adults
and children. The minimum oral
dosage is 100 milligrams.
The discovery was made during
research on fertilizers for citrus
trees. The actual study concerned
what happens to nitrogen after it
enters the roots of the trees. In the
course of running the tests, an un unknown
known unknown compound kept appearing in
the leaves and fruit.
Through a series of complex
analyses the substance was ana analyzed
lyzed analyzed and found to be Synephrine.

An analytical tool, an infrared
spectrophotometer, was used to
identify the various substances.
The five new compounds dis discovered
covered discovered along with Synephrine
make up a new family of com compounds
pounds compounds called the Phenolic
amines. They are scientifically

FRIDAY All Rsh
You Con Eat,
OLD-FASHIONED Hush Puppies,
FISH NIGHT Cole Slaw 97 s
5 PM 9 PM
Fresh Cedar Key Rsh
LARRYS
Restaurant
1225 W. Univ. Ave. 372-6666

UF To Study Pollution Problem

The Phelps Sanitary Research
Laboratory, research branch of the
Civil Engineering Department, will
become a center of lake pollution
study in Florida, according to Dr.
George B. Morgan, administrative
head of the Lab.
Morgan said that the Lab will
conduct a three year project south southeast
east southeast of Melrose to study the effects
of additives such as treated sewage
to Florida lakes.
Morgan, along with Dr. Thomas
D. Furman and Dr. Hugh D. Putnam
of the Civil Engineering staff, will
direct the experiments.
He pointed out that lake pollution
is becoming an alarming problem
in the state, affecting recreational
and sports facilities. He cited Lake
Apopka in central Florida as a lake
receiving excessive nourish nourishment
ment nourishment leading to pollution.
Morgan said that Florida has a
unique problem because of its high
mean temperatures and mineral
water. Both foster the growth of
harmful algae, he said.
The projected study, already
partially financed by the University
of Florida and drawing the attention
of state agencies, is aimed at the
physical, chemical and biological
description of lake mechanics.
The intention of the researchers
is to partition the clean figure-8
shaped lake so that munenis may
be added to half of it while the other
portion remains free of additives.
By careful monitoring of tem temperature
perature temperature and oxygen levels in both
sides, the experiments should show
the growing affects of the added
material on the lake metabolism,
or rate of organism formation.
Further experiments will show
seasonal variation in the number
and types of bacteria and algae
present in the experimental and
control sides of the now pure lake.
Morgan declined to guess how
soon the results of such an exper-

names as follows: Octopamine
(another first in plants), tyra tyramine,
mine, tyramine, N-methyl tyramine, Hordi Hordinine
nine Hordinine and feruloylputreseine.
These compounds may prove
valuable in the citrus industry in
the analysis of natural citris in ingredients
gredients ingredients of canned drinks.

THREE YEAR PROGRAM SET

iment could be put to practical use
in Florida, but said that the first
step in analyzing the problem might
spur interest among Floridians.
With 30,000 lakes in the state,
the problem will become more and
more important in the next few

XEftdx dopitS
1-19 Copies, luy ea. 20&
Over, 9 Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship
OF GAINESVILLE
GUEST SPEAKER, OCT. 24th:
Dr. Herta Pauly, Visiting Professor of Philosophy
And Religion
TOPIC:
Seeing Things Together And Seeing Things Apart
As East Meets West
SUNDAY, 11 A.M.
EVERYONE INVITED 324 FLORIDA UNION
WORRIED
...about THE job?
Interview after interview...
Company after company...
Will my college education be wasted on a
run-of-the-mill job?
But don't give up yet. Soon they'll work
down the list of thousands of ordinary guys and
finally reach good ol' ordinary you. At last,
it's your chance to be interviewed.
Go in there and tell the interviewer why
you're different enough to get THE job.
If there is the slightest possibility that you
aren't that different.. .here's an idea for you.
SHOW THE INTERVIEWER YOUR
PRIVATE PILOT'S LICENSE YOU
GOT FROM CASSELS IN-THE-AIR.
Sure! A license from the only FAA-approved
private pilot course available in Gainesville.
Not only can you be more places faster; you
can be there cheaper than with any form of trans transportation,
portation, transportation, to cover the same amount of miles and
time consumed. Also, statistics prove it's safer.
You say that's not much. Believe me, it's
plenty. It all spells PROFIT for your future em employer.
ployer. employer.
Start your lessons now, during these valuable
college years. Get an introductory half-hour
plane ride today at Cassels In-The-Air for only $5. j
(Oh! A warning in advance: They'll let you
fly the plane yourself after only 10 minutes aloft.)
CASSELS IN-THE-AIR
GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT I

years as population increases,
he said.

§GATQS)b
a 8
8 REACH J
BlpEOPufr'T
S vniv. £>. 2832 7



Cross Atlantic On Skiis?

By CHERYL KURIT
Alligator Staff Writer
ter ski across the Atlantic
n? Not impossible says UF
nt Randy Rabe.

I FINAL WEEK
CLASSICAL SALE
40% off
I DGG Reg* ss*9B Ovr Fries $3.50
60% .
Monitor/ VOX
Reg. $4.98 Oir Price $1.99
See And Listen To These Terrific Savings At
23 W. UNIV. AVI.
Fr* Forklii li R*r
New hrs. 9-9Mon.thiu Fri./9-6 Sat., Closed Sun*

I K£ HOUSE OF TRAVEL]
I HH Serving all your travel needs I
House of Travel No Added Service Fees I
I Fully Accredited Agency I
I PHONE I
I 378 1601 3415 W. UNIVERSITY AYE. I

STUDENT SAYS 'YES

The New York to Paris trip is
planned for the summer of 1966,
and will be executed by a team of
six St. Petersburg men.
To prepare them for the 4,700

mile trip, a trial run from St.
Petersburg to Nassau will be made
over the Thanksgiving or Christ Christmas
mas Christmas holidays. While this run will
be mainly for testing purposes, the
Worlds Water Ski record from
Miami to Nassau will hopefully be
cut in half.
The existing record for this run
is ten and one-half hours or about
18 miles per hour.
Randy Rabe, the master-mind of
the overseas trip, explained that
the skiers will be towed by a spe specially
cially specially equipped Marlin, a 28 foot
ocean racing boat supplied by the
Marlin Yacht Company, Inc., of
Ft. Lauderdale. The boat will be
powered by two 600 horsepower
Ford engines supplied by Holman-
Moody Marine Division of Miami.
A sister ship, either a large
corporation yacht or tanker, will
be used as a fuel tender and per personnel
sonnel personnel carrier, continued Rabe.
The skiers will ski one at a time
in four hour shifts twenty-four
hours a day. There will be two
skiers on the small boat at all
times, one skiing and the other a aboard
board aboard ready for the next shift.
The other skiers and personnel
will be aboard the sister ship.
TYPING TABLES
&
SMALL DESKS
FROM $6 TO $35
Some NEW, Some USED
KISERS
Office Equipment
604 N. Main St.

Two skiers will be transferred
every eight hours to the small boat
by means of a swing boom without
a loss of speed, added Rabe.
The Marlin will run approxi approximately
mately approximately twelve hours with a full
1000 gallons of fuel. Refueling will
be accomplished in a manner simi similar
lar similar to aircraft procedures. The
Marlin is capable of 76 miles per
hour and is ten and a half tons.
The route taken will be the South
Atlantic with stops made at Ber Bermuda,
muda, Bermuda, Azores, Lisbon, and Le
Havre. The trip will originate from
the fame Statue of Liberty and end
at the Eiffel Tower of Paris.
The trip will be made slalom
style and those composing the team
are, besides Rabe, Tom Saule, Ron
Chamberlain, Mike Cooper, aIIUF
students, Craig Wadsworth, and
Bill Moore, Brevard Junior
College students.

Friday. Oct. 22. 1965, The Florida Alligator,

UF Student Randy
Rabe checks out the
boat (No. 44) that he
plans to use to cross
the Atlantic. 007 pro provides
vides provides some rough
competition. Below
Rabe goes through a
few stunts on the skiis.

The venture Is owned and o.
ganized solely by Randy Rabe En Enterprises,
terprises, Enterprises, Inc., St. Petersburg,
and is for sale as a promotion
package to anyone who wants to
buy It.
Rabe, himself, has been a lead leading
ing leading Innovator of ski tricks, includ including
ing including skiing backwards barefooted
and skiing on one bare foot, and
has won six worlds first titles
while with the Cypress Gardens
troupe. He was also a member of
the group which skied to the New
York Worlds Fair from St.
Petersburg in 1964.
Aside from his water skiing en endeavors,
deavors, endeavors, Rabe appeared in Gator
Growl singing a song that will soon
be released nationally.
According to Rabe, the test run
will be covered by the ABC tele television
vision television networks Wide World of
Sports, and that fuel and other
necessities will be donated by var various
ious various companies.
Bond Suit
Date Set
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Leon
County Circuit court Judge May
Walker today set a hearing for Oct.
27 on a suit seeking an injunction
against use of public personnel and
facilities to propagandize the
S3OO million road bond program
Judge Walker set the hearing for
10 a.m.
The suit was filed Friday by Sen.
John McCarty of Fort Pierce and
a dozen legislative colleagues op opposed
posed opposed to the bonds for four-laning
over 1,000 miles of primary high highways.
ways. highways.
It was filed against the Highway
Patrol, Development Commission,
Road Department and Turnpike Au Authority.
thority. Authority.

Page 11



5, The Florida Alligator, Friday. Oct. 22, 1965

Page 12

Rathomon
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VOICE OF THE DEAD: Holly Howard acts as the medium through which the dead hus husband
band husband tells his side of the seduction of his wife.

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CONVINCING SCENE: Tajomaru (Carl Strano) tries to
persuade the wife (Una Yukatan) to many him.

JAPANESE BANDIT: Carl
Strano takes the lead role
as Tajomaru who seduces
the wife.
rt 3
Photos by Gerald Jones
*
FINAL TOUCHES: Bob
Heffley who portrays the
disillusioned priest receives
a last stroke on his oriental
eye make-up.

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STUDY TIME: Jerry Rhodes, left, and Michael Doyle take advantage of between
scenes time.

Florida Players
Opening Night
Rashomon, an oriental murder mystery, is being presented by
Florida Players .in Norman Auditorium this week and next week.
Performances will be given today and tomorrow at 8 p.m.;
next Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., and the same schedule
will be followed for Friday and Saturday as the previous week.
Tickets are on sale at the front of Norman Auditorium form
3 to 7 p.m. every day.
Non-student price is 85 cents. Students will identification cards
will be admitted free and high school students will be charged
55 cents.
Rashomon is' the name of the crumbling gates at the entrance
of Kyoto, Japan, in the 12th century. A Japanese couple traveling
through the woods to the city are discovered by a bandit.
Attracted to the wife the bandit succeeds in seducing her, and
the husband is soon found dead. Theplfttof the play evolves around
four different versions given by the bandit, the wife, the dead
husband and the woodcutter witness on whether the wife succumbed
to the bandit or was raped and on whether the husband killed him himself
self himself or was murdered.
it $5 f
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Woes Os A Paper Boy

DENVER (UPI) Donald D.
Kistler 42, operator of sev several
eral several self-service newspaper
stands, said customers were
cheating him out of S4O a
month by paying for 10-cent
papers with pennies.
This week Kistler said he

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spotted a man leaving just two
cents for a paper. He said he
jumped on a bicycle, caught
the customer, and demanded
the full prices. He said the
man pushed his bicycle down
and tried to run over him with
a car.

Its Pie In The Eye
At Old Pi Lam House

By EUNICE TALL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Pi Lambda Phis had their
dates eating out of their hands Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday nightfor about an hour.
They setup a Tom Jones din dinner
ner dinner and strictly followed two rules:
that no silverware would be used,
and each person would feed his
date.
Dressed in blue jeans, sweat sweatshirts
shirts sweatshirts and sloppy joe outfits,girls
came prepared for the worstand
most of them got it.
Theres too much conserva conservatism
tism conservatism these days, said President
Sandy Sadja. Pi Lams are revert reverting
ing reverting back to the past.
Whats a better way to get to
know your date, than by feeding
her? he continued.
The vanilla pudding smells
bad, Dan Davis told the girls.
So the girls, unsuspecting, smelled
the puddingbut it ended up all
over their faces.
The remainder of the menu
included cottage cheese salad,
fried chicken, broccoli french
fres and rolls.
I think Tom Jones better come
back in person to this dinner,

Female Judges Increase Ranks

Six new members have been
selected for the Womens Judiciary
Council.
The Council is composed of UF
women students who judge cases,
usually of a disciplinary nature, of
those women students who have
committed offenses that endanger
the safety of themselves or others.
New members that were chosen
are: Carolyn Greany, 2UC; Marie
Clara Dence, 2UC; Louise Patton,
3AS; Candace Hampton, 3AS; Di Dianne
anne Dianne Selditch, 3AS; and alternate
Patricia Gautier, 2UC.
Selection of' members is by the
old Judiciary members and by the
Executive Board of the Womens
Student Association. Each dormi dormitory

Humpty
Dumpty
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OLD-FASHIONED Hush Puppies,
FISH NIGHT Cole Slaw 97<
5 PM 9 PM
Fresh Cedar Key Fish
HUMPTY DUMPTY
Drive-In & Restaurant
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEALS
FH2-5387 310 t

* Br Jt \M
mA r I
; V ..' f |MH|
p mfm
TRY THIS OUT PAL: Battle of the sexes

wailed Jimmy Hauser. I think we
need some help.
Then the dinner was over.
Id thought Id drown in vanilla
pudding, Sharia Herndon, lUC,
contributed.

SIX NEW MEMBERS

tory dormitory president and each sorority
president recommends one person.
From the list composed of these
recommendations, the selection is
made.
The women chosen are those who
have shown responsibility and
scholastic achievement at the UF.
According to their advisor Dr.
Marjorie Jackson, assistant Dean
of Women, the judging of these
cases by fellow students has in increased
creased increased the effectiveness of the
program.
The Council judges cases re recommended
commended recommended by the honor councils
of the dorms, sororities, faculty
infirmary, and off-campus. Any
other source can also refer cases.

Friday, Oct. 22, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

We used to have food fights at
the Tri Delt house, but not quite this
bad, added JoAnn Notarls.
And Kenny Solomon said. Well
you have to admit it was different.
The proof was in the pudding.

The aim of the Council is to ed educate
ucate educate and council the women
brought before it with the hopes that
they will benefit from the experi experience,
ence, experience, explained Dr. Jackson.
The advantage of the Judiciary
Council over such bodies as the
honor councils in the dorms, is that
more time can be spent on each
case. More information on each
girl is available through my per personal
sonal personal files on women students,
added Dr. Jackson.
The present members of the
Council are: Anne Saunders, 4AS;
Carol Shaw, 4AS; Natalie Zadoff,
3AS; Jane Ktmbrell, 3AS; and Lee
Ann Draud, 3AS.
These women remain on the
council until 1 graduation; when a
position becomes vacant, the newlv
elected women take over. T..._
allows for overlapping terms, con concluded
cluded concluded Dr. Jackson,
Fidelity Union
Life
ISIS
THE COLLEGE PLAN
Exclusively For
THE COLLEGE MAN
.. Guaranteed By A
BILLION Dollar Co.
... Payments deferred
'til earnings increase
Campus Representatives
Mel Ward Geo. Corl
Dan Sapp Bob Si frit
376-1208

Page 13



Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 22. 1965

Moor

n n off weekend for the Gators means all UF fans will have their
eyes glued to their televisions tomorrow and will be treated to
one of the top intersectional games of the year.
Ara Parsegians Notre Dame squad will tackle the team that wrecked
its national championship express in the final game of 1964, the South Southern
ern Southern California Trojans.
As if the revenge motive of the Irish werent enough, both teams are
ranked in the nations top ten. The winner is sure to jump even higher
in the national polls.
USC has the countrys most explosive offensive weapon in Mike
Garrett, the workhorse halfback who has a chance to set national rush rushing
ing rushing records. Garrett has carried 151 times in five games thus far for
an astronomical 852 yards. He picked up more than 200 against Stanford
last week.
Notre Dame also has an explosive offense which features the running
of Bill Wolski and Nick Eddy. The Irish have rolled past four of five
opponents, losing only to Purdue, 25-21. They will surely be wanting
to avenge the defeat out on the West Coast last year.
All this interaction should yield a tremendous ball game at South
Bend tomorrow. The Trojans, behind the unstoppable Garrett, should
win by a touchdown.
Another Headliner
In the days other headliner, Michigan State takes on Purdue. This
game should decide who will be the visiting team in the Rose Bowl.
Michigan State has everything a national champion is made of. Every Everything
thing Everything from the best halfback in the Big Ten (Clinton Jones) to a 295-
pound middle guard. Fullback Ray Asila and barefoot kicker Doug
Kenney are Hawaiian imports who do outstanding jobs. Topping the
list is quarterback Steve Juday, an all-America hopeful.
The Boilermakers dont have enough hands to stop the Spartans
omnipotent offense. Michigan State will win easily.
Gator Cokes Better Buy
Perry Moore, assistant to the Athletic Director, reports that Rev.
J. Graham Spurrier (father of quarterback Steve) came to visit him
following the Ole Miss game to complain that Cokes were only 15 cents
at the game up there.
Rev. Spurrier was amazed when I proved to him that our Cokes at
25 cents are a better buy than Ole Miss at 15, Moore said.
Moore explained that he poured the contents of two Ole Miss Cokes
into one UF 25-center.
Id like for everybody to know that our Cokes are not as high-priced
as somebody elses, Moore explained.
The whole incident has got me wondering, though. The question I
keep mulling over in my mind is: Did Moore take a 25-cent UF game
Coke to Oxford with him, or did he bring back a 15-center from Ole
Miss to Gainesville?
Two Others To Consider
While everyone in the Southeast is singing the praises of Steve
Spurrier as all-America quarterback, two other Southern signal-callers
are doing just as well. Kentuckys Rick Norton and Texas Techs Tom
Wilson are ahead of Spurrier in passing yardage and Wilson leads the
UF star by one completion.
Norton has been able to hit the long bomb for Kentucky on several
occasions and has been the SECs top passer for the past two years.
Wilson carried the Red Raiders to their finest-ever finish in the
Southwest Conference a year ago and has been even better this year.
His favorite receiver is Donnie Anderson, a sure-fire all-America
at halfback.
Neither of this pair is getting the publicity Spurrier is, possibly
because their teams arent as good as Florida. But, both have fine
records which should be noted.

Offense Unit
Looks Good
In Scrimmage
Coach Ray Graves was pleased
with the Gator football teams of offensive
fensive offensive performance in a scrim scrimmage
mage scrimmage Thursday but reported the
Florida defense was erratic and
ragged.
The Florida coach said all the
offensive units did a good job and
said he was especially pleased with
the running and blocking of Marquis
Baeszler and Don Knapp.
Graves didnt single any of tne
Gator defensive players out for
special mention, but said the de defense
fense defense as a whole wasnt as sharp
as it should be.
The Gators wont practice Fri Friday,
day, Friday, but will hold a light drill
Saturday.
After the practice Saturday
morning, members of the coaching
staff except Graves will fly to watch
the Auburn Tigers play Southern
Mississippi and then will go on to
Lexington, Ky., to watch Georgia
and Kentucky tangle in a night
game.

SPOR TS EDITOR

w
MEN'S AND WOMENS
PANTS AND JACKETS
Jn + Cords
N' i Den!m
- White Slim Fits
* White White Levi's
_ Brown Californians
K I White Californians
* Matching Jackets
Fit Ifightr Gainesville
Wear Right! Stockman Sapply Co.
At the Gainesville Livestock Market
5001 N.W. 13th St. --

R Wi

Frosh Take On FSU
In Seminole Country

By DOUG RHOADS
Alligator Staff Writer
Fresh from a 15-9 victory over
Auburns frosh team last Friday
night, Florida freshman coach
Dave Fuller feels his team will be
ready to meet arch-rival FSU
Saturday.
This years Florida frosh will
meet a high scoring FSU team

View From Behind
> I IB jP
MM:
I
GATOR COACH: Observes Practice's Line Play

j mijyyuiaiicw
i mnj£UKh|j7
v -~

under the lights of Doak Campbell
Stadium.
Fuller said this Baby Gator team
is not as good as the one three
years ago, but is still a well
balanced team with a lot of pride.
Our greatest weakness is the
lack of depth in the backfield.
said Fuller. We only signed nine
backs and three of them are out
with injuries.

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The varsity will be in need of
linemen these next few years, so
we principally recruited linemen,
he explained. However, standout
backs like quarterback Larry
Rentz and high school All-Ameri All-American
can All-American halfback Larry Smith provide
the backfield with winning po potential.
tential. potential.
Both boys played well against
Auburn, said Fuller. Rentz
passed well and Smith made
several important runs, his longest
being an 18-yard gainer, on a draw drawplay.
play. drawplay.
In addition to FSU tomorrow, the
Baby Gators meet Miami the fol following
lowing following Friday and close with
Georgia on November 12.
* Miami is a high-scoring, of offensive-minded
fensive-minded offensive-minded team that should
play a good game against us,
stated Fuller. Also, this is prob probably
ably probably the best Georgia freshman
team in years.
Ends George Dean and Jim
Yarborough are coming along well
and should be able to fill in varsity
positions next year, Fuller said.
In addition to these two, there
are another half-dozen boys who
will be able to aid the Gators
varsity next fall he added.
Right now, the team is preparing
for the game this weekend with
arch-rival FSU.
The FSU coaches instill the
spirit of the traditional Florida
rivalry at the beginning, said
Fuller. So, they should be ready
to play a good game against us.
Florida won last year, 14-0.
OILER HAS
SUCK TRICK
HOUSTON < UPI Houston
Oiler defensive back Tony Ban Banfield
field Banfield has found away to keep
up with pass receivers he con contends
tends contends does away with most of
their chances for faking he
watches their belt buckles.
Banfield said a receiver can
fake a defensive man out of
position with his hands, eyes,
head, and feetbut the belt
buckle is a solid cluewhere
it goes, the player goes."



Georgia Hurting For Wildcat Clash

ATLANTA (UPI) Youll have
to forgive the 10th-ranked Georgia
Bulldogs if they have misgivings
about going into the lair of the
explosive Kentucky Wildcats Sat Saturday
urday Saturday night.
It would be a tough trip for the
Southeastern Conference leaders
even if they were healthy. In their
present condition, it could be dis disaster.
aster. disaster.
The Bulldogs, who have virtually
no passing attack, lost their top
runner, halfback Bob Taylor, via
a broken leg last week and will be
manning their defense secondary
with a corps of walking wounded.
With Taylor out for the season,
Georgias top runner is quarter quarterback
back quarterback Preston Ridlehuber who is
averaging 31 yards per game and.
worse yet, has completed only eight
of 25 passes.
On the other hand. Kentucky

[Gator] OPEN DAILY
Except Sunday
* 9:30 AM 'Til 2AM
. NO ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
i FREE PRACTICE FROM 5-7 PM DAILY |
A 7 TABLES
R Air Conditioned Television
D Snacks & Soft Drinks
S 308 W. University Ave. 6-9139
[lounge] FREE PARKING
Fast Aid Coavealeat Service
At The NEW
B&B TAKE OUT
Featariag
Shrhap Hanbergers
Chickea Freach Fries
Boxes To Go
The Drive-In Window saves
you the trouble of leaving your car
B&B TAKE OUT
412 S.W. 4th Ave.
l

FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
And
All Men's & Women's Athletic Programs
Toble Tennis Tobies by Brinktun
Nets, Bolls, Paddles
Swan! Shirts and Pants
JERSEYS LETTERED AND NUMBERED
TO YOUR ORDER
TEAM LOTS OR SINGLY |
JIMMIE HUGHES SPORTING GOODS
North Central Florida's Most Complete Sporting Goods Store
One Block East of Campus 1113 W. Univ. Ave.
TROPHIES FOR ANY AWARD ENGRAVING

quarterback Rick Norton appears
en route to a new conference pass passing
ing passing record. The Wildcat bomber
has completed 63 passes for 1.034
yards and, with the season only
half over, needs only 791 to break
the 13-year-old mark ofGeorgias
Zeke Bratkowski.
The Wildcats also have two of
the top runners in the Southeast
tailback Rodger Bird andwingback
Larry Seiple.
Georgias conference lead is at
stake. Runnerup Mississippi State,
ranked one notch behind the Bull Bulldogs
dogs Bulldogs as the nations No. 11 team,
takes on Tulane in New Orleans
Friday night and a State win coup coupled
led coupled with a Bulldog loss would re reverse
verse reverse their standing.
Theres one other conference
game this weekend, but little is
at stake there except personal
prestige. In that one, Ole Miss,

which beat Tulane last week for its
first conference win of the season,
will be host to Vanderbilt which
has yet to win in league play.
In non-league action: Indepen Independent
dent Independent Georgia Tech will be host to
Navy; ninth-ranked Louisiana State
will be host to South Carolina of
the Atlantic Coast Conference;
14th-ranked Tennessee to indepen independent
dent independent Houston; 15th-ranked Ala Alabama
bama Alabama to IndeDendent Florida State;

Alligator Staffers Pick The 20 Toughest
Be ran E _ Cason Sears Lane* ke.alter DwOe. Stutter V .ofnr Speater Oenaas Moot ert*a Kar imuM
Pickers 63-31-6 60-34-6 60-m- 57-37-6 s*-*-4 3S-j-* ss-- 33--6 sa-ao-r. s*-- --< s*--4
.670 .636 .63* .61* *O7 J*s .3*5 5*5 .514 .*74 .47* .Me
Miss. State-T ulane MMMMMMMMMMMMM
Georgia Kentucky K KKGG KKKKKKGK
Navy Ga. Tech GGGNG NGG GGGNG
FSU Alabama AAAAA AAA AA AAA
Miami Pitt. MM P MM M M M MM P PM
California UCLA UUUUCUUUUUUUU
USC Notre Dame NUNNNNNNNUU NN
Duke Illinois IIIIDDDI II ID!
Army Stanford SSASSS AS SSS AS
Wash. Oregon OOWWOOWO 000 OO
Vandy Ole Miss MMM MM MMMMM MMM
W. Va.- Penn. St. PWWP PWWP PP PWP
Michigan Minn. Min Mich Mich Min Mich Mich Mich Min Mich Min Mich Min Mich
Colorado -Nebraska NNN NN NNNNNN NN
Baylor Tex. A4.M T BTTT TBT TTB TT
Rice Texas TTTTTTTT TTT TT
T.C.U. Clemson CTTCCCCTCCC CC
Mich St. Purdue P MMMM P PM MMM MM
lowa NW NIIINWNNIIIN-
Ohlo St.-Wisconsin O O O QOWOOOWOW O

SAYS DIRECTOR WELBORN
UF Training Table Best

By JIM McCLINTOCK
Alligator Staff Writer
Its number one In the country
and I defy anyone to prove differ different,
ent, different, said Gay W. Welborn, direc director
tor director of food service, referring to
the UF athletic training table.
Ive been all over the country
and have seen enough food of others
to realize this is the best. said
Welborn.

and Auburn to independent Southern
Mississippi.
Also. Miami will be at Pitt.
Memphis State at McNeese State
and eighth-ranked Florida has a
free weekend.
Kentucky. 3-2, has been rated
a touchdown favorite over Georgia.
4- 1 Mississippi State and Ole Miss
are favored to win their games.
Georgia Tech is favored by less
than a touchdown. LSU by a lop-

The training table, located in the
basement of the Florida Union, is
completely run by the campus food
service.
They pay us for the service
and we conduct the entire pro*
gram. Coach Graves and the team
trainer oversees the program and
make changes as they see fit,"
said Welborn.
Between 125 and 135 football and
basketball players are served
seven days a week while the re remaining
maining remaining athletes on scholarship
are given money to eat out.
When the training table is
closed for such things as away
games the remaining boys eat in
the main cafeteria," said Welborn.
Steak is served twice a week and
roast beef on Sunday. They boys
can have one serving of meat and
all they want of everything else,
said Welborn.
A balanced diet containing a
great amount of protein is prepared
by Welborn and Mrs. Grace Mad Madden,
den, Madden, head dietitian with assistance
and recommendations from the
trainer. According to Welborn the
menu is centered around protein.
Greasy meats, such as pork, and
gaseous vegetables, like cabbage
and broccoli, are very seldom
served.
We also serve the pre-game
meal," said Welborn. They are
very light consisting of steak,
potato, toast, and tea." Milk is
never served before a game or at
lunch because it will curdle as
soon as a boy 1s active.

Friday, Oct. 22. 1965, The Florida Alligator,

sided margin, Tennessee by more
than two TDs, Alabama by more
than a touchdown, and Auburn by
a wide spread.
The Tech-Navy game shapes up
as one of the better intersectional
battles of the weekend. Both teams
have 3-1-1 records after winning
their last three straight, and both
won votes for the national ratings
this week after Navy blanketed Pitt
12-0 and Tech beat Auburn 23-14.

The training table also serves
the All-Sports Banquet every
spring. If the football or basket basketball
ball basketball team is here during Christ Christmas
mas Christmas the table stays open. A
complete feast is served on a hol holiday
iday holiday when the team is here,"
Welborn said.
Welborn said food service will
run the training table planned for
the new athletic dorm. Things
haven't been ironed out. but the only
problem is the volume of boys who
will be served.
It takes a large volume to al allow
low allow a food service to function
adequately," explained Welborn.
One hundred and fifty boys may
not be enough to make serving the
new athletic dorm worth while."
Soccer Club
Tackles
Unbeaten
UF's unbeaten soccar club will
meet St. Petersburg Saturday at K>
a.m. on Fleming Field.
St. Petes team is also unbeaten
and is the first big test of the sea season
son season for the Gator booters, who woo
their first two matches over lesser
opposition.
Last year, St. Pete defected UF
by a 4-1 score and went oo to win the
Suncoast Tournament in which the
Gators participated.
A larger than average crowd is
expected for the clash between the
two powers. Admission is free.

Page 15



I C3/\rxlT Jp%
SHIRTMAKBRS jKm* m
Honda Sport 50 ITri
its us quality ot the \
A Flashy Cycle H armon Football Forecast IJj |jt
TOP 20 TEAMS (Forecasting Average: 652 Right, 213 Wrong 754) I j-
I iL ..I 1-MICH. STATE 6 SOUTHERN CAL 11-TENNESSEE 16 KENTUCKY i 'JT
tAf 111 ACO UlnA 2-ARKANSAS 7 FLORIDA 12-GEORGIA 17 FLORIDA STATE W' \
Ivl lllvJV If IIU 3 NOTRE DAME 8-L.S. U. 13-GEORGIA TECH 18-MISSOURI
4-TEXAS 9-PURDUE 14 CALIFORNIA 19-U.C.L.A.
5 -NEBRASKA 10-ALABAMA 15-NAVY 20 -STANFORD
Saturday, October 25Major Colleges
Air Force 35 Pacific 0 HIGHLIGHTS
Alabama 17 Florida State 14
I I If 41 Cirri fUrr Arkansas 36 North Texa S s tate 'o In spite of Arkansasbig victory over Texas
IRU Nljl Udj) Baylor 1 21 fSET & M iT l! last week, the Michigan State Spartans, as a
Boston College 30 Richmond o result of their steam-rolling of Ohio State, .
Brigham Young 21
su/-5 u /-z al R a £ to n ,2 They beat out the Razorbacks by .8 of a point. f |\~
_ Colgate 23 Brown 7 Idle Notre Dame moved back to third behind Q \
UArff Armanrn oSrtSiuth 14 Hazard io Arkansas, and Texas dropped to fourth. Ne- J O W \
61 IUI 111 Cl II iC East Carolina 20 The Citadel 7 braska just creeped by Southern California to 1 jJ£= P
George Washington 17 William & Mary 14 end in the sth spot With the Trojans #6. "P | WTJ
Georgia Tech 22 Nlvy UCky 21 Florida edged up a notch to 7th, and Louisi- r jf
Idaho 28 Montana o ana State climbed from 11 th to Bth after sink- T^YVMIf^AMV
!owa' S 17 Northwestern 13 in 6 Kentucky. While Alabama remained #lO 1/Ul> HjAI 10
Marshall 15 &!2?viS ,olina il after its tie with Tennessee, Purdue upped
' Maryland 19 North Carolina St. 14 its ranking from 12th to 9th. rr LL | i
SSSKSHS*,. 2? Sr ; S The second ten looks a bit strange this V \i
m m Miami, Fla. 23 Pittsburgh 13 week, with six new shining faces as Duke,
-w Miami, Ohio 20 Ohio U. 8
Michigan state 28 Purdue 14 West Virginia, Michigan, Auburn, Ohio State,
M* SissTslfppi l) VandertHit *6 and Mississippi State fell out of the Top 20.
/ic \A/ I Inlworcltw A\/# State 21 Tuiane io Well, hang onto your Irish ancestors or your MZJ W. UFNIV. AVt.
615 V 'i- Ur v y - SSSS. 27 Sa4r* Trojwt horns! Southern cal trawls to Notre
- SSShISSaA. 1? iSSTrSSf Dame stadium t 0 d 0 battle with lhe "*"
IHA f All APIA lit A Notre Dame 20 Southern Cai 15 Irish. After last years surprise party on the I f
JJIC VUliegje Lite gsi ho s^ a a te 21 iSSSPstate o coast, this should be one of the toppers of the mftFIC
Football Forecast 855ST* s * 11 >§ year. Have a hunch thattheparty will be Irish Irish
Irish wi v Penn state 21 West Virginia 12 flavored this year Notre Dame to rope the I si
STV SKS?" S S' i v ani ,5 Trojans by live points. C/THTIIHIPKIPS
M B Stanford w Army 7 And not lar away from South Bend theres 3MI IMIvIVI IW
r Tennessee 25 Houston 7 gonna be another wing-ding . Big Ten style
T e c as u. 14 ciemson 8 * betw ee n Michigan State and Purdue. The ___
Texas Tech 20 s. m. u. 13 winner of this one takes a big step toward the K ~~
Tulsa 0 21 clncmnati / ,Chlan Bi S Ten championship and a few thousand
11- VI Utah state 11 u *? bouquets of roses. The top-ranked Spartans
viiianova 27 Chester 7 will stay undefeated, melting the Boilers by
S,a,e I H a £ionst. *7 Colorado might spell a little trouble for
0 Wichita 20 Southern Illinois io Nebraska, but only a little. The Cornhuskers II I
xavier 13 Chattanooga 9 will slip the long needle to the Buffaloes by | '|H
THF EAST (small colleges) at least 19 points. Arkansas will win its 18th |
OAMtb Alfred 26 Rochester 14 in a row, and North Texas will be the victim; |
Amherst 14 Wesleyan o the Razorbacks by 36 points. I
Bates 25 Trenton 0 XT J I IHI
GEORGIA KENTUCKY Cm?" Guard 26 Worcester Tech 6 lon ger in the drivers seat -at least for I MH
NAVY -GA TECH Connecticut 14 Temple 7 moment ~ the Texas Longhorns go after I S
MIAMI PITTSBURGH %s£s> S 7 tMs week Texas is favor ed over |
SOUTHERN CAL-NOTRE DAME hL n £ >r 0 21 l I ice by four touchdowns. I
MICHIGAN STATE PURDUE Maine 25 Rhode island o Jubt in time to sn eak in the forecasting |
MICHIGAN MINNESOTA -Montclair 41 Gi'^sToro' 8 'o average a The percentage is neither |
FSU ALABAMA Northeastern 19 New Hampshire 7 inching up nor inching down. The totals: 652 I I
VANDERBILT OLE MISS IprinSSSu 31 AmencanTntemal 'o rl ht 13 wrong, and 28 ties; average .754. |f K|
DUKE ILLINOIS uJIST. IS g'urt.nn. o c "j!!* J,"* li,e 0f ,he nation I I
ARMY STANFORD Wilkes 20 Muhlenberg 6 L .a.u. win roll a bit at the expense of South I
w ,iams 27 Tufts 7 Carolina., the Tigers by 15 points. Alabama I
MIDWEST (small colleges) faces a new member of the Top 20 17th-rated
> Albion 19 Kalamazoo 13 Florida State, a team we havent Dicked rnr- I
Anderson 18 Manchester 15 rprtlv cinr>o I
Ashland 13 Ohio Northern io rectl > since the season started! Itll be a real
> B ker 27 McPherson 6 closie with by three. IK
dhJA | on a pedestal?
Guest Prognosti gators .. .the only company selling 376 1 252 Not a bad idea. But why not save them
exclusively to college men. 378-1230 f or hungry students? Alan's customers put
CUCA Beta Theta Pi Georgia Seagie Colleac Life his sandwiches right where they belong-
Kentucky Kentucky Kentuccy 0 under their belts. They enjoy it, too.
Ga. Tech Ga. Tech Ga. Tech Insurance They come back for more and more.
Notre Dame Notre Dame Southern Cal Company of America I 5 f Y T see iu f h< sn,t eno 9h Mme
Michigan State Michigan State Michigan state ,105 W Universifv Ave | MISTER to make sandwiches forlhat pedestal. He
Michigan Minnesota Michigan # rr * %C A needs it all to keep satisfying customers.
Alabama Alabama Alabama Suite 4, Gomesv.lle | dANDWIUI S Q/ every time you see on empty pedes-
DiA^ iSS Illinois Duke 2357 | SHOP Carolyn Plaza n k of Alan. You'll never have
Stanford Stanford Army an empty pedestal for a stomach.