Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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HOMECOMING 9 65

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Vol. 58, No. 30

University of Florida

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Friday, October 15, 1965

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When Things Will Happen: 1

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Inside Todays
Big Alligator
Homecoming queen candidates 4
Tfte men behind homecoming 5
J/F construction booms iJ
r/F research T 4
Arliskas reign to end ... 19
World news 22
Growl history schedule tonight 23
Sorority house decorations 27
Gators ts. Carolina State story 23
Homecoming football history 3i
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FRIDAY
12:00 6:00 p.m University of Florida Showcase, Plaza of the Americas
1:00 3:00 p.m Parade, University Avenue
3:15 4:45 p.m Florida Blue Key Smoker, Florida Gymnasium Basement
4:00 5:00 p.m Swimcapades, University Pool
4:45 7:45 p.m Florida Blue Key Banquet, Florida Gymnasium f
5:00 7:30 p.m Mortar Board (Women) Banquet, Student Service Center
7:00 7:45 p.m Pre-Gator Growl, Florida Field
8:00 10:00 p.m Gator Growl, Florida Field
SATURDAY
7:30 9:15 a.m Professional Fraternity Breakfasts: Legal Fraternity Breakfasts
Delta Theta Phi Holiday Inn, 7:30 a.m.
Phi Alpha Delta, University Inn, 8:00 a.m.
Phi Delta Delta, Episcopal Center (Weed Hall), 8:00 a.m.
Phi Delta Phi Ramada Inn, 8:00 a.m.
, Alpha Kappa Psi business fraternity, University Inn, 8:30 a.m.
8:30 6:00 p.m University of Florida Showcase, Plaza of the Americas (not open during
the game)
8:30 10:30 a.m Alumni Reunion, University Auditorium Lawn
10:00 11:30 a.m Swimcapades, University Pool
10:00 12:00 noon Soccer (Florida vs. Jacksonville University), Fleming Field
10:30 11:30 a.m John Marshall Bar Association skits, College of Law
11:00 1:30 p.m Alumni Barbecue, Florida Gymnasium
2:00 4:30 p.m Football: Florida vs. North Carolina State, Florida Field
8:30 12:30 a.m Homecoming Ball
SUNDAY
8:30 10:30 a.m Student Religious Center-sponsored Breakfasts

It Started In '92...

A simple spring reunion at East
Florida Seminary in 1892 marked
the beginning of what has become
the traditional Homecofning spec spectacular
tacular spectacular at the University of Flor Florida.
ida. Florida.
Football entered the picture a
year after the University opened
its doors on the new Gainesville
campus in 1905. Students staged
a Dad's Day over the Thanksgiving
weekend and fathers came to camp campus
us campus to visit their sons and watch a
football game.
Modern Homecoming got its
start in 1916 with a bonfire and
pep rally before a football game,
but it was not until 1924 that
Florida organized its Homecoming
and officially recognized the cele celebration

1
Hi
HOMECOMING '6ls on the new frontier

bration celebration as an annual event.
In that year, Dr. A. A. Mur Murphree,
phree, Murphree, late president of the Uni University,
versity, University, set up a framework of
student organizations with the
responsibility for planning and
staging Homecoming celebrations.
From this nucleus of student plan planners
ners planners emerged Florida Blue Key,
a mens leadership fraternity,
which has since planned and co coordinated
ordinated coordinated the event.
In that first student-planned
Homecoming, 2,300 football fans
jammed the newly-constructed
Fleming Field bleachers, just
north of the present Florida Field
Stadium, and cheered Coach (later
General) James A. Van Fleets
Fighting Gators as they defeated

Friday, Oct. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Missouri Valley Conference
Champion Drake University, 10-0.
Since that time, Homecoming has
burgeoned into the action-packed
weekend it is today. The Florida
Field Stadium was expanded in 1964
to seat an additional 3,000 per persons,
sons, persons, giving it a capacity of almost
48,000.
Homecoming activities encom encompass
pass encompass Gator Growl, the worlds
largest student show; the Friday
afternoon parade featuring floats
and marching bands; the Swim Swimcapades
capades Swimcapades watershow; fun-poking law
school skits which annually roast
prominent politicians; the numer numerous
ous numerous honorary fraternity break breakfasts;
fasts; breakfasts; and of course, the game.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 15, 1965

Homecoming Queen Naming At Growl I
wmmmmmmmJl

A
Ann Camp
Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. C.
Camp of Jasper, Fla., five feet,
eight inches tall, weighs 125 pounds
and measures 36-24-36. She has
blonde hair, brown eyes and her
previous titles include Miss Jasper
High School, Miss Hamilton County,
district FFA Sweetheart, and
runner-up in Miss Florida Crown
contest. Interests include swim swimming,
ming, swimming, golfing, skiing and horseback
riding Sponsored by Sigma Chi
fraternity

WHICH ONE WILL SHE BE?

Paula Hicks
The daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Walter Hicks of Altamonte Springs.
Former titles include Miss Mait Maitland,
land, Maitland, Military Ball Queen, Miss
T. V. Directory Cover Girl and
Miss "SM/L£ of Florida. Spon Sponsored
sored Sponsored by Delta Gamma sorority,
five feet, six inches tall, weighs
115 pounds and measures
36-23-36. Interests include water
sports, sewing, writing, modeling
and traveling.
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Cathy Green
Five feet, /owr inches tall,
weighs 115 pounds and is 35-24-36.
A blonde s/ze £/*e daughter of
Jack E. Green and hopes to major
in education. She is the former
Miss Pensacola High and Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming Queen. Interested in danc danclng>
lng> danclng> ringing and skiing, she is
sponsored by Sigma Nu fraternity
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The organization behind and in front of the
scenes at Homecoming is Florida Blue Key.
The mens leadership organization plans, sponsors
and executes Homecoming. All activities this week weekend
end weekend were either planned or coordinated by FBK.
Preparations for Homecoming began last April
when FBK President Stuart Parsons, 3LW, appointed
the general chairmen, the eight division heads, the
director of Gator Growl and the assistant general
chairman.
The staff spent several weeks going over reports
from previous Homcomings to learn the scope of
their jobs. They also appointed the rest of their
staff members.
During the summer the staff was busy working
on Homecoming. Division heads and most other
officials were required to stay in Gainesville over
the summer to work on the Homecoming plans.
Wilson Atkinson, 3LW, general chairman of Home Homecoming,
coming, Homecoming, was the backbone of the show. Atkinsons
job was mainly concerned with coordination and
correspondence. He arranged forThruston Morton,
Republican Senator from Kentucky, to speak at the
FBK banquet and for W. Dexter Douglas, Tallahassee
attorney, to be toastmaster.
Stephen C. OConnell, Florida Supreme Court
Justice, was chosen to emcee Gator Growl. OConnell
is president elect of the Florida Alumni Association.
Atkinson was also responsible for interviewing
for all major staff appointments and for helping
develop the general Homecoming outline.
Homecoming Parade Chairrnan, Hank Raatama,
ILW, coordinated and planned the entire Homecoming
parade. He began work in early May by writing
high school bands asking for participation in the
Homecoming parade.
Raatama contacted fraternities and sororities for
float participation and for clowns to march in the
parade. He also contacted various groups around
the state, asking for parade participation.
The participants in the parade include 19 high
school bands and 25 fraternity and sorority entries
in float and clown competition.
The most hectic part of the parade chairmans
job is yet to come. This afternoons parade will
keep Raatama working ilhtil the last minute.
Tonights Gator Gator Growl nas kept Walter
L. Bud Robison busy. Robison, director of Gator
Growl began assembling his staff in early May
and his work this fall has kept him busy with
talent and skit tryouts, night meetings and planning.
Growl director handles all preparations for the
show. Robison made all technical arrangements.
This year's Growl has special empahsis on being
more of a pep rally.
Script writing occupied a large portion of the Growl
staffs time.
m

...They Make Homecoming

BUD ROBISON
The technical problems involved in producing a
show in the Florida Field are numerous.
Robison gives most of the credit for Growl to
his staff who have been working with him since
May.
There are three rehearsals for Growl. Last
year, two of the rehearsals were rained out, but
Growl itself has been free from rain except for
one year.
The job of Homecoming publicity fell to Jeffrey
B. Fuqua, 3AS, director of promotion and pub publicity.
licity. publicity. The job covers all local and national
publicity concerning Homecoming.
The first task was selecting a Homecoming
slogan. This year, entries came from 23 states.
Ron Fick, 3AS, won with the slogan Gators Cheer
Floridas 400th Year.
Fuqua also helped with the Homecoming contest.
This year, the contest was held at Cyprus Gardens.
The Homecoming Sweetheart and Court will be an announced
nounced announced tonight at Gator Growl.
Other areas Fuqua worked on include the printing
of the Alumni Brochure which is sent to 35,000
alumni, the Gator Growl program, the FBK Banquet
program, the Mortar Board program and the Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming promotional bumperstrips.
The director of publicity also handled all state statewide
wide statewide news releases concerning Homecoming.
Alumni Events Division Chairman, John Hume,
was in charge of setting up and carrying out two
of the main Homecoming events. Hume worked on
the Florida Showcase, an educational exhibit featur featuring
ing featuring the areas of operations and outstanding achieve achievements
ments achievements of the various colleges and departments at
the University.
The Alumni Reunion, Humes other project, will
be tomorrow morning. This consists of a coffee
hour and a short program featuring an outstanding
alumni or guest of the UF.
Welcome booths were set up on the Alumni
Reunion Grounds and are serving as information
centers. They supply campus maps, schedules and
any other information desired.
It is impossible to explain all the details of Home Homecoming.
coming. Homecoming. The five students mentioned above were
also aided by Wayne Alford, assistant general
chairman of Homecoming; Jim Moore, administrative
director; John Wolf, Finance director; Sam Ulman,
technical derector; Steve Gardener, personnel dir director;
ector; director; Doug Lynn, special functions director; Butch
Wooten, honored guests director; Leo Rocek, FBK
banquet chairman and Gene Brown, Alumni barbecue
chairman.

Friday, Oct. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 5



Page 6

, Tlie Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 15. 1965

EDITORIAL
Wlace one brick atop another, and seal it with
T* mortar. Sod the earth. Install chimes in
a tower, Erect goal posts in a field. Hang paintings
in a hall. Connect tubes and vials in a laboratory.
Stand a gray head behind a lectern. Seat lithe
figures in ugly and worn writing desks.
It is called a university.
THE UNIVERSITY is not difficult to build. All
it takes is money--money for the mortar and the
sod and the chimes and the paintings and the vials
and the salaries. Money is cheap. Money comes
from productivity which comes from skills and
knowhow, which comes from universities. So univer universities
sities universities are investments and have proliferated,
springing up like toadstools in a meadow after a
friendly rain.
But a university is not a toadstool.
A UNIVERSITY also is ideas. And courage. And
faith. And challenge. And audacity. A university
is a marketplace for the exchange of views and
peopled with brains courageous enough to express
them. It is dignity. It is status. It is inspiration.
It is two humans reaching out to one another,
one with thirst and the other wisdom. They touch,
and both are enriched--one with knowledge, the
other with fulfillment.
What have we at Gainesvilleuniversity or toad toadstool?
stool? toadstool?
Our Chancellor was selected by edict from
the Governors office in defiance of constitutional
procedures.
Our administrators are told which architects
to hire for building disigns.
Our educational salary scales are established
and lobbied through by minor Tallahassee function functionaries
aries functionaries although the salaries were previously estab established
lished established by the Board of Regents and the Legislature.
Our Medical School physicians are told how
many aides to provide for the safe-keeping of
psychotic children.
Our business managers are told where to
buy institutional insurance.
Our professors are openly slandered as pinks
and Communists by the incoming Chief Executive.
Our buildings are named by legislative enact enactment
ment enactment or political suggestion.
Our Board of Regents is a bone of contention,
slobbered over by two massive political figures, each
seeking to cache it in his lair.
Our President is told, to the dollar, what to
pay for the exalted position of vice president.
Our educational salaries are slashed, because
a PhD teaching history to two thousand students
must not be paid more than a PhD copying Whig
resolutions in the musty archives of Tallahassee.
Our trimester is damned and discarded before
a substitute is contrived.
One of our leading administrators is brow browbeat
beat browbeat by the Governor in a public hearing.
The University of Florida never before exper experienced
ienced experienced such a time of troubles. It has writhed
in disillusionment. The student government pro protested.
tested. protested. The facutly protested. The University
Senate protested. The President protested. The
City of Gainesville protested. We screamed in
agony as we sank into a political sea.
OUR CRY summoned Governor Haydon Bruns to
our campus last week. He did not lift us from our
abyss. Instead, he sealed it over. The University
is enmeshed, he told us, in the machinery of
government. Our unhappy plight is due to the in inevitable
evitable inevitable workings of the law and budgetary
procedures.
He did not tell us why we never had such trouble
before.
Governor Burns should know why we suffer. He
appointed a majortiy of the State Budget Commission.
He appointed a majority of the State Board of
Education. He appointed all the members of the
State Board of Regents. He appointed the Chan Chancellor
cellor Chancellor of the entire university system.
Governor Burns has power. We are his creatures.
We serve at his pleasure and bend with each of
his breaths. Which will it be:
University? Or toadstool?
EDITORIAL STAFF
Drex Dobson assistant managing editor
Bill Lockhart editorial page editor
Andy Moor sports editor
Eunice Tall features editor
Gene Nail wire editor
Fran Snider student government editor
Peggy Blanchard coed editor
Judy Miller greek editor
Scott DeGarmo copy editor
Associate Editors: Bob Wilcox. Bruce Dudley,
Terry Miller, Yvette Cardozo. Justine Hartman,
Cheryl Kuril, Eddie Sears. J{ ((
Norma Bell Jim Bailey Susan Froemke
Sue Kennedy Leslie Marks Steven Brown
Elaine Fuller Mike Willard Kathie Keim
Kristy Kimball Judy Knight Jane Solomon
Suzieadleston Sharon Robinson Howard Rosenblatt
Dick Dennis Arlene Caplan Linda Rabinowitz

The
Florida Alligator
Steve Vaughn Benny Cason
Editor Managing Editor
111
"WELL, BACK TO THE OLD GRIND."
Florida Politics
by Mike Garcia
Aeedless to say, University of Florida Homecoming is upon us.
4 *As custom has dictated through the years, the UF campus will be
flooded with alums, students, whisky salesmen, corsage peddlers
and last, but not least, those ever popular Gentlemen from Tallahassee,
the Florida Politicos.
In the spirit of good cheer which has customarily permeated the
Homecoming ceremonies here. 1 think it would be a good idea to
dislodge ourselves, at lease temporarily, from the hot-bed of political
emotion now surronding the campus.
In this spirit I wish to acknowledge the various outstanding person personages
ages personages who will be on campus this weekend.
First, of course, our asutue Governor. Charley Johns. Ole
Charlie, as everyone knows, has always been a favorite of college
people everywhere. As UF Pres. Allen once said. I think Johns
i5....i5....a great....Oh, well hell do....(anything.)

Secondly, but surely not secondary, is that good friend of the
Florida man, our great comptroller. Cash McFrugal. Cash was
born in Sopchoppy, that fine county seat of Wakulla Co. Before
being elected to the comptrollers position. Cash ran a poker game in
the back of John McCartys general store. It was here that Cash
learned so much about money management.
Thirdly, ye have our secretary of agriculture. Jack Beanstalk.
Secretary Beanstalk, a resident of Belle Glade, gained much of his
agrarian experience at the Saw Grass Institute for advanced Hog
Fattening. Ole Jack was elected best Hogcaller of Glades County
(this has nothing to do with calling up pork-barrel legislation).
Os course, we cannot leave out that wonderful, fine, astute, gentle gentlemen
men gentlemen of the Legislature. Scottinsky McKellystine, the Representative
from Miami Beach. McKellystine was instrumental in passing such
fine reforms as the Yehaw Junction Metropolitan Development Bill
and the Panama City Draft Daflin campaign.

'. . 0
And finally, our wonderful Chairman of the House Committee on
Keeping our Highways Free of Ladyird Weeds, Hoodonit Burns Burnspepper.
pepper. Burnspepper. Hoodonit has always been the champion of Great Reform
programs. Among his most outstanding achievements 'was the
ross C reek Bond Program, where Hoodonit rerouted all roads awav
from Bryant County.
Os course, we never jest. And we of The Alligator sincerely
hope this 1965 Homecoming weekend will prove to be a great re rejuvenation
juvenation rejuvenation of that old Gator custom of propriety, purity and pro procrastination.
crastination. procrastination. 3
The Gieat Garcia leaves you with this thought: Its High Time
for One United Sunshine State. Lets get on the Go Team and elect
the Best Qualified Businessman Governor.

JOHN JENKINS WRITES
yit he current fad among campus radicals is de-
ways and means of avoiding the draft.
Methods suggested are feigning conscientious ob objection,
jection, objection, various ailments, and even homosexuality.
These tactics have been used before on an individual
basis, but never have such means been openly advo advocated
cated advocated and supported by a group. The main basis for
this rebellion is our involvement in Viet Nam. But
the criticism of the draft cover many more things.
Among the most often heard criticisms of the
draft are: 1) it is unnecessary, 2) it is unfair,
3) it is wasteful of human resources for college men
to serve as privates, 4) it requires people against
their will to support a foreign policy they do not favor.
FIRST OF ALL, is the draft really necessary?
Given that the armed services need men, is the draft
the only way to fill that need? The answer is obviously
no. A purely professional armed force can be re recruited.
cruited. recruited. It would, however, cost additional billions
of dollars annually; guesses range as high as 20
billion. Most career military men relish the idea of
a purely professional force. They would dearly love
to end the training and retraining problems inherent
in the rapid personnel turnover caused by the draft.
These men are realistic enough however, to foresee
the long range impact of mercenary force on the
moral courage and patriotism of the nation.
As for history, it seems to be on the side of those
who favor the draft. Calls for volunteers in past
years have generally fallen on deaf ears. In the
Revolutionary War, Washingtons army was hamper hampered
ed hampered constantly with the lack of volunteers. At the
outbreak of the Civil War the number of northern
volunteers dwindled after the Second Battle of Ma Manassas,
nassas, Manassas, and when a conscription program was in instituted,
stituted, instituted, riots occurred. World War II absolutely
demanded some form of compulsion.
IS THE DRAFT unfair? It certainly is, but, oddly
enough, in favor of those who protest the loudest.
The draft hits the healthy, 19-year-old, non-college
student. The college student can avoid the draft
simply by remaining in school until he reaches the
age of 26. The burden of defending the nation and the
luxury of its education then falls unfairly on the man
least likely to reap the benefits.
Most experts, including Selective Service Director
Lewis Hershey, favor a truly universal military
training system, which we do not have. Under such
a plan all would serve, though perhaps a shorter
time. Such a plan is outlined in an editorial in the
current issue of Life Magazine.
IS THE DRAFT wasteful of talent? Should a man
with a bachelors degree, and in some cases a mas masters,
ters, masters, have to serve as a private? Presuming no
ROTC experience in college, is he more suited for
military leadership, for quick promotion, than a high
school graduate with no college training? I believe
the draft is wasteful in this respect, but if the college
man has not planned ahead to meet his military ob obligation,
ligation, obligation, if he has not realized that he ought to serve
where his talents can best be utilized, if he has not
accepted this role of leader which society attaches to
college graduates, then he must serve out his obliga obligation
tion obligation in the ranks.
Should a man have to fight in support of a foreign
policy he does not like? Yes, of course. What kind of
game are we playing here anyway? Just because one
persons views are not those of the leaders of the
country does not give that person the right to work
at odds to the countrys goals. I do not deny the right
to dissent, to protest. I DO deny the right to disobey,
to subvert. If majority rule is to prevail, it must
prevail in all instances. I reject the premise that
anyone enjoys the right to weaken the nation, to
subvert soldier morale, to sabotage troop trains.
The decision has been made: We will defend South
\ iet Nam. My acceptance of this decision is not
blind acquiesence. It is my reasoned judgment that
anything less than acceptance would be against the
best interests of my country.
No, our system of compulsory military training
is by no means perfect. It is not fair, and it does
leave a lot to be desired towards effective utiliza utilization
tion utilization of human resources. But, some form of com compulsory
pulsory compulsory military training is necessary, if for n
other reason than to sustain the level of volunteers
in the other services. Lastly, it is the will of the
majority of people in this country that we retain
the draft, and no group or individual is justified
in attempting to usurp the will of the majority.
The ballot is the only acceptable means for changing
the course this nation will follow, domestic or foreign.



Editor and Staff
Florida Alligator
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida
Gentlemen:
The Constitution and laws of the State of Florida
impose certain specific duties and responsibilities
on the Chief Executive and all other officials.
Motivated by deep interest and grave concern, I
went far beyond any requirement on the governor
when I made the unprecedented visit to the campus
within twenty-four hours of the urgent invitation of
the elected campus leaders. Their request was fora
round-the-table conference to obtain the laws and
the facts relative to budget processes.
The Florida Alligator, as the official media of the
University of Florida, also has an obligation. The
student body has the right to expect full and accurate
reporting, particularly when the subject could affect
the accreditation of your own university. The students
should be allowed to read the facts expressed by their
governor rather than half quotes of others and editor
ializing in the guise of news reporting.
In light of the obligations assumed by both of us, I
respectfully request that you print, in equally promi prominent
nent prominent position in tomorrows issue, this entire com communication
munication communication to the faculty and student body without
alteration.
I ODoned my campus visit remarks with the state statement
ment statement that a crisis was brewing and if it continued
Florida could face the loss of accreditation in all our
universities. I immediately related this observation
to three things:
(1) The untimely discussion of budgetary proce procedures
dures procedures required by State Law. (2) The Faculty Senate
Resolution referring to the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools, citing conflict of Florida laws
with the Associations desired single board and
budgetary autonomy for universities. (3) I associ associated
ated associated points (1) and (2) and pointed to the impasse
created by the fact that only the Legislature can
change laws, and since the 1965 Legislature ad adjourned
journed adjourned last June no change could be made until the
1967 legislative session.
As background, 1 reviewed that attempts to change
the budgetary laws as they applied to universities
had been made many times without success, parti particularly
cularly particularly in the 1961, 1963, and 1965 sessions of the
Legislature. I also pointed out that I was not in state
government until 1965 and then I took absolutely no
part in this question which did not evidence enough
support to receive committee recommendation.
Proceeding then in a discussion of responsibility
imposed on the Cabinet by existing law, I pointed out
the procedures by which budgets are processed and
approved. All departments, including the universities
and the Board of Regents were required to have their
budgets in the hands of the Budget Commission
(State Cabinet) by June 15 to be approved prior to
July 1, the beginning of the fiscal year. This year
all departments of State Government complied with
the required time schedule except the universities,
whose budgets were not received until July 23 over
one late.
*
governor
The Budget Commission does not specifically
approve established positions under $15,000 for
faculty or under $12,500 for administrative per personnel.
sonnel. personnel. Therefore, the universities were advised to
proceed with July 1 payrolls at whatever increased
rate had been proposed by the universities. This
authority was granted by a hand delivered letter
dated July 13, ten days before university budgets
were received. Salaries above $15,000 were to be
paid at the June rate until recommendations were
approved by the Budget Commission.
The Legislature provided a five percent increase
for all salaries for the year beginning July 1, 1965
and a three percent increase for 1966. They further
provided additional funds with which to equalize
salaries of comparable positions at all levels in the
several institutions of higher education.

reply from Gov. Burns

The Budget Commission, dealing only in general
classifications of positions, gave blanket approval
to all classified as Distinguished Professors and
to some 12,500 other faculty and administrative
positions that received salary adjustments. There
were 192 positions, where recommended increases
were in excess of ten percent, or were deemed to be
grossly out of line with other salaries in the Univer University
sity University System and other state agencies. Os these, 116
were non-educators or administrative personnel.
Regarding both groups the Budget Commission ex expressed
pressed expressed the willingness to discuss and consider any
individual cases where the universities felt unusual
or exceptional consideration was warranted. This
has resulted in several adjustments and others are
now under consideration.
In response to a question put by the Secretary-
Treasurer of the Student Body, and for clarity and
understanding only, I pointed out that because of delay
in submitting budgets the salary of the Vice President
of the University of Florida had not as of that date
(July 13) been fixed or approved. I also pointed out
that the salaries of all university presidents were
fixed by the State Legislature, ranging from $23,000
to $19,000 for presidents of newer universities. This
somewhat establishes guidelines for vice presidents
salaries as well as the matter of comparable posi positions
tions positions in the other state universities.
You will please note, as I asked the audience to
note, that throughout the entire discussion I had not
injected a single personal theory but, instead, dealt
strictly with law and facts.
At the next point, I did depart to compliment the
statement Secretary Tom Adams made the previous
day. I said that I was happy he expressed a willingness
to explore delegating as much authority as legally
possible to the Board of Regents. I pointed out that it
would have been politically understood had I made
the statement, as I had recommended to the Cabinet
the appointment of each member of the Board of
Regents.
May 1 ask The Alligators permission to correct
one other erroneous inference that appeared in
several issues since my visit. A review of official
minutes will confirm that every action on this entire
subject was by a Cabinet of state officials elected by
the people of Florida, with the exception of the State
Treasurer where Mr. Broward Williams is serving |
the unexpired term of the late J. Edwin Larson. May
I further cite, as I did when present, that the budget
processes of 1965 are the same as the past ten years.
Further, that the members of the Cabinet have only
fulfilled the responsibilities imposed by law, which
duties and responsibilities cannot be delegated or
neglected.
I recited the recommendations of the Budget
Commission and the appropriations of the 1965 ses session
sion session of the Legislature that earned for them the
title of Most Educational*Conscious in History.
For operating budgets of universities, the appropri appropriations
ations appropriations provide a 19 percent increase over 1963-65.
Increases of 14.6 percent for secondary education,
23 percent for textbooks (from $lO million to $12.7
million), and $3 million increase for food serving
staffs. The Legislature also placed the Minimum
Foundation Program on a current year basis by
1968-69, requiring $3.1 million during this bien biennium
nium biennium and $8.4 million in the 1967-69 biennium.
For new construction at universities and junior
colleges SBB million was provided, which is in Itself
an all time high.
The Alligator failed to say that the some two twohundred-odd
hundred-odd twohundred-odd persons in the audience gave a resound resounding
ing resounding ovation at the conclusion of the forty-five minute
discussion. Also, no mention was made of the fact
that I told the audience I had telephoned Dr. Reitz
at Washington before accepting the invitation of the
student leaders, that Dr. Reitz had designated Vice
President Robert Mautz to preside, and that the entire
program, questions, and platform seating was
directed by the Vice President and student leaders.
My role as Governor was strictly that of guest on
the campus of a great university, where I have re received
ceived received many honors, sent both my daughter and son,
and have personally supported financially and physi physically
cally physically for more than thirty years.
I .will appreciate the granting of this request for
publication in the interest of higher education in
Florida, as well as from your governor and estab established
lished established friend.
Sincerely,
, Haydon Burns
Governor

The Alligator accepts all letters
to the editor. Due to space limi limi
limi tations, however, we are unable
to print letters exceeding 250 ***
words. Names will be withheld
upon request of the writer.
INTRODUCING....
"ALBERTThe Fighting Gator"
Who beat Northwestern 24 to 14
L.S.U. 14 to 7
Ole Miss. 17 to 0
Uplp
Hes just in
!£¥ Jill ,#r
Homecoming
Pins SI.OO
Original designs by Metzke
CAMPUS SHOP
& Bookstore
..located in the HUB
Campus scene! I

Friday, Oct. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Igator classifieds]

for sale
HARDTOP fits all 1963-65 MG
Midgets or Sprites (without roll
up windows). Like new used 6
months. Can be seen at the Pure
Gasoline Station on 13 and Univ.
Ave. across from Wolfies. (A (A---27-st-p).
--27-st-p). (A---27-st-p).
1965 HONDA S-90. Excellent con condition,
dition, condition, brand new. $375. Will accept
reasonable offer. Contact Steve
Harris. Room 3079 Hume Hall.
372-9372. (A-30-st-c).
1962 YAMAHA, 55 cc. Electric
starter, 100 mile per gal. Ex Exc
c Exc llent condition. No reasonable
offer refused. Call 372-9213 after
6:00 p.m. Ask for Gene in room
649. (A-30-st-c).
- -
LIMITED MEMBERSHIPS are now
available in Triangle Flying Club.
Buy a part of 2 modern airplanes
and learn to fly at worlds lowest
cost. Call Bill Burwell at 372-3563.
(A-28-3t-c).
1965 TRIUMPH TIGER CUB, still
under warranty, like new. Will
finance. Ph. 236-2287. Silver
Springs, Fla. (A-28-3t-c).
MOVING will sell: baby play playpen-bed,
pen-bed, playpen-bed, basic record player,
iron, baby bath. Call 372-7627.
(A-28-3t-c).
WOLLENSAK 4 track tape record recorder.
er. recorder. Model T-1515. Good condition.
SIOO. All assessories included.
Call 378-3776. (A-28-3t-c).
60 LB. BEN PE ARSON BOW. Great
for target or hunting. Excellent
condition. SSO. 462-1904. (A-28-
3t-c).
for rent
FURNISHED ROOM, private bath
and entrance. Daily maid service.
Central heat. TV cable connection.
5 mins, from campus. Car neces necessary.
sary. necessary. Available Oct. 18. $45. Call
372-5826 or 372-4592. (B-29-
st-c).
WILLIS TON MOTEL: Rooms by
week or month. Single or double.
Student rates. Television, phones,
and daily maid service. Rooms
available for all University events.
Phone Williston 528-4421. (B (B---30-lt-c).
--30-lt-c). (B---30-lt-c).
; V'
1 BEDROOM FURNISHED apart apartment.
ment. apartment. SSO. 419 NW 2 Ave. Call
McKinney-Green, Inc., Realtors.
FR 2-3617. (B-28-ts-c).
NEWLY DECORATED apartment
for University man. Call 376-9864.
11l SW 3 Ave. (B-27-3t-c).
i
lost&found
FOUND key chain with many keys,
Chain of small hearts. Left at Gail
Gynns Pot Pourrie. (L-28-3t-c).
REWARD. 18 car. white gold band
diamond ring. Lost between Tigert
and Anderson Hall. Call 378-3640.
(L-29-ts-c).

real estate
10 ACRE TRACT, 12 miles west
of city part wooded and part
cleared. $360 per acre SIOO down
$45. per month. Call Wayne Mason
c/o Ernest Tew Realty Inc., 376-
6461. (I-25-6t-c).
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom, 2 bath
house. Central heat, built-in
kitchen, newly painted. Carport
and storage area. Small downpay downpayment.
ment. downpayment. 372-3826. (I-24-ts-c).
help wanted
CONTROLLER. Men to train for
controller assignment which offers
excellent opportunity for those
qualified. Age 25-38. College edu education,
cation, education, major in business adminis administration
tration administration or accounting. Experience
would be advantageous but not ab absolutely
solutely absolutely essential. Many outstand outstanding
ing outstanding employee benefits. Apply
Personnel Dept., Sears, Roebuck
and Co., 1420 NW 23 Blvd. Gaine Gainesville,
sville, Gainesville, Fla. (E-28-10t-c).
personal
ANYONE SEEING MY CAR, Black
Alfa Romeo Spyder, parked next
to Royal Castle on Friday, Oct. 8,
please contact me. I am being
fined SSO. for something I didn't
do. William Wilhelm, 6-6212. (J (J---30-2t-p).
--30-2t-p). (J---30-2t-p).
GAIL GYNNS Pot Pourrie Shop
at the Village Square. Classes in
tailoring Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.;
Custom designing Tuesday at 8:00
p.m.; knitting Wednesday at 10:30
a.m., beginning on Oct. 19 & 20.
FR 8-1001. (J-28-3t-c).
SARAH HOPE invites all her
friends and customers to visit her
at Rame Hair Stylist, 319 W.Univ.
Call 372-5549 for appointment. (J (J---28-3t-c).
--28-3t-c). (J---28-3t-c).
ATTENTION STUDENTS: If you
purchased a Seminole last year
bring your receipt by Room 9 in
the Florida Union and claim your
book. All unclaimed books go on
sale Oct. 15. (J-15-10t-nc).

WINNER OF 3 ACADEMY AWARDS;
Â¥ A GRAND UPROARIOUS BASH!" N
UU Time Magazine
| S
HI Weekend jf Adults $1
Jp Children 35< 12
ANTHONY QUINN |||
SALAN BATES IRENE PAPAS
MICHAEL CACOYANNIS PRODUCTION
'ZORBATHE GREEK' S
AC Box Office Opens 12:30 m
Q Features: 2:45 3:25 6:05 8:45 I
' 'ZORBATHE GREEK''

services

IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios. 372-0300. (M (M---8-ts-c).
--8-ts-c). (M---8-ts-c).
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Charlie
and Mildred would like to say hello
and invite you to visit their brand
new, fully air-conditioned coin
laundry. E-Z Wash. 1126 W.Univ.
Ave. While doing your laundry at
E-Z Wash, Launder-It at 1122
W. Univ. Ave. is open till 9 p.m.
Mond. thru Fri. and from 8-6 on
Sat. for dry cleaning and shirt
service. (M-28-ts-c).
-
PINE WOOD SCHOOL. 1704 NE 9
St., 372-3343, open 12:30 p.m. to
5 p.m. for all U of F home games.
Excellent playground, refresh refreshments.
ments. refreshments. $2.00 per child. Registered
nurse in charge. (M-30-lt-c).
DAILY CHILDCARE. Experiencea
mother to care for children. Age 3
or older preferred. Inquire at 1743
NW 3 Place. (M-29-3t-c).
WILL BABYSIT and type term
papers and thesis at my home at
any time. Call 8-4066. (M-30-
3t-c).
SATURDAY HORNING
From 10:30 to 2 p.m.
Tr ., cc cc|[)uel
|[)uel cc|[)uel Os The Titans^
Day At The Races!
5 And Cartoons
Children will not be
permitted to stay af af--iitei^eeniShow
--iitei^eeniShowi af--iitei^eeniShow |i^^^

1 autos I
1963 CHEVY II; 6 cylinder,
floor shift, heater. Good shape.
SI2OO. Call 376-8806, evenings.
(G 30- ts- c).
1958 ANGLIA. First $175. Call
2-2210 or see at 256-S Flavet 111.
(G-29-st-c).
1963 AUSTIN HEALY SPRITE.
Radio and heater. Clean. SIOSO.
Phone 8-3392. (G-28-3t-c).
1960 VOLKSWAGEN, radio, white
side walls. S2OO. and take over
payments. Call 376-0119. (G-30-
ts-c).

x\^vx-xvx-x-x-xvx\^x-xxvx-x-x*x*x'x*x*:v>x*x*x*>:xvx%vx">;xv:v:':\xv:v:v:vxx;
z^j^nrnvnnw
_ >^p*iyg-i^TwsriicT
I 2400 Hawthorne Road Rt 20 Phone FR 6-SOll l
FIRST AREA SHOWING
FRI. SAT. ONLY!
3 EXCITING New Hits!
"THE THIRD PY
v 'W J 9
GEORGE PEPPARD AND
EUZABIIH ASHIEY
Mvmebm*
"Two Carefree Americans turn Paris on its Ear
JAMes Djck, ELKe an9>*e
(j3RNen-Vah DvKesoMmeDicKjNson
* RDSS HUNTeR '\ pijpouctioN^^
' S'* s
DeaP 4K
IIImSBI Heart

I autos
1963 FUTURA CONVERTIBLE
Bucket seats, 4 speed transmit
sion, r & h, like new condition
$1195. Call 8-4229 or see at 327
NW 15 Terr. (G-25-ts-c).
1964 CARMEN GHIA, VW; W h ite
with black interior; radio, heat heater,
er, heater, white walls. Price low, must
sell. Excellent condition. Call 8
4957. (G-30-st-c).
1960 CHEVROLET IMP ALA hard hardtop,
top, hardtop, white, radio and heater.
Powerglide 283. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Want SBSO or best offer.
Call 378-1187 or 378-4380. (G (G---28-ts-c).
--28-ts-c). (G---28-ts-c).



wanted
[ROOMMATE DESIRED to share
private house. Ideal location quiet
neighborhood. 5 mins, from center
of campus. Screen porch and back backyard.
yard. backyard. Call 378-4303 after 6 p.m.
(C-29-st-c).
1 FEMALE ROOMMATE, immedi immediate
ate immediate occupancy. 1 bedroom apt. in
Colonial Manor. Oct. rent already
paid. Call Barbara 8-3744. (C (C---27-st-c).
--27-st-c). (C---27-st-c).
ONE SHARP ROOMMATE to share
ultra-cool bachelors pad in Lake Lakeshore
shore Lakeshore Towers. Call 378-4138 after
5 p.m. (C-27-ts-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
one bedroom apt. $37.50 per
month, utilities included. Call 378-
2780. (C-30-st-p).
DRIVER NEEDED to pull trailer
to Mobile, Ala. over weekend.
Expenses paid. Call 378-2780. (C (C---30-lt-p).
--30-lt-p). (C---30-lt-p).
HORSES: THE TEPEE RANCH
Ladies Horse Polo Team has a
vacancy for one, or more students,
students wives or faculty wives
who can furnish their own horse
and equipment for the weekly free
polo instruction and polo practice
at Tepee Ranch. Mrs. Barbara
Kohler (student and student wive),
president. Miss Helen Price (gra (graduates
duates (graduates daughter), vice president.
Mrs. Mary Pancgyk (students
wife, secretary-treasurer. For
information call Col. Price, Cav Cavalry
alry Cavalry (retired), 372-5844 between
7 and 9 p.m. week days. (C-29-
lt-c).
ONE DOUBLE MOTEL ROOM,
available foil Friday,yct.
Saturday, o/t. 16. DRcated M-X/2.
miles thi J Starlet Call
Rick Zinnr room
647 anv/inr '.m. Friday.
(J-29/t-'Otf
GIRLS, j-
Go-Go wiUl a Hx of
W. e. S2O
permaopnts, sly sls #rmanents
Limitflime only. Phone
372*6549. (J-29-3t-c).

NOW SHOWING
Open Dally From 12:30
Continuous Shows Daily
From 1 p.m. Features:
A MOVIE THAT YOU SHOULD
NOT MISS -JUDtTH CRIST-on NBC-TV '-TODAY" show
kn Sreraiver-DiniOGaroe
PS-jjteijy#
#No childrens tickets sold for this engagement
eAcres of Free Parking

I Gator Ads I
I Are Worth I
l' IKi M E j
I COMING I

licin TdTnnnnTTnrv
"MTMtksT m-ijYIH
Tonight, SaturdayM
'SHENANDOAH' I
James Stewart
GATHERING OF EAGLES'!
Rock Hudson H
BUS RILEY'S I
BACK IN TOWN'
Ann-Margret !
I
DONOVAN S REEF' I
HORSE SOLDIERS' J

STUDENT VALUE SPECIAL
SAVE 13
ON THIS:
Powerful Compact 9 Transistor 4
FM/AM Pocket Size Portable I H # **
Dynamic 8 ohm Non-Reactivo Resis Resistance
tance Resistance Speaker for Tone Qarity
Attractive Slide Rule Dial for Easy d 4 :
High Impact Plastic Cabinet With |B
Spun Finished Grill I
Genuine Top Grain Matching Ebony fl|
leather Carrying Case
Tonemaster Private Listening Ur "B fll
Built In Sensitive AM Ferrite A..renno B
1 9Vj" FM Swivel Telescope Antenna |§iH|
Plus 3 Diodes and I Thermistor for mL jP
ALL THESE OUTSTANDING FEATURES WITH A RIU 30 DAY
\ MONEY BACK GUARANTEE
Compare This Valwa With Camparabla Radios Selling far $29.05 and Mara
iE i Innovation Electronics Industries
V. O. BOX 259, NORTHTOWN STA. CHICAOO, lIIINOIS 40045
NAME TOTAL
ADDRESS _____ TAX
CITY STATE AMT. ENCLOSED t
PLEASE SEND RADIO(S) at $14.95 EACH
My nrpnlmHnn with a membership
n( i interested In earning funas Please send details for
oa^JUtiittLi&d&saafiaaMaiaMasfiiaaaisaaaaepaHMaaMaaManaa^ManMaiMaMjM
X Fish
NigHt
S. /
.. *.
FRIDAY AII th* Fi*
You Can Eat,
OLD-FASHIONED Ho* Popple*,
FISH NIGHT Cole Slaw 97<
5 PM Y PM
Fresh Cedar Key Fish
LARRYS
Restaurant
1225 W. Univ. Ave. 372-6666
WALT DISNEY
preeartte
DOROTHY McGUIRE and FESS PARKER
co-starring In
, jfek _____
'Jb h/9 lI
wjtr V/Yl 'V
'* mm 3 t, BufM nSH DitnDi/on Co Inc Onnty Prodwrtoit*
if o mihuUmr

Friday, Oct. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator. Friday, Oct. 15, 1965

Mercantile Security Life Insurance Co.
.
V : . %
Presents COLLEGE ESTATE PLAN
-*.
(
__ rV foMV^
vv \SSV K' N k
_ L P,v;ii olNG
Tasi
\ 1 \
\
naduate Student' contact \
College Sem inS urance co P letl ei \
'^ ea te some n uld conside ~ from \
* \
college tnen _ omettan q unu \
\ -c i* concet -nvesimenl \
\ company- lts insurance. > \
\ e Plan is un ia ue CoUe geEstate fev(el \
\ b. eonlV nQ other \
\ end disCiUW are not onW \
\ is dl eient 7 n odditian. Yn lU \
\ elusions- vice ive pl ogtam at \
\ mcludtng mtUlaty ot obtain ttas ..and, \
\ aUv the tequitemen t 0 q ual wVIO tsh \
\ HatuiaUy- college men roU ps \
\ strict; ''' WeV^ to meet the who don't- \
\ depose e whtV e in school an Held- You \
\ wtnakedepos o ut leaders he college- \
\ ate speeds teaSo nS a to lose by invesu lesv call- \
\ Thet rrtogain andn lta d t ogWV uaCOUl \
r;
' \
Jb r r<
< r< t
I
Agents here at the University are frank menke jerry fults
JAMES SKIP GRIFFIN BILL OLINGER
1219 W. University Ave. Ph. 378-1473



wti mu -*** --i ff S 4 lii****'*** SS-: ~_2. .iv' Wtk
Going Up Since April:
Chemistry Research Building, Research Library, Mental Health Unit

By TERRY MILLER
Alligator Staff Writer
Three new building projects have
gotten under way within the past
year and two others continue on
UFs expanding campus.
Begun since April of this year
are the new chemistry research
building, the research library and
a childrens mental health unit at
the medical center.
The $1.75 million chemistry re research
search research building will provide room
for major increases in graduate
student and post-doctoral work.
according to Dr. H. H.Sisler, head
of the chemistry department.
The new building will have of offices
fices offices for 13 chemistry professors
and 106 graduate and post-doctoral
students, Sisler said.
The four-story building now
underway south of Leigh Hall is
expected to be completed during

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NEW FLORIDA UNION: plenty of building, but kitchen may cause delay in construction

the summer of 1966 and open for
September classes.
There will be a sharp expansion
in the volume of organic and in inorganic
organic inorganic chemistry research that
can be carried on at UF with the
completion of this building, Sisler
said, but research in new areas is
not expected.
When completed, UFs chemis chemistry
try chemistry department will have some of
the finest facilities of any chemis chemistry
try chemistry department in the southeast,
Sisler said.
About SBOO,OOO for the research
building came from the National
Science Foundation. Six new
chemistry professors who will be begin
gin begin here next fall are also
supported by science foundation
grants, Sisler said.
The $2.25 million research
library being constructed on the
north end of the Plaza of the
Americas is also expected to open
by September, 1966.
Most of the research books will
be moved to the new building, as
well as most of the offices now in
the main library.
Last September ground was
broken for a sl.l million addition

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ENGINEERING COMPLEX: includes chemistry research unit

to the Medical Center complex.
The newest addition to the com complex
plex complex is a childrens mental health
unit -- the first in a three-phase
$6 million construction project.
When completed the project will
be UFs Center for Human
Development.

Now under way is a four-story
unit to be attached to the east side
of the Teaching Hospital which is
expected to be ready for occupancy
by January, 1967.
The mental health facilities will
have in-patient quarters for 24
children, facilities for teaching and

Friday, Oct. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

research in this area, a develop development
ment development clinic, and other laboratories
for study concerned with human
development.
The $5.25 million Florida Union
Building, now being constructed to
the south-east of McCarty Hall, is
expected to open at least by June
1960.
Originally set to open in April
of next year, installation of
$200,000 of kitchen equipment may
cause the extra delay.
Offices in the present Florida
Union, as well as the Alumni As Association
sociation Association and the University Place Placement
ment Placement offices, will be moved to the
new structure.
The 250,000 square-foot building
will house four public lounges,
meeting rooms, a barbershop, two
art galleries, a browsing library,
music listening rooms, a 350-seat
auditorium, a branch of the Campus
Shop and Bookstore, a 470-seat
drama theater and a multi-lane
I ¥
bowling alley.
Work is now concentrated on the
building itself. Landscaping and
beautification of the lake in front
will begin when the building itself
is completed.
Emory Diamond Village, an 11
apartment building village, opened
for occupancy in August.

Page 11



i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 15, 1965

Page 12

figill |
( To Face I
fThe Judge (
By TERRY MILLER
Alligator Staff Writer
Charlatan Editor Bill Killeen is
scheduled to appear before the
Tallahassee Municipal Court Ort.
28 on charges of publishing and
selling obscenity.
The 24-year-oldd editor was
originally arrested in Tallahassee
on Oct. 5 for selling without an
individual solicitors license.
Killeen said that four hours be before
fore before he was arrested he was not notified
ified notified that he would have to get
a SSO city occupation license, which
he did. He said,, he was not
notified that an individual permit
(costing $3) was needed.
Killeen will be defended by a
lawyer from the American Civil
Liberties Union (ACLU) when he
appears on Oct. 28.
The ACLU has promised to back
him right down the line, he
said.
I think it might be necessary
to appeal it maybe once or twice,
but it is inevitable that we w#l
win, Killeen said. i
Killeen said Lt. George Daws
of the Tallahassee Police Dept,
told him he tried to stop them
from selling the magazine because
of the tremendous pressure by the
Tallahassee Democrat, the city
Chamber of Commerce and the
Catholic Womens Club.
Tallahassee is such a tight
town, Killeen said, because no
one has ever fought it before.
They probably expected us to
fold up our tents and leave town,
he added.
Killeen said the State Attorneys
office has stopped the selling of
the magazine at other outlets in
Tallahassee.
Even before the magazine has
been judged, he said.
Tallahassee advertisers in the
magazine have also received pres pressure
sure pressure from people in Tallahassee.
Killeen said that even if he wins
his case the courts still will have
won, for they have caused damage
to the magazine.
According to the bailiffs office
of the Tallahassee Police Depart Department,
ment, Department, Killeen posted SSOO bond for
each of two charges.
Arrested with Killeen on the
original selling without permit
charge was Marilyn Todd, Char Charlatans
latans Charlatans advertising manager. Miss
Todd posted a SSOO bond for a
single charge.
Gator Guard
To Take Part
In Activities
By HOWIE ROSENBLATT
Alligator Staff Writer
Gator Guard, the Army ROTC
precision drill team, will make its
first appearance of the year this
afternoon in the Homecoming par parade.
ade. parade. The team will march and
perform several intricate man maneuvers.
euvers. maneuvers.
Last year, Gator Guard won top
honors at Sarasota, Orlando, and
the,. Mardi Gras. At Mardi Gras
the team competed with 77 other
marching and precision drill teams
and emerged with the best overall
trophy.
The drill team will also perform
at pre-Growl tonight and halftime
tomorrow.
PATRONIZE
GATOR
ADVERTISERS

Alpha Lambda Delta Eyes Smart trosh

By CHERYL KURIT
Alligator Staff Writer
Superior scholastic attainment by women students during their
first year in college is recognized by Alpha Lambda Delta.
This organizations requirement for membership is a 3.5 out of
a possible 4. For transfer students on a different grading system, the
average required is exactly halfway between the tow highest grades
given by the institution.
Membership is open to those women students who have completed
one trimester of school and have met the grade requirement.
Advisors to Alpha Lambda Delta are: Dr. Marjorie Jackson,
assistant Dean of Women and Dr. Tommy Ruth Waldo, assistant
professor of English and recently chosen to appear in Whos Who
in American Women.
This honorary organization recognizes the potential in fresh freshman
man freshman women, what will be the final result we dont know, commented

-
I
Heres the
shortest line
between
graduation and
a go-places
career.
Uli *> . . ...
Your name:
H '... .
I Its the one you sign on at your
I placement office for an interview with IBM
I October 20-21
zzzszzxzr'* r::; a ,rr2 r
I stability? New frontiers in all Why not come along?
technologies-with the leader in a growth company like IBM ....
in the nation's fastest-growing responsibility and advancement Wh ,9v l er area of stud W
major industry? come rapidly. In fact, during ask us how you might use your
iq. .. the next five years IBM exDects Particular talents at IBM.
IBM can offer you extraordinary t 0 appoint approximately 6 000 J b PP r, cmties at IBM lie in
growth opportunities ,n new manag PP s eight major career fields:
Research. Devekrpment, of training and education 9 (1) Research and Development,
I S27',^r in 9 programs Will help you meet < 2 > Engineering,
a d Administration throughout the challenge of growth. (3) Manufacturing, (4) Finance
its network of labs, plants and Administration,
and technical centers. So visit your placement office (5) Marketing, (6) Field
If you want the facts about these n W f r a lme on IBM Sign Engineering, (7) Systems
careers, youll want to talk to 00 for your mterview lf f or any Engineering, (8) Programing,
the IBM interviewer. reason you can t arrange an IBM is an Equal Opportunity
n ... interview, visit your nearest Employer,
ertainly, he wants to talk to you IBM branch office. Or write writea
a writea out these key jobs. Manager of College Relations W M
They re jobs with technical IBM Corporate Headquarters | 11
I responsibility. Where you can Armonk, New York 10504. B JCI
I

Dr. Jackson.
We hope that these women will relate their knowledge to ev
living and show love for their fellow man, added Dr.
Pledging service for new members will be held on Oct. 22
the officers officiating.
Present officers include: President Kathie Taccoline; Vi Ce
President Joyce Naness; Secretary Jane Louise Cook; Treasury
Susan Nieman; and social Chairman Sue Peoples.
Members of Alpha Lambda Delta help with tutoring, and assis
Mortar Board.
Invitations have been sent to those women thought to be eligible
but some may have been overlooked, commented Dr. Jackson.
Any student who believes she is eligible for membership, includiM
transfer students should check with the Dean of Womens office
123 Tigert Hall, Monday, Oct. 18 through Wednesday Oct. 20.



Some Hangovers
Psychosomatic

CHICAGO (UPI) Some persons
have hangovers because of guilt
feelings, an authority of psycho psychosomatic
somatic psychosomatic medicines said Sunday.
And some persons going to a doc doctor
tor doctor for a cold do so for an emo emotional
tional emotional crutch.
Dr. Bertram B. Moss, Chicago
president of the American Academy
of Psychosomatic Medicine, wag
interviewed on the eve of the aca academys
demys academys annual meeting.
Some people have hangovers
SWEETIES TOUR
UF Homecoming Sweetheart
finalists Ann Camp, Kathy Green
and Paula Hicks toured the U.S.S.
Shangri-La Sunday at May port
Naval Base near J cksonville.
The visit was coordinated by
Mayport officials and representa representatives
tives representatives of Florida Blue Key, mens
leadership fraternity at the UF,
which is sponsoring Homecoming
this weekend.

I WHY I
FLY?
Other than the fact that flying an airplane by yourself is one of
the most exciting and personally satisfying experiences you can B
lever have, what usefulness could being a pilot be to you? YOUR I
I WORTH TO AN EMPLOYER automatically goes up when you have I
I this ability added to your accumulated bag of tricks. YOU ARE I
I PERSONALLY CAPABLE OF BEING MORE PLACES FASTER I
lat your convenience which gives you an edge on a competitor. I
YOU BECOME A MEMBER OF ONE OF THE MOST ELITE AND B
SELECT GROUPS IN AMERICA less than .4 of 1% of the nations
I population can fly. And the most unbelievable and yet amazingly B
I true facts is that in the course of a year, THE COST OF FLYING B
IIS LESS THAN USING ANY FORM OF TRANSPORTATION to B
I cover the same amount of miles and time consumed. AND BY B
FAR THE SAFEST -- and this has been proved statistically. fl
As a university student YOU ARE IN AN IDEAL POSITION RIGHT I
NOW to budget time and money to take advantage of the most I
I economical flying school opportunity available to you today. B
in a nutshell, THE MOST VALUABLE ASSET YOU HAVE IS B
TIME to use these college years to your advantage. PERHAPS B
LEARNING TO FLY IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT B
EDUCATIONAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS YOU COULD TAKE WITH
YOU. These are just a few of the many reasons which may apply
Ito your plans for your future. If you feel that these may be I
Interesting to you, come out to the Gainesville Municipal Airport.
I ASK FOR OUR $5 INTRODUCTORY FLIGHT LESSON to see if I
I you have the ability and interest to complete our program. B
IWe ask that you dont call us, for the same reason that you B
wouldnt call a girl you have never seen and ask her if she is B
pretty. We cant tell you about flying on the telephone. Airplanes B
Bdo our talking for us. So come see the talking airplanes at B
I Cassels In The Air, Gainesville Municiple Airport, Waldo Road. B
I CASSELS-IN-THE-AIR I
I GAINESVILLE fl
O* MUNICIPAL
AIRPORT I

just to punish themselves through
guilt feelings, Moss said. Cer Certiainly
tiainly Certiainly in many cases there are
physiological reasons, but in
others, there are emotional rea reasons
sons reasons for the day after the night
before.
Some alcoholism is caused by
victims unconsciously seeking
death to relieve their tensions,
Moss said.
Moss said five out of six per persons
sons persons who go to the doctor for a
common cold need an emotional
crutch. He said they know there
is no positive cure for a common
cold. Moss said patterns of psy psychosomatic
chosomatic psychosomatic illness change from
time to time.
Decades ago, Moses said, it
was fashionable for women to
faint or swoon.
He said this wasnt from too tootight
tight tootight corsets, but was just at attention-getting.
tention-getting. attention-getting.
Lately, he said, there have been
unexplained backaches and neck
pains.

POLITICS' PRICE: getting cut down in JMBA skits
John Marshall Bar Skits
To Take Annual Politico Pokes

Its no holds barred as poli politicians
ticians politicians line up to receive their
share of satire and fun-poking
at the annual John Marshall Bar
Association skits following the
UFs Homecoming weekend law
fraternity breakfasts here tom tomorrow.
orrow. tomorrow.
The Fun starts at 10:30 a.m.
as the politicos become the object
of laugh" in skits depicting their
activities as seen by the College

SHIRTS %|P|Py
JACKETS jjMmjST
Mens And I
Womens -frSBT Vp
mm
Gainesville H H
Stockman I I
Sapply Co. W
, Qp
At the Gainesville Livestock Market
5001 N.W. 13th St.

of Law actors.
Some of the many political fig figures
ures figures present will be seen laugh laughing,
ing, laughing, while others, for the mom moment
ent moment at least, will wish they had
stayed home.
National and state government
leaders feel the sting of the sear searing
ing searing satire as law students expose
hilarious political situations--
much to the amusement of the
audience.

Friday, Oct 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

No one knows for sure when the
law skits first started, but the
free event draws an overflow crowd
at Homecoming. Twelve hundred
seats will be set up near the Col College
lege College of Law to accommodate a
portion of the estimated 2,000
persons who will attend.
Chairman of this years skits,
Dan Carlton, second year law
students from Wauchula, and his
band of writers have come up with
an apparent three-ring arena of
laughs. The sets arent spectac spectacular
ular spectacular and the actors are anything
but professional, but the satire
should hit the nail on the head.
The skits open with a five-act
impression of the national, A
Glance at the Great Society, tell telling
ing telling a story about a tall Texan
with an even bigger dream. He
comes to Crawfishville where his
very Southern wife begins a beau beautification
tification beautification project. All goes well
until a Republican Representative
and other dignitaories arrive on
the scene.
The satiric spotlight then shifts
to Tallahassee for the second
presentation, billed as a tender,
true-to-life drama, The Continu Continuing
ing Continuing Story of Haydon Place.
Haydon Place is where the
state politicians get their treat treatment,
ment, treatment, according to Carlton.
Its an inside story of road build building,
ing, building, education and political musical
chairs designed to tickle a few
funnybones.
FIDELITY UNION LIFE
THE COLLEGE PLAN
exclusively for
THE COLLEGE MAN
.. .Guaranteed by top
company.
.. .No war clause
. Deposi ts deferred
until your earnings
increase.
Campus Representatives
Bob Si frit Dan Sapp
Mel Ward Geo. Corl
376-1208

Page 13



The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 15, 1965

Page 14

A university, much like its foot football
ball football team, takes pride in being
nationally ranked.
But the competition among the
nations universities becomes
more demanding than simply com compiling
piling compiling yardage or scoring touch touchdowns.
downs. touchdowns. In the academic huddle, a
big power university is known
for its strength and depth in the
research laboratory and class classroom.
room. classroom.
The UF, recently chosen by the
National Science Foundation as re recipient
cipient recipient of a 1 Center of Excellence
award, today is considered one of
the Souths leading institutions in
the field of research and education.
A $4.2 million NSF grant, a awarded
warded awarded to Florida in July, is the
largest of its kind every channeled
to a university by this organization.
Only nine other institutions across
the nation have received similar
grants. In selecting Florida as a
center of excellence, the NSF
pointed to the Universitys con continued
tinued continued growth and progress in
graduate research and undergrad undergraduate
uate undergraduate training.
In less than a decade, Florida
has almost tripled its overall ex expenditures
penditures expenditures for research. In 1955
the University was spending rough roughly
ly roughly $6 million annually on its varied
research projects. Now that figure
has jumped to an estimated $17.2
million.
The range of interest in research
projects conducted by over 800
professors last year spans the
field, covering everything from
tracking turtles in the Atlantic to
discovering a sight-restoring
drug.

§ Florida Players Rashomon Opens At Norman Thursday I

I
I
si


:* I
&fl
X I
:: I
hhhhhhi
$ IN RASHOMON: Mikd OoVl. left- Jeny Rhodes

Staff researchers in engineering
continually redefine and suggest
new techniques relevant to the na nations
tions nations space effort. Florida is now
a major research facility in the
National Aeronautics and Space
Administrations plans and is mak making
ing making recognizable gains in such
technical fields as random vibra vibration
tion vibration studies, laser ignition prob problems,
lems, problems, liquid propellant mixtures
and load capacities of fuel tanks
in boosters and rockets.
A noted zoologist, Dr. Archie
Carr, has devoted the last 10 years

investigating the migratory habits
of the large green turtle found
primarily in the Caribbean a rear;
Now. after experimenting with dif different
ferent different ways of keeping tabs on the
wandering amphibians (some have
been found thousands of miles away
from their nesting grounds). D*.
Carr soon may be given equipment
space aboard one of NASAs satel satellites
lites satellites in order to track his turtles.
Tracking the turtles by satellite
would enable the zoologist to keep
an almost hourly fix on the marine
creatures. The Navy Department,
which is supporting much of this
work, feels it can benefit from
learning how and by what methods
the turtle navigates 1.400 miles out
to sea and returns two to three
years later at almost the exact spot
from which it left.
Air pollution experts are keeping
ahead of what could be a serious
problem in Florida with studies in into
to into the causes of contaminated air,
while specialists in sanitary engi engineering
neering engineering seek new methods to rid
the states streams and rivers of
waste and filth.
The states eroding beaches are
other areas of special interest to
research professors. Experts es estimate
timate estimate Florida is losing 15-20
million cubic yards of sand yearly
from its shores. This poses a ser serious
ious serious threat to the tourist industry
as well as projected development
and construction along such areas
as the Gold Coast, Clearwater,
Sarasota and Ft. Myers, Daytona
Beach, St. Augustine, Jacksonville
and Fernandina Beach.
To learn how the sand is washed
away and where it eventually
settles, fluorescent tracers are
mixed with sand that is dredged
from off shore and later dumped
on the beach as part of a nourish nourishment
ment nourishment program.
Doctors at the University of
Florida are taking giant strides in
their chosen fields of medical re research.
search. research. Dr. Herbert Kaufman, one
of the nations most prominent
eye surgeons, recently discovered
a sight-restoring drug known as
IDU. After countless experiments
on animals, the drug later was
applied to humans suffering from
blindness or partial blindness
caused by corneal ulcers.
Another medical expert at the
Universitys J. Hillis Miller Health
Center has been recording the mu mutational
tational mutational growth of chicken embryos
hatched under cyclopropane, a

The mystery, charm and excitement of Ancient
Japan comes alive next week as the Florida
Players present their first production of the
season, Rashomon.
Though Rashomon is not actually traditional
Japanese drama (it was first presented in New
luaL a K h > uw! h rv Flonda P '^ rs
attains a Kabukl-like charm. Authentic music
co orful kimonos, a samurai swordfight and a
setting complete with hand-painted Japanese
screens combine to transform Norman HaU into
a Nipponese fantasyland.
rSnrr Th r vi,y *^
seenOcl.Wc
tZ l n\ S T urday
.hru gh Sat U r^ y o le :l^^^y
Florida students featured in the
cast are Mike Doyle 1#
ley, Ruth Ann He 11 wig HoMyu? V? Hef
Kendrick Jr Jerry B-nes
The Florida Plavers' f r,i 7. M Carl Strano
Dr. L. L. Zin'tZZ. mIH d,rected b

dimensions [
in research I
Hi I:
'v V x
P- Xy ''
* I
p >..

x if -. 1
v Vv '#
~ B
I

common anesthesiology adminis administered
tered administered at times to expectant
mothers.
To date over 2,000 eggs have
been hatched in the gas and their
varying mutations studied and
compared. Doctors want to know
more about the unborn fetus and
how chemical reactions, such as
cyclopropane given to a pregnant
woman affects the fetus.
Researchers feel this informa information
tion information cannot be applied to human
embryos, which may react differ differently
ently differently than developing chicks. How However,
ever, However, the knowledge learned from
this project can provide a point of
departure for research into the
effects of drugs and anesthetics on
humans.
Research in the physical and
social sciences, plus the human humanities,
ities, humanities, also is advancing on many
fronts at Florida. Nuclear studies
form an active part of the scienti scientific
fic scientific arena with special emphasis on
chemistry, physics, mathematics,
radiology and engineering. The
University has its own atomic re reactor
actor reactor and as such utilizes this
equipment to study critical reactor
shutdown techniques.

Political scientists question the
merits of Congressional investi investigations,
gations, investigations, historians probe for ans answers
wers answers to tax problems, and geo geographers
graphers geographers live with peasant Peru Peruvians
vians Peruvians in order to understand human
migration tendencies.
These are just a few of the 1,000
or so investigations under way by
professors at the University of
Florida.
In the coming months and years,
the Universitys campus will be
enriched by some $16.2 million in
new research facilities. Florida
soon will have a separate graduate
research library, a bioenviron bioenvironmental
mental bioenvironmental engineering research cen center,
ter, center, additions to the College of
Engineering, a new chemistry re research
search research unit and a space sciences
research center.
Ground has been turned for
Human Development Center a
jacent to the existing medica
complex. This facility W1
specialize in the abnormalities a
principles associated with human
growth and development and pro
mises to be the only one of its kino
in the world.

Umbrella
For Growl ?
Gator Growl may be showeredI
more than its famous fire* 0
show.
The U. S. Weather Bureau has
forecasted partly cloudy skies
rain for today and tomorrow*
As of last night it was undete
mined what would happen
did pour at Growl time. The
which is too small anyway. wl
set up for the Blue Key bancl
Homecoming house deco^. at ! e( j
and floats were already 0
thoroughly yesterday so tie
year birthday tbeme will be
priately characterized by a
wrinkled text*re.



118 SCHOLARS CANT BE WRONG!

UNIVERSITY GARDENS,
Gainesvilles Best Rental
Apartment Value, NOT
Conducive to Scholarship?
BALDERDASH!...
...and our reqistry of 14 PhDs
and teaching personnel, 39
graduate students and 65
undergrads not to mention
22 professional people says so.
FEATURES I Were 100% Occupied...
FOR YOUR
COMFORT but wefe only 20%
AND PLEASURE... completed.
* Private Patios and BalconieA .. .. AUJ
* i D .. D \ wan nuw
Large Recreation Room X
* Four-Acre Lake \f or reservations.

* Twin Swimming Pools \
* Full-Time Residence Manager \
* Tennis, Handball Courts \
* Picnic Area, Barbecue Facilities \
* More Than 18 Beautiful Acres
* Beautiful Preserved Native Trees \

* Inviting Paths Through Gardens, Groves \
* Laundry Facilities, Conveniently Located \
* Separate Storage Area, Each Apartment \
* Individual Central Air Conditioning, Heating \
* Fireproof Construction, Sound-Conditioned \
* Inside Corridors for Complete Privacy \
* Spacious Apartments \
700 Square-Footers & 900 Square-Footers \
* Hotpoint Range, Oven, Hooded Exhaust Fan
* Hotpoint Refrigerator-Freezer
* Abundant Kitchen Cabinet Space
* Step-Saving Work Surfaces
* Hotpoint Garbage Disposal Unit
* Colorful Ceramic Tile Baths
* Oversized Walk-In Closets
* Sliding Glass Doors to Patio, Balcony
* Formica Cabinets in Kitchens, Baths
* Wall-to-Wall Carpeting
Living Rooms, Bedrooms, Hallways
* Parquet Oak Flooring in Dining Rooms
* Central Television Antenna, All Apartments
* Limousine Service The Half-Mile to UF Campus
* Near Elementary, Secondary Schools
* Walking Distance From Shopping Center
* Close to Business, Industrial Complexes, Churches
* Only 500 Yards From U.S. 441, Quick Access to Others

1- Apts. From sllO
2- Apts. From $l3O
Coll 376-6720

UNIVERSITY gardens

.1

...only 1/2 mile from the UF campus
at 700 SW 16th Avenue

The Perfect Note
In Off-Campus Living;

STUDIOUS
' fYLISH
SOCIABLE

1
.'*l

UNIVERSITY
UNIVERSITY I*
FLORIDA I
* I
I
o'Si I = I UNIVERSITY
I I GARDENS
I I S.W. 1 AVI.
/ r

Drive by and look us over during
HOMECOMING WEEKEND
(specially you alums
and visiting parents).

*

Friday, Oct. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 15, 1965

America Largest
Paper Consumer

By BRUCE CONGLETON
Alligator Staff Writer
How much paper do you use
in a year? Fifty pounds? A
hundred? Guess again.
According to chemical engineer
Dr. William Nolan, each Amer Amercan
can Amercan uses over 350 pounds of paper
per year.
This ai .ount becomes even
more impressive when you con consider
sider consider that per capita consumption
in Europe is 80-90 pounds a year
and 1-2 pounds a year in India,
he said.
Nolan, currently engaged in pro production
duction production research of pulp wood in
the paper industry, insisted that
these figures reflect the degree
of luxury and literacy in our
country.
The paper industry is the fifth
largest industry in the United
States, Nolan said. Paper mills
are producing and average of 2,500
feet of paper a minute, but many
mills still arent at capacity pro production.
duction. production.
| Delta Chis |
I In 75th |
Year
The Nightcrawlers (The Little
Black Egg) will be the band at
Delta Chis Homecoming blast to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow night at 8:30 p.m.
Delta Chi will also enter a float
and hold an Alumni meeting during
the weekend.
This year marks the 75th anni anniversary
versary anniversary for the brotherhood, which
is celebrating a Diamond Jubilee
in New York this week.

1119 W. Univ. Ave. (next to Donigan's)
PRESENTS
1945$ MOST IMPORTANT
DOUBLE RELEASE
THE NEW THE NEW
PETER, PAUL JOAN
$2 1 7 .. AND S3 mm BAEZ
$3.97 MAPY $4.7
stereo lIW 1IWI stereo
FREE PARKING Gainesville's Franchised
CENTRAL CHARGE # y
GREETTN^ARDS^^^**^^^'*"

There are many reasons for
this, he said, The primary
one being that paper production has
been mainly an art down through
the ages and not a science such
as the petroleum industry.
Nolan explained that his job is
to develop the most economical
system of producing better grades
of paper more efficiently.
This eventually involves using
computers, he said. Computors
could be used efficiently as a
management tool to determine
temperature controls, amounts of
raw materials, projected yields
and numerous variable and tech technical
nical technical facotrs which have been
and still are subjected to human
error.
For instance, if computer con control
trol control could increase the yield of a
mill 2-3 per cent the savings in
production costs could amount to
as much as a half a million dollars
a year, Nolan said.
Computers would not, as many
might think, put more men on the
unemployment lists.
Since labor in the paper industry
is ralatively small, present em employees
ployees employees could be retained and could
maintain the mill on a more effic efficient
ient efficient basis, he said. Computers
would eliminate the educated
guesses and the paper industry
could prosper by producing better
qualigy paper continuously.
Paper has been produced ever
since the time of the Egyptians,
he said, But scientifically the
industry is lagging behind. In
such a major and vital industry
it is imparative that it catch up
in order to meet the needs of
our rapidly expanding nation.

Free University of Florida
For Lively, Relevant, Adult Education
(REGISTER BY MAIL)
The Free University of Florida is a Federal tax exempt,
nonprofit educational institution incorporated under the
laws of the State of Florida. Its teachers and students are
the only voting members of the corporation, and together
they elect the schools administration. FUF is financed
by a nominal student tuition of $1 per week per course,
by tax deductible individual contributions, and by foundation
grants. The schools teachers are unpaid volunteers. FUF
is an autonomous band of scholars dedicated to non noncoercive
coercive noncoercive higher education and to bringing the student into
the city and the city into the classroom. It has no affiliation
or connection with any other school, any organizations of
a political or partisan nature, and its books, records,
and academic affairs are open to the inspection of all
interested persons.

LAW AND LIBERTY ... STANLEY
LAUGHLIN.
An examination of the paradox of
liberty and equality; the historical
relationship of law and liberty;
legal environment of individual au autonomy;
tonomy; autonomy; current cases in marginal
areas of freedom: narcotics, sex.
speech, and conscientious objec objection.
tion. objection.
c
HUMANITIES FOR POST-MOD POST-MODERN
ERN POST-MODERN MAN .... ED RICHER.
Selected readings in pursuit of the
cross-logics and various drifts of
modern civilization; use of psycho psychoanalytic
analytic psychoanalytic and anthropological
lenses to help make visible al alternative
ternative alternative systems of decision decisionmaking
making decisionmaking that compete for our
loyalties within everyday life be behavior.
havior. behavior.
THE NEGRO IN THE NOVEL
. ....... HERMAN LEVY.
The role of the Negro as character
and as author: Baldwin. Ellison,
Wright, and others.
STUDENT POLITICAL ACTIVITY
IN BRAZIL . JOSEPH WEISS.
Structure of the Brazilian univer university;
sity; university; students as a class, their
organizations, activities, and the
weight of their ideas in politics.
HOW TO READ THE DAILY
NEWSPAPER ... ED RICHER.
Critical awareness through tactics
of informational self-defense;
forms in modern mass communi communication
cation communication as modes of authoritarian
social control; prescription for i
humane and artful system of demo democratic
cratic democratic communication.
THE IMAGE OF BUSINESS IN
AMERICAN LITERATURE .
WILLIAM GOLDHURST.
Occasional lectures on the relation
of business in American life as
seen by the nations fiction writers.
JAZZ: A SURVEY OF AN AMER AMERICAN
ICAN AMERICAN ART FORM .... MARTIN MARTINCURRY.
CURRY. MARTINCURRY.
READINGS IN CONTEMPORARY
POETRY .... MARTIN CURRY.
COMMUNICATING POETRY
LEWIS TATHAM.
Oral readings to be followed by
discussions; purpose of the course
is to sharpen student sensibilities
as they apply to daily poetic per perception.
ception. perception.

. .the faculty dealing with
general education must be indepen independent
dent independent of and even isolated from the
university, close enough to it to
get the advantages of its facilities
and a few of its men; remote enough
from it to be able to work on its
problems without the interference
or control of the university ... It
remains to be seen whether any
such organization can ever be ef effected
fected effected and if so whether it can
succeed. Nothing short of it can
bring order out of the confusion
produced by the conflicting aims
of collegiate and university work.
--ROBERT MAYNARD HUTCHINS
'-V
SUPERVISED FIELDWORK IN
SELECTED POVERTY AREAS
.... STEVE McVOY.
Designed primarily to acquaint
volunteers with fieldwork prob problems
lems problems in Negro ghettos: racism,
oppression, insularity, communi communication,
cation, communication, and other issues of ghetto
life to be confronted through self selfencounter
encounter selfencounter and haul work.
OUR CHILDRENS WORLD ....
DAN OF FORD, WILLIAM
WO L KING.
Characteristic problems of child childadult
adult childadult relationships and the influ influence
ence influence of prevailing social norms
on the development of children and
their parents. A course especially
lor collegians who look forward to
parenthood, for mothers and fath fathers,
ers, fathers, and for those generally
puzzled by the world of children.
WORLD POLITICAL AWARE AWARENESS
NESS AWARENESS IN 20TH CENTURY
AMERICAN LITERATURE
JOHN PENROD.
Impact of European fascism and
Woild War II on the American
novel and the world-consciousness
of American writers.
FREE University of Florida
P. O. Box 13658, University Station
Gainesville, Florida
Gentlemen:

I wish to enroll in Mr. 's course on
rr -. I understand that the first meeting
X; e c a^s establish a permanent time, meeting place ( r
ij: h and perha P s course content. For this first meeting. I
absolutel >' unavailable, even once, on nights.
X Name
| Address, Tplease print)
Telephone ..
vocation

THE YOUNG CHRISTIAN CON CONSCIENCE
SCIENCE CONSCIENCE AND ITS PROBLEMS .
WILLIAM NEVILLE, ROXY
MEYER, ROBERT SCARBOR SCARBOROUGH.
OUGH. SCARBOROUGH.
Seminar-style discussions of
moral decision-making for the
contemporary young Christian; an
examination of case histories that
pose the tougher problems of con conscience;
science; conscience; a general introduction to
moral case law, or casuistry; ex exploration
ploration exploration of the language of con conscience,
science, conscience, as distinguished from the
languages of the social and natural
sciences.
AFRICAN GOVERNMENT .. RENE
LE MARC HAND.
Surveys the rising development of
nationalism in sub-Sahara Africa,
and its relation to tribalism, re regionalism,
gionalism, regionalism, and Pan- Africanism.
THE ENGINEER AS A MORAL
DECISION-MAKER . COURT COURTLAND
LAND COURTLAND COLLIER.
Some human aspects of the prob problems
lems problems of engineering brought about
by the modern world of man manmachine
machine manmachine systems.
CHRISTIAN FIELD EXPOSURE TO
COMMUNITY AND STUDENT
ISSUES . JOHN TOUCHBERRY.
A Georgia Seagle Residence Hall
seminar, open to all. that struc structures
tures structures personal encounter in local
areas of concern: ghetto, factory,
school, temple, coffee house, and
rebel camp. Each encounter is fol followed
lowed followed by a period of reflection
involving ethics, social values and
theology.
RACE, SEGREGATION. AND IN INTELLIGENCE
TELLIGENCE INTELLIGENCE . MARSHA I I
JONES.
A review of results and thee i 1,;
psychological testing, genetics
and anthropology as they bear on
the comparative intelligence
white and black Americans.



Alligator Grows With Homecoming

By TERRY MILLER
Alligator Staff Writer
Through the years the coming of
Homecoming at UF sees many
changes that occured during the
previous year. The Alligator is no
exception.
The Alligator has progressed
through the years from a small

[Gator] OPEN DAILY
J B Except Sunday
9:30 AM 'Til 2AM
, NO ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
j FREE PRACTICE FROM 5-7 PM DAILY I
A 7 TABLES
R Air Conditioned Television
D Snacks & Soft Drinks
S 308 W. University Ave. 6-9139
Lounge FREE PARKING

ART EXHIBIT
Behold The Man
from
Georges Rouaults
October 11-17
BAPTIST STUDENT CENTER 1604 W. UNIV. AVE.

Iplcn^^l^lveekendFor/^O^^rkel
HlgH * .*. 1 |||||||l
I I
I 4BPL I
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m MIAMI 1 'V. Jf
I 1
I Tw iiv MONTEGO BAY ROUND TRIP $64.00
\ ..-* A* > NASSAU ROUND TRIP $27.00
I 1 4
I House of Travel ;|l
|i .A 3415 W. Uni versify
373 1601 I

|; BREAKFAST 29< I
I One Egg (any style) One Slice Crisp Bacon One Pc. Buttered Toast I
I Qfits Coffee (2nd Cup Always Free) Snack Bar Open 8:30 a.m. I

eight-page weekly during the late
2os to a daily producing papers
such as this 36-page edition you
now hold.
The latter part of the roaring
*2os saw Jean Harlow gracing the
pages of The Alligator in weekly
advertisements. But the newspaper
at that time served also as a vehicle
for poetic endeavors of students on

campus.
The 1927 Homecoming edition of
The Alligator was the regular
eight-page weekly but with a special
four-page Homecoming section
part of which was poetry and cur current
rent current cheers that the expected 4.000
fans should know for the game.
That year the crowd cheered out:
Ray, Ray, Ray! Gator, Gator.
Gator!
Sis, Sis, Sis! Boom, Boom,
Boom, Bah!
Could they have foreseen our
own 1965 Gator Hay (Graves)?
The Alligator improved during
the 1930s with pictures of sweet sweethearts
hearts sweethearts (imported from Tallahas Tallahassee)
see) Tallahassee) now brightening the pages of
The Alligator.
Color was not used then. That
is unless the printer ran out of
black ink and the whole paper was
printed in blue, for example.
In 1939 an eight-page Alligator
was published twice a week. But
a special 12-page Homecoming
edition appeared that year.
World War II had its effect on
Homecoming atUF too. There were
few activities in 1942, other than
the football game itself, and only

material enough for an eight-page
edition could be gathered together.
The shortage of paper caused by
the war was also felt by The Alli Alligator.
gator. Alligator.
After the war. enrollment at UF
shot up with the influx of the recent recently
ly recently discharged veterans. In 1947
a 16-page Homecoming edition was
produced by the veterans.
In 1949 The Alligator proclaim proclaimed
ed proclaimed itself the largest weekly in the
south with a circulation of 12,000.
The Homecoming edition that year
was the biggest to that time with
20 pages.
Color was used in the 1954
Homecoming edition with banners
of orange across the front page
of the 16-page paper.
The 6os have seen color used
in every edition. Production has
gone up in these years with The
Alligator finally becoming a weekly
paper.
A 16-page regular edition with
16-page magazine section, with
color, was produced for Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming in 1961.
In 1962 a total of 32 pages in included
cluded included a 16-page magazine section
and 27 pages in the regular news newspaper
paper newspaper section.
This year The Alligator has pro produced
duced produced in its regular editions more
pages each day than it has ever
done in the past.
A SALESMAN
-TYPE THIEF
VISALIA, Calif. (UPI) A gun gunman
man gunman who stole sl6l from a cloth clothing
ing clothing store took time to wait on a
customer.
With the store owner and clerk
bound and in the rear,
the bandit politely greeted a woman
customer and sold her a necktie.
The money from the sale was in included
cluded included in his loot.

Friday, Oct. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

I Prize
f Winner, f
But... |
By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Staff Writer
Ron Fick, 3AS, won about S3OO
worth of prizes for his first place
entry in the annual Florida Blue
Key homecoming slogan contest.
But, he hasnt been able to use
a single prize.
I had to give most of them
away because 1 couldnt use them.
said Fick, whose winning slogan
was Gators Cheer Floridas 400th
Year.
The stalwart varsity tennis play player
er player submitted his winning entry the
day before the deadline in July,
and was in his Maine home when
he learned of his selection.
Little did I imagine that things
would wind up as they did, said
Fick.
Among the prizes he received
were a three to four day cruise
for two to Nassau on the steam steamship
ship steamship S. S. Florida, a weekend for
two at the Diplomat East and West
Hotel and Country Club in Holly Hollywood,
wood, Hollywood, a homecoming weekend for
two at the Gainesville Holiday Inn,
two tickets to the homecoming
game and a SSO shopping trip from
Gainesville merchants.
Fick said he at first planned to
use his prizes but couldnt when
he found out the conditions in involved.
volved. involved.
For instance, I couldn't take
the weekend in Hollywood, Fick
said, since it had to be used in
August and 1 was in Maine at that
time.
Next, I found that the Nassau
visit is only good until December.
I wont be able to go since the
trimester will not be over until
the prize has expired.
Fick said he had no use for the
homecoming tickets or the weekend
at the Holiday Inn, so hegavethem
away.
I have an apartment here in
town, Pick explained, so what
good is a weekend at the Holiday
Inn to me? I suppose I could give
it to out-of-town friends, except
they all live in Maine.
For the same reason. I gave
away the game tickets. I have my
seating assignment, so what do I
need them for?
With all ttie rest either given
away or invalidated, Fick still has
his SSO shopping trip.
I received 10 free meals from
Longs Cafeteria and five passes
to the Florida Theater in this
group, Fick said. I might use
these, but havent as yet.
Fick said he found the whole
thing very frustrating, almost as
much so as losing a tennis set 6-0.
When you win a contest, all the
prizes look good in print, Fick
said. But when it comes right
down to it you dont get much of
anything.

Page 17



Page 18

t, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 15, 1965

Queen Finalists:
'Anxiety Mounts

By SUSAN FROEMKE
Alligator Staff Writer
Anxiety mounts as the seconds
tick by today for the three finalists
in the UFs Homecoming Queen
contest.
The queen will be named tonight
at Gator Growl. The finalists:
Paula Hicks, Ann Camp and Kathy
Green.
Miss Hicks says she thinks this
contest was the most organized one
shes been in.
Activities began the night of Sept.
17 when all contestants participat participated
ed participated in evening gown competition
at University Inn. The following day
they took a bus to Cypress Gardens
where they were interviewed by
judges.
The judges were very nice and
put you at ease, Miss Green said.
They asked a leading question
like, Where are you from, and
then you took it from there de developing
veloping developing the conversation, she
said.
After the personality interviews,
the girls were wisked off to the
bathing suit competition which
ended preliminary judging events.
When announced as finalists,
Miss Camp remembers being
shocked; Miss Green sur surprised
prised surprised and Miss Hicks surpris surprised
ed surprised because there were so many
cute girls there.
Purpose of the finalists is to
prompt Homecoming spirit
which includes being guests at var various
ious various luncheons and dinners.
The girls agreed that Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming spirit is unique each7ear.
Since we beat Ole Miss, the
spirit should be tremendous at the
game, predicts Miss Hicks.
Miss Hicks, 2UC, sponsored by
her own Delta Gamma Sorority,
was UFs 1964 Military Ball Queen.
She is majoring in advertising and
Russians
Create Match
For 007
MOSCOW (UPI) A new
chapter is being written in
the running battle between
the Communists and Secret
Agent James Bond, the fic fictional
tional fictional hero of lan Flem Flemings
ings Flemings spy thrillers.
It has just been an announced
nounced announced that Agent 007 may
soon meet his match in an
equally enterprising agent
by the name of Aqvvakum
Zakhov of Communist Bul Bulgaria.
garia. Bulgaria.
Zakhav is the brainchild
of Bulgarian author Andre
Gulyashki. His books are
popular here, and he is
writing a new one.
Gulyashki did not elabor elaborate
ate elaborate on the plot, but there
was little doubt that Bond
would find himself in
trouble.
FLORIDA =
=FACTS
Florida produces 64 per cent of
the worlds grapefruit and 23 per
cent of the worlds oranges, says
the Florida Fruit & Vegetable
Association.

Almost $400,000 a year is spent
on maintenance of the lush parks
and parkways in Coral Gables to
help the city maintain the title of
The City Beautiful.

currently holds a part-time joo at
the Stag and Drag clothing shop.
Last summer, sides modeling
for Jantzen advertisements, Miss
Hicks traveled around the U. S.
commentating fashion shows for
the company. She says she loves
Florida life.
Miss Green, sponsored bySigma
Nu, an elementary education ma major,
jor, major, is a member of Angel Flight,
Delta Delta Delta sorority, and
served as a secretary to student
government.
Following a line of honors in
high school, Miss Camp seemed
destined to be a finalist here.
Miss Camp, lUC, is sponsored
by Sigma Chi fraternity. Coming
from Jasper and planning to major
in elementary education, Miss
Camp is a Delta Delta Delta pledge,
was Miss Jasper High School,
Homecoming Queen and Miss Ham Hamilton
ilton Hamilton County.

'*mZ 2| Jk
' W>V v m illHrffllM jygMg
H x-x-

FLASH ONE-TWO
What new development will make indoor
photography four times as much fun for
the nations millions of camera fans? The
new Blue Dot Flashcube, developed by
GT&Es Sylvania subsidiary for use with
the new Kodak Instamatic cameras.
Pop one on and youre ready to take
four flash pictures without changing
bulbs!

GTE
enl loni k"*'* l 'rtf'on* otcion Cc AulOffline llectnc lonium ftatlnc SftMma (Hone fit**"

|Artist Exhibit!
Two art shows are being dis displayed
played displayed in the Florida Union by the
Fine Arts Committee this week.
Twelve paintings by Paris-born
Marie Wilner will be in Bryan
Lounge until Oct. 21. This exhibit,
circulated by the Old Bergen Art
Guild, is one of her shows* that
has been presented at Revel Gal Gallery,
lery, Gallery, New York City, Bridgeport,
Conn. Museum of Art, Brussels
and at numerous other distinguish distinguished
ed distinguished institutions in this country and
abroad.
Miss Wilner is known throughout
Europe, Asia and the United States
for her poetic, expressive quality
in romantic, mysterious art.
Watercolors of Jake Lee, a lead leading
ing leading West Coast artist, are on dis display
play display in the North Wing Gallery of
Florida Union. With a personal
interest in the history, traditions
and culture of California, he paints
scenes and activities of that region.
Among the subjects on exhibit
are Old Chinatown, Chinese New
Year, Chinatown Fourth of July
and various scenes of a China
camp. This exhibit will continue
through Oct. 29.

-THREE-FOUR BEFORE CHANGING

i he Sylvania Blue Dot Flashcube revolves
t ? r shot brin g'hg a fresh Blue
Dot flashbulb into position, with its own
built-in reflector.
With this latest of many important in innhnf
nhnf innhnf nS I" 1 GT&E millions of b me
that gra a 6rS WNI g6t the rebt sh t at used to get away while they were
changing bulbs.

Gary Wayne Arnold, center, a senior in the UFs College of
Business Administration, has received a $l5O scholastic achievement
award from the Peninsular Insurance Company. Also pictured are
Dean Hart, and Rufus Mathison.
Meredith At Columbia U.
NEW YORK (CPS) -- James Meredith, whose enrollment at the
University of Mississippi three years ago set off long, bloody rioting
last week enrolled at the Columbia University Law School.
Meredith, 32, registered at Columbia on a $2,000 scholarship
he had received from the university. ** '
He told a news conference that he didnt expect to have much
time for civil rights activities because of the hpavy load of classes
he was taking.

The Sylvania Blue Dot Flashcube is an
other example of how GT&E keeps grow growing
ing growing through constant research and swift
response to the changing needs of the
public.
If you're looking for a young, aggres aggressive
sive aggressive company with no limit to its growth,
you may wish to view GT&E in the light
of your own future.



WT lT|
Mr yec ==^_i
Mr* /
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IJC i
r^pP 5, I
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I
PM
NIAGARA HEAT-AND-MASSAGE SET I
I "JUST PUT IT WHERE IT HURTS."
mk Helps relieve minor pain, tis Increases circulation
I arthritis, rheumatism where applied
>1 when they occur Helps relieve everyday
Jf| restful, tension, fatigue
drugless sleep
"It Isn't Niagara If It Isn't Cyclo-Massage"
I Th^v'uu
M I %/ CYCLO-MASSAGE*
X u
II OPEN DAILY & SUNDAY 2-5 p.m.
|| ALSO BY APPOINTMENT
|| Office & Display Room 2109 N.W. 13th St.
f| Opposite J.M. Fields
|| OFFICE PH. 378-1786 HOME PH. 372-6721

Crvr^'CsV
'B# W I
jibiw
Hnpnl
.. ' fc ~~
Be-.
Casey Linwick, ATO Little Sister and Valorie Dunn, DG, are already
in the mood for Homecoming with the latest fashions from the Campus
and Career Shop. Accessories to add that final finishing touch. We"
We're the newest college shop in town-ready to serve all your collegiate
needs.
Come in, Relax, have a free Coke, and shop in a leisure atmosphere.
Make this year your finest Homecoming ever with styles from....
IHMMifI
I 1,,.
1227 W. X^W^/
Univ. Av. y
Store Hours: 9-5:30 Mon. Thru Thurs. 9 to 9 Fri.

Mary Arliskas Reign To End

By KATHIE KEIM
New Homecoming Sweetheart is
crowned tomorrow and the reign
of this years Sweetheart will come
to an end.
What will not end of Mary Ar Arliskas
liskas Arliskas is the memory of the last
12 months.
I remember being very sur surprised
prised surprised to even be on the court,
Miss Arliskas recalled. I had just
transferred from F. S. U. and I
didnt know a soul.
l felt like an ant so small
so insignificant, as I stood there
in front of all those people at half halftime.
time. halftime. Winning was really the great greatest
est greatest thrill Ive ever had.
The contest will undoubtedly
open new horizons for this years
winner, as it did for Miss Arliskas.
She was invited to appear in other
contests, as well as be a judge.
She appeared on the covers of
several magazines and had some
modeling jobs. She did radio com commercials
mercials commercials in Jacksonville and help helped
ed helped open two or three stores and
theaters.
Above all, she says, this has
been an experience I can tell my
children years from now.
I hope I can have other exper experiences
iences experiences as wonderful. And I sin sincerely
cerely sincerely hope this year's Queen takes
full advantage of the opportunities
and responsibilities of represent representing
ing representing our school.

AS HOMECOAf/NG QUEEN

iUfsa £m*\
f- l|
Hr W i3jLjHP ~w a j3jL- v'^RH
mam
%Vjj
.Jsp^C. f/ MM'. 4
;% wT, 4/ -SflKfr %Mi*mmM -y%
r M/^ y £ '* r p %
MARY ARUSKAS
Ijmm^mmmmmmmmi~"
For The Sporting Gator:
I RAIN COATS RAIN HATS
IsTADIUM SEATS MINIATURE
I GATOR FOOTBALL JERSFYS
I BOYS SIZES S M L
I Gator Sweat Shirts Stencilled
I (CHILDREN AND ADULT SIZES)
I Gator Tee Shirts
l| RACKET I
I RESTRINGING
I 24 HOUR
|| SERVICE I
I trophies!
I ENGRAVING SERVICE |
Ijimmie Hughes S <££E B
iNorth Central Florida's Most Complete Sporting Goods
[Store, 1 Block East of Campus at 1113 W. Univ. Ave.|

Friday, Oct. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 15, 1965

THE GATOR BAND: Dixie on their minds
Gator Band To Salute Old Glory Tomorrow

The Gator Band will play Tunes
of Glory tomorrow for Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming halftime. The Band will
salute Floridas 400th year with
songs from the periods under each
of Floridas five flags.
At the pregame show the band
will salute the visitors from North
Carolina State with Carolina.
Visiting alumni will be saluted with
We are the Boys.
The Director Emeritus of the

Tulane U. Dean
Speaks Monday

Dr. John Snell, dean of the
Graduate School at Tulanq. Uni University
versity University and professor of history,
will be the first speaker in Eur European
opean European history lecture series at
the UF.
Snell, who holds a doctorate
from the University of North Car Carolina,
olina, Carolina, will speak at 8:15 p.m.
Monday in McCarty Auditorium.
The first of five lectures spon sponsored
sored sponsored by the NDEA Program and
Ford Foundation, Dr. SNELL'S
ADDRESS WILL BE ON Contem Contemporary
porary Contemporary Germany.
Other lectures will be given by
Dr. David S. Landes, Harvard
University; Dr. A. H. de Oliveira
Marques, University of Lisbon and
visiting professor at Auburn; Dr.
Louis Gottschalk University of
Chicago, and Dr.GeorgeG.lggers,
State University of New York at
Buffalo.

Ktffcrt~l Si
TRADITIONALLY^^^^B(SS|M
THE STORE FOR Hla^'Sfcvi
CLASS RINGS WSkLw Jg|
CHARGE 1
211 W. University Ave. ACCOUNTS
372-8658 WELCOME S **s#

UF bands, Col. Harold B. Bach Bachman,
man, Bachman, will be welcomed back to
Florida Field as he directs the
Star Spangled Banner.
The Gator Guard and the Billy
Mitchell Drill Team will join in
the Half-Time festivities along
with the lovely Corps of Gator Gatorettes
ettes Gatorettes who will perform a gala
flag twirling routine as the Band
plays Tunes of Glory, Bull Bullfight

Snell, a native of North Carolina,
has taught at Tulane since 1953
and was named to his present
position in 1963. He also has
taught at the University of Wichita
and the University of North Car Carolina.
olina. Carolina.
Snell is author of numerous his historical
torical historical articles and editor, author
and co-author of seven books.
Snell served during WW II as
a first lieutenant in the U. S.
Air Force, with 50 combat mis missions,
sions, missions, and holds the Air Medal
and Distinguished Flying Cross.
He is presently president-elect
of the Southern Historical Associa Association
tion Association and one of four founders of
the European History Section. He
is also a member of the Amer American
ican American Historical Assocaition and has
held several offices in the asso association.
ciation. association.

fight Bullfight Song, Bonnie Blue Flag
and The Stars and Stripes For Forever.
ever. Forever.
The Homecoming Queen and

Now! New Chevelle
by Chevrolet
%

Two new Super Sport beauties
for 66a hardtop and convertible
propelled by nothing less than the
new Turbo-Jet 396 VB.
This remarkably efficient power plant,
with aircraft-type valves, deep-breath- 0
ing ports and other design advances,
develops 325 hp in the standard
version. And youre welcome to order
mort?in a 360-hp versionif youre
so inclined.

See the new 66 Chevrolet, Chevelle,
£[!SiQ^t^2liL22^£2!!itStt§-§lyoujldealers

trophies will be presented along
with the awarding of the Fergie
Ferguson Award to Floridas All
America fullback Larry Dupree.

V)
Both Chevelle SS 396 models ride on
a special flat-cornering chassis. A fully fullysynchronized
synchronized fullysynchronized 3-speed transmission with
floor-mounted stick shift is standard. Or
you can order a 4-speed or Powerglide
also Strato-bucket front seats, center
console and full SS instrumentation.
Your Chevrolet dealers is the place to
see how all this feels from behind the
wheel. Hes a great believer
in letting the customers fgnJ/OHnsw
handle the merchandise. "ir*"'

Just Like
| Keystone Cops |
TULSA, Oklal (UPI) lt was
like an episode from the Keystone
Kops comedies.
Two Tulsa officers, taking a pair
of suspected drunks to jail Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, stopped when they saw a
third suspect at a North Tulsa
intersection.
They grabbed him, but while
trying to put the handcuffs on, he
bolted and escaped. While the
policemen chased him, the other
two suspects tied from the car.
Meanwhile, another police car
had sf pped at the scene. A man
in a stolen car careened around
the corner, saw the police, lost
control of the car which
overturned. He also ran away.
Net results: Three cars in the
city pound, but no one in jail.



FOR NEW RESEARCH BUILDING

Science Foundation Donates Grant To UF

ts has received a $538,150
rom the National Science
tion for support of a Biolo Biolociences
ciences Biolociences research facility to
istructed on the campus,
building is the first unit of
jniversitys planned life
Ks complex. Total cost of
ven-floor structure, to be

\\A <
{ i V
Just call Kim Dapper Dan" I
HES WEARING wool
flannel Haggar Slacks. He wears them to I
1 lllplfll and still he looks dapper. Theyre styled with
'll# the trim fit he wants in fine dress slacks. I
/jfr W j worsted wool. Orion in the blend makes
/SMtl WMmmk these slacks hold their knife-edge crease and
' jml shrug off wrinkles practically forever. No I
rlllfr WIN A FORD MUSTANG or one of 50 other big
iwmMf tllllip prizes. See your llayyar dealer for details.
m iLmm
fmO
OETHAOOAK SLACKS AT: WILSON'S DEPARTMENT STORE
BELK LINDSEY DEPARTMENT STORE I
THE STORE WITH MORE / y
\ C E^ ER I

located on the corner of Radio
Rd. and Newell Drive, will be
$1,934,950, inc 1 uding the NSF
grant.
John T. Wilson, deputy director
of the National Science Foundation,
notified University President J.
Wayne Reitz of the grant which was
awarded for the two-year period.

Grant funds are being matched by
state monies recently approved by
the Board of Regents and the State
Cabinet.
The biological sciences provide
the fundamental scientific under undergirding
girding undergirding for many of the areas
upon which humans depend for
health and welfare, according

to Dr. George K. Davis, director
of the Universitys Division of
Biological Sciences, who will ad adminsiter
minsiter adminsiter the program.
The spectre of the population
explosion with the associated pro problems
blems problems of food production, nutrition
and disease control is emphasiz emphasizing
ing emphasizing the need we have for basic
studies in the biological sciences,
he noted.
Just as basic research in
chemistry and physics provided
groundwork for the rapid advances
which have been made in what we
call the nuclear era, so basic
research in the biological sciences
may be expected to provide the
foundation for breakthroughs in
medicine and agriculture, Dr.
Davis continued.
The UF is committed to a

French Girls 'Barely
Dont Sleep In Nude

PARIS (UPI) If shes French,
she probably doesnt sleep nude.
She likes to wear something frilly
at night.
So says a survey made by the
afternoon paper France Soir pub published
lished published Wednesday in the wake of
reports that German lingerie
makers are up in arms because
Greta doesnt wear anything in bed.
German nightwear makers are
complaining because, they say, the
average German womans outlay
on nightclothes has dropped from
the equivalent of $5.60 in 1963 to
$3.30 in 1964.
Not so in France, says France
Soir.
Here only one girl out of 15
sleeps nude. And most of these
came out wholeheartedly in favor
of the traditional nightgown rather
than mens pajamas.
In the land that produced the
perfume which used to be Marilyn
Monroes only bedtime garb,
French women spent a total of

jIOO% PURE M
£Sm|

The bti of eireryShtnq and lota of it Q|y ( | g Mr _er Cklt
I m the big newBIOSHEF Two lean nten- r I
Oar 100% pure beef hamburgers learned
with golden Kraft cheese and ga> Jk
dan fresh latfuca looped with a special j/f II *
- '''\^, . Hama B'oiied on a hot loaatad Triple
Dec Ker bun People on the go go for
delicious
Bw^y.'.//V/ r. buy in town
I I 11 SEBBS
!k linMM nalxinwea ay aw# 9*l Oat Sveta #a VKfcanapooa _
MBE2SMSBimS3H

Friday, Oct. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

strong development in the
biological sciences. The support
from the NSF is, in part, recog recognition
nition recognition of the stature of our staff
and the potential of our future,"
the director concluded.
The new building will house the
Department of Zoology and in includes
cludes includes teaching and research lab laboratories,
oratories, laboratories, facilities for constant
temperature and controlled en environmental
vironmental environmental rooms and specialized
equipment.
Plans call for construction to be
under way in the early part of
1966 and completed by September,
1967.
In addition to space for faculty,
staff and laboratory technicians,
the new unit will provide study
and laboratory areas for 32 grad graduate
uate graduate students.

$33.8 million on nightgowns last
year, France Soir said.
They only sp6nt $12.8 million
on pajamas, according to the paper.
France Soir theorized that the
girls wear gowns for sex appeal
here.
The nightgown is their favor favorite
ite favorite because of its feminity," the
survey said.
This is why the pajamas used
by many young girls give way
quickly to nightgowns when those
girls marry, the paper explained.
Marie Louise Angel, mother of
a teen-age daughter, put it this way.
"I buy about two nightgowns a
year and Im more tempted by the
pretty ones than the practical
ones," she said. My 16-year-old
daughter prefers pajamas."
On the other hand, MyrlamDon MyrlamDonzeau
zeau MyrlamDonzeau has found a compromise.
Long live the pajamas," she said.
. . When it is warm, like now,
I only wear the top. Thats what
I do."

Page 21



Page 22

!. The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 15, 1965

Peking Master Minding
: = Another Asian Revolt

By K. C. THALER
Foieign News Commentary
LONDON (UPIj Communist
China is reported to be master masterminding
minding masterminding a new campaign against
Thailand in an apparent attempt
to open another front in South Southeast
east Southeast Asia.

Cabinet Adds More
Money For Schools

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The
Cabinet, hoping to eliminate some
paper shuffling, has pledged $7.9
million for additional school build building
ing building this fiscal year in 53 counties.
Under the new Cabinet policy, the
full $7.9 million appropriated by
the Legislature to match county
school building funds was released
to the state Department of Edu Education
cation Education in a lump sum.
It will be distributed by the
Education Department to the count counties
ies counties as it is needed to pay off
individual building contracts. In
the past, each individual countys

United Chunch of Qainesville
(United Church of Christ: CongregationalE. & R.)
t-sci extends to students and faculty
-an invitation to New Adventure
ln Christianity
Sunday 10:00a.m. Worship
and Sunday School
Florida Union (temporary meeting place)
Fast And Convenient Service
At The NEW
B&B TAKE OUT
Featuring
Shrimp Hamburgers
Chicken French Fries
Boxes To Go
The Drive-In Window saves
you the trouble of leaving your-car
B&B TAKE OUT
412 S.W. 4th Ave.

+ univepsity +
lutheAn chuch
ffifu- the eighteenth Sunday Aftee tninity.
The Service 9 and 11A.M.
Inquiry And Confirmation Class 10A.M.
thupsdAy Confession And I
The Sacrament Os The Altar 9P. M.
. 1826 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE
(Always Open For Prayer)

Diplomats say Pekings cam campaign
paign campaign against Thailand is aimed
at provoking a revolt there against
the present government.
The move is part of Chinas
flexible strategy in Southeast Asia.
The growing American build-up
in Viet Nam and the Viet Cong

amount was acted upon separately
by the Cabinet. The Cabinet adopt adopted
ed adopted the policy to cut down paper
work on the program.
Sitting as the Trustees of the
Internal Improvement Fund, the
Cabinet at its meeting Tuesday
gave Dade County 60 days to adopt
a better causeway and recreational
development plan than the one pro proposed
posed proposed by the City of Islandia.
Islandia, which has been trying
to build a causeway to the main mainland
land mainland for several years, requested
and got right-of-way in August
to build its own highway.

failure to score a major victory
during the recent monsooA sea season
son season were understood to be causing
anxiety both in Hanoi and Peking
about the Communist prospects in
that part of the world.
China is therefore looking for
possible alternatives with stepped
up subversion in Thailand as the
immediate target.
Pekings toughening policy is
also partly prompted by recent
severe setbacks on other interna international
tional international fronts which threaten China
once again with diplomatic iso isolation.
lation. isolation.
Peking was understood to be in increasing
creasing increasing assistance to the clan clandestine
destine clandestine Thai Communist Partys
campaign to win power in Thai Thailand.
land. Thailand. The party is largely Pe Peking
king Peking orientated.
The reports said there are grow growing
ing growing indications that Peking is try trying
ing trying to build up puppet regimes as
a front for the Communist Party
which hopes could help to under undermine
mine undermine and overthrow the present
pro-Western regime.
Pekings designs have been spot spotlighted
lighted spotlighted by a meeting a few days
ago between Mao Tse Tung and
Prince Phanomjong, a former Thai
premier who has been living in
exile in fchina for many years,
the reports said.
There was speculation the move
signalled Pekings intention to use
him as a possible front man for a
new major liberation campaign.
% Peking has set up liberation
movements in Thailand as part
of its campaign of subversive ac action.
tion. action. They are the indepen independence
dence independence movement and
tic front.
Liaison with the Thai Communist
and liberation movements is main maintained
tained maintained by Wu Hsiu Chuan who is
the contact man between Chinas
Communist Party and foreign par parties.
ties. parties.
Just how far and how fast Pe Peking
king Peking intends to go at persent in
its campaign of subversion of Thai Thailand
land Thailand remains an open question.
Peking apparently is probing
presently, but some diplomats be believed
lieved believed it is set for an all-out
onslaught.
Pekings rulers were believed
in a truculent mood at present
and the recent diplomatic setbacks
in other international theaters--
Algeria, India, Indonesiaappear
to be prompting Chinas leader leadership
ship leadership to look hurriedly for alter alternative
native alternative fields of activitv.

News Around
The World
from the wires of United Press International
International
STORM SPOTTED . The seasons fifth tropical storm, Elena,
was spotted in the Atlantic Thursday. Packing 50 miles-per-hour
winds at her center, the storm is located about 1,475 miles east of
Miami. Elena is moving forward at 10 miles-per-hour with gales
extending outward 300 miles to the north of the center. Although its
no immediate threat to land, forecasters refused to predict the storms
movement over the next 36 hours due to its irratic nature.
PASS SECURED .. U. S. Air Cavalry troops
seized control of historic Man Yang Pass 250
miles northeast of Saigon Thursday in a light lightning
ning lightning thrust that opened up the Communist Communistharrassed
harrassed Communistharrassed Highway 19 to the provincial capitol
of Pkeiku, The effort is a part of the U. S.
South Vietnamese plan to defeat the Viet Cong
by dividing the country in half. The pass over overlooks
looks overlooks the strategic Highway 19 that links the
coastal post of Qui Nonh to Pleiku in the Cen Central
tral Central Highlands
NOBEL PRIZES ANNOUNCED . Three French Scientists were
awarded the 1965 Nobel Prize for medicine Thursday for research on
genes that may help future scientists regulate the life process. The
winners are Prof. Fransois Jacob, 45, Prof. Jacque Monod, 55, and
Prof. Andre Lwoff, 63. All are department heads at the Pasteur
Institute in Paris. They are known as the Three Musketeers.
FIGHTING PLANES . Unconfirmed reports indicated that new
fighting has erupted in central Java between Communist rebels and
the Indonesian Army. The army maintained tight internal security
amid reports that Communist boss D. N. Aidit was leading the armed
Communist troops in battle with government troops. Numerous clashes
have been reported in central Java since the abortive attempt to oust
President Sukarno on October 1.
National
DRAFT RAISED . The Pentagon Thursday ordered 45,224 men
drafted for the Army and Marine Corps in December. The call is a
10,000 jump over the call-up plan established by President Johnson
this summer. Though the custom has been to relax the draft call in
December because of the holidays, the critical situation in Viet Nam
makes this impossible. The call, which is the largest since the Korean
War, follows sharp increases since September to avoid a call-up of
civilian reserves.
SUPERSONIC LINER TESTED . The 185-foot forerunner of the
Supersonic Air Transports, XB7OA, reachedfor the first time Thursday
I a speed of 2,000 miles-per-hour almost three times the speed of
sound. During the flight the experimental craft attained an altitude of
70,000 feet at the record speed, which is the crafts maximum capabi capabilities.
lities. capabilities. This marked the first time an aircraft of such size had flown
at the speed and height that will be required of the transport.
Florida
OGL LAUNCHED . The second ina series
of Orbiting Geophysical Laboratories was
launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in
California The satellite, carrying equipment
for 20 different scientific experiments, went
into a polar orbit ranging from 970 to 300 miles
high somewhat higher thanexpected. The
spacecraft is performing well and it would have
to be considered a success/* a spokesman said.
FEDERAL TAKE-OVER? ... In a speech Thursday, Comptroller
Fred O. Dickinson warned that the federal government might take over
the highway safety program in Florida if the state doesnt take action
to halt the increasing death toll. He said the success of driver education
had exceeded the most optimistic expectations in Florida, but further
improvements were needed in preparing youngsters for the hazards of
driving.



* T*;'' *.

H By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Hrises are in store for the
jH| audience tonight, Bud Robi Robilw.
lw. Robilw. director of Gator Growl,
Hses.
UFs oldest student will
He is 400 years old and
number is 0002.
Hur skits will be presented by
Hirganizations. Graham Area
He first dorm area to perform
Hi tor Growl, which dates back
Hl6. Graham Area will present
Hit entitled, Florida Under
H Flags.
Howl will aiso show Florida
Hr five flags Spanish,
Hch, English, Confederate and
p'CONNEL: Growl MC

Justice OConnell
65 Growl Emcee,
:x- SG President
By LOU DALLY
Alligator Staff Writer
It was a warm election day in that spring of more than 27
years ago. Maybe this partially accounted for the largest
turnout of student voters the UF had ever seen.
The date was March 31, 1938 when Dr. John L. Tigert was
President of the University and Josh Cody was coaching the
Gators. Stephen OConnell (Florida Student Party) was battling
Earl Powers (University Union Party) and John Schaub (Inde (Independent)
pendent) (Independent) for the Presidency of the Student Body.
It was expected to be a close race from all aspects as 112
men ran for 54 offices, the largest slate since the beginning of
Student Government.
Under the leadership of OConnell, however, the election
became a Florida Student Party landslide. OConnell won the
Presidency by a margin of 147 votes. The FSP catapulted 33
men into office while the University Union Party managed
to grab only one top spot.
Today OConnell is serving as a Florida Supreme Court Judge.
Hell be emcee at Growl tonight.
He was president of his sophomore class, a member of the
Executive Council, captain of the boxing team, on the ALLIGATOR
staff, a member of Blue Key, a member in LApache, Sabres,
and F Club and a brother in Alpha Tau Omega. He was
elected to the Hall of Fame in 1938.
In 1938, OConnell succeeded George Smathers as President
of the Student Body. Smathers, now a United States Senator from
Florida, also plans to attend Homecoming,,
Recognized as one of the UPs greatest debaters, Smathers
was nominated and elected by the then unopposed student Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic Party in 1937. He was on the track and football squads and
was captain of *** basketball teas la 1996.
. *f X ,' < s*4

American. The theme for this
years Homecoming is Gators
Cheer Floridas 400th Year.
The three other skits are Phi
Kappa Taus Florida Through the
Ages, Delta Upsilons From
Gainesville with Love, and Alpha
Delta Pis Whos Afraid of the
Big Bad Wolf?
The Growl skits were chosen
from entries by many UF organ organizations.
izations. organizations. They will be judged again
tonight.
The emcee will be Florida Su Supreme
preme Supreme Court Justice Stephen C.
OConnell, president elect of the
UF Alumni Association.
The fireworks program has been
expanded for this year. Robison
said there will be a special trans transformation
formation transformation presentation.
The fireworks display will in include
clude include a Project Mercury Rocket
Countdown and takeoff. During the
fireworks display the sky will
change color from white to blue
to rainbow. This will be followed
by 2,800 colored balls of fire.
Stadium Road, in front of the
Engineering Building will be bar barracade
racade barracade for parking during Growl.
This is to prevent parked cars
from catching fire from sparks
dropped by the fireworks. Robison
asked students to please remem remember
ber remember not to park in the barracaded
areas.
The fireworks display will last
approximately 12 mintues.

Other Growl acts include: the
Chimney Sweep Dance from the
movie Mary Poppins danced by
the UF Modern Dance Group, The
Revised Vanguard Singers, The
Muler Twins singing Winken,
Blinken and Nod, Bernadette
Castro, the Combined Glee Clubs,
Barbara Allen and Randy Rabe and
The Intruders.
The UF football team, who face
North Carolina State in tomorrows

6 Let The Gator Growl... 9
...And He Has Ever Since

Gator Growl began as a modest pep rally in 1932
with a little known student sports announcer, a bon bonfire
fire bonfire and a young Jacksonville attorney.
Since then, the little known sports announcer has
become nationally known broadcaster, Red Barber;
the young attorney has become ex-Governor Fuller
Warren, and the student pep rally has become Gator
Growl, billed as the worlds largest all-student
show in the world, which celebrates Its 33rd anni anniversary
versary anniversary Oct. 15 at the University.
Growl received its unique name from a tired
Florida Blue Key member, legend says, who turned
sleepily from a meeting which had failed to name
the rally and remarked: Oh, let the Gator Growl!
This year, the extravaganza will make use of the
talents of 1,000 students working in the capacities

I 1 TONIGHTS GROWL SCHEDULE
;£ INTRODUCTION MASTER OF CEREMONIES. Stephen C. OConnell, Justice, £
: : :j Florida Supreme Court. £
:£ COACH RAY GRAVES AND THE FIGHTIN GATORS £
NELSON M. HARRIS JR. The Don Fleming Memorial Award. (President, :£
University Alumni Association).
£: jim OVERSTREET The Florida Cheerleaders. (Head Cheerleader, Junior, £
Hallandale). $
£ THE SPANISH PERIOD :£
£ DAN MOWBRAY Queen Isabella. (Sophomore, Boca Raton). ;£
CYNTHIA & ILONA MULLER- Winkin, BlinkinandNod.(Freshmen, Miami Beach).
PHI KAPPA TAU Florida Through The Ages £:
£ THE FRENCH PERIOD £
CHARLOTTE SINK The Poor Little Match Girl. (Freshman, Lexington, N.C.). :£
BARBARA ALLEN Birth of the Blues. (Junior, Arlington, Va.) £
£ ALPHA DELTA PI Whos Afraid of the Big, Bad Wolf £
£ THE BRITISH PERIOD £
x ORCHESIS DANCERS Mary Poppins and Friends £
DELTA UPSILON From Gainesville With Love
THE GATOR BAND Hard Days Night :j:
RANDY RABE AND THE INTRUDERS Smoke Stack; Baby, Baby. (Junior,
St. Petersburg). i
£ THE CONFEDERATE PERIOD £
REVISED VANGUARD SINGERS Salty Dog; The Klan :£
£: DAN MOWBRAY General R. E. Lee. (Sophomore, Boca Raton). :£
GLEE CLUBS When The Saints Go Marching In: A Variation In Themes. :£
:£ (Guy B. Webb, Director). £
£: THE AMERICAN PERIOD ;£
BERNADETTE CASTRO His Lips Get In The Way. (Sophomore, Ocala). :£
;£ BARRY DIAMOND T. V. Roulette. (Sophomore, Coral Gables).
GRAHAM AREA Florida Under Five Flags
% ALMA MATER
FIREWORKS

/GROWI)
N. (AS IN GATOR) J

Homecoming game, will be pre presented
sented presented to the Growl audience. The
team was presented in Pre-Growl
activities in previous years.
Presentation of thfc* Don Fleming
Memorial Award will be given to
the outstanding athletic team cap captain
tain captain from the preceedtog year.
Pre-Growl festivities, which
start at 6:45, include the presen presentation
tation presentation of Mrs. UF and drilling by
the Gator Raiders, the Billy MiV

Friday, Oct. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

of musicians, performers, ushers, directors and
technicians.
In those days Growl in addition to the bonfire,
would perhaps include a freshman football game,
a polo match and dances.
For the bonfire, each freshman was required to
bring his weight in firewood. This practice was
doomed In 1947 when a practical joker set fire to the
wood two days ahead of schedule. It has been re replaced
placed replaced by a gigantic fireworks display.
Replacing the other events in the cast are folk
singing and other talent displays plus student skits
which poke fun at politics and campus life.
And despite a few mishaps and pranks, Gator Growl
has survived the years and grown to be one of the
most anticipated events of Homecoming for students,
alumni and visitors. <-*

chell Drill Team and the Gator
Guard. The Gator Guard and the
ROTC men will serve as ushers
for the evening.
Six high school bands will also
entertain the early arriving audi audience.
ence. audience. Gator Growl starts at 8 p.m.
The gates will open at 6:30.
The East side does not have re reserved
served reserved seats and will be on a first
come, first served basis.

Page 23



Page 24

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 15, 1965

,11 ROUND THI WO*U>jl stRVICE B
mT steaJShip
l arm indipenpint &
If ESCORTED TRAVEL J
Ip# AUTO RENTAL ANO 1
II PURCHASE f
WORLD
travel travelservice:
service: travelservice:
808 W. University Av. Ph. 376-4641

<|L LITTLE PIGS OF
p AMERICA W
y GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA //'T ffl I
BAR-B-Q AT ITS BEST
1625 N.W.l3thSt.-Ph. 372-7141
SANDWICHES MENU
Regular Jumbo
BAR-B-Q-PORK 45 65 I
BAR-B--Q-BEEF 55 75 I
HAMBURGERS 35 45 I
CHEESEBURGERS 40 45 I
Do it yourself
SIDE ORDERS Pork and Beef
SLAW (60z.) .15( pt.).. .35 f \
-W* BEANS( 6 oz.) .25(pt.)...50 SANDWICH J I
L '<\Tk v FRENCH FRIES .25 45 6 PACK 2.10-2.70 [ I
Ct BRUNSWICK STEW, bowl .55 (pt .) .75 (qt.) I .40 8 PACK 2.80 3.60
ONION RINGS 35 12 PACK 4.20-5.40
CHILI 40 (Al I the ingredients to Tj I
POTATO SALAD .25(pt.) .50 fix your own sandwich //tW I
V and save 10c on each.)
SPECIALTIES I
PORK (lb.) 1.55 I
WE SPECIALIZE IN CUSTOM BARBECUING BEEF (lb ) >-90 I
Smoked .15 lb. Barbecue .201 b. RIBS (slob) 2.20
CHICKEN < half ) 80
CHICKEN ( whole ) 1.50
WHOLE SHOULDER (lb. ) 1.35 I
BAR-B-Q SAUCE (3 02.). 15(pt.).65 I
DIAL A MEAL FOR QUICK
SERVICE 372-7141
I

Drifters Here Tomorrow

PAYDAY $25 $600
MONEY
Marion Finance Co.
222 W. Univ. 376.5333

The Drifters will drift into UF
Homecoming events Saturday to
highlight the occaisons annual
dance, this year dubbed The 400
A-Go-Go.
Held mainly for the benefit of
dorm residents who are invited to
come stag or drag, the dance will
be an open air affair in the track
parking lot from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Saturday.

SPRO
Will Aid
Newsmen
By EUNICE I. TALL
gator pick up
The Student Public Relations
Organization (SPRO) is making
facilities available in the Stadium
for representatives of the news
media during Homecoming week weekend.
end. weekend.
A press center, will be main maintained
tained maintained in Stadium 326 in the west
side of the stadium (Florida Field)
with typewriters and telephones
available for use of the visiting
press.
The room will be open today from
1 to 7 p.m. and 10 to 11:30 p.m.,
and on Saturday from 10:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. and 4:15 to 6 p.m.
Access to the room is tnrougn
the double glass doors and via the
elevator in the stadium.
Members of SPRO will be on
duty during the day to host the
press representatives and distri distribute
bute distribute all news releases from In Informational
formational Informational Services.
Donuts and coffee will be served.
SPRO is in its second year of
operation and includes some 25
undergraduate and graduate stu students
dents students who intend to practice public
relations as a profession.
A pioneer organization of this
type among the nation's colleges
and universities, SPRO has re received
ceived received the endorsement of the
Florida Public Relations Associa Association
tion Association and is launching a program to
interest other schools in the for formation
mation formation of similar PR groups.
Officers for this year include
Park Trammell, president; Jack
Chancellor, vice president; Frank
Marconi, secretary; and Tom
Green, treasurer.
Students interested in joining
SPRO should attend the meetings
at 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth
Wednesdays in Room 236.
Honorary
Membership
Set For Burns
Presentation of an honorary
membership to Governor Haydon
Burns and a pre-game talk by
Coach. Ray Graves highlight the
1965 annual alumni reunion Satur Saturday
day Saturday at 9:45 a.m. in front of Uni University
versity University Auditorium.
The presentation to the Gover Governor
nor Governor will be made by Nelson M*
Harris Alumni Association Presi President.
dent. President. Harris will also make the
annual scholarship award.
The event will also include wel welcomes
comes welcomes by UF President J. Wayne
Reitz and Stewart Parsons, Blue
Key President. William O.E. Hen Henry,
ry, Henry, Alumni Loyalty Fund chairman,
will be master of ceremonies.
A social hour and registration
will precede the formal program.
The Gator Band and the University
Choir will provide entertainment
during this period. Registration
will begin at 8:30 and last till
10 a.m.
lots op Racket
..with
QATOB A&S
"



HOMECOMING DIVISION CHAIRMEN |
H| General Chairman Wilson Atkinson, Hollywood
Assistant General Chairman Wayne Alford, Bartow £
Director of Gator Growl Bud Robison, St. Petersburg
K Executive Secretary Nancy Calhoun, St. Augustine
§ Administrative Director Jim Moore, Bradenton
Finance John Wolf, Orlando
H| Technical Sam Ullman, Pompano Beach
| Publicity Jeff Fuqua, Coral Gables
H Personnel Steve Gardner, Plant City
Special Functions Doug Lynn, Tampa
H Alumni Affairs John Hume, Coral Gables
H Parade Hank Raatama, La Crosse
Alumni Barbecue Jim Cooney, Miami
Blue Key Banquet Leo Rock, Melbourne
Honored Guests' . Butch Wooten, Tallahassee
You're with your best girl Homecoming weekend.
You'd like to impress her parents (he's in steel and
H oil). So you've eaten cheeseburgers for three months
H and bought this Oxford Weave, 55% Dacron and 45%
Wool Suit
Worth the effort and the price.. .$65.00
It's a Cricketeer and a great natural shoulder model.
We've all the furnishings you'll want, and a handsome
pair of Bostonians. And ten to one she's wearing a
stunning ensemble from our ladies department if
you're still a little short after the cheeseburger
diet.. .Use your student charge card..
dltveMHOHb i
225 W. University Ave.
SERVING SONS AND DAUGHTERS FOR 31 YEARS
Free In The Huge Lot At Rear Os Store

I fraternally
|^*peafc:ing
By JUDY MILLER
Alligator Staff Writer
The Phi Gamma Delta's have made their weekly trip to the J.
Hints Miller Health center to entertain the children. The Fiji s
are winners of both the Greek Council and Dan B. McCarty trophies
for social service and have been making these visits for the last
year. Sunday will bring the Fiji's to the center for a special hoot hootenany
enany hootenany for the children.
Phi Epsilon Pi have just elected their new slate of officers. They
are C. D. Hobbs, Superior; Arnold Willen, Vice-Superior; Bill Lopatin,
First Treasurer; Terry Dunlap. Second Treasurer; Steve Handshu
Recording Secretary; Frank Ventura, Corresponding Secretary; Robert
Stern, Sergeant at Arms, and Martin Lawson, Chaplain.
The Phi Mu's had an ice cream social with TKE and will have
a picnic social Tuesday with Delta Sigma Phi. Phi Mu Is; alsohaving
u BH ah
ju njim riis.
B fPVPBIf v
. v twwl
t :*9\ Unl%.
B jar gmm k lff
B \b'- v BBfrr*HW^^^b
IP % \\vEU
FIJIS: at Hi 11 is Miller
its Carnation Weekend Oct. 29 and 30. They will announce pledge
class sweethearts.
Thelma Mossman, originator of the 11 p.m. Alligator on the Air
show on WRUF f was not believed to be real by the brothers of
Pi Kappa Phi who held a nightly Thelma Mossman Listening Hour!'
Shes real, boys, a Phi Mu, and was recently selected one of the
10 a.m. announcers for WRUF.
This afternoon many of the fraternities and sororities will see
the culmination of their hard efforts on building floats and creating
our homecoming atmosphere. Fraternity and sorority gators support
Floridas 400th year, and do it regally in this afternoons parade
on West University Ave.
Campus Pac On Sale
fix fcMMUtifUMy I B BEB^^^BBESStaIbtRI s
ZZ. II buhavetl fcg: fP|j X
A I t i^
1 B |JJQ B
.*** 1 .MmAOiM*
_.__SMBP * vi tmitkif*
Campus pacs will go on sale Friday of Homecoming Weekend
at 6:30 on the gym lawn in the stadium co*.*;r near the Engineering
building. Saturday campus pacs will be on sale from 8 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. on the University Auditorium lawn.
Valued at nine dollare for each they are sold through Dollars for
Scholars at three dollars each.
The campus pacs for men and women contain soap, shampoo,
hair cream toothpaste, toothbrush, Old Spice for men and hair spray,
sun tan kit, eye make-up for women.
Proceeds from the sale go to Dollars for Scholars fund to be used
for loans to UF students. Each dollar relsed is matched with nine
from the Federal Government. Last year $1,600,000 was loaned to
UF students.

1-19 Copies, 10V ea. 2U&
Over, 9 Copies Made While You Wait
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK-SAVE
1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Friday, Oct. 15. 1965, The Florida Alligator,

r7h^norlda^UuSlto?Tra^
official publication of the
University of Florida and
Is published dally, Monday
through Friday morning
during regular trimester and
twice weekly during summer
trimester, except holidays
and vacation periods.
Entered at U. S. Post Office
as second class matter.

Page 25



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 15, 1965

Page 26

** f y\(mi j TQmt
C*MBLH*i
TRAIL 90 The Harmon Football Forecast I
TOP 20 TEAMS (Forecasting Average: 529 Right, 173 Wrong 754) I T
16-NEBRASKA 11-L.S.U. 16-AUBURN IWm 3111
2- STATE 7-MISS. STATE 12-PURDUE 17-MISSOURI /II W
3 TEXAS 8 FLORIDA 13-OHIO STATE 18-MICHIGAN I if 4
4- NOTRE DAME 9-GEORGIA 14-TENNESSEE 19 WEST VIRGINIA flf § &
££ A I 5 SOUTHERN CAL 10 ALABAMA 15 KENTUCKY 20-DUKE I *Wr
-/i t*U£J[ £j£@d / Saturday, October 16 Major Colleges Well, the Porkers of Arkansas did it! They 1 Jmi jf
C7C7 Ariz b onTstate 14 sln"joirstate io jumped from 4th place last week into the #1 f/f jM
Jmm 1 ff ¥ Arkansas 17 Texas 15 position in the nation, skipping over Michigan (fi '>
ll ttlC Honda BucJfneii 24 Pennsylvania 13 State, Texas, and Notre Dame to do it. So this jy
California 16 io Saturday, the Southwest Conference champ- <* s^Jgg|r
-m Citadel 18 Arkansas State 14 ionship is on the line ..So is the Razorback ~~
that PfOPsS Cornel? 0 17 H^ard^ 6 13 16-game winning streak and so are the un- ft ftl/11/vf/
l/11/vf/ ftl/11/vf/ Duk outh 20 ciemson 7 defeated seasons of both the Texas Longhorns, !i \
East Carolina 20 Louisville 17 ranked third, and Arkansas. These two powers A \
fl M Vir h/) y/1 Furman 17 PrelbyteriTn na Sta,e 7 aim at this one all season. For what our guess | B ) C C | \
B' T %/\/ M M/%5 m **Geo. Washington 19 Cincinnati 14 is worth, well go with an Arkansas victory in 11 lr_JL_
- Georgia Tech 15 Auburn 14 The Big One by just two points. ATI
MMnoif rOSS 23 Pndiana U 7 And there are two biggies on the Big Ten |
Kent State 20 Western Michigan 6 schedule this week too. The new Number Two DONiIf^ANX
m Marshall 16
StPeiVS SiJsut? 17 SA., 7 State play 13th-ranked Ohio State, and Pur- Mill HI ft
Honda, s!i2iSi?Ssw. I 8 J!S.is state tans will clip Ohio State by ten points, and the U
.. ~ Navy Ur 21 Pittebu-rfi 14 Bollerboys will nip the Wolverines by two.
Nebraska 40 Kansas State 0 While 4th-ranked Notre Dame takes a
Northwestern 13 16 wfsconsfn *6 breather, the Trojans of Southern Cal, in the 112'! W UNIV AVF
615 W. University Ave. ofe 3 on ma 20 i #5 spot, get ready for their block-buster with vv UIN|V MVC
Oregon state 13 idaho rCe A*' 10 the Irish on the 23rd by tackling Stanford.
TLa Prin n cet S on te \l
I IIP ViOlloflc Life Purdue 16 Michigan 14 Southern Cal by fifteen points. a
- || iM h 5 m Cal 19 Rice f rd 14 Ok, Nebraska, youre convincing us!! The A/
Football Forecast II £ cV' If skepticism of the Harmon ratings over the fIL/l VO
Texas Tech 20 Oklahoma state io power of the Cornhuskers has about vanished. 9 9
f \ Tulsa 0 27 Ki n Te?aT n I The >' moved up again this week, from Bth to Akl JV
Utah state ll K,anr' C 0 6th, and their point spread over Kansas State f I IKANn
. j Vanderbilt 14 V. p. I. io shouldnt be printed. However -in very very 111 fi
iBS Wake no Forest ?2 H Small Nebraska by 40 points.
Washington state 21 Arizona io In the good guess and bad guess department, 4
wS Virginia 2? vPrginif G 7 things picked up a litJe this past week. The rV KJ I
wiu!am & Mary Sl*ds M oT," C S,a e ll little fellas decled to let the big fellas have I
n;, Wyoming 30 Texas Western 14 their day. Our percentage is now .754 based
?f£ er f? Col'umbia 8 n 529 smiles and 173 frowns. CT/^y
jjMar EAST (small colletfes) 7th-ranked Mississippi State will walk by lw|
# LMSI (Small CO lege ) Memhpis State by about three touchdowns, and m **
Smberat 32 'Svelte, Florida, #B, will blitz North Carolina State by Tft X i~ 7 S*k
Tiir Bowdoin 18 Williams 14 26 points. 1A I M f
THE GAMES i;;&rt 19 American mtemi J Florida State will be another toughle for f
Clarion 17 | di bo > .J 9th-ranked Georgia. However, it should be s
Georgia vs. FSU Gettysburg 14 Lehigh S 7 Bulldog Day as the Georgians are favored
N. C. State vs. FLORIDA icEStown"' 30 Gi^ssboro"" 3 7 by seven points. Alabama, #lO, will also have
Texas vs. Arkansas Lock Haven 25 shippensburg 13 its hands full with 14th-ranked Tennessee.
Auburn vs. Georgia Tech MasMchusetts 27 island Alabam should pluck it out by six. A% \A
Purdue vs. Michigan **Montciair 20 southern Conn. 19 There were four new faces in The Tod 20 V* \
Muhlenberg 14 Lebanon Valley 12 1 c \ A luMP? J ff/\ m. m. \
Ohio State vs. Michigan St st. Lawrence 20 Norwich 18 last week, and it seems that three of them \ m. m. \
Pittsburgh vs. Navy s a ter S n tate 12 liked the company . Theyre still there. r VX \
UCLA vs. Missouri Temple 19 Lafayette 7 West Virginia, #l9, is favored over Virginia
Kentucky vs. LSU Vermont 30 New Hampshire 6 by 14 points. Duke, No. 20, should slide by J l~f I I
Tennessee vs. Alabama ll Bi^mVbJrg 7 Clemson by thirteen, and Big Eight power L / / I I
mbion MIDWEST I < 9 Srn Hop. C<,lle eS) tougher'thar^u!c! L.aT iUS W P ntS Q I
\hJ.i Bethany, Kan. 20 McPherson o And 11th- ranked Louisiana State will edge I I Bluffton 20 Otterbein 13 Kentucky #ls hv fivp nrint ---- I I
Carthage 20 Millikin 14 R.eiuutKy, wo, Dy live points.
Le^s Alan's downtown (the Seagle Building^^
AyLMryn CMGA ls nexf f 0 and A,an s ln Carolyn Plaza (the other
CWH A) Sh PS 6Xfend SOuthward rom it) aren't exactly the
\ I ~most prominent establishments, size-wise; but food-
Guest Prognosti gators ...the only company selling :* wise? Greai Gallopin' Gators, they come on like
exclusively to college men. | Gangbusters, yet.
AGR CLO clica I if# 378-1230
FLORIDA Florida I m m | J<6ouf number. As well
Texas T Insurance I Alnnc known as fhose in the girls' dorms,
Purdue Purdue Auburn Company Os America I u|CTtD we M wager, for we are deservedly
Michigan state Michigan state 1105 W University Ave "'STFR famous forsandwiches supreme and
Pittsburgh Navy pittsbureh* c CAMIIIAfirU lightning-like delivery. Drop in
LSU LSU SOUn 372-2357 iji CUAB r w n /.L e and us show you
Alabama Alabama Alabama § J nUr Carolyn Plaza what the growing acclaim is all about.



i 81 w .
dROUGH THE AIR: she floats with the greatest of ease
she's the daring young sorority girl making an (alligator

iiSl Phli.
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I HOMECOMING: brings back remembrances of kindeigarten days
I LIVING ROOM ANIMALS: at KD house

Muscle A Decoration Must

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#**
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$i Photos by ::
**
Ron Sherman g
** *
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i i DU 1^
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V\ Eiir I 4uw?r£r9Msl
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OBVIOUSLY: it* going to be a float

Friday, Oct. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Muscle ana raw courage are ap apparently
parently apparently prime factors in putting
up Homecoming decorations at the
University of Flor^a.
Also needed is a long suffering
Homecoming chairman with lots of
ideas about how to find lost ham hammers,
mers, hammers, how to make paint appear
out of thin air and how to make an
80-foot tall alligator if the situa situation
tion situation demands it.
All this week and right up to the
wee hours of this morning many
undoubtedly were out at 6 a.m. to today
day today putting finishing touches on
decs -- girls have done mens
work.
Heights did not upset them,
scratchy chicken wire didnt stop
the, a house smelling like paint
was not about to halt their efforts,
and hammers and nails andsmash andsmashed
ed andsmashed fingers were cried over but
didnt stop the ongoing process.
Everything must be finished by
noon today, Homecoming officials
demand, so supreme efforts were
made to comply.
But tonight, tne girls who wore
the messy jeans and sloppy sweat sweatshirts
shirts sweatshirts will be transformed into the
radiant beauties going to Gator
Growl and the house decs so long
labored over will be admired fora
day and then torn down to be re remembered
membered remembered only in bruises,
scratches and paint-splashed
clothes.

Page 27



Page 28

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 15, 1965

' £_
SSE3SSQBB

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA
national scholastic honor society.
Girls with a 3.5 or better average
in any trimester of their fresh freshman
man freshman year may sign up in the Dean
of Womens office, 1231 igert Hall,
Monday, Oct. 18 through Wednes Wednesday,
day, Wednesday, Oct. 20. Transfer students
to ay also apply.
GAMMA SIGMA EPSILON meet meeting,
ing, meeting, 7:30 p.m., Monday in Room
142 Leigh Hall. Refreshments will
be served.
RisliFs
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Serving Daily 6:00 AM 12:00 PM
Daily Specials
Mama Dees Cakes Papa Dees dough-nets
Fountain Service Service.l.
.l. Service.l. i
The Biggest Tea In Town
Gold Coast
1720 W. Univ. Ave.
"The University is across from US"

HILLEL HOUSE, Hillel Alumni
Brunch, Sunday, Oct. 17,11:00 a.m.
to 12 noon.
Tank Driver
Panics, Crashes
READING, Pa. (UPI) Stamp Stamping
ing Stamping on the accelerator instead of
the brake pedal in an emergency
is a common cause of accidents
but the damage mounts when youre
driving a tank.
It happened to Kenneth Parker,
17, of suburban Montrose Manor,
a member of Company B, 77th
Armored Division, during maneu maneuvers
vers maneuvers at the Army Reserve Cen Center
ter Center here.
Barker said he was driving
a 50-ton tank down an inclined
driveway when he got a signal
to stop. He said he could not
stop the heavy tank on the slope.
He told police he panicked and
jammed his foot on the throttle
instead of the brake.

Homecoming
Will Bring
Many Cars
Driving conditions will be ex extremely
tremely extremely hazardous and dangerous
Homecoming Weekend and students
should make a special effort to look
out for each other during this
time, warned UF Chief of Police
Audie Shuler.
Extra police will go on duty
at about noon Friday to help with
the traffic overflow at the most
dangerous intersections and will
move around from intersection to
intersection as traffic conditions
dictate.
Shuler said there will be no
restricted area for parking after
noon Friday, except for the area
adjacent to the gym which will be
reserved for Florida Blue Key
members and their guests. All
other areas will be open to the
general public.
Normally, we have a few ac accidents
cidents accidents because drivers seem to
be extra precautious at this time,
Shuler said. If thisattitude pre prevails
vails prevails this year we should have a
safe weekend for everyone.
MENS BLAZERS
.BLUE ONLY
.100% WOOL
m
gNIIT 523
nit unvuimr avsnus
Ow TMI-OOLDGOAtr

1 Kelly Will Speak
|: At Breakfast §

Gubernatorial candidate Scott Kelly of Lakeland will be the featured
speaker for the Alpha Kappa Psi Business Fraternitys Homecoming
Breakfast at the University Inn Saturday morning. The breakfast begins
at 8:30 a.m.
We are very fortunate to have Senator Kelly as our speaker this
year, President Dennis Driscoll, 3BA, said.
The former state senator was a candidate for Governor of Florida
in the May, 1964 Democratic Primary. Kelly ran third in a field of
six candidates.

Kelly became the youngest Real Realtor
tor Realtor in the United States in 1951 at
the age of 23. He now operates a
real estate agency and general in insurance
surance insurance agency and is a developer
of residential properties. Kelly is
also engaged in the general con contracting
tracting contracting business, owns a citrus
grove and is director and chair chairman
man chairman of the Executive Committee
of the Imperial Bank of Lakeland.
During three years as city com commissioner
missioner commissioner and Mayor of Lakeland,
Kelly instituted a juvenile delin delinquency
quency delinquency control program that was
recommended by the Kefauver
Crime Investigating Committee as
a model plan for other cities.
As a state senator for eight
years, Kelly served as Chairman
of the Legislative Investigating
Committee on Public Roads and
Highways that uncovered payola
in the State Road Department and
was also a leader in the fight for
Constitutional Revision and fair
reapportionment.
AUF alumni Kelly attended the
university on a football scholar scholarship.
ship. scholarship. He was a member of the Pi
Kappa Alpha social fraternity.
Kelly was elected to the city
commission of Lakeland when he
was 25 and served as Mayor at
27 the youngest Mayor in the
citys history. When he was 28 he
was first elected to the Florida
Senate winning over three op opponents.
ponents. opponents.
Kelly was named Lakelands
Outstanding Young Man of The
Year in 1954 and three years
later was named one of Floridas
Five Outstanding Young Men.
In 1961 he received the Florida
Legislative Achievement Award
for performing the most effective
committee work of any member in
the 1961 Florida Legislature. The
next year he was nominated for
the Ten Outstanding Young Men
of America Award.

H HE
HL
SCOTT KELLY:
morning words
iGrowl Fans!
I Will Be (
I 'Dazzled' (
A yellow blue dazzler?
5 Whats that? §:
Even the fireworks commit- $:
6 tee isnt sure, but it will be £
seen by over 45,000 spectators
y. as the fireworks display ends
Gator Growl tonight. $
x The yellow-blue-dazzler is
v but one of the many displays
in the fireworks show which
x will last 10 to 12 minutes, Dan :£
x Carlton, 3LW, chairman of the :$
£ fireworks committee, said. ;X
>: The SI2OO display will have
k six set pieces fired on the £:
:j: ground and the rest will be %
: aerial. :$
> C\
The committee has tried to
>: provide a program with many
displays that have not been
presented at Growl in previous £:
: years, Carlton said.
One display will be a ground
and aerial combination depic depicti
tin depicti 6 the two-stage Gemini
space ship firing. Appropriate
sound effects will be included, i:
; he said. :£
V.
The fireworks were pur purchased
chased purchased from the American $
: Fireworks Co. of Hudson,
Ohio. The company president
:j will be here to conduct the
firin of the displays.
The displays will all take
Place at the south end of the
stadium. No one should park : : : :
r stand in the area between
: the stadium and the Engineer- :j:|
ing building during the firing, : : : :
Carlton said. g



Randy Jackson
J*m.&*j BMjfflfejEJ&? *Ajk I A % **% K
afors Survive f Make Or Break Slate

By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Staff. Writer
B Make or Break portion of the University of
das 1965 football campaign has ended.
September many observers indicated that if Florida
Bo at last have the long-awaited BIG year, it would
I to pass the grueling test of its first four games.
B Gators first tilt against Northwestern, was rated
B-up. The Orange and Blues first TD was symbolic,
Bve Spurrier unleashed UFs mighty weapon with a
Bd aerial to lonesome end Charles Casey. Caseys
Beception total after games stands at 19.
Brida rolled on to a 24-0 lead after three quarters.
Bsive halfback George Grandy had given the Gators
Bt with a tally scored on a pass interception, seconds
B the half.
B 1 consistent place-kickers like Bobby Lyle and
By Hall being lost by graduation, the kicking situation
Bn unsure quantity. Sophomore Wayne Barfield and
B Don Barrett soon responded to the challenge.
Btt boomed a 32-yard field goal against Northwestern.
Bid is eight for nine for the season in extra-point
Bts.
B Wildcats have since proven themselves no patsy.
Bdawed Indiana, 20-0, eased past Oregon State (1964
Biowl team) 15-7, and stayed ahead of eighth-ranked
Dame for three quarters before bowing.
second tilt, with always-rugged Mississippi State,
B Gator fans off-guard. Few expected the Orange
Blue to crumble in only their second game of the
players were ready for the Mr. Inside-Mr. Outside
B Marcus Rhoden and Hoyle Granger. The one who

spoiled the victory dinner was State quarterback Ashby
Cook. Cooks nifty running of the option play, particularly
in the third and last quarters, propelled the Bulldogs to
a come-from-behind 18-13 triumph.
The exuberant mood of UF fans, earlier inflamed by
Allen Trammells daring 13-yard TD dash on a fake
field goal, changed to a widespread feeling of bleak
despair.
Who could be expected to beat Mississippi State? No
one has yet. The Bulldogs rank ninth in the nation in one
poll, with an unblemished 4-0 slate.
Next came the toughest back-to-back nightmare on the
Gators schedule. First fifth-ranked Louisiana State, and
then Homecoming at Mississippi.
The Bayou Bengals came spoiling for trouble. They re remembered
membered remembered the Gators 20-6 runaway last December in
Tiger Stadium. Prognosticators adjudged the Tigers a
two-point favorite.
Sophomore Richard Trapp thrilled 47,550 spectators
and gave a harbinger of future seasons by out-racing a
LSU defender and hauling in a 22-yard strike from
Spurrier for six points. Junior fullback John Feiber
powered his way to another score, and Florida prevailed,
14-7.
For 19 years, Mississippi had fought off all ransackers
at Homecoming. They rated a slight favorite to make it
twenty.
Head Coach Ray Graves sent out the Spurrier-to-Casey
combination once again. Barfield chipped in with a field
goal, and Spurrier fought his way nine yards for another
score. Final score: Florida 17, Mississippi 0.
Where do the Gators stand after their initial four
games? A mark of 3-1 against topflight competition is a

Friday. Oct. 15. 1965. The Florida Alligator,

record to be proud of. A forecast of 9-1 Is not just an
idle dream. Perhaps a Bowl Bid, the Gators' first s nee
1962, will be forthcoming.
As Spurrier and Graves have maintained, it takes a
TEAM effort to win week after week against top flight
opposition. Certainly no Gator can be overlooked.
One grldder the Associated Press didn't forget is
quarterback Spurrier. They named him Back of the Week
for the nation after his stellar performance against Ole
Miss. A quick glance at the statistics shows Spurrier
compiling an overall All-America Performance.
Spurrier ranks seventh nationally in passing yardage
with 645 yards on 55 completions In 101 attempts. He
has thrown three TD passes and has run for two more.
The Johnson City, Tennessee, flash ranks fourth on
the squad in rushing yardage with 51. Solid, power-running
Felber leads the ground-gaining corps with 71 yards In
28 carries
Reserve quarterback Harmon Wages has developed into
a definite running threat. He has gained 55 yards in 22
carries. Jack Harper, Don Knapp, Marquis Baeszler,
and Jimmy Jordan have all gained over 40 yards for UF.
Junior Knapp has the best running average. In 7 plays
he has amassed 51 yards, for a gain-per-carry of 5.9
yards.
All-America senior Bruce Bennett sets a new school
record for interceptions each time he grabs one. He has
already returned three for 49 yards this season. Grandy,
of course, scored a TD with one. Trammell also has one
to his credit.
Casey, Feiber, and Spurrier share scoring honors
with 12 points each. Barfield has earned 1! by kicking
alone.

Page 29



Page 30

), The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 15, 1965

Harper Out For Saturday Clash

Florida flankerback Jack Har Harper
per Harper will not start against North

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Carolina State this weekend be because
cause because of a sprained ankle he re received

ceived received against Ole Miss.
Coach Ray Graves said either
Richard Trapp or Hall Seymour
would start instead of Harper.
Harper dressed in sweat clothes
for Thursdays piactice, but he
hasnt practiced all week, and
Graves decided it would be best
to limit the backs action this
week.
Besides Harpers injury, Graves
is worried about the weather and

Frosh Meet Auburn Today

Floridas Baby Gator football
squad opens its season against
the Auburn freshmen at Auburn
today.
Coach Dave Fuller said his team
is healthy and ready to play after

_^LMoortl
ME/
SPOR TS EDITOR
Florida football fans should be treated to a pleasant homecom homecoming
ing homecoming tomorrow.
It ought to be a joyous occasion for all as the fans enjoy an
easy victory over North Carolina State. The team should also
be in good spirits without the pressures of SEC competition
hounding it.
Florida should whip the Wolfpack by as much as it wants to,
which could be something by 24-7.
Cokes Still A Quarter
Contrary to circulating rumors, Perry Moores Cokes will
still be 25 cents at the Homecoming game. Some malicious body
had been passing word that Americas favorite drink would
be sold for 35 cents from now on.
The whole thing may have started in the Athletic Department
when it was revealed last week that profit on Cokes was less than
it should be.
If the rain continues through the weekend, however, coffee at
15 cents and aspirin at 25 may prove more popular.
Pro Scouts Interested
Two professional scouts were on hand to view the Florida-
Ole Miss game last week.
Both Bill Hudson of Oakland and Ed McHeever of Boston
were impressed by several players.
You have a lot of good boys on squad, McHeever said.
Both cited Steve Spurrier and Charles Casey as outstanding
pro-prospects. Also noted for their ability were Allen Trammell
Bruce Bennett, Barry Brown, Larry Gagner, Lynn Matthews,
Ron Pursell and Jack Harper.
Both scouts were impressed with the strength of the Florida
team.
How did you ever lose to Mississippi State? McHeever
asked.
Trammell May Miss
Ace defensive back Allen Trammell will see little if any
action in tomorrows game.
Trammell has been hurting since the first game of the season,
but played in the manner of the true competitor he is in the
three important conference clashes which just passed.
With this week and the next two to take it easy, Trammell
should be able to give a top effort against Auburn Oct. 30.
Ive got to put myself together, Trammell said. I havent
been much help to the team these last couple of weeks.
The last statement is open to question.
HOMECOMING?
Holiday Motel & Rest.
20 minutes west of
UF Medical Center
on Highway 24
CALL NOW
4&6-2121

the Wolfpacks pass defense which
is rated eighth in the nation. It
was cloudy and rained all day in
Gainesville Thursday, and the wea weather
ther weather bureau promises the same
for the rest of homecoming week weekend.
end. weekend.
Graves is afraid a combination of
the weather and North Carolina
States pass defense could hurt
the Gator offensive machine.
We cant expect to be up for

six weeks of practice.
I think we have a well balanced
offensive attack, said Fuller. It
all depends on how the game de develops
velops develops as to whether we will run
or pass more.

this game like the previous
so the weather sure cant help
us, said Graves Thursday, stand standing
ing standing in a light drizzle of rain.
Besides we cant take our
opponents too lightly either; they
are a tougher ball club than some
people think.
The Gators wont practice Fri Friday,
day, Friday, but the Wolfpack will stop
in Gainesville Friday and use the
Gator practice field for drills.

Fuller said he didnt know too
much about the Auburn team.
Like ourselves, they havent
played yet this year, he said.
Floridas freshmen this year are
unusually deep in linemen. Because
of this Fullers backfield is not as
deep as Gator teams in the past
have been. But what the backfield
lacks in depth it makes up for in
quality.
Two all-America high school
performers, Larry Rentz and
Larry Smith, will start for Fullers
team. Rentz made his fame at
Coral Gables as a quarterback,
while Smith set all kinds of scoring
records for Tampa Robinson as a
halfback.
Others in the starting lineup on
offense will be George Dean at left
end, Terry Morris at left tackle,
Eddie Foster at left guard, Dave
Barnhart at center, Chip Hinton
at right guard, Guy Dennis at right
tackle, Jimmy Yarbrough at right
end, Bill Gaisford at wingback and
Bill Mcride at fullback.
Defensively the Baby Gators will
line up Steve Clark at right end,
Walter Ritchie at left end, Lloyd
Turman at right tackle, Gary Duven
at left tackle, John Dorsey at mid middle
dle middle guard, Bob Young and Jeff
Warren at linebackers, Larry
McQuinn and Steve Ely at corner cornerbacks,
backs, cornerbacks, John Gasque and James
Slaton at halfbacks and Esmond
Marks at safety.
Dodgers Take
Series With
Koufax
MINNEAPOLIS ST. PAUL
(UPI) The Los Angeles Dodgers
became baseballs world champ champions
ions champions Thursday for the third time
in six years by beating the Minn Minnesota
esota Minnesota Twins, 2-0, on Sandy Kou Koufax
fax Koufax three-hit pitching.
Koufax, the 29 year old left lefthanded
handed lefthanded premier pitcher in base baseball,
ball, baseball, humbled the Twins for the
second time in three starts with
the help of Lou Johnson and Jim
Gilliam.
Johnson provided the winning
margin with his second homer of
the series in the fourth inning and
Gilliam, who began the season as
a coach, saved the victory with a
glittering back-handed stab in a
drama-packed fifth.
Pitching with the spectre of
teammate Don Drysdale warming
up in the bullpen, Koufax sent the
all-time record crowd of 50,596 at
Metropolitan Stadium home with
long faces as he struck out 10,
walked three and repeatedly
worked his way out of jams.
His last one came in the ninth
with most of the fans on their
feet exhorting their beloved Twins
to go, go, go. Harmon Killebrew
responded by lining a single to
left with one out but Earl Battey
struck out and broad-dhouldered
Bob Allison, Koufax personal pig pigeon
eon pigeon throughout the series, also
struck out to end the game.



Homecoming
Revisited:
X
c Ik
Mercer Fell To Gators
19-7 In 1924

IfR By DICK DENNIS
mm Alligator Staff Writer
mm The 42nd annual renewal of the
9Hf Homecoming Gridiron Classic
finds the Gators of 1965
UgHnocking on the door for the Uni UnijJersitys
jJersitys UnijJersitys 25th homecoming victory
Wm A UF Homecoming celebra celebrajjHion
jjHion celebrajjHion in one form or another has
IjHxisted for 73 years. Dads Day
jageant was formed in 1892 to be
||Hield on each Thanksgiving Day. At
Bihis time the University was in
gjjJcala.
~||| In 1905, the UF was established
§|Bn Gainesville. Football was desig desigjliated
jliated desigjliated an official part of the campus

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I FORMER TEAM: J. Hillis Miller and
I Bob Woodruff

in this same year.
The custom of lighting a bonfire
and having a pep rally began in
1916. The first Homecoming game
was played at Fleming Field on
Nov. 4, 1923, before a capacity
crowd of 4,000. The University
officially recognized the custom of
Homecoming Weekend in 1924.
Captain Robbie Robinson and
Dick Brown led the Gators to this
first Homecoming triumph, 19-7
over Mercer.
The Orange and Blue's record
for 41 Homecoming contests is a
creditable 25-14-2. Thirteenshut Thirteenshutouts
outs Thirteenshutouts have been posted. The Gators

have won six.
Five teams have furnished the
opposition for more than half of
UFs homecoming games. Georgia
Tech is the leader with six en encounters.
counters. encounters. Maryland follows closely
with five frays.
BEAT TECH
The Gators took two games from
the Engineers, and have won four
from Maryland. Auburn, Louisiana
State, and Vanderbilt have, each
faced the Orange and Blue four
times.
Florida was never defeated in

Homecoming contests on Fleming
Field. They won seven straight
from 1923-1929. The last of these
saw the most prolific scoring.
The 1928 squd, under the aegis
of Coach Charles Bachman, was
the national high-scoring champ champion.
ion. champion. It rolled up 336 points. Hapless
Mercer succumbed on Nov. 20,
73-0.
All-Southern Conference enc
Dale Vansickle was helped that da)
by Tommy Iwens, who scampered
for four TDs. Other stars of thal
period included Ark Newton.
Robbie Robinson, Goldie Gold Goldstein,
stein, Goldstein, Clyde Crabtree and Ed
Jones.
20,000 FANS
20,000 fans viewed the dedica dedication
tion dedication of Florida Field on Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming Day in 1930, but Alabama
soured things with a 20-0 victory.
Highly-ranked Maryland was
downed 7-6, in 1936, as the Gators
took advantage of the breaks. All-
Southeastern Conference (SEC)
great Walter Mayberry dashed 21
yards for the score. Bugs Hen Hendricks
dricks Hendricks tacked on the winning point.
The first night Homecoming duel
was played in 1938. The Orange
and Blue did justice to the occasion
with a 21-7 beating of Maryland.
Quarterback Ernest Cody was the
sparkplug.
In 1945 the unbeaten Gators were
upset 7-0 by Vanderbilt. Buddy
Carte penetrated deepest, to the
5-yard line.
Jack Nochols 90-yard kickoff
return in 1950 stung Auburn, as
the Orange and Blue won, 27-7.
Two TD dashes by Haywood Sul Sullivan,
livan, Sullivan, together with his pinpoint
passing, gave UF a 33-13 decis decision,
ion, decision, in 1951.
CENTENNIAL
The Centennial Homecoming
Celebration (1952) saw Rick Ca Casares
sares Casares explode for two TDs, a field
goal and four extra points. The
veteran Casares stars for the
Washington Redskins in the Nation National
al National Football League. Sullivan
manages the Kansas Athletics in
the American League.

Don Chandler, now with the
Green Bay Packers, could drive
no closer than the 12-yardline in
a 20-0 loss to Tennessee, in 1955.
The 1956 UF squad won three
Homecoming games. They won on
the road frotmVandy and LSD and
came home to smash Auburn, 20-0.
Jimmy Dunn sped 58 yards for a
marker. A three-part play worked
for a 47-yard TD. Quarterback
Harry Speers lateralea to Jack
Simpson who passed to Jim Roun Rountree.
tree. Rountree.
A great comeback effort by the
1958 UF players salvaged a6-6tie
with Vanderbilt. With only eight
seconds remaining. Dunn passed to
Dave Hudson for a tying TD. The
kick was blocked.
In 1960 the Gators had their best
SEC season. Yet. They beat Tulane
at Homecoming, 21-6. This was
Ray Graves first season as head
coach.
LSU WHITEWASH
LSU whitewashed the Gators at
Homecoming in 1961 and 1963. In
1962 the Orange and Blue exploded
for 30 points in the second half to
demolish Vanderbilt 42-7. Sopho Sophomore
more Sophomore Larry Dupree led all rushers
with 84 yards.
%
A packed house saw the 1964
Gators humiliate South Carolina,
37-0. The gridders jumped to a
28-0 halftime bulge and never let
up. Jack Harper twisted his way
through the Gamecocks for a long
TD.
Senior Larry Dupree, who had
not practiced all week, came off
l the training table to charge through
for six points. Steve Spurrier hit
Charles Casey with beauty after
beauty.
Graves Homecoming mark
stands at 3-2. The Gators Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming streak is a bare one game.

23-SKIDDOO: Florida Field Before West Stand Addition
|
£^jt3|fl
AMONG THE IMMO RTA LS: 'A 11 -Ameri ca
lineman Vel Heckman

Friday, Oct. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

* v
$:
OF ANCIENT
j:> >:
| VINTAGE:
& 5:
HUBIE HOUSTON:
quarterback 1 940
OLD TIME MOVER:
Fred Hogan

Page 31



Page 32

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 15. 1965

Noggle, Spurrier Match Records

By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Staff Writer
North Carolina State quarter quarterback
back quarterback Charles Noggle is a better
runner than Steve Smirrier.
jjijL
K M
\ I
SHELBY MANSFIELD***

Alligator Staffers Pick The Winners
Benny Eddie Glenn Jeff Den- Bruce Dick Steve Ron Fran Andy Don Fed- Cheryl
Pir>lr*rc CaSO Sears Laney kewalter DuUley Dennis Vaughn Spencer Snider Moor erman Kuril Consensus
ricucrs 51-25-4 50-26-4 50-26-4 48-28-4 48-28-4 47-29-4 47-29-4 46-30-4 46-30-4 44-32-4 44-32-4 35-41-4 47-26-4
.671 .658 .658 .632 .632 .618 .618 .605 .605 .589 .589 .461 .644
Florida-N. C. St. FFFF FF FFFFFFF
Kentucky-LSU LLLL LKLKKLLKL
Georgia-FSU F GF G G GG G GF FGG
Alabama-Tennessee A A A A A AA A AA AAA
Michigan-Purdue MP P PM MPMMM P P
*
USC-Stans ord SUUUU UUU SUUSU
NW-Wisconsin NNN NNNNWNN NWN
lowa-Minnesota 111 IIIMMMI 111
Penn St.-Syracuse SSSSS PPPSS PSS
California-Wash. CCWWC CWWCC WCC
Mich. St.-Ohio St. M MM MM MM MMM
Virginia-W. Va. VWWWV WWWVW WWW
lllinois-lndiana 111 111 111 111 111 111 Ind 111 111 111 111 111 111
Navy-Pltt NNNNNNPNNNNPN
Auburn-Ga. Tech AAAAAGGAAA AAA
Arkansas-Texas ATT AT TTATAAA-
Clemson-Duke .DDDDDDDDDDDDD
Missouri-UCLA MMMU U MMM MM MMM
Ole Miss-T ulane MMMMTMMM MT MMM
Maryland-N. C. NMMNMMMMNMMNM

Soccer Club
Meets Dolphins
The Ui- soccer club will play
Jacksonville University for its an annual
nual annual homecoming Game Saturday
at 10 a.m.
Last year the Gator soccer club
beat Florida State 2-1 in the home homecoming
coming homecoming contest.
Against Jacksonville, the Gator
soccer players will be trying for
their second win this season. They
beat St. Leo 4-0 in the first game
of the year.
The UF soccer club has only
been beaten eight times since 1953,
and it will be trying to keep this
winning record unblemished Sat Saturday.
urday. Saturday. The club has won 80
games and tied eight.

This is the opinion of UF Assis Assistant
tant Assistant B-Team Coach Larry Travis,
who has scouted North Carolina
twice this season.
Noggle will throw short passes
P
SragiFjrSti v*
GARY ROWE

t 1 AUNT JEMIMA S
All-Yov-Can-Eot
SPECIALS
Mondays & Wednesdays
Spaghetti, cole slaw and
garlic bread. $1
Tuesdays & Fridays
L Kitchen "ish, cole slaw, tartar
p sauce, french fries.. .$1
Thursdays & Saturdays
Chicken, potato salad,
baked beans, rolls.. .$1.50
10% Discount to UF Students Showing I.D/s
£
Open 6 a.m. til midnite
Saturday til 2 a.m.
N.W. 13th St. & 16th Ave.

and likes to call off-tackle and
sweep plays/ Travis contends.
Noggle, a 6-1, 205 pound junior,
has carried 56 times for a net of
144 yards. He has completed 26
of 47 passes (55.3%) for 231 yatds.
Against arch-rival North Carolina,
he dashed 15 yards for a score.
Co-captain Shelby Mansfield,
6-1, 193, is the Wolfpack work workhorse.
horse. workhorse. A senior, he has 184 yards
in 58 carries. Mansfield scraped
out 74 yards against the Tarheels.
The teams leading scorer with
12 points, his eight receptions for
71 yards tab him as No. 2 Wolf Wolfpack
pack Wolfpack receiver.
Wingback Gary Rowe, small but
quick at 5-8, 186, has snared 11
passes for 89 yards. Wendell Cole Coleman
man Coleman ranks third with seven catches
for 71 yards.
The Wolfpack has all its ex experienced
perienced experienced players on defense. They
have pretty good size and are real
strong and hard-hitting, Travis
pointed out.

Their hard-nosed defense is
their real They realty scrap
with you and fight you till the last
minute, Travis said.
The Gators and North Carolina
State have met nine times. The
Orange and Blue won the last out outing,
ing, outing, 7-6, in 1947. Overall, Florida
leads in games won with five. One
ended in a scoreless tie.
Coach Earl Edwards team has
compiled a deceptive season mark
of 1-3. A 45-yard field goal by
junior Harold Deters, 5-10, 198,
with 35 seconds remaining gave
NCS a victory over Wake Forest,
13-11.
South Carolina scored on two
field goals for its 13-7 winning
margin. North Carolina beat the
Wolfpack on a three-pointer, 10-7.

DONT Let us lock in 24-hour
Protection from Odors*
LOCKED-IM m
SMEAR it on DEODORANT \M
Used In All
Laundered Wearing Apparel
((I jErfl Body Odor
|| IJf II MJ| M M § I # Mildew Resistant
w nNeumot cleaners
Jtfj O 315 NW 13th St.
VOLKSWAGEN Or AMfAiCA. INC- I
Any change will be an improvement. I
All we do when we change the Volkswagen is I
to make it work even better.
We don t play with the way it looks.
So the 1966 VW still looks he same.
And there you have the whole Volkswagen
point of view:
We keep looking for ways to improve it.
And then we knock our brains out to make the
new pieces fit old VWs, too. I
All the improvements make a fat book. I
And every one has made the car a touch better I
than it was before. I
This year, the backs of the front seats can be 1
locked so they won t push forward. Engine powers
increased for the 4th time. And the windshield has 1
a 3rd defroster (so you'll see where you're going
in such a hurry). I
This system not only makes the VW better all I
the time, but also makes parts easier to get, me mechanics
chanics mechanics more skillful and owners always in style.
And we can still keep the price at a nice, rea- I
sonable $1585*
Keep the change, I
Miller-Brown Inc. I
4222 NW 13th St. A -:r I
Suggested retail price (East Coast) P.0.E., local taxes I
charges, if any, additional/* I

NCS stayed with tough Clemson
until the last six minutes before
bowing, 21-7.
Noggle and reserve signal caller
Page Ashby throw more more to
the flat than down field. Tight end
Bill Gentry, with two grabs for
21 yards, and split end Harry Mar Martell,
tell, Martell, with two for nine yards, lag
far behind wingback Rowe.
The fleet Rowe also leads the
squad in kickoff and punt return
average. The Burnham, Pa. flash
has returned 10 kickoffs for 184
yards. Rowe has run back six punts
for 49 yards.
Both the offensive and defensive
lines will average 207 pounds. The
big offensive backfield, in addition
to be experienced, will weigh 196
per man.



MW
HERES A SPECIAL SUBSCRIPTION
OFFER DESIGNED JUST FOR YOU
.With your son or daughter enrolled at the University of Florida, you'll take a special interest in
the news and activities of the university community. There's no better way to keep abreast of the
doings at your youngster's new Alma Mater than to read the Florida Alligator, so we've arranged
this Special Offer to parents and relatives of new Gators. Clip and mail this coupon now. This
offer void after October 30, 1965.
.. j
Daily Mail Subscription SI O.OO
5 Days a week, September thru April (First Two Trimesters)
Special Twice-a-week Subscription $4.50
Tuesdays & Fridays, September thru April

I
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ZIP CODE
i Please enter my subscription for DailyLJslo;Twice-a-WeekjJS4.so.
(Make checks & money orders payable to The Florida Alligator. Do
not send cash or stamps.)

Friday, Oct. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Mail To:
FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
CIRCULATION DEPT.
Room 9, Florida Union
I University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Page 33



Page 34

:, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 15, 1965

\ ; mVy Sv 'v v ~'/ H tJ Hj io
>. \ -W N>A// // n B: > Sis
rv \ S K 2 S l " u, S

Lost Alumni 'Gator Locator'

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
AND CAMPUS SHOPS
37 MAIN BOOKSTORE & CAMPUS SHOP
38 BROWARD BRANCH
39 JENNINGS SHOP
40 MEDICAL BOOKSTORE
41 TRI SHOP

FOOD SERVICE UNITS
27 CAMPUS CLUB S MAIN CAFETERIA
28 COED CLUB CAFETERIA ft SNACK BAR
29 FLORIDA ROOM CATETERIA & SNACK BAR
30 GRAHAM HALL SNACK BAR
31 HEALTH CENTER SNACK BAR
32 HUME HALL CAFETERIA SNACK BAR
33 JENNINGS HALL CAFETERIA & SNACK BAR
34 RAWLINGS HALL CAFETERIA ft SNACK BAR
35 STUDENT SERVICE CENTER CAFETERIA
S SNACK BAR. DANCING, PARTIES
36 TOLBERT HALL. SNACK BAR

300 ENGINEERING BLDG
3 05 ROLFS HALL v
107 MEDICAL SCIENCES
234 STADIUM
102 LAW BUILDING
102 MEDICAL SCIENCES
101 TEACHING HOSPITAL
1 03 PHARMACY
203 FLORIDA GYM
203 MILITARY BLDG
204 TIGERT HALL

16 ENGINEERING
17 FORESTRY
18 health related professions
19 JOURNALISM & COMMUNICATIONS
20 LAW
2 1 MEDIC INE
22 nursing
23 pharma c y
24 physical education & health
25 R.O.T.C. COORDINATOR
26 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

7 FLORIDA UNION & STUDENT
government offices Florida union bldg
8 CASHIER & STUDENT DEPOSITOR V THE HUB
9 main library library
10 foreign student adviser international center
BLDG A E
OFFICES OF ACADEMIC DEANS AND DIRECTORS
11 AGRICULTURE 126 MCCARTY HALL
12 ARCHITECTURE & FINE ARTS ARCH 4 FINE ARTS BLDG.
13 ARTS 6 SCIENCES 103 ANDERSON HALL
14 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 214 MATHERLY HALL
15 EDUCATION 126 NORMAN HALL

KEY STUDENT SERVICE OFFICES
5
1 REGISTRARi ADMISSIONS 138 TIGERT HALL
CURRENT RECORDS 34 TIGERT HALL
2 STUDENT AFFAIRS. DEAN OF MEN,
DEAN OF WOMEN, LOANS. SCHOLAR.
SHIPS 4 EMPLOYMENT 124 TIGERT HALL
3 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
COUNSELING 204 TIGERT HALL
4 COUNSELING CENTER 125 BUILDING E
5 STUDENT HEALTH (INFIRMARY) INFIRMARY
6 HOUSING GROUND FLOOR, SOUTH SOUTHWEST
WEST SOUTHWEST WING BROWARD HALL



1 University
Avenue:
Crowded
ViV
| For Todays
Big Parade
***
University Avenue will be
crowded with thousands of spec spectators
tators spectators this afternoon when the
Homecoming Parade begins its
1 p.m. march.
Sixteen Florida high school
bands have agreed to participate
in today's parade, according to
Hank Raatama, parade chairman.
Some of the better-known en entries
tries entries include Seabreeze High
School, Daytona; Englewood High
School, Jacksonville; and Florida
Military School, Deland.
The maximum number of high
school bands will be 21, according
to Raatama, and entries are still
coming in The UF Gator Band,
according to tradition, lead the
parade.
Raatama said the colwn compe competition
tition competition among campus organiza organizations
tions organizations will be stressed this year.
The clown entries, tried last year
for the first time, proved popular
with the parade-watching crowd,
according to Al Leonard, 1964
parade chairman.
Trophies will be awarded to the
organization sponsoring the most
original and humorous clown,
Raatama said. Two member teams
is the maximum for clown entries.
Float entries, also judged com competitively
petitively competitively for trophies, will be
sought among campus organiza organizations,
tions, organizations, fraternities and sororities
as soon as they activate in the fall
trimester.
Trophies will be awarded to the
winner of the float competition, the
winner of clown competition, and
the winner of the best clown and
float combination.
"This enables one entry to win
a maximum of three trophies,"
said Raatama.
Other parade features include a
25 -girl marching team from James
S. Richards High School in Talla-
Yhassee, old model cars, a 1921
I fire engine and a space capsule
I from NASA complete with actor
lastronaut.
Hn
M
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GATOR PARADERS: Ready To Cheer "Florida's 400th Yeor" If
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MORE PRETTY GIRLS: Last Year's Kappa Alpha Float 8
- Jiifl

Friday, October 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,



Hie Florida Alligator, Friday, October 15, 1965

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Color;
Beauty;
Music
On
Parade

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