Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
... I II O SEE SPORTS SECTION
Ole Miss Next On Gators Menu? pagk 13.15

'Publishing More Pages Per Week Than Any Other Collegiate Daily 9
The Florida
AlligatSr

Vol. 58, No, 25

Br
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NO HARM DONE: This scene occurred during Wednesday night's Growl tryouts

Yufee Elections Slated Tuesday

By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Mike Maiaghan, secretary of the
Interior, announced yesterday the
disputed Yulee elections will be
re-held Tuesday and the winner
could attend the Leg Council meet meeting
ing meeting Tuesday night at 7:30.
Maiaghan and Honor Court Chan Chancellor,
cellor, Chancellor, Sid Stubbs, will count the
votes at 6 p.m. The new repre representative
sentative representative will have to be ratified
by Leg Council to be official.

**
| Viet Nam Expert Unger j
I To Speak At Bent Card
X Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs :
I Leonard Unger, will speak at the Bent Card coffee house tonight g
8 at 11 p.m. on U. S. policy in Viet Nam. 8
Unger is in Gainesville to speak at the Jay- B g
cees annual banquet tonight at the Ramada Inn.
8 There will be ass per person charge at the B :j
8 banquet, but no charge at the Rent Card. :
Unger uas impressive State Department ere ere-8
-8 ere-8 dentials having served as U. S. ambassador to
8 Laos (1962-64) and deputy chief a j!
8 the American embassy in Thailand (1958- ). ...
*: He has been working for the federal gove
g ment since 1939. UNGER
some of tne other positions Unger has held include being
& with the National Resources Planning Board, Department of
S site and Foreign Service, Council of Foreign Ministers, Com- :
S mlttee to Investigate ftalo-Yugoslav Boundary Dispute, Parts
| Peace Conference, Trieste, NATO Command and European
Bureau of the Department of State.
!v ....rr.v.'.v.^\v.^///;-;v;'Xv>Xv!v/:v!v!!v!vTv
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University of Florida,

LEG COUNCIL SEAT AT STAKE

Voting will be held from 8 a.m.
to 6 p.m. There will be the
same regulations and the voters
will again use voting machines.
Sue Williams, an unaffiliated
candidate, won the Yulee area
seat by five votes. She was
opposed by Sue Brutchyard of Pro Progress
gress Progress Party. Miss Williams was
the only unaffiliated candidate to
win a Leg Council seat.
The election was invalidated by
Stubbs after voting irregularities

Friday, October 8 1965

were reported. Stubbs decided to
ask that the election be re-run
after Attorney General Jake Dyal
said there may have been un unfair
fair unfair practices.

INSIDE
More Burns
....4,6,11
Growl Grumbles
....10
Killeen In Jam
....4
Medical Center
....6
The Alligator staff will meet
this afternoon at 3:30 in Flor Florida
ida Florida Union Basement.
LBJ Not Glum
Over Operation
Washington (upi> Pres President
ident President Johnson, preparing to enter
the hospital last night, displayed
the vigor and enthusiasm of a man
heading for a vacation rather than
major surgery.
The Chief Executive took on a
heavy load of official and cere ceremonial
monial ceremonial chores today to clear the
: decks for his. expected 10 to 15-
day absence from the White House.
(Additional Story, Page 2).

*-
GATOR SPECIAL
ON MONDAY
The Alligator will publish a special four-page supplement to next
Mondays paper concerning the political meddling situation
facing Floridas state university system. Free mail out of the
supplement will be available by filling in an address space pro provided
vided provided and dropping the papers in cardboard containers to be found
at most of the regular Alligator distribution points.

Burns Doesnt
Explain Much

By MAUREEN COLLINS
and BRUCE DUDLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Gov. Haydon Burns came to the UF yesterday and delivered a
lecture on operation of the State Budget Commission.
Some observers at the gathering in the Medical Center Auditorium
termed the Governors explanation little more than a political
science lecture.
Burns also said there was a gross misunderstanding by Ul Ulstudents
students Ulstudents concerning the hiring of a vice-president, a position now
vacant.
He said the Budget Commission did not cut the salary recommend recommendation
ation recommendation when UF President J. Wayne Reitz tried to hire a vice-president.
The university budget request was cut, but the actual salary
wasnt, he said. The salary was actually increased by $1,500
although the Budget Commission did not approve the entire request.
Burns said he doesnt forsee any change in the set up by which
the university budget requests now go through the Budget Commission.
He said any change would have to be made by the legislature.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz has asked that the control of the
university funds be handled by the university presidents and the
Board of Regents rather than the Budget Commission.
Burns said another problem was created because all the state
universities didnt get their budget requests in until July 13. The
deadline for the university budget requests had been set at June 15.
Because of this, temporary approval was given the requests until
they were investigated and then some adjustments had to be made,
the Governor said.
Burns, who had little time to spend here because he was due in
Ocala for festivities in connection with the Florida Thouroghbred
Breeders Sales this weekend, did not open the meeting to general
questioning, but allowed three student government officials to ask
-a total of six questions.
Student leaders were originally invited to sit on stage and form
a panel to discuss the issues with the Governor. However, they
I we re removed from the stage
before Burns appeared to make
room for Board of Regents mem members
bers members who accompanied the Chief
Executive.
Burns' entourage includes J.
Broward Culpepper, Chancellor,
Wayne McCall, Board of Regents
See BURNS on P. II

Burns Talk:
Leaders Take
Skeptic View
By 808 WILCOX
Alligator Staff wriwr
Some campus and state leaders
expressed skepticism over Gov.
Haydon Burns remarks yesterday
at the J. Hillis Miller Auditorium.
It Is true that the legislature
has tried to correct this budgeting
situation as Burns said, but It
Is also true that some of the
cabinet members have been against
the change, said State Rep. Ralph
Turlington.
The Gainesville representative
said he thinks that some changes
GOV. BURNS: will be made even though.
Only six questions See SKEPTICAL on P. 4



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 8, 1965

News Around
The World

from the wires of United Press International

International
RESENTMENT MOUNTS . Radio Jakarta broadcasts Thursday
reported that resentment was mounting against Indonesian President
Sukarnos failure to crack down on the Communist Party for its part
in last weeks abortive coup. The radio which issued the report is
controlled by anti-Communist military elements. The protests, from
more than 20 mass organizations throughout Indonesia, called for public
executions of the Communists involved in the coup and murder of
seven anti-Communist army officers.
LUNA-7 LANDS . Heading for the moon at a speed of almost 3,000
miles-per-hour, the Soviet Unions Luna-7 moon rocket was expected
to make a historic soft-landing Thursday night at 6:08 p,m. A
soft-landing a highly complex task would help the Russians
grab back some of the space headlines which have been monopolized
recently be the American Ranger and Gemini shots.
MORE TROOPS LAND . United States
military strength reached a new high in Viet
Nam when the final elements of the Ist Infantry
Division came ashore at Vung Tau, 37 miles
southeast of Saigon. The 15,000-man strong
Big Red One division will bring the total
of troops in South Viet Nam to over 140,000.
FIGHTING REPORTED . The Indian Defense Ministry announced
Thursday that its forces had killed 35 Pakistani troops in one of the
biggest clashes since the cease-fire went into effect two weeks ago.
Pakistani radio charged at the same time that the Indians had opened
a new front in Kashmir where it said Pakistani troops beat back a
brigade-strength Indian attack.
National
NEW SMOKING LINK ..A New Jersey scientist who provided some
of the major evidence linking cigarette smoking and lung cancer now
feels smoking is a major cause of heart attacks. Dr. Oscar Auerbach,
after examining the hearfs blood vessels in 1,372 men who died in the
Veteran Administration hospital in East Orange, N. J., has reported
smoking clogs up coronary arteries.
NEW COMET COMING ... A comet just
becoming visible to the naked eye is expected
to provide the most spectacular celestial
show of the century by Oct. 21, a noted
astonomer reported Thursday. Dr. Thomas D.
Nicholson, chairman of the Hayden Planetar Planetarium
ium Planetarium in New York, said the Ikeya-Seki Comet,
discovered Sept. 18, is similar to the Great
Comet of 1882 which startled the world with its
brilliance.
Florida
FLORIDA PREPARES ... In an effort to handle an avalanche of
refugees from Communist Cuba, Gov. Haydon Burns Thursday told
State Welfare Director Frank Craft to enlarge his staff in Miami. The
governor also called on President Johnson to set up a resettlement
program to move the refugees to other parts of the state. He said a
large number of the refugees would create economic chaos in South
Florida.
'NEW PLANTS PLANNED . More than 1,700 new jobs will be
created in Florida by record-breaking industrial expansion plans re reported
ported reported in September. Almost $34-million worth of new plants and
major expansions were reported to the Development Commission by
26 Florida plants during the biggest month in dollar value ever re recorded
corded recorded for the state. The largest plan by far for expansion was by
Occidental. Corp. of Florida to build a $25-million fertilizer plant
near White Springs.
TEST DELAYED ... A human maintenance
error was blamed for the delay ina test count countdown
down countdown Thursday for the Gemini 6 space ren rendezvous
dezvous rendezvous flight. The voyage, in which two
astronauts will try to link their spaceship
iwith another orbiting satellite, is now set for
Oct. 25. Officials said both the rockets passed
the Thursday test though the delaying problem
could have postponed a real shot.
The Florida Alligator is an official publication of the University
of Florida and is published daily, Monday through Friday morn morning
ing morning during regular trimester and twice weekly during summer
trimester, except holidays and vacation periods. Entered a
U.JS. Post Office as second class matter.

Johnson Operation Today

By MERRIMAN SMITH
UPI White House Reporter
WASHINGTON (UPI) Pres President
ident President Johnsons doctors pro pronounced
nounced pronounced him in excellent health
Thursday and said the operation
to remove his gall bladder would
start at 7:30 a.m. today.
The President arranged to enter
Bethesda Naval Hospital in the
Maryland suburbs late in the even evening
ing evening after attending a special
Salute to Congress at the State
Department.
For the next 10 days to two
weeks, while the President is con convalescing,
valescing, convalescing, the 19-story hospital on
the Naval medical complex will
be, for all practical purposes, the
White House.
The President moved rapidly
from one appointment to another
Thursday as he swept his desk
clear of business. Dr. George
A. Hallenbeck, the 50-year-old
Mayo Clinic surgeon who will per perform
form perform the operation, said it should
be about six weeks after the gall
bladder is removed before the
President will feel as good as
he evidently did Thursday.
Hallenbeck and three other doc doctors
tors doctors on the case met briefly with
reporters at the White House to
discuss the Presidents health and
the operation. Dr. James O. Cain
of the Mayo Clinic, the Johnson
family doctor for many years,
put it this way.
This is truly a very ordinary
problem of gall bladder disease
and we see absolutly no trouble
in handling this.
Cain also said the President
had been given a recent physical
check-up, and the results showed
him to be in excellent health,
Young GOP
Opens Tomorrow
The new state headquarters of
the Florida Federation of Young
Republicans will open tomorrow
with an 11 a.m. ceremony and open
house from 10 a.m. 4 p.m.
The offices are across from the
UF campus in the old Florida Book
Store Building. Present tomorrow
will be Bernie Sindom, executive
secretary of the National Federa Federation
tion Federation of Young Republicans from
Washington; David Wells, state
chairman of the Florida Young Re Republicans,
publicans, Republicans, and Billy Mitchell, exe executive
cutive executive vice president of the
Gainesville Chamber of Com Commerc
merc Commerc
Fidelity Union
Life
THE COLLEGE PLAN
Exclusively For
THE COLLEGE MAN

... Guaranteed By A
BILLION Dollar Co.
... Payments deferred
'til earnings increase
Campus Representatives
Mel Ward Geo. Corl
Dan Sapp Bob Si frit
376-1208

HIS SPIRITS HIGH

with blood pressure, pulse and
respiration rate perfectly normal.
Dr. J. Willis Hurst, a heart
specialist from Atlanta, Ga. who
has treated Johnson for years,
re-emphasized that the President
had suffered no cardiac symptoms
since his heart attack 10 years
ago. As far as surgical risk

Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship
OF GAINESVILLE
OCTOBER 10TH DISCUSSION LEADER:
Dr. Roy E. Lambert, Professor of Humanities
"The Religious Challenge And The Catholic Response"
EVERYONE INVITED SUNDAY > 11AM 11AM-324
-324 11AM-324 FLORIDA UNION"

I j|t SitvetotuuM I
Traditional Apparel
I For Men And Women 1
I 225 W. University Ave. I
I N|/ou haven't really seen a selection of trim, I
1 tapered, natural-styled slacks until you've seen I
I ours.. .Hundreds to choose from. Dozens of fab- I
I r cs colors. All sizes. Hopsacks, Worsteds,
I Poplins, Flannels and all the restfrom $9.95. I
I P eQ Hy worth coming downtown for... I
1 alterations free I
2 P pee Parking at Rear of Store I
I USE YOUR STUDENT CHARGE I

was concerned, he said it was no I
worse for Johnson than for a pat- I
ient* of the same age who had I
never had heart trouble. 1
In answer to a question, Dr. I
Hallenbeck said there had not been I
the slightest Indication of any ma- I
lignancy. Cancer, he said, occurs I
only rarely in this type of case. I



Mensa Members
Elect New Officers

The UF chapter of Mensa has
held its first meeting at the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union Wednesday night and
selected a slate of officers to serve
until the group holds its first
elections in February.

THE
IQ
KIDS

treasurer.
Mensa is a new group on campus
and has strict requirements of its
members.
Requirements for membership
are that you be associated with the
UF and be a member of the inter international

fuiends, Romans,
countymen...
Gato Ai>s Sell!

Night
I -A- A|%-1
Fiuexv AH F j*
.'OLD-FASHIONED Hu* PuppiM,
FISH NIGHT Colo Slow 97 s
SPM-9-FM
Fmh Ctdor Ky R A
LARRYS
Restaurant
1225 W. Univ. Ave. 372-6666
*

pianAlGWeekendForAToWPrice|
IFLIGHTS DAILY. FROM W.P.B. AND MIAMI I
1 Mfe^K MONTEGO BAY ROUND TRIP $64.00 I
| NASSAU ROUND TRIP $27.00

President of
the group is Ed Edwin
win Edwin Stuart, vice
president is Carl
B. Hayes. Sec Secretary
retary Secretary will be
Michael T. Sipe
and William
Swisher was
selected as

national international group which requires that
your IQ be in the upper two percent
of the population.
Selection for membership in
Mensa is made by the American
Mensa Selection Agency. This
agency offers I.Q. testing to anyone
curious about their own 1.Q.,
whether or not the person is in interested
terested interested in membership.
The I.Q. test is mailed to anyone
who applies for it and is taken under
self supervision and returned to
Mensa for analysis.
Those who score sufficiently
high on this test will be invited to
undergo further supervised testing
if they are interested in member membership.
ship. membership.
A nominal fee of $3.00 is asked
of applicants to cover cost of
processing.

ts I L jtoPR 1
DRILL TIME: Cadets go through their paces

ROTC Changes r Significant
Air Forces Boaz Says

By JOHN WINN
Alligator Staff Writer
Theres no doubt about it
this is the most significant change
in the ROTC program in 46 years,
said Col. William N. Boaz, UFs
professor of Air Force aerospace
studies.
Boaz was speaking of last years
ROTC Vitalization Act, an updating
of the nations ROTC program
which is getting into full swing at
UF this fall.
Three provisions of the Act
affect UF students.
Junior college transfers without
basic ROTC training may enroll
in advanced ROTC classes after
attending a six-week summer

DONT Let us n 24-hour
Protection from Odors*
SmY* SMEAR it on DEODORANT | M
f Used In All
jjrfjbO Laundered Wearing Apparel
111 16/11 Body Odor
II \JT 11 Ilf AMM Mildew Resistant
w Hi neuhbot cleaners
XJ O 315 NW 13th St.
C.I. CLEANERS 1728 W. Univ. Ave. l

training camp. Formerly, they
were ineligible for advanced ROTC
until completing the basic pro program.
gram. program.
Advanced ROTC students will
receive their first pay raise since
1916. It boosts their pay sl3 per
month to S4O, which is tax free.
Some advanced ROTC cadets will
get scholarships from the national
government paying for tuition, lab
fees and textbooks, and providing
a SSO per month subsistence allow allowance.
ance. allowance.
The junior college transfer
program opens the door to a com commission
mission commission for the student without
basic ROTC, Boaz said. And
even more appealing to the student

Fridav, Oct. 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator.

is the fact that it will put approxi approximately
mately approximately SI,OOO in his pocket for
taking one course for two years."
Competition for the scholarships
is keen, said Boaz. Only one-fourth
of those applying are accepted.
The ROTC Vitalizatlon Act was
voted by Congress in the 1964
session, too late for any UF action
last year. But approval of the UF
Senate last February, and con confirmed
firmed confirmed by President J. Wayne
Reitz, opened the way for new pro programs
grams programs this fall.
Boaz pointed out that the
Vitalizatlon Act was necessary to
provide for the nations ever in increasing
creasing increasing college population, much
of which is being accommodated by
junior colleges whose graduates
heretofore were not eligible.
UF Prof Seeks
Improved Paper
A UF professor may be instru instrumental
mental instrumental in revolutionizing Florida's
thriving paper Industry.
Dr. G. B. Killinger of the Ag Agronomy
ronomy Agronomy Department has been
experimenting recently wlthkenaf,
a plant native to India and Africa
which is used for making cloth and
could perhaps be used for making
paper and feeding livestock.
Last year Killinger planted an
experimental acre of kenaf at the
Beef Research Unit in Gainesville.
"Several paper-pulp companies
in the Southeast have taken samples
of kenaf from the Gainesville plant plantings
ings plantings and report favorably on its
qualities as a substitute for wood
pulp in their plants," Killinger
said.
"An average yield of ten tons
per acre would likely make this
crop attractive to the paper manu manufacturing
facturing manufacturing industry," continued
Killinger.
"Kenaf is not a new crop to
Florida, but is new to the paper paperpulp
pulp paperpulp industry, he said. Kenaf was
previously grown in tsie Everglades
where its bark was stripped and
used to manufacture a type of cloth.
Killinger explained that there is
a long way to go and a lot of ob obstacles
stacles obstacles to be overcome before this
plant could be used efficiently on
a large scale.
"There are many advantages in
kenaf but it is still too expensive
to replace the pine in paper mak making,
ing, making, he said.

Page 3



Page 4

l, The Florida Alligator. Friday. Oct. 8. 1965

Charlatan Editor Killeen
In Tallahassee Trouble

TALLAHASSEE -- Charlatan
Editor Bill Killeen, arrested Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday in Tallahassee for selling with without
out without a permit, now faces charges
for publishing and selling ob obscenity.
scenity. obscenity.
The 24-year-old Killeen posted
$l5O on the selling without a permit
charge and is scheduled to appear
in Tallahassee Municipal Court
Oct. 11. v
Lt. George Daws of the Talla Tallahassee
hassee Tallahassee Police Department said the
city has a warrant out for Killeens
arrest on the obscenity charge, a
misdemeanor.
Daws told The Alligator that City
Attorney Roy Rhodes decided the
latest issue of The Charlatan was
obscene and that the states at attorney
torney attorney may file a similar charge.
Killeen, in a phone call from
Tallahassee, said: A policeman
told me in private that they were
out to get me because of pressure
being put on the department by The
Tallahassee Democrat, the Talla Tallahassee
hassee Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce and
the Catholic Womens Club.

..-rts*-' - pf WiM 1 ' ~ ' V > igP * y'y' #%
BURNS PICKETED: by members of the Freedom Party

Skeptical
Continued from page I
Prof. Manning J. Dauer, polit political
ical political science department head, said
Burns explanation still leaves un unsettled
settled unsettled the problem of how author authority
ity authority is to be delegated to the Board
of Regents.
It would be better if he would
give some concrete plans to al alleviate
leviate alleviate the situation, said Dauer.
Dauer said that seven states are
now getting general appropriations
for education form the legislatures
and allowing the various con controling
troling controling boards and institutions to
set their own salary policies.
Dauer said that the data given
by Burns showing that current
education salaries are above the
national average was misleading.
* Some of his data was compar comparing
ing comparing 10 month salaries here with
nine month salaries elsewhere.
Therefore he added one months
salary to ours when comparing
other nine month salaries, he
said.
his difference puts us below
the average/* said Dauer.
Stu Parsons, president of Flor Florida
ida Florida Blue Key, said The talk was
t b had expected. It was
r justification for what has
'^"happening.

W
: V
: m % 1
KILLEEN
Democrat Editor Malcolm B.
Johnson denied his paper has been
pressuring anybody, although one
mv best wtmpn rormrtprs COW the

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jl F 1212 N. Main St. ||
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magazine, was indignant and took
action on her own.
As for the Catholic Womens
Club, Johnson chuckled I wont
say.
Killeen has had several run-ins
in the past with the Catholic group.
Daws also denied any pressure
on the police department, but he
added: I could not say there s
not been interest in the magazi e,
especially by the Security Pol e
at Florida State University.
Johnson said he disapproved of
the magazine and what bothers
me most is that respectable firms
advertise in it.
Killeen said The American Civil
Liberties Union may enter the
case.
I talked with the ACLU this
afternoon (Thursday), Killeen
said, and they told me theyll take
the case and will foot all the bills.
Killeen also said he contacted
Playboy Magazine and that the edi editors
tors editors requested a copy of the last
Charlatan before deciding whether
to enter the case.

emp u s
o][lT Ijraj


WESLEY FOUNDATION: Sun Sunday,
day, Sunday, 6:30 p.m. Discussion led by
Rev. Thaxton Springfield.
DELTA PHI EPSILON OPEN
HOUSE: today, 8:30 p.m., Open
house in honor of new pledges.
UF FACULTY CLUB: Saturday
night, Square dance featuring west western
ern western and ballroom dancing. Host:
Dr. Ernest Bartley, No admission
charge or reservation.
EUROPEAN CLUB: Today, 8:30
p.m., Highland Court Manor, 1001
NE 28th Ave. Everyone welcome.
4>
USED BOOK SALE: today, 9
a,m. 8:30 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m. Building next to City
Hall on NE Ist St.
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST
FELLOWSHIP SPEECH: Sunday,
11 a.m., Florida Union, Room 324.
Speaker: Dr. Roy E. Lambert.
LIBERAL FORUM: Sunday, 7:30
p.m., Florida Union, Johnson
Lounge. Speaker: Dr. William
Carter, Assistant Professor of
Anthropology.
GAMMA DELTA SQUARE
DANCE: today, 8 p.m., First Lu Lutheran
theran Lutheran Church.
SUCCOUTH SERVICES: today,
7:30 p.m., Hillel Building. There
will also be a Sunday Brunch, 1-
12:30 noon.
INTERNATIONAL HOST COM COMMITTEE
MITTEE COMMITTEE MEETING: Saturday,
10 a.m., Florida Union, Room 215.
Open to all interested persons.

RECORD
I OPEN EVERY NITE TILL 9PM| 1119 W. UNIV.
I EXCEPT (Next to Donigans)
FOLKSONCj NEW!
65ss=a Elektra
H Folk Sampler
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WE STOCK THE ENTIRE NONESUCH CATALOG
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FOOTBALL SENDOFF- tori
5:45 p.m. in front of Womens Gym
FORESTRY SEMINAR: today
3:40 p.m., McCarty Hall, Roo m g
Speaker: Dr. Edward Hacskavlo
from the Forest Physiology L i
oratory, Beltsville, Md.
CYCLO-MASSAGE*
EQUIPMENT OF
GAI NESVILLE
it Increases circulation
where applied
fa Helps relieve everyday
tension, fatigue
fa Helps relieve minor pain,
arthritis, rheumatism
when they occur
restful,
drugless sleep
"It Isn't Niagara If It
Isn't Cyclo-Massage"
"Just Put It Where It
Hurts."
Grand Opening
SUN. OCT. 10
2-5 P. M.
Office & Display Room
2109 N.W. 13th St.
Opposite J. M. Fields
Ph. 378-1786



Health Center A Community Service

Staff Writer Jeraldine Brown took
a tour through the J. Hillis Miller Health Center
to see how such a large hospital operates
Here's what she found.

The UFs J. Hillis Miller Health
Center is a unique complex of in institutions.
stitutions. institutions. It is designed to develop
human health and well-being on
several fronts, while it trains fu future
ture future leaders in the health
professions.
The UF and its health center
practice the concept that health
care involves the health team:
the doctor, persons in related
health professions, the community,
the researcher, the educator, the
counselor, the church.
The center includes facilities for
the colleges of medicine, nursing,
pharmacy, health related profes professions
sions professions (physical therapy, occupa occupational
tional occupational therapy, speech and hearing
therapy, medical technology, re rehabilitation
habilitation rehabilitation counseling, clinical
psychology, health and hospital
administration).
These health oriented disci disciplines
plines disciplines exchange information and
ideas within the center.
Many of the unique facilities first
incorporated in the design and con construction
struction construction of the physical plant are
now being copied in similar institu institutions
tions institutions all over the world.
The facilities are designed to
function as one integrated unit to

United Chupch of Cjainesville
(United Church of Christ: CongregationalE. & R.)
fey extends to students and faculty
an invitation to .. ..
ln Christianity
Sunday 10:00a.m. Worship
and Sunday School
Florida Union (temporary meeting place)
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Creators o\er
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serve best the needs of the
students.
Each of the first six floors con connects
nects connects with the Medical Sciences
building, and clinical functions of
the teaching hospital are related
floor by floor with functions in the
basic sciences.
For long-range patient care, the
modern concept of treating the
ambulant patient and spouse or
close relatives is in an effectively
reproduced home environment.
Treatments take place in a con convertible
vertible convertible living-sleeping, double doubleroom
room doubleroom accomodation.
In this unique family-help
facility, the student has direct
contact with patients whose treat treatment
ment treatment needs are not fully dependent
on a staffed medical ward.
Another unique unit of the hos hospital
pital hospital contributes to medical
research in the specialized treat treatment
ment treatment of difficult problems.
A 10-bed clinical research
center is housed on the sixth floor
and includes special laboratory and
dietary facilities that permit con controlled
trolled controlled treatment conditions.
In the College of Nursing,
students learn to work with patients
and families in the hospital and with

- **'**" iBBjgBraBEHHBSBBi x
Wjj JR*
THE HEALTH CENTER From on aerial view

students in other health pro professions
fessions professions as a team member.
Students in the College of Health
Related Professions learn the
principles and techniques of their
various specialties in the same
environment with students in medi medicine,
cine, medicine, nursing, and pharmacy.
This early association with other
professional students gives them a
unique opportunity to learn how
their individual responsibilities

r Tiny Room 9 Produces Shows

On the second floor of Rolfs
Hall, from a tiny room comes
radio programs that are produced
for 40 Florida radio' stations
weekly.
The programs are called Agri Agrifeatures.
features. Agrifeatures. Six of them, each five
minutes in length, are recorded and
copied onto 40 reels of tape, as are
15 one-minute announcements used
on radio stations from Tallahassee
to Key West.
Responsible for this operation is
R. C. Bob Smith, assistant com communications
munications communications specialist for the
Florida Agriculture Extension
Service, whose headquarters is
also in Rolfs Hall.
Our department, headed by Dr.
Harvey Sharpe, handles the radio
informational program of the Ex Extension
tension Extension Service at the state level,
says Smith. In addition, there are
local programs conducted by many
of the 'home demonstration agents
in each Florida county.
Five of the weekly programs

I Like to have I
I your nose tickled? I
| Planning to live in |
I anyway?!
I The first three parties to sign up for an apartment
I BEFORE 2 P.M. SATURDAY (tomorrow) will win I
I for themselves A FREE BOTTLE OF FRANCE'S I
1 FAVORITE BEVERAGE. (Besides, by early next I
I month you'll be living in GAINESVILLE'S BEST I
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can complement each other
throughout their careers.
Faculty members are not only
physicians, but also researchers.
Because of their 3-ply roles, the
teacher-physician-researcher can
often pass on first hand informa information
tion information to students.
While experimenting with rab rabbits,
bits, rabbits, Dr. Herbert E. Kaufman dis discovered
covered discovered a drug called IDU which

feature Smith, who Conducts inter interviews
views interviews with UF specialists in areas
connected with agriculture. Smith
says his work with the program
keeps him busy.
I have to arrange the inter interviews,
views, interviews, decide the subject matter
to be covered, contact the special specialist
ist specialist on that particular subject, and
conduct the interview, which we
record, he says.
I also write 10 one-minute an announcement
nouncement announcement which we send out in
script form to 125 radio stations,
and write and record 15 other one oneminute
minute oneminute 'spots' which are sent to
stations in addition to the full fulllength
length fulllength programs, he says.
In his spare time, Smith con conducts
ducts conducts training sessions for the
county agricultural agents, show showing
ing showing them how to use broadcasting
for extension Service purposes,
and any other assignments that
happen to come up.
All of this requires about a
six-day week on Smiths part,

Friday, Oct. 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

can cure a blinding virus-caused
corneal ulcer. Some students from
Dr. Kaufman's classes were
assisting him during the discovery.
As a result, a first-hand detailed
explanation was given to Kaufmans
students.
The future holds in store for the
health center a College of Dentist Dentistry,
ry, Dentistry, Veteran's Administration hos hospital,
pital, hospital, and a human development
center.

if the recording equipment
doesnt break down.
About the program Smith says,
Although our subject in agricul agriculture,
ture, agriculture, our approach is universal --
we try to speak FOR the agricul agriculturist
turist agriculturist rather than TO him.
If we talk about roses, for ex example,
ample, example, we aim not only to the
farmer and his wife, but to the
retiree, to the cattle rancher's
wife, and to the suburbanite who
wants his lawn to look nice.
Or, says Smith, if our sub subject
ject subject is the extermination of
roaches, a roach doesnt care
whether he lives on a farm or in
the city, and our comments can
apply to either one.
Although Smith has worked with
the Agri-features program for
the past four years, the4ntervlew
format has been used for only the
last year. In that time, Smith es estimates
timates estimates hes conducted over 250
interviews, ranging in subject
from outdoor recreation to pet
care to Operation Firefly.
Operation Firefly was a pro program
gram program conducted by the National
Aeronautics and Space Adminis Administration,
tration, Administration, according to Smith, in
which NASA needed a chemical
substance which can be found only
in the lantern end of a firefly.
Smith interviewed an expert about
the program.
The five-minute programs and
one-minute announcements are
copied onto the forty various tapes
using equipment which reaches
literally from the floor totheceil totheceillng
lng totheceillng of the studios in Rolfs Hall.

ROY SIEG
FLYING SERVICE
Air Taxi Sarvica
Flight Instruction
Call Us Day Or Night
Air Taxi To All
Football Games
STENGEL FIELD
372-2911

Page 5



, The Florida Alligator. Friday, Oct. 8, 1965

Page 6

Burns
e listened with keen interest
to the remarks of Haydon Bums
during his brief visit to campus
yesterday.
Frankly, Bums was as cold as
an iceberg. He was deliberate,
eloquent, and reserved. To sum
up the address he said relatively
nothing. Exactly what we expected.
Perhaps the only controversial
question raised was the possibility
of the disaccreditation of the
entire state university system.
And we note with concern this
particular issue.
This issue stems from the ability
of the State Budget Commission
to control the operating funds of
the university system.
To quote the Miami Herald in
a recent editorial, The accepted
administrative practice is to give
an institution a budget and let it
operate. Florida law permits no
such thing."
Secondly, to quote the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Sun, Governor Bums ap appointed
pointed appointed University Chancellor Cul Culpepper.
pepper. Culpepper. Governor Bums has found
a powerful tool in budget controls.*
It is plain to see that Governor
Burris has the state university sys system
tem system in the palm of his hand.
We were extremely surprised to
hear him say, At no time has
there been any political meddling
in Florida*s state universities. If
there has been I haven*t been a
party to it.**
Burns may want us to believe
that he hasn*t interfered but we
have reason to doubt his contention.
If Haydon Bums is the man he
says he is, a serious attempt
to solve the growing decay of the
state* s university system will
begin.
more Burns
.A" er Haydon Bums announced
intentions of coming to the UF
yesterday, some student leaders
were invited to sit as a panel
on the Medical Center stage to
question the governor at the end
of his remarks.
The students showed up all right.
But just before Bums entered all
the students but SG President
Bruce Culpepper and Blue Key
President Stu Parsons were booted
off to make room for some Board
of Regents and State Budget Com Commission
mission Commission members. The rest of
the students present didn*t get a
chance to question the governor.
Frankly, we*d rather have seen
the students on the podium with
a chance to direct their thoughts
toward Bums than the politicos,
who did little more than sit there
and nod their heads in agreement.

GENTLEMEN, I've. COME To ./W0 SO GENTLEMEN,
GAINESVILLE. TOT*y AND j cJOU tyIJH THIS
MAKE m POSITION CLEAR TwOUkHT DONT TAKE TAKEIN
IN TAKEIN THIS MATTER. I feel IT THOUGHT... d
|$ Os UTMOST IMPORTANCE ANS 3 WOODEN NKKL6S.
That there is A constant THANK. v
line of Bull ... er... i mean
COMMON I CATION BETWEEN
THIS CAMPOS AHO M9...ER-.
im ' r y

thinking out loud
By Jim Moorhead
Broadway musical comedy for local theater lovers?
The answer is yes if you dont mind a leisurely, 45-minute,
four-laned drive to Ocala.
The show under discussion is Rodgers' & Harts Babes In Arms,"
and its the current vehicle for a gifted UF post-graduate named
Marshall Thomas, the talk of the town in our neighboring city to the
south. Marshall, who got his graduate degree in music at the UF this
past summer, has been commuting-in-reverse the past several weeks
to rehearse for the leading mans role in the Marion Players latest
little theater production.
A native Miamian, 26-year-old Marshall has been staying in Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville since he completed a summer acting job with the Cross And
Sword" Florida centennial play in St. Augustine. Hes right on the
verge of kicking around" for a year or so before settling down to
some real work (probably music education), and decided to accept
the Ocala offer to get an extra show under my belt." Hes getting what
he bargained for: At least half the shows tunes feature his strong,
clear baritone voice.
Its Marshalls first Broadway-type show, but hes been warbling for
folks since high school days as a church choir member; in fact, he
worked his way through college singing in night clubs and at private
parties with dance bands. As he puts it, My only visible means of
support has been singing."
Commuting 40 miles nightly to sing for a small little theater group
is not exactly a run-of-the-mill activity. I asked Marshall for his
impressions of the experience thus far. I like it very much, said
he. Its a different kind of experience working with kids so young
(eight years up) . It has been and is going to be fun . and I think
thats the most important thing.
Its typical little theater. I like the show and I like whats being
done with it. The music? What can you say? The music is great. Its
a funny show ... so you can see its got to be good."
Ironically, Marshalls favorite love ballad, My Funny Valentine,"
is in the show and he doesnt get to sing a single bar. Its sung to
the leading man, Valentine by name, and I cant
sing to myself. But its a nice song whoever
Vocalizing is serious business with Marshall,
but he laughed embarrassedly when I asked him
to explain his urge to perform. Then, thoughtfully
and without any dramatics, he said this:
I have to sing. Anyone who belongs in music
is compelled to do it. I dont think you have any
i a dcLi ai i choice. I never sat down and said, Well, I think
MARSHALL Ill go into music, or *1 think Ill sing. It was
just there. Call it creative outlet. A person has to do what he is best
at. I think this is true of any occupation, but its especially true of
the arts.
Marshall expects to be teaching in a year or so, but wants to lay oft
from both sides of the teachers desk until then. I really think Ill be
a better teacher if I stay away from it for a year. A trip to California
is on his agenda after a jaunt to Hialeah to visit his parents. Im not
tied down, not married, and Ive got some money saved up. It will be
a helluva lot of fun. I know Im going to run out of money. When I do,
Ill do some singing or some real work. Ill be an itinerant
musician.
But dont make me sound like a beatnik. Ill take a bath and shave
and wear clean clothes every day.
Right now, Marshalls main preoccupation is with Babes In Arms.
Tonight is opening night and it runs through next Friday with only
Sunday night off. Hes hopeful many Gainesville and UF faces will show
up in the audiences, and says: I think this would appeal to anybody
who likes Broadway musical comedy . .and anybody around here who
does like it certainly hasnt had a chance to see it. The music is great
. . and a little theater production is always full of surprises."
Those who choose to make the Ocala excursion will discover they
can purchase tickets for only $1.75 each ($1 for UF students showing
their IDs). Curtain time is 8:15, and the theater is three miles east
of Ocala on the Silver Springs road.
Its for sure youll see at leastone other Gainesville face -- looking
right at you from center stage.

JOHN JENKINS WRITES I
Note:
This is the first in a series of columns by j Jenkins, a senior in Business Administration, jfl
is married, a native of Tampa, and a member of I
Sigma Nu social fraternity.
******* Edit(
Alan Levin in his letter of September*
JUHcontends that . . a great many
are normally apathetic about campus politics hj
such preconceived notions of Freedom Party a
turn their apathy to outright hostility." I
Having laid the groundwork for his premise tl
anyone who doesnt love the Freedom Party
prejudiced, Mr. Levin then proceeds to examine I
reasons for OUR hostility. These reasons notio
Mr. Levin calls them that we enlightened ell
to are that Freedom Party is a group of beatnM
that FP is too idealistic, and Freedom Party M
group of leftist, pinko, commie dupes.
My sardonic sense of humor tells me to agree
Mr. Levins views of my views of the Freed
Party and be done with it. My common sense, hcl
ever, tells me to examine what he says more clos
Is the Freedom Party a group of beatniks?
beatnik is a disheveled, disorganized looking indil
dual closely resembling the south end of a mop go!
north, then Freedom Party has far more than!
share of beatniks. Oh, Ill grant you a normal-look!
fellow now and then but they do seem in the minor!
at an FP meeting. If a beatnik is a follower of I
bohemian way of life, then Freedom Party sco!
again. Your very own knight in shinig armor,
professor Ed Richer, and your present titular hel
Alan Levin, both admit to Greenwich Village way!
Is the Freedom Party too idealistic? I dont knl
And neither does Mr. Levin. And NEITHER has
Levin heard this notion expressed to any great ext!
Instead, Mr. Levin has assumed a theoretical stai
which by implication makes all Freedom Party!
wonderfully indealistic and the rest of us stod!
realistic. Mr. Levin has given me a thesis I do I
want so that he can develop an antithesis of his d
choosing. Its an old device, Mr. Levin, but it J
not work. I might add that Mr. Levins stated concl
of idealism is to . .bring to an end the Adminl
trations parental guidance* of our academic freed!
and our private morality with ...a free choica
fields in intellectual and physical pursuits. It wo
appears that ex-professor Richers free love doctr
has found an ardent follower.
Is the Freedom Party a group of leftist, pin
commie dupes? You tell me, Mr. Levin. A dupe i
person easily deceived or cheated. Freedom Pa
and/or some of its followers have consistently ad
cated getting out of Viet Nam, urged unilate
disarmament, supported the elimination of aIIRO
(not just the compulsory feature), criticized our en
into Dominican Republican affairs, and hel
sponsor Steve Wiseman, Coordinator of Stud
Freedom Movement at the University of Califor
at Berkley, who said, We dont care if the peo
associated with us are Communist or not so long
they help us in our free speech movement. Som<
FP followers have also advocated release of pers
jailed in civil disobedience, the faking of a consci
tious objector status to avoid ROTC, and the reject
of fall-out shelters. I am still looking, Mr. Levin,
ONE protest against the dehumanizing effect
Communism, for ONE cry of outrage over Russ
brutality in the Hungarian revolt, for ONE express
of censure when Castro revealed himself to b
Marxist- Leninist. I am still looking, Mr. Levin,
one word of support for ANY United States pol
vis-a-vis Communism.
I have had just about enough of the Freedom Pal
the Student Peace Union, the campus radical with
substance. I am tired of the iconoclast who te
down and never builds. I am fed up with Presic
Reitz is a fink, FREE University, fraternities
anti-academic, students should be activists (presi
ably in everything but studies), down with the
ministration, only Freedom Party understai
American doesnt understand, Communism, the (
lomatic corps stinks, sexual freedom, ad
finitum, ad nauseam. I am equally weary of
my paper, The Alligator, cluttered with letters fJ
a miniscule minority which views itself throug
magnifying glass and hopes that fellow students
do the same.
And lastly, Mr. Levin, I am fed up with you,
Hoke Griffins, the Ed Richers, the Bonnie Gr
spans, the Martin Kahans, the Stephen Rozmans,
Joel Starkeys, the Jim Fines, the Judy Benningi
the Don Federrpans, the Jim Daceys, and all the
of the self-gratifying individuals who view t
college contemporaries (16,000 of us) as igno
clods, themselves as the omniscients, and ANY<
in authority as a Hitler.
Oh yes, Mr. Levin, there is one more *l
conceived notion we have about the Freedom P a
We believe you are a bunch of phonies piayi
dangerous game with dangerous methods and
adequate people. If you should get what you ask
you would faint at the prospect of shouldering i
ponsibility for vour actions.



| BRUCE CULPEPPER
j this week week-OURING
-OURING week-OURING the campaign last week there were two issues dis discussed
cussed discussed which have a great deal of merit. Though we had not
: oeen actively involved in these two areas before, we are now
: : : moving as rapidly as possible.
Then Mens and Womens Interhall Councils are two vital but
;X isolated groups. They could do more for this university than any
|:j: ther sin gle organization because of their intimate contact with
dormit ory life. For years Student Government has not worked
closely with these two groups, especially the womens interhall.
:j:j I think this is a tragedy. Im sorry that I didnt realize this
£ sooner. Ill do all that I can to correct that in the next few months.
I am asking the president of the two interhall councils to become
members of my cabinet. They will advise us, inform us, and work
jx with us in solving and recognizing dorm problems. Also, they can
x become active in some of the Student Government projects.
X; THE SECOND issue was ROTC. Chances are slim for a full
:* scale abolition of ROTC by the Senate. This is because of the
j:j: current Viet Nam crisis and the general attitude of many faculty
;% members. Chris Tompkins and I are working on a alternative
* which might receive additional support, if the abolition is not
* accepted.
v.' This alternative is to substitute certain classes of physical
education in place of ROTC for those who object to the military
x programs. Under this plan a student could have his choice. Were
just at the grassroots of this proposal so I would appreciate ahy
£ comments on the part of the student body as to its advisability
x or acceptance.

Due to the need for a sounding board in which students and members
of the faculty may present lengthy discussions of issues, the editors
of The Alligator wish to introduce a new format for the editorial page.
Speaking out, the title of the new feature, will be an opportunity for
those who wish to present ideas on any subject. Those who wish to
have an article published under this new feature may do so by sending
it to The Editor, c/o The Florida Alligator.
Editor

LETTERS
angry
Editor:
It is beyond me how the manage management
ment management of the Cl can be so cold
hearted about the tragedy that oc occurred
curred occurred in their establishment. This
murder is everyones business,
especially the students here at
U of F. The Cl has always had a
reputation to live up to and it is
following true to form in this
matter.
An Angry Freshman
commends
Editor:
I commend your title to Mr.
Meyers letter about our foreign
policy. He seems to be giving us
the TRUTH. My first thought was
to wonder if a democracy and a
POPULAR Nazi state are neces necessarily
sarily necessarily incompatable. I would tend
to doubt it.
I ALSO find it interesting that a
nation which might be a Nazi state
Is so concerned about its under underprivileged,
privileged, underprivileged, its minority races, and
giving the right to vote to all who
bother to register.
With regard to the obvious
international duplicity evident
in our supplying arms to conflicting
sides of a dispute, I wonder if any
nation exists that d6es not have a
current or potential dispute with
another. Even Monaco has conflicts
of a serious nature with France.
I Mr. Meyer would have us
give military aid to no country.
I, for one, would not accept this
position.
FINALLY I wonder if what Mr.
Meyer says about our information
on Viet Nam is true, how is he able
to evaluate the report of the May 2
Committee and find it to be the
facts not conjecture and pre prejudice.
judice. prejudice. Obviously he has a
mystical source of TRUTH. If it
isnt the case, I would suggest that
he look at Eric Hoffers book the
True Believer and think a bit be before
fore before giving the world his next
revelation.
Jess Elliott, 7ED

NOTE

sjsT*
| bone I
I A fascinating story thisplot ingredients include OF OONTSSmon
special blendings of polyester fibers and cotton,
I heat curing and similar scientific novelties. The Some say it is the best looking sport coat in the B
I point of the story, however, is simple. Press with- Proprietors possession. Some say it is the best I
I out ironing. Wash after wash. Period. looking herringbone. Either way, the gentleman
T ~ T can only be a winner if he makes it his own. This S
S J|y gw gw i very day, if he so desires.
I | XUjgjf 1
l e l3 W. UNIVERSITY AV Jstas n 9rog I

The
Florida Alligator
Steve Vaughn Benny Cason
Editor Managing Editor

by Donald H. May
WASHINGTON (UPI) Russia now has its own version of the
Great Society.
For 10 days the high councils of the Kremlin have been promul promulgating
gating promulgating a new economic program. If carried out it would appear to
make changes in the fabric of Soviet life as sweeping in their own
way as the new deal.
It speaks of price, profit, bonus and credit. The words emerge
like the voices of displaced persons and have led to some Western
speculation that Russia has creeping capitalism.
But a closer look shows that there is little of capitalism in this
program, put forth just one year after the new leaders took over
from Premier Nikita S. Khruschev. The changes, as present Premier
Alexei N. Kosygin, himself says, are designed tostrenghten socialism
and speed up our progress toward communism.
Kosygin outlined the program in a Kremlin speech Sept. 27
16,000 words of Soviet bureaucratic prose without one joke.
It abolishes Khruschevs network of regional planning councils
and substitutes 28 central planning bodies, each to govern a branch
of industry on a national basis.
Kosygin declared that the role of party leadership in management
will increase.
The deepest changes may be found in the field of incentives for
industry. Soviet industrial enterprises, Kosygin said, will be
judged by the central planners on the basis of efficiency andtsales,
rather than on overfulfillment of production plans, sometimes
in items consumers dont want.
As an incentive to efficiency, enterprises will be allowed to
keep more of their profits to reinvest in better equipment and also
to pass on as incentive bonuses to workers.
But profit in the' Soviet dictionary is a statistical concept of
value produced above cost. There is nothing in Kosygins plan of
the concept of private investment for private gain. Wages and prices
will, for the present, remain fixed.

Friday, Oct. 8, 1965. The Florida Alligator,

STYLE TIPS for ..
OFF THE CUFF
And that is where your
shirt sleeve should be!
At least one-quarter inch
of your shirt sleeve
should show below the
coat sleeve when you*are
standing with your arms
dropped to your side.
This elegant touch of
shirt showing puts you
in style.
jllr / Tnifh's
Imcn i shop
AT A NFW LOCATION
919 W. University Aye,

Page 7



Page 8

t, The Florida Alligator. Friday, Oct. 8, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for rent
ONE BEDROOM Furnished lake
cottage. Lake Winnott, 23 miles
from Gainesville. Lake privileges
$35 monthly. Call Mr. Kaplan,
372-0481. (B-l-ts-c).
PETER PAN MOTEL Only 20
minutes from Gainesville on U. S.
41 in Williston. Roomy and modern.
Spring Air Beds. Free TV, Air
conditioned. Coffee in rooms. Re Reserve
serve Reserve rooms now for University
events. Also special rates for stu students
dents students by week or month. Phone
JA 8-3941. (B-19-7t-c).
MODERN STUDIO-TYPE apart apartment,
ment, apartment, 1-2 people. Furnished. 212
SE 7 St. During day at 372-3617
at dinner time 378-3289. (A-23-
3t-c).
2 BEDROOM, furnished apt., near
campus in SW section. Just com completed.
pleted. completed. Fully equipped kitchen plus
air-condition. Phone 378-3636.
(B-24-ts-c).
1964 NEW MOON house trailer.
For sale or lease. 2 bedroom,
55x10. Carpeted, air conditioned,
fenced yard. Pool. Fuel supply.
Floor length drapes. Call 372-
7659. (B-25-3t-c).
for sale
1963 MARLETTE Mobile Home
10x55, 3 bedroom, air-condition air-conditioning,
ing, air-conditioning, washer, utility house, fenced
yard. Call 6-8896 after 5:30 p.m.
Pinehurst Park. (A-20-10t-c).
19C5 HONDA, 305 Super Hawk. 4
months old, never raced or in
accident. With Fiberglass saddle
bags & luggage rack. Has 8 months
tc go on collision insurance. Call
6-4 <95 and leave number. Will call
back. (A-22-4t-c),
GIBSON VANGUARD AMPLIFIER,
dual channel, tremolo, reverb
echo, only 4 mos. old, great shape.
Call Sol. 378-4781. Must sell.
Lets deal.
1965 PIEDMONT Mobile Home.
2 bedroom, 1 bath, automatic
washer. Pay closing and pick up
payment of S6O monthly. At Pine Pinehurst
hurst Pinehurst "Park, Lot 3. Call 8-2472.
After 5:00. (A-22-st-c).

HI AT
1 *OO
3:00
SUN
AT
1:00
ONLY
1 F iSOc/
"What's New Pussycat?"
Sat. at 5:10, 7:10, 9:10
| Sun, at 3:10, 5:10, 7:10, 9:lo^*!^^^^"

for sale
CLEGG & METER TRANSCEIVER,
SBS. Heath CW Transmitter, $35.
Bow, arrows, etc., $lO. Call Leon
Morrison, 372-6093 after 5:30p.m.
(A-23-3t-p).
HOUSE TRAILER, 22, bath with
shower, stove and refrigerator.
Excellent condition. $750. Ideal for
1 or 2 students. See at 511 NW
14 Ave. (A-23-3t-c).
4 BURNER APARTMENT STOVE,
electric. 1-1/2 years old. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. $75. Phone 372-
1315. (A-23-3t-c).
STEREOPHONIC 4 TRACK TAPE
RECORDER, $175. or best offer.
Almost brand new. Call Bill at
8-4248. (A-23-3t-c).
1963 MUSTANG MOTORCYCLE.
Excellent transportation. Like new
$225. Call John 8-1933. 2121 NW
lOSt. (A-24-3t-c).
1964 VESPA-ALLSTATE, 4 gears,
1400 miles. Looks and drives like
a new machine. Cost $389. new.
Best offer over $250 takes it.
FR 8-4124 after 6:00. (A-24-2t-c).

S' OUrixlMii \
r presents \
Peter Peter
Seders OToole
Romu Schneider
Capucine
Paula Prentiss
and least but not last
Woody Alien
and guest star
Andress^
Released thru
UNITED ARTISTS
TECHNICOLOR* CULT O, '
FI6HTIM 1
/s
fob you/

for sale 1
3 AQUARIUMS. Call 372-4388
after 5:00. (A-24-2t-c).
1965 S-90 HONDA, one week old.
$375. Call 372-9464, Rm 1046 be between
tween between 7-8 p.m. (A-25-3t-c).
5x7 FOX SKIN RUG in green felt
backing. SSO. Phone 378-4127 after
1:30 p.m. (A-25-lt-p).
G. E. PORTABLE STEREO, record
player just over-hauled. Call
Wayne Rm 410 after 10:30 p.m.
376-9372. (A-22-4t-c).
lost & found
$25 REWARD OF RETURN of
Smokey," male, Sealpoint Sia Siamese.
mese. Siamese. Lost 9-2-65. No questions
asked. NW section. Call 372-8242.
(L-23-3t-c).

S/>lfffTnWinptarh Tonjiel
>hfat.i m *3 TOPHnS I
11 2400 Hawthorne flood Rt. 20 Phone FR 6-SOll l
I EXCLUSIVE FIRST AREA SHOWING I
ktOncea
LS Thief I
I ALAIN DELO nYnN-M ARB RET
I VAN HEFLIN JACK PALANCE I
IGIANTSPECTACLE OF THE AJi KIRK MORRIS I
I WORLD'S MIGHTIEST MEN RICHARD LLOYD I
I "A TUNNEL BACK PSOBIiH edmund owien I
I INTO THE HUMAN chuckconnors I
I RACE" **-* STELLA STEVENS I
1 ...

I services
b-
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios, 372-0300. (M (M---8-ts-c).
--8-ts-c). (M---8-ts-c).
1
EXPERIENCED TYPIST would like
to do typing in home. Especially
interested in thesis and disserta dissertation.
tion. dissertation. Call Mrs. B. E. Steptoe at
378-5879. (M-22-st-c).
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Charlie
and Mildred would like to say hello
and invite you to visit their brand
new, fully air-conditioned coin
laundry, E-Z Wash, featuring
Gainesvilles only 14 lb. washer
for 25?. 1126 W. Univ. Laundry
next to McCollums Drugs. (M (M---18-13t-c).
--18-13t-c). (M---18-13t-c).
NEED A BABYSITTER? 3 experi experienced
enced experienced sitters available at 6-0340.
Julie Bird. fM-25-lt-cl.

wanted
RIDE WANTED from New Orleans
to Gainesville tor Homecoming
weekend, Call Sid 2-7178 or
6-9217. (C-.24-2t-c).
CAR WANTED 1950-57 any make
or model in good condition. Call
6-1957 after 6 p.m. weekdays or
all day Sat. & Sun. (C-24-2t-nc).
2 MALE ROOMMATES to share
two bedroom apartment with
kitchen. Call 6-5212. Ext. 30. (C (C---24-2t-c).
--24-2t-c). (C---24-2t-c).
WOULD LIKE TO RENT a surf surfboard
board surfboard for the weekend. Call Mike
at 376-0278 before 10 a.m. Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday. (C-25-lt-c).
RIDERS FROM MIAMI to Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville for Homecoming. Leaving
noon, returning Sunday. Call Kate
at 8-2748. (C-?*-2t-p).



personal
ATTENTION STUDENTS: If you
purchased a Seminole last year
bring your receipt by Room 9 in
the Florida Union and claim your
book. All unclaimed books will go
on sale Oct. 15. (J16-10tnc)*

f working \
f on his )
SUNDAY'S
FUN DAY,
CHARLIE
BROU/N
THE NEW
PEANUTS
CARTOON BOOK!
by Charles M. Schulz
ONLY SM at your col,e 9
bookstore
Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc.

SHOWING
II Open Daily From 12:30
I I I Continuous Shows Daily
1 "^TSsSSSjpW I F rom 1 p.m. Features:
1 \w I 1:05 3:15 5:25 7:40 &
JohnVAiyne DeskMartw
Adults 50 ART (
~ ACRES ROCKING GALLERY
OF CHAIR FOR
FREE LOUNGE LOCAL
PARKING SEATS ARTISTS

( WINNER OF 3 ACADEMY MWK
Sff Z ORB A THE QREE K
BASH' n ""ANTHONY QUINNALAN BATES IRENE FPFAS
Wl ! Y# ZlTm.tub ONSET LILA KE9ROVA MMVPL
-TH W ,e A TORBATHE B" ADULTS SI.OO CHILD 35< jDf)L
Jr w c rtu '^ < T IZ^sSI

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

personal
TOM WOULD LIKE TO INFORM
Bill that the Loach doesnt have
wings and that the Loach is still
coming. (J-25-lt-c).
READY FOR THE NEW LOOK?
Tenas just returned from the
Jacksonville Trade Show with the
new short curly cut, fantasy eye eyedos,
dos, eyedos, Paris styled hair coloring
and make-up. For Appointment call
372-5549. 319 W. University Ave.
(J-21-ts-c).
help wanted
WAITER WANTED: Part-time
from 4-8 p.m. 5 day week. Apply
in person. Larrys Wonderhouse,
14 SW 1 St. (E-23-ts-c).
WOLFIES RESTAURANT FULL
OR PART-TIME WAITERS AND
WAITRESSES. DAY OR NIGHT.
SEE MR. DERKAS OR MR. SCIG SCIGLI£.
LI£. SCIGLI£. (E-22-st-c).
ARE YOU EASILY discouraged?
If the answer is no and you want
to gain experience in meeting the
public, and be trained in handling
people, call Mr. Baker at 8-2966
between 10 and 5. You must be
able to work 20 hours per week
including 2 evenings. A S4O per
week salary will be earned by
those qualified. (E-19-ts-c).
MALE HELP WANTED Various
jobs, hours arranged. Day or night.
Hourly wage. Apply Kings Food
Host, 1430 SW 13 St. 378-1656.
(E-25-3t-c).

real estate
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom, 2 bath
house. Central heat, built-in
kitchen, newly painted. Carport
and storage area. Small downpay downpayment.
ment. downpayment. 372-3826. (I-24-ts-c).
10 ACRE TRACT. 12 miles west
of city, part wooded and part
cleared. $350 per acre SIOO down
$45. per month. Call Wayne Mason
c/o Ernest Tew Realty Inc., 376-
6461. (I-25-6t-c).
FOR SALE: 2 CBS HOUSES.
1, 5 rooms; 1, 6 rooms. Good
condition. Low down payments. No
reasonable offer refused. 2-3118.
(I2sstc).
autos
1962 CORVETTE convertible,
transistorized ignition system,
tonneau cover, good tires, 327
engine, powerglide. Car is in ex exc
c exc llent condition throughout.
$2400. Call 378-2057.(G-24-3t-c).
1951 BLUE DODGE. SSO. Call
8-4165 for information. (G (G---24-2t-c).
--24-2t-c). (G---24-2t-c).
1960 CHEVROLET IMPALA hard hardtop,
top, hardtop, white, radio and heater.
Powerglide 283. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Want SBSO or best offer.
Call 378-1187 or 378-4380. (G (G---24-2t-c).
--24-2t-c). (G---24-2t-c).
1964 VOLKSWAGEN, light beige,
heater. Owner going abroad. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. $1395. Call 372-
7627. (G-25-3t-c).
1963 FUTURA CONVERTIBLE.
Bucket seats, 4 speed shift. Radio
and heater. $1195. Call 378-4229.
(G-25-ts-c).

' ll
L
I LAST TIMES TONIGHT! I
COLUMBIA j a HAROLD
PICTURES Hf CHI
Presents !Production
I cRt I
I BALLOU I
% I in COLUMBIA COCOW |
I "DR. STRANGELOVE"!
^^Petei^ellei^^^^B
I SATURDAY ONIY I
ALL COLOR HITS!
I "BOYS NIGHT OUT" I
I Doris Da/ in I
TWINKLE AND SHINE'S
I. Glenn Ford in
""'starts Sunday 1
rMnuu m I
I WAD, B

autos
1956 PLYMOUTH, 6-cylinder,
standard shift, good condition
throughout. $225. or best offer.
Call 372-02Q7. fr.-23-3t-c).
1964 SPITE FIRE, less than 20,000
miles. Excellent condition. SIOO
equity and take up payments of
$66.75 monthly. Phohe evenings
376-5764. (G-24-3t-c).
1958 AUSTIN HEALY, wire wheels,
good tires and paint. See at Kappa
Sigma House. Call 6-9198. (G (G---24-st-c).
--24-st-c). (G---24-st-c).

XEROX
COPIES
NEW LOW PRICES AT
QUIK SAVE
1-19 Copies, 10£ ea.- 20 &
Over, 9?
COPIES MADE
WHILE YOU WAIT
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK SAVE
1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
MM

Friday, Oct. 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Block And Bridle
Valuable To UF
Block and Bridle members do
more than just ride horses at
Homecoming.
Established at the UF in 1937,
Block and Bridle is a club for those
interested in livestock. Many of the
members ride their horses in the
parade at Homecoming. But few
students know anything about the
organization.
Block and Bridle is a club of
about 50 UF students. Member Membership
ship Membership is ODen to all.
Block and Bridle helps the ag agriculture
riculture agriculture department, works with
extension services, sponsors 4-H
judging, sponsors stock shows, a awards
wards awards scholarships, conducts field
trips and works on service
projects. Faculty advisor D. L.
Wakeman, assistant professor of
animal husbandry, calls it the
right arm of the department.
The organization cooks and
serves meals for those enrolled in
agriculture short courses. This is
source of revenue. At a recent
three-day beef cattle short course,
Block and Bridle served local
rancers attending. Last year
2,000 meals were cooked and
served.
A field trip this winter will cover
the southwest section of the state.
Last years three-day trip cover covered
ed covered the southeast area and included
visits to horse and swine opera operations,
tions, operations, horse farms and feed mills.
As a service project Block and
Bridle members plan to be con consultants
sultants consultants to the boys in the Sheriffs
Boys Club Ranch in Live Oak.
Club officers are Mike Fields,
president; Bill Caruthers, vice vicepresident;
president; vicepresident; Sherry Thompson,
secretary; and Bill Bennett,
treasurer.
The organization was once called
Saddle and Sirloin, but changed its
name to Block and Bridle in the
19205. Block signifies meat pro production
duction production (beef, lamb, pork),
and bridle represents horse pro production.
duction. production.
I Sweet Tooth |
TAMPA, Fla. (UPI) A thief
with an apparent sweet tooth has
stolen a collection of special re recipes
cipes recipes from his bakery, Joe Dalz
told police Tuesday.
Diaz said two ledger-type books
filled with the recipes and repre representing
senting representing years of collecting have
disappeared. He said he saw the
books Monday afternoon, but that
they were gone from the bakery
Tuesday.
Speeding Car
MONTVILLE, Conn. (UPI)
A speeding car struck a parked
car, knocking it into the front
of local Democratic headquarters.
As it continued to run out of
control the speeding vehicle
rammed into another building. It
missed the local Republican party
office by five feet.

Page 9



Page 10

), The Florida Alligator. Friday. Oct. 8, 1965

By EUNICE I. TALL
Alligator Staff Writer
Four skits, including for the first
time one by an independent organi organization,

Scenes From The Winners
B B ms^ m i &s*%dMks
' v
>xsW-Â¥* : MJ 4iU4wM*<> *&& ~ .-i,'
GRAHAM AREA: "Dean Hailstone" beer-canned at "Kappa Awful" riot.
:: W'SI
DELTA UPSILON: James
JSttfnH Beam, after long ordeal,
; >ML finds the spirit of Florida
r 94 I in the people of Florida
Mm I HM themselves.
MJ H1 I u fT^k3
DE 11 LI 111 k vV
Vi fw b 1 tA
£ tj J]| -3? ; ;>i'H ) ',*c ~ >
p %% v 1 ,RT ; IM < 'ip % ;>3|fv mjmm w
f \ I L /l JUL' V I 1
k m
Pm m sv
mlk ,ppVl# v
u 3 m Htj!
J *4 r-J*&- vM */-Sf.*-.
*v''.'V' :
ALPHA DELTA PI: Red introduces Wolf-pack Raider to Grandma with the
big foot for stamping out roads between Micanopy to Cross Creek
- fc|
PHI KAPPA TAU: Ponce
*de Leon
enating water of Florida, .' v s if -
glug, glug, glug, glug...

GROWL SKITS SELECTED

zation, organization, were given the okay late
Wednesday night for performance
in Gator Growl Oct. 15.
The best of the 15 semi-finalists

ADPi, DU, Graham,PKT Winners

.V..'.. .. .V....1tt _***.* .!*.* --
were Graham Hall, Alpha Delta Pi
sorority, Phi Kappa Tau and Delta
Upsilon fraternities.
After the traditional three hours

of try-outs in the Plaza of the
Americas Wednesday night which
drew a crowd of 1500, a panel of
10 judges retired to a closed room
in the Florida Union for three more
hours.
We listened to the tapes of the
skits again and discussed the per performances,
formances, performances, their quality, staging,
production, and appropriateness/
said Wilson Atkinson, Homecoming
chairman.
We were very pleased to have
Graham Area in the Growl this
year, Atkinson said. It will make
Growl more of a university affair
with interest from an independent
group.
During the evening someones
pants fell off, a boy lost his contact
in the crowd and a fake muscle
fell from a girls shoulder.
Other than that, Atkinson said
the mechanical aspect of the per performance
formance performance went better than I have
ever known.
He estimated that each groups
skit cost between S4O to SSO for the
tapings plus costume and prop ex expenses.
penses. expenses.
Until late Wednesday afternoon
the judging committee consisted
totally of men. Mrs. Wilson At Atkinson
kinson Atkinson was asked to judge when
the oversight was realized, said
Director of Growl, Bud Robison.
We purposely excluded any un undergraduate
dergraduate undergraduate judges on the panel,
Atkinson said, to eliminate any
possible bias.
He said the judges were influ influenced
enced influenced in their decisions by err
reaction.
The judges were Alvin Alsobrook
of Alumni Affairs; Spurgeon
Cherry, director of intramurals;
William Cross, assistant dean of
men; Ron LaFace, past president
of Florida Blue Key; Robert Jen Jennings,
nings, Jennings, director of Academic Ser Services
vices Services and former Gator Growl
Chairman in 1956.
John Webb, professor of journa journalism
lism journalism and communications; Robert
Foster, assistant director of the
Gator Band; Lester Hale, dean of
student affairs; Wilson Atkinson,
chairman of homecoming, and At Atkinsons
kinsons Atkinsons wife, Kay Lani, graduate
student in nursing.

Numerous Protests
Over Skit Cutback
Some phone calls and protests found their way into the Gator
Growl office yesterday from students and organizations who ob objected
jected objected to the judges choice of four skits instead of five originally
announced.
Four skits were 'head over shoulders' over the others, said
Wilson Atkinson, chairman of homecoming. To keep our com committments
mittments committments to the university and to the students and participants,
we only chose four this year.
We listened to the tapes all over again in the meeting just to
make sure every organization was given a fair shake, Atkinson
continued.
Atkinson and Director of Gator Growl Bud Robison both agreed
they would have liked to have more skits if it was possible.
I would have liked to have had more skits, but I have to go with
what our judges told me, Robison said. I don't think it will
necessarily deter from the total Growl performance.
Atkinson commented, It has been our policy to find judges who
represent all wSlks of campus life and those who are in contact
with homecoming activities. We wanted to get responsible people to
make an intelligent choice and an appropriate one for Gator Growl.
We had hoped to select as many skits as we could find, with a
minimum of five, Atkinson said. Unfortunately there were only
four skits that had conformed to the standards of quality ap appropriateness
propriateness appropriateness expressed to the participants.
I feel this was the best selection of judges that I have ever
worked with in this area, each one being of the highest integrity
and neutrality.

PHOTOS BY NICK ARROYO
Ar

Bt
K A
'^St
M si
Bt :<: Hg 9
B 0 W
K BF $ Hr
il VpMsMf
MHHMP Mp --
MISS ROTC: real boost to
military moral
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. ,:;. ft % Bb rBBBBBjft
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ADPi'S MYSTERY GIRL:
wears a path across the
stage.



fifth annual playboy party

Bunnies To Pay Annual Visit To Graham

'By FRANK SILOW
Alligator Staff Writer
Four years ago tiraham
Area started a tradition of
sponsoring a theme party on
a campus-wide scale. The
party was a success and has
grown larger each succeeding
year.
Graham Areas first ven venture
ture venture into a large theme party
originated with their Playboy
Party in the Fall of 1962.
This years party will be this
trimester with a few new in innovations,
novations, innovations, said August Schild Schildbach,
bach, Schildbach, president of the Graham
Area Council.
Schildbach and Area Coor Coordinator
dinator Coordinator Jay Stormer expect
a crowd approaching 2,000
students at this years func function.
tion. function.

CALL FOR YOUR
Personal Cosmetic
Appointment on
Thursday and Friday
October 14 & 15
MEET GENII
f I
| The only cosmetic with I
built-in Shielding! Cre- I
ft ated in Florida but effec- I
ft tive everywhere. Enjoy a U
ft more firm skin resistant 1
1 to aging, wrinkling, and m
I lining with Genii. MM
M Genii is available at our I
M cosmetic counter and ice invite 11
If you to try it today.
JEAN GRAHAM J
1 COSMETICS J|
I 1 SPECIALTY SHOP II
1 311 N. W. 13th St.^l

traditionally
THE STORE FOR WWiM £
CLASS RINGS BFsl9^J%l
CHARGE
211 W. University Ave. ACCOUNTS

The party expenses cost
approximately SSOO but that
is covered by admission re receipts.
ceipts. receipts.
There will be bands per performing
forming performing in the upstairs and
downstairs rooms, a floor
show in each room, and an
authentic theme with the coeds
dressed as bunnies and actual
Playboy souvenirs. Gifts are
given out randomly throughout
the party such as cigars, cos cosmetic
metic cosmetic kits, beer mugs, sweat sweatshirts,
shirts, sweatshirts, and transistor radios.
The party is one of the most
unique in the country being
sponsored by a college living
area according to a college
consultant for manufacturers
after viewing the party per personally
sonally personally two years ago.
Graham Area also sponsors

speaking

By JUDY MILLER
Alligator Staff Writer
This past weekend the Delta Tau Deltas sent eleven members
out to the local Boys Club. The DTDs worked for 2 hours
refereeing football games, spreading sand and cutting grass.
At the Theta Chi house last weekend the TXs entertained
one-hundred and fifty parents at the annual Parents Weekend.
Today is the evening for the Delta Phi Epsilon open house
for the benefit of fraternity men who want to meet the new pledge
class. Parents weekend for the D Phi Es will be on October
29-31. Donna Berger was selected Sweetheart of the Billy
Mitchell Drill Team.
The Alpha Chi Omegas held their annual Goat Song Nignt
Tuesday while the neophytes, dressed in hideous garb, sang to
a goat in the middle of the patio. This is a national tradition
which proved very humorous for the incoming sisters and
members.
Tonight the Alpha Epsilon Phis are planning a social with
the Sigma Chi house. On Saturday night the A E Phis are having
a pledge social with Pi Lambda Phi.
Phi Delta Theta intertained Alpha Epsilon Phi and the Delta
Gammas over the last two weeks. Oct. 1 found a western theme
at the Phi Delt ski-lodge with AEPhis and their hosts in
appropriate attire.
The DGs danced the week before to music by the Challengers
and were entertained with a skit entitled Black Bart foiled again.
Phi pledges Tom Borland, Bunkie Wilson, Chip Reamy and Bob
Webbush, who is currently under contract in Washington, D. C.,
have also entertained with Beatle music at the weekly socials.

a, similar party in the second
trimester with the theme being

Continued from page I
member, Chester Ferguson,
Chairman of the Board of Regents,
and Henry Cramer, chairman of the

Fast And Convenient Service
At The NEW
B&B TAKE OUT
Featering
Shrimp Hamburgers
Chicken French Fries
Boxes To Go
The Drive-In Window saves
you the trouble of leaving your car
B&B TAKE OUT
412 S.W. 4th Ave.

Harolds Club, a gambling es establishment
tablishment establishment in Reno, Nev. The
format is basically the same
with fake gambling being fea featured
tured featured and prizes given.
Schildbach said the Harolds
Club party has never achieved
the same success as the Play Playboy
boy Playboy party. But it is still
a worthwhile and entertaining
social diversion, he said.
Hume Area was the second
to follow suit with an affair
called the Hume Hawaiian.
This year will be the fourth
consecutive year for this
event. This years Hawaiian
will be held in late October
of early November.
Tolbert Area is the third
dormitory area to attempt a
large scale party, with the
Computor Dance.

ANYONE FOR PAINTING
Pretty Glnny Monte decided the Kappa Delta house needed a new
coat of paint. So the Fort Lauderdale sophomore decided to do it
herself. Nice outfit for painting, huh!

Burns Speech

Budget Commission.
Under questioning, Burns denied
that there had been any "political
meddling" in the state university
system and said "If there has

Friday, Oct. 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Last year was the first
Computor Dance, between the
men of Tolbert and the women
of Broward Hall. Seventy
couples were matched by a
RW 200 digital computor and
brought together at the dance.
Ken Simon, dance coordi coordinator,
nator, coordinator, said the affair was a
great success and this year
they are expanding the
machine programing.
Simon feels the event can
surpass any on campus if the
success gained last year can
be maintained.
The success of the parties
at Graham, Hume, and Tolbert
Areas show the need for well
run and original social events,
and give the Florida students
caliber parties on the college
level, commented Simon.

been, I havent been a party to
it."
Speaking on the rumored re resignation
signation resignation of Reitz, he said. "I
would be hopeful that there would
not be one (a resignation)."
The states Chief Executive said
he came to speak here because
he was "concerned" over the re resolutions
solutions resolutions passed Tuesday by the
UF Faculty Senate. The resolution
voiced support for Reitz and his
policies and condemned the actions
of the Budget Commission in
chopping faculty and staff salaries
on a line-item basis.
"I dont have the attitude that
I own the State of Florida," Burns
said, "Im only a servant."
He said the Budget Commission
excerclses control over state uni university
versity university budgets because it is the
only place "where there can be
any semblence of equality."
Burns referred to the problem
of balancing salaries between uni university
versity university personel with, for example
a doctoral degree, and other
state employees wlht the same
degree.
"We must have some equality
and balance between every state
department, the Governor re reiterated.
iterated. reiterated.

Page 11



Page 12

5, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 8, 1965

/Mrs. UF Contest
Finals Saturday

Can she iron a long-sleeve
starched man's dress shirt in 10
minutes without wrinkles?
Can she plan a design and color
scheme in a limited time and ex explain
plain explain why she did it?
Does she look equally well in
sportswear as in a short cocktail
dress?
Well, UF men, if your wife can
do all these things, you may have
a potential Mrs. University of
Florida on your hands but next
year's model since the finals of
this year's contest wind up Satur Saturday
day Saturday night.
Twenty-one university wives are
competing for the title now held
by Mrs. Howard McNulty of Lake Lakeland.
land. Lakeland.
After judging here, the contest contestants
ants contestants will be narrowed down to five
finalists. Each of these will be
asked a humorous and a serious
question and will be judged on
poise, beauty, audience appeal and
personality.
Mrs. Thomas Righetti, chairman

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WSA SESSIONS
like this one result in policies which concern every woman student on
campus. In order to make each woman student feel more like they do
have a representative body, WSA recently issued membership cards.

Romance
Can Be
Sc Rocky

PITTSBURGH (UPI) Joseph
McCorkle has found that the road
to romance can be rocky.
McCorkle, 17, and his fiancee
were driving Tuesday to the court courthouse
house courthouse tQ apply for their wedding
license.
Stopped for a traffic light,
McCorkle inadvertently shifted the
car into reverse. Things began
to happen. The car lurched back,
nearly hitting a policeman and a
woman pedestrian. Then it went
forward, knocking down another
policeman.
The second officer, FredSlaney,
fired at the fleeing car. The
vehicle went out of control, strik striking
ing striking two parked cars. McCorkle
was charged with driving without
an operator's license; not having
a registration card, leaving the
scetoe of an accident, failure to
stop on command of an officer,
assult and battery with a
CM.
get his marriage lic license
ense license either.

of the Medical Dames committee
for the contest, said that the finals
are scheduled for 8 p.m., Saturday
at P. K. Yonge Auditorium. Ad Admission
mission Admission is free.
Final judging will be done among
among a Grecian atmosphere, she
said. Usherettes and master of
ceremonies Tom Kirby of WGGG
will be dressed in Grecian cos costumes
tumes costumes to carry out the theme,
she said.
Once selected, Mrs. UF will be
hostess at the university's Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming Alumni reunion and will
be presented at Pre-Growl. She
and the four runners-up will also
ride in the Homecoming Parade,
Mrs. Righetti added.
Contestants include: Patricia
Wipf, sponsored by the Agricul Agriculture
ture Agriculture Dames and from Torrance,
Calif; Mary Ann House, Archi Architecture
tecture Architecture and Fine Arts Dames,
Tampa; Virginia Lundquist, Arts
and Sciences Dames, Excelsior,
Minn.; Robin Bissey, Business
Administration Dames, EauGallie;

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Joyce Bryan, Education Dames,
Jacksonville.
Rose Marie McCall, Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering Dames, Green Cove Springs;
Roberta Aldrich, Health Related
Professions Dames, Tampa;
Carolyn Daniel, Journalism
Dames, Gainesville; Noel Liles,
Law Dames, Fort Lauderdale;
Becky Blackwood, Medical Dames,
Fort Lauderdale; Joyce Lowe,
Pharmacy Dames, Jacksonville.
Madeleine Van Walleghem,
Corry Village, Lima Peru; Patri Patricia
cia Patricia S. Whitaker, Diamond Village,
Waynesboro, Va.; Mary Morris,
Flavet in, Fort Lauderdale; Emily
Safko, Schucht Village, St. Peters Petersburg;
burg; Petersburg; Jean Schwartz, Phi Kappa
Tau fraternity, Thomasville, Ga.;
Cindy Eden, Sigma Nu fraternity,
Daytona Beach.
Lynn Edgar, Kappa Alpha Theta
sorority, Sarasota; Betty Parsons,
Kappa Delta sorority, Bluffton,
Ind.; Duchess Hodson, Arnold Air
Society (ROTC), Venice; and
Cathryn Morris, Forestry Club,
Waycross, Ga.

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MRS. UF 1964-65
Mrs. Sylvia McNulty gives up her crown as Mrs.
University of Florida Saturday night. Seen with
her at her victory last year are son Thad, husband
Howard and daughter Laurie.
A Crowning Touch...
The new Mrs. University of Florida will be crowned by the old one,
if everything goes right.
Mrs. Thomas Righetti, chairman of this year's contest, said Thurs Thursday
day Thursday that present plans call for Mrs. UF 1964-65 to return to crown
her successor.
Last years queen, Mrs. Howard McNulty, sponsored by Lav Dames,
now lives in Lakeland, Mrs. Righetti said. She has promised to be here
to pass the crown on.
A first place winner and four runners-up will be named after Satur
day nights competition and each will receive a silver tray, courtesy of
Robertsons, she said.
Winning contestants will have been rated tops in several contests
which have been held during the past several weeks.
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Miss.-Gator Clash Rated Tossup

OXFORD, Miss. (UPI) Flor Florida
ida Florida and Mississippi meet Satur Saturday
day Saturday in a tossup game that could
tighten the SEC race even more.
The IB*th ranked Gators are
2-1 after losing an upset ot Miss Mississippi
issippi Mississippi State. The Rebs are 1-2
in the midst of their worst string
in the 18-year reign of Johnny
Vaught as coach.
Florida probably would be favor favored
ed favored if it werent for several key
injuries. Add these to the sur surprise
prise surprise showing the Rebels made in
their 17-16 loss to Alabama last
weekend and its anybodys ball
game at Hemingway Stadium here.
Coach Ray Graves Gators were
badly bruised in their upset win
over LSU last week. Guard Jerry
Anderson, halfback Allen Tram Trammell
mell Trammell and safety man Bruce Bennett
are on the doubtful list.
Vaught regards Florida as
equal in teams of material with

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Alabama. He has spent the week
gearing his defense to the passing
of Florida quarterback Steve Spur Spurrier,
rier, Spurrier, second leading passer in the
SEC with 37 completions in 70
throws for 22 yards and two touch touchdowns.
downs. touchdowns.
For Ole Miss, the game is
Homecoming and acomeback
must. The Rebs have never
lost a Homecoming game and they
need this one more than theyve
ever needed one.
Vaughts Rebels are inthe midst
of their worst performance in his history.
tory. history. Theyve had more losses
this year and last than in the entire
seven-year spanfroml9s7 to 1963.
Tougher scheduling has been the
main reason but there also is a
psychological factorOle Miss
had football players die on the
practice field before the start of
the 1964 and 1965 campaighs.

Were going to put in a few
changes for Florida. Vaught said.
Im sure going along with Jimmy
Heidel at quarterback and our tack tackles,

The Florida Alligator

Friday, Oct. 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Can They Do It Again?
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WINNING TD: John Feiber scores against LSU

I people on the I
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T^SLL m *

les, tackles, Jim Urbaitek and Dan Sartin,
have been fine. Stan Hindman has
been doing some great blocking.
Graves predicted a real of-

Page 13

fensive game." He said Ole
Miss hasn't gotten their best
play, and I hope they don't this
weekend.

SPORTS

Harriers Face
W. Kentucky
The Florida cross country team
meets Western Kentucky this Fri Friday
day Friday in the second meet of the year.
The Gators beat South Florida
in their first meet.
Next week the Gators will run
against Florida State and Miami.
Soccer Club
Plays St. Leo
Floridas soccer club will play
Its first game of the season Sat Saturday
urday Saturday against St. Leo College Soc Soccer
cer Soccer Club on Flemming Field.
The UF soccer team split its
games with St. Leo last year.
The Gator soccer club has an
88-8-8 record since Its beginning.
Last weeks meet with St. Pet Petersburg
ersburg Petersburg Soccer Club was canceled.
This week the game starts at
1:30 p.m. and will be over for
the broadcast of the Florida-Ole
/ gator ADS \ I
l ARE DREAMY!/
* w



Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday. Oct. 8. 1965

Ole Miss Like Teams Os Old: Eibner

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Staff Wrftaf
This Ole Mss lootet like tite
Ole Miss of old.
That was how Gator bead swnk
John Eibner summed vg the
and Blues next football
Generally near the Wf vr .V
national pigskin ratings the Vfis--
sissippi Rebels slipped last >-ear
to a 5-4-1 season record, and lost
to Tulsa, 14-7, in the Bluebonnet
Bowl. Eibner feels, however, that
the Rebels have a powerhouse unit
this year.
On offense, Ole Miss has a fine
passing attack. Eibner stated.
Tlieir receivers are running

Alligator Staffers Pick The Winners
Mt> Fan* Glenn Steve Fran Ron Jeff Den- Bruce Andy Don Fed- Dick Cheryl
.'ason Sears Laney Vauhn Snider Spencer kewalter Dudley Moor erroan Dennis Kuril Consensus
Pickers w-so-a 35-21-4 35-21-4 32-24-4 31-25-4 31-25-4 30-26-4 30-26-4 29-27-4 29-27-4 28-28-4 22-34-4 31-23-4
.643 .625 625 571 .554 .554 536 .536 .518 .518 .500 .393 .574
Florid a-Ole Miss FFFF F FFFFFFF F
LSU-Miami LLLL L LL LLLLLL
FSU-Kentucky KKK KK KKKKKKFK
Alabama-Vanderbilt A A A A A AAA AAAAA
Purdue-towa IPPPPIIPI I P P 3
Syracuse-UCLA SSSUS SUUUUUUU
Wisconsin-Nebraska NNNNNNNNNNNNN
Indiana-Mlnnesota MMM I M M M M I M M I M
Mich. St.-Mich. MSM MMMSS SSS S S
Oregon-Stanford S OO S O SSO OO S O O y
Illinois-Ohio St. O 1001 0000 l 000
USC-Washington W UU WU WWUWU WWW
Notre Dame-Army ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND
Ore. St.-NW N OONO NNONO N O
Ga. Tech-Tulane GGGGGGGGGG G GG
Arkinsas-Baylor AAAAA A A A A A A A
Pitt-Duke P D P P D PDD PPD P ?
TCU-Tex.Tech TC TT TC TT TT TT TT TT TT TT TT TT
Oklahoma-Texas T TTTTTTTTTTT
Clemson-Georgia GGGGG GGGGGG G G

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their pass patterns wvll. and. the
quarterback is tutting them with
gvv*i ttuvws,
Rebel sagtiai-caller is Jimmy
besieU TW ISO pound senior
o*arsveb< >4vrts a near 50per cent
pass axe rage.
vs x**t wakes him doubly dan dangerous
gerous dangerous Eibner continued, is
that he is one heck of a runner.
If you cover his receivers, but
leave him running room, hell kill
you with the run.
Also returning to this years
Rebel squad are 25 other letter lettermen.
men. lettermen. Some of the top returnees
are halfbacks Mike Dennis and
Dave Wells.

I am especially impressed with
the running of Dennis, Eibner
said. He is one of the strongest
runners in the South. Ole Miss
likes to use him on the power sweep
around end. On this play, hes a
dangerous threat to rush for six
points on the scoreboard.
Fullback Bobby Wade could also
trouble the Gator defense, as a
runner and as a receiver.
Eibner continued. Mississippi
likes to run a play-pass series
with the fullback. The quarterback
will fake a hand-off to Wade, and
then allow him to run out into the
flat for a short pass.
Against Alabama last week, the

Rebels used this play, and com completed
pleted completed seven passes on it.
Eibner sees the Rebel offensive
line as a big, strong, veteran group
that in anchored by 235 pound All-
Southeastern Conference guard
Stan Hindman and 245 pound tackle
star Jim Harvey.
Opposing Ole Miss, a team
.must establish a good passing at attack
tack attack and complement it with a
running game, Eibner went on.
The Rebel front line on defense
holds well against the run, making
it necessary to get airborne to
score.
According to Eibner, an aerial
attack against the Rebels is no easy
task.
Their defensive secondary has
straightened out some earlier
problems and now is a competent,
effective group.

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Eibner cited as an example the
Miss.-Kentucky contest two weeks
ago, in which the Rebels virtually
contained the vaunted aerial circus
of the Wildcats.
Jim Urbanek, a 240-pound defen defensive
sive defensive tackle, and Rocky Fleming, a
roving linebacker or 4 monster*
man, are top performers who Eib Eibner
ner Eibner feels will be trying to knock
down Gator blockers and runners
all afternoon.
Eibner concluded. I dont think
anyone should be fooled by the
Rebels 1-2 won-lost record this
season. Against Alabama, they
fumbled twice within the Tide 10-
yard line and lost by only one point.
The Rebels are a strong, powerful
and dangerous club. It will take an
effort from the Gators equal to
that of the LSU game to beat Mis MississiDpi.
sissiDpi. MississiDpi.



Koufax Foxed By Minnesota

MINNEAPOLIS ST, PAUL
(UPI) The suddenl y mighty
Minnesota Twins beat golden
armed Sandy Koufax, baseballs
premier pitcher and bowled over
the stumbling, fumbling Los An Angeles

Tide, Vo/s, Georgia
Favored In SEC
There is only one other game between two SEC teams Saturday
and that one shapes up as less of a contest than the Gator-
Ole Miss Clash. It pits the Alabama Crimson Tide against the
Vanderbilt Commodores who are still seeking their first victory.
There are two games on tap that match SEC teams with
teams from the neighboring Atlantic Coast Conference, yet
count in the SEC standings. In these, sth ranked Georgia is
host to Clemson and Tennessee is host to South Carolina.
SEC Commissioner Bernis Moore ruled that these games
would count in the leasug standings to enable Georgia and Ten Tennessee
nessee Tennessee to each have six SEC games. There schedules fell to
five league games when Georgia Tech withdrew from the conference
last year.
The rest of the SEC teams play independents. Tenth-ranked
Mississippi State will be host to unbeaten Southern Mississi;
Lsu will be at Miami, Fla., 19th ranked Kentucky will be host
to Florida State, the team that beat the Wildcats 48-6 last years
also 19th ranked Auburn will be host to little Chattanooga;
and Tulane will host Georgia Tech.
Memphis State, the only major southeastern independent not
playing an SEC opponent, will be at Tulsa.
Tulane, a seven-point underdog, is the only SEC team which
is not favored over an outsider. Mississippi State and Auburn
are prohibitive favorites. Georgia is favored by two touchdowns.
Tennessee, LSU and Kentucky are all favored by one touchdown.

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geles Angeles Dodgers, 5-1, Thursday for
their second straight World Series
triumph.
Rangy Jim Katt, a six-foot-four,
26-year-old lefthander, set down
the Dodgers on seven scattered

singles in out-duelling the mighty
Koufax in a contest where the
usually sure-fingered Dodgers
embarrassed themselves by com committing
mitting committing three errors,
Zoilo Versalles, the chunky little
hero of Minnesotas opening day
8-2 victory, had an important hand
in Thursdays outcome, too, by
scoring the first run of the con contest
test contest and later contributing a triple.
Husky Harmon Killebrew, who
chipped in with two of the Twins
nine hits on this damp, overcast
day and left fielder Bob Allison,
who turned in the defensive gem
of the series in the fifth inning,
also were key men for the on onrushing
rushing onrushing American League champ champions.
ions. champions.
But in the final analysis, the
Dodgers actually beat themselves
as they first muffed a glorious
opportunity to tie the score in
the seventh and then helped their
own downfall further by loose
handling of the ball in the bottom
of the seventh and the eighth.
Kaat, an 18-game winner for
the Twins during the regular sea season,
son, season, struck out only three men,
but one of them, pinch hitter Don
Drysdale, proved to be the key
to the outcome.
After the Dodgers had strung
together singles by Ron Fairly,

Swim Team
Meets Monday
The Florida swimming team will
start practice 4 p.m. Monday.
All freshmen and varsity
swimmers are supposed to report
to practice, and Coach Bill Harlan
reports that he is especially inter interested
ested interested in new freshmen.

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Jim Lefebvre and John Roseboro
to cut the Twins lead to 2-1 in
the seventh, Drysdale, the losing
pitcher in Wednesdays opener but
the Dodgers* leading hitter during
the year with a .300 average. v, s

A Moor Moorvery
very Moorvery good college football team comes to the crossroads"
at some time or other during the year.
Its usually on a Saturday somewhere near the middle of the
season. The crossroads is represented by a big game which
could spell the difference between a great year and a mediocre one.
Such a case Is Floridas meeting with Ole Miss tomorrow after afternoon
noon afternoon in Oxford. If the Gators win, there should be no stopping them.
But, if they lose, an SEC title will be out of reach.
Winning in Oxford has never been an easy thing to do. Coach
Johnny Vaught has only lost three games in 19 years as Rebel
coach. He has never lost a homecoming and Saturdays battle is
just that for Ole Miss.
This, in itself, is enough to scare the life out of any Gator fan.
But there are other things. For instance, Ole Miss is coming off
two tough losses to Alabama and Kentucky and ranks at the bottom
of the conference standings. The Rebels have never lost three in a
row under Vaught.
Add to this the fact that Ole Miss lost both the Alabama and
Kentucky games in the final minutes and you can see why the Rebels
will be tough Saturday.
But, dont count the Gators out. Every man on the squad knows
how much this game means and is dedicated to the purpose of
winning it. They know they have the material to win and plan to do
just that.
The offense is in good shape with all eleven starters in good
condition. It is about due for that high-scoring game which it has
always been capable of, but unable to come up with as yet.
Defensively, there is a good-sized casualty list which includes
such stalwarts as Allen Trammell, Bruce Bennett and Red Ander Anderson.
son. Anderson. Only Anderson is Injured severely enough to keep him out of
action, however.
Its been said all year that the defense would be hurting if anyone
got injured, but there were a lot of sophomores (Wayne McCall,
Dan Manry and Don Giordano) in the game when the Gators held
LSU to 7 points. If this group was good enough to stop the powerful
Bengal backs, it should be able to handle the less potent Rebels,
minus Don Street, their top power runner.
Ole Miss, on the other hand, has had trouble moving the ball.
The Rebs have a good running game, but may have trouble picking
up yardage without Street in the backfleld. Their passing attack
is not as good as in the past because their signal-caller, Jimmy
Heidel, is not a good passer.
Defensively, however, the Rebels have been very tough. Their
one weakness is pass defense, and this is the reason Florida
should win.
One sidelight of the game is that both teams seem to weaken in
the final quarter. The Gators have yet to score in the fourth, and
the Rebel defense has yielded only in the late stages of its games.
Which all means that the game may be decided in the last few
minutes.
My personal opinion, however, is that the Gators will get some
points on the board fast and hold on to beat the Rebels by some something
thing something like 26-10.

Friday, Oct. 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

sent up to swing for Koufax with
runners on second and third and
one out.
Kaat struck out Drysdale on
three pitches and that proved to
be the Dodgers final big threat.

Rifle Team
Meets Rebels
Tomorrow
Sporting a 3-0 record, the Flor Florida
ida Florida Rifles, UF rifle team, left
for Oxford, Mississippi this morn morning.
ing. morning. The squad of ten men will
face the Ole Miss rifle team
on Saturday.
The whole team has been look looking
ing looking forward to this road trip,*
said officer-in-charge Major Har Harvey
vey Harvey M. Dick before departing sot
Oxford. Coach Sgt. Ist Class
Joe Nave and myself believe the
men will shoot a good match against
the Rebels. We're looking forward
to remaining undefeated."
Plans call for the squad to
shoot against the Ole Miss rifles
Saturday morning, and take in the
Gator-Rebel football contest that
afternoon.
We hope we cha leave Oxford
with both Florida teams victor victorious,"
ious," victorious," Dick said.
Some of the top shooters who
left this morning were Toby Muir,
Lee Young, Jim Waugh, and Jeff
Williams.

Page 15



l, The Florida Alligator. Friday. Oct. 8. 1965

Page 16


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THE GAMES
FLORIDA vsi Ole Miss
Pittsburgh vs. Duke
FSU vs. Kentucky
LSU vs. Miami
North Carolina vs. N. C. State
Arkansas vs. Baylor
Oklahoma vs. Texas
Notre Dame vs. Army
Illinois vs. Ohio State
Michigan State vs. Michigan

cuca ato sigma nu exclusively to col lege men.
Florida Florida Florida
Duke Pittsburgh Pittsburgh GOiIGQC Lif
Kentucky Kentucky Kentucky
lsu lsu lsu Insurance
North Carolina N. C. State N. C. State
Arkansas Arkansas Arkansas wOnfipSny Os America
Notore Dame 1105 W. University Ave.
Ohio state Illinois Illinois Suite 4, Gainesville
Michigan Michigan Michigan State 372-2357

The Harmon Football Forecast
TOP 20 TEAMS (Forecasting Average: 401 Right, 133 Wrong 751)
1- TEXAS 6 GEORGIA 11-PURDUE 16-WEST VIRGINIA
2- DAME 7-FLORIDA 12-L.S. U. 17-MISSOURI
3- STATE I-NEBRASKA 13-MICHIGAN 18-KENTUCKY
4- 9-SOUTHERN CAL. 14-OREGON 19-ILLINOIS
5- STATE 10-ALABAMA 15-WYOMING 20-DUKE
Saturday, October 9 Major Colleges
Alabama 27 Vanderbilt 8
Arizona 21 New Mexico 0
Artzona state 19 Wichita 14 The surprising Bulldogs continue to roll. They
Arkansas 21 Baylor 8 ...
Auburn 28 Chattanooga o are ranked 6th this week, and will whip Clemson
* B o W rig n han? r Young 20 6 by 27 P ints Florida, alter its big upset of L.S.U.,
Buffalo 25 Boston u 8 moved from 12th right up to the 7th rung of the
Cincinnati 17 Xavier 7 national ladder. The Alligators will clip Ole Miss
Colgate ... 21 Holy Cross 13 bv 5 Saturday
Colorado State U. .20 Texas Western 9 y J aaiuiuay.
Dartmouth 30 Pennsylvania o Texas and Arkansas will keep right on winning.
East 6 Carolina 21 Richmond *1 The top-ranked Longhorns will bump Oklahoma by
Florida state ::::::, is Sucky* i! 21 P ints > and 4th-ranked Arkansas will hand
Furman 14 Wofford o Baylor its second straight loss, this one by 13
George Washington 17 V. P. 1 14 __ infc 3
Georgia 34 Clemson 7 points.
BS&S T cn It Columbia 2 Michigan-Michigan State .. almost enough
Idaho 10 Utah state 7 said! It has to be one of the bitterest rivalries in
Kansas :::::::::: 20 lowa Itate :::::: *5 the nation. The Spartans moved up to 3rd... The
Louisville 15 SiJtSn Fla 13 Volverines dropped to 13th. Though national rank-
Maryiand 14 Wake Forest 13 ing means nothing, well pick Michigan State to
IS'sSt. z::. 24 sSlttem Miss. On the West Coast, Oregon andSouthernCal are
Missouri 29 Kansas state o storming toward a showdown. The 9th-rated Tro-
Navy* 27 wuuarn & Mary 7 jan are ten points too strong for Washington, and
New*Mico state.. U S !!. :::l ^ on 4 m Stanford Indians by
North Carolina 24 N. Carolina St 7 Six.
Northwestern 18 Oregon state 15 game this Saturday that may be more one-
''' it c3Sf.de u sMed than almost any in their series is the Army-
Oregon 21 Stanford 15 Notre Dame fracas in New York City. The Irish
Princeton 17 CorneM College | are currently 2nd in the Harmon ratings, and the
RuSere 30 Lehigh 6 Cadets are trying to bounce back. Notre Dame will
Southern Cal 17 Washington 7 roll, however, by 32 points.
fermessee 20 Carolina *7 Ye Olde Crystal Ball stayed a bit on the blurry
111 ffiSSSf iS Me again last week so it was a tough battle trying
Texas Tech is t. c. u 7 to stay on the plus side of a .750 forecasting aver-
Tuisa 25 Memphis state 14 a^e owev er, thanks to the Midwestern small
Washington State 1! SfuEnL, } Coll6geS where e 35 out of 37 correctly,
West Texas 30 Trinity o we managed to do it. No thanks to the major
Wyoming 1113 20 Utah Cltadel g colleges! So the seasons totals read about thusly:
Yale 20 Brown 7 404 right and 134 wrong for a .751 average.
cact femail A P werful Southerner, still unbeaten, is sth-
EAST (small colleges) ranked Mississippi State. And the Bulldogs will
Alfred 18 st Lawrence 14 P unish Southern Mississippi this week by 24 points.
Bates rSt 24 Worcester Tech *7 Alabama is still #lO after a real scare from Mis-
SSBfflT 1 14 TemSf Urg e sissi PP i The Tide will pin Vanderbilt
Delaware 17 Lafayette 0 by points.
' ft \SSST v *"*>' J The Cornhuskers ol Nebraska climbed from 15th
,ndi.n, Sf ie, p .. 21 Edjnbom J UILT *? T 0f thelr rst reaU V
Juniata 14 Susquehanna 6 con vmclng win this season. To hold their new spot
M < fine HaVen I? New Hampshi re 'l to Badgers of Wlsconsto
Massachusetts 17 Connecticut 7 by a t least 14 points.
Northeastern 19 American Intl *6 Taking the biggest skid of any team in the Top
** P T~&?n d m thlS WCek they move into Bi & Ten competition
Tufts 15. Trinity 6 a 6 a ns t the lowa Hawks. And the Riveters should
Upsaia 20 Wilkes 7 whup the lowans bv 13 noints
Vermont 14 Rhode Island 13 *io points.
**West Chester 28 Millersville 12
Williams 20 Middlebury 6

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