Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Yulee Lea Election Declared Invalid

By DREX DOBSON
Alligator Staff Writer
Honor Court Chancellor Sid Stubbs has called for
a special election in Yulee area after invalidating the
legislative council elections there.
Stubbs decision to invalidate the election results was
based on a report by Attorney General Jake Dyal, who
investigated the disputed election.
Dyal reported that two election violations had occurred
at Yulee Hall Stubbs reccomended the close election
be re-run because there may have been unfair practices.
Sue Williams, who ran unaffiliated won the Yulee area
seat from Sue Brutchyard who represented Progress Party.
Miss Williams won by five votes.
Election irregularities were charged against two polit political
ical political parties. Progress Party claimed irregularities
in the voting procedure. Their claim was based on voting
advice igiven by political party representatives
taking check-off slips from fraternity and sorority
members.
The check-off girls were allegedly from an Action
Party affiliated sorority.
Progress Party was charged with illegal election
procedure after party literature was placed in girls

Publishing More Pages Per Week Than Any Other Collegiate Daily
The Florida Alligat#r
6

Vol. 58, No. 23

FLORIDA HIGHER EDUCATION IN JEOPARDY?
Senate Backs Reitz, Hits Politicos

Leg Council,
City Leaders
Laud UF Boss
By MAUREEN COLLINS
Alligator Staff Writer
University Senators and faculty
members backed UF President J.
Wayne Reitz in a strongly-worded
resolution yesterday which also
condemned the policies of the State
Budget Commission (composed of
Gov. Haydon Burns and the Cabi Cabinet).
net). Cabinet).
The University Senate, meeting
in special session unanimously
passed the resolution which ex expressed
pressed expressed support and confidence in
Reitz and commended him for his
stand on university fiscal au autonomy.
tonomy. autonomy.
Senators and other faculty mem members
bers members double the number that
usually come, one observer said
-- jammed McCarty Hall Audi Auditorium
torium Auditorium to attend the meeting which
was especially open to members of
the press.
See SENATE on p. 11

r eview f National Distribution Eyed

By CARL BROWN
Alligator Staff Writer
A nationally distributed creative arts magazine published
and. edited by students at the UF may soon be a reality,
if the Board of Student Publications approves.
The Florida Review, will be a magazine dedicated
to excellence in the literature and art of the humanities,
according to Assistant English Professor Butler Waugh.
Waugh outlined the general appearance cf the pros prospect
pect prospect ve magazine to be on a format similar to the Sewanee
Review.
It will definitely be a literary-creative arts magazine
and not a general interest publication, Waugh said.
If funds for it are obtained, it will be dedicated to

Petitions Supporting Reitz: *City Commission
*University Senate *Legislative Council *Florida Blue Key
|

Hf JCv
UNIVERSITY SENATE: suddenly, attendance

YULEE VOTING:
WIPED OUT
r, ,

University of Florida, Gainesville

excellence on a national scale, he said.
A subcommittee was set up by Student Government
to study the possibilities for the magazine. David A.
West, chairman of the committee, said a charter has
been drawn up and will be submitted to the Board of
Student Publications Oct. 13.
The magazine will initially cost $3,000, West said.
The original petition to start the magazine Included
the signatures of many Interested persons, so we feel
the magazine has a wide support.
A major concern of the board is continuity, West
said. We want to be sure that once its started it can
be kept up.
We all want this magazine to be a real credit to

message boxes in Yulee Area. This definitely is a
violation of the election code, Stubbs explained.
Stubbs said he had received several statements from
students who were at the election polls last Thursday.
The function of Honor Court not to place the
blame fdr alleged violations on any particular party or
persons, but merely to decide whether the events at
the polls may have influenced the election.
The election was close. It is our determination
the events at the polling place may have influenced the
outcome of the election, Stubbs explained.
The Honor Courts only function in this case is to
rule on the election results. If the political parties
wanted to claim uniair practices, they could go before
a special election board.
Mike Malaghan, secretary of the interior, is in charge
of the new election. It will be scheduled some time
within the next 14 days.
Miss Williams was the only unaffiliated candidate to
capture a leg council seat in the entire election. Progress
Party won 22 seats in the election. Action Party won
seven leg council seats.

Wednesday, Oct 5, 1965

the university," he said.
As for material in the review, students will be a source
of contribution, as well as outside sources. "There
is a chance of payment of articles if we get approval,"
Waugh said. Most of the better literary magazines pay
for their material, he added.
"The scope of the whole issue will be the humanities,
including art, literature, reviews of scientific work,
films and many other possibilities, according to Richard
Matthews, an English student working on the Review's
development.
The magazine, as the charter now reads, would have
a three-professor advisory board, but would be run
by the students and be student edited.

Johnson:
Operation
On Friday
By MERRIMAN SMITH
White House Reporter
President Johnson said Tuesday
that he will have his gall bladder
removed Friday at the Bethesda
Naval Hospital outside Wash Washington.
ington. Washington.
Johnson made his dramatic an announcement
nouncement announcement shortly after he had
informed Humphrey and the cab cabinet
inet cabinet of his condition.
Humphrey told reporters: The
President has fully discussed the
situation with me and the cabinet
and we are clear as to the pro procedures
cedures procedures to be followed during his
See OPERATION on P. 11
WHAT?????
NEW YORK (UPI) Odds Oddsmakers
makers Oddsmakers proclaimed Ole Miss a
two point favorite in their Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming battle with the Florida
Gators Saturday.



!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1965

Page 2

News Around
The World
from the wires of United Press International
International
WALL SEALED . The East German Communists Monday stopped
issuing emergency passes to West Berliners to visit East Berlin and
sealed the wall again. The Communist action followed a deadlock in
negotiations to renew an East-West pass agreement that expired Sept.
24. Under the agreement signed Sept. 24, 1964, 36,000 West Berliners
have passed through the wall to visit relatives in East Germany
because of sickness, deaths, births, and weddings.
PATROL AMBUSHED . Viet Cong guerrillas killed or wounded
all members of a U.S. infantry patrol in the jungles 15 miles northeast
of Saigon, a military spokesman reported. A patrol usually consists of
12 men. In the air war, Guam-based B-52s hit suspected Viet Cong
stronghold in South Viet Nam in the 37th raid in the war.
REDS DOWN PLANE ... In a Peking radio
broadcast Tuesday the Red Chinese said its air
force planes downed an American fighter in a
dogfight over South China. The broadcast said
the downed plane was one of four that overflew
South China on a provocation mission shortly
after noon Tuesday. The other three fighters
fled in dismay after finding the situation un unfavorable
favorable unfavorable to them the announcement said.
.
SOFT LANDING? . Western experts speculated that the Soviet
Unions latest space rocket may be headed for a historic soft-instru soft-instrument
ment soft-instrument landing on the moon. The Luna 7 was the third Soviet moon shot
this year. It follows one apparent and one admitted failure. If not an
attempt at a soft landing, the experts think that the station may be aimed
at an orbit around the moon and a return to earth.
National
REPORTERS APPEAL . Sixteen top reporters of the New York
Times Tuesday appealed to Mayor Robert Wagner to make recom recommendations
mendations recommendations to end the 20-day strike by the American Newspaper
Guild that has resulted *in a near blackout of news in the Nations
largest city. However, Executive Vice President of the Guild, Thomas
J. Murphy, stated that he does not want Wagner to intervene as he did
to end the 114-day newspaper strike in 1963.
STRIKE LOSSES . During the period of
January to August of this year, strike idleness
has been the highest since 1959, the Labor De Department
partment Department reported Monday. It said walkouts
during the first eight months 0f1965 accounted
for a loss of 16.8 million man-days work. An
estimated 1,160,000 workers were involved in
the 2,910 strikes over the period.
TALK GOES ON . Opponents of the right-to-work repealer
continued their filibuster against the pending bill. Starting with Tues Tuesdays
days Tuesdays session, Republican Senate Leader Everett Dirkson said that
quorum calls would be used. This would require supporters of the
measure to produce at least half of the Senate members while opponents
must produce only a talking team.
Florida
FEDERAL AID RECEIVED . Florida accepted $1.5-million in
federal money Monday to begin repairing hurricane-damaged public
facilities. In signing the agreement, Gov. Haydon Burns said that
sl-million would go for state and county repairs, and the remainder
would be used for repairs of federal property in the state. Hurricane
Betsy caused a total of $9.61-million damage in 10 South Florida
counties.
CHRISTIAN TAKES OVER ... Florida gained
a new school superintendent Monday who
pledged to make its public schools the best in
the country. Floyd T. Christian took over as
state superintendent succeeding 17-year veter veteran
an veteran Thomas D. Bailey, who resigned. The furor
over the reported resignation of the University
of Florida President J. Wayne Reitz, who at attended
tended attended the swearing-in, did not mar the cere ceremony.
mony. ceremony.
The Florida Alligator is an official publication of the University
of Florida and is published daily, Monday through Friday morn morning
ing morning during regular trimester and twice weekly during summer
trimester, except holidays and vacation periods. Entered at
U. S. Post Office as second class matter.

Speaker Ban Shakes
Carolina Universities

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (UPI)
A spectacular controversy over a
law banning Communist speakers
is shaking North Carolinas uni university
versity university and colleges to their roots.
Before all the leaves on this
wooded campus fall this season
the University of North Carolina
and all state-supported colleges
in the state could lose their ac accreditation
creditation accreditation or be put on probation.
The Regional Accrediting Ass Association
ociation Association will meet soon after
Thanksgiving to decide whether to
continue accreditation. The
charge: political interference.
The issue seems simple on its
surface. The state law bars known
Communists and persons who have
pleaded the Fifth Amendment in
Communist investigations from
speaking on state supported col college
lege college campuses.
The issue is not simple, how however,
ever, however, when its surface layers are
stripped away. At the heart, there
are two related issues: who shall
control the university and what is
the universitys basic role?
Is it the role of a public uni university
versity university to conform to the opin opinions

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ions opinions of a majority of the tax taxpayers
payers taxpayers who support it? Or should
a university go free to go where
truth leads it even if where it
goes offends those taxpayers?
Should the politicians, elected
by the taxpayers, control the uni university?
versity? university? Or should the academ academicians,
icians, academicians, who believe thay have their
own high responsibilities, control
it?
The law was passed in the final
days of the 1963 general assembly.
It is widely believed in North Car Carolina
olina Carolina the law was aimed squarely
at the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill, although it applies
to any tax-supported campus.
The university has long had the
reputation of fostering liberal
ideas in a Bible belt state.
In 1963 racial demonstrations
occurred all over North Carolina.
Students and professors from the
university took part. It was par particularly
ticularly particularly exasperating to the pol politicians
iticians politicians when a group of white
and Negro demonstrators picked
as a target the favorite hotel of
the legislature in Raleigh.

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Final Growl Tryouts
Slated For Tonight

By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Tryouts for the largest student show in the world
will be held tonight in the Plaza of the Americas
at 6:30 p.m.
Gator Growl, to be held Oct. 15 in the Florida
Field, is billed as the largest student participation
show. Fifteen skits will participate in tonights
tryouts. They are the skits whose tapes and
scripts were judged best by Growl officials.
The skits that win tonight will be preformed
in the show during the first night of UF Home Homecoming.
coming. Homecoming. The tapes are broadcast over the loud

Bums Nixes Road Debates

TALLAHASSEE (UPl)~Govern (UPl)~Governor
or (UPl)~Governor Haydon Burns refused Monday
any debate with the mayor of
Miami about a proposed S3OO mil million
lion million road program because I
dont recognize the mayor as an
expert on highway construction.
Miami Mayor Robert King High
had called for a debate on the
road program while Burns was
traveling in the Orient recently.
Burns beat High for the Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic nomination for governor
last year.
The governor said he will be begin
gin begin an intensified campaign for
voter approval of the bond pro program
gram program Thursday with a speech to

College Master

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XI C 315 NW 13th St.
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Get Eaton's Corrasable Bond Typewriter Paper.
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a horse breeding association in
Ocala. Friday morning he is
scheduled to talk to the Florida
Associated Industries in Orlando
and Friday night Burns plans to
talk to the Daytona Beach area
Democratic Club.
The governor said he will make
at least two speeches a day, with
the exception of days when the
State Cabinet meets, urging ap approval
proval approval of the bonds between now
and the Nov. 3 general election.
i

speaker system and contain an unusual collection
of sound effects.
The quality of the skits this year far exceeds
those in the past. They should provide good
entertainment for all who come to see them,
Hugh Fletcher, skit coordinator siad.
The organizations whose skits will be presented
tonight are Sigma Chi, Phi Kappa Tau, Alpha Delta
Pi, Alpha Epsilon Phi, Alpha Tau Omega, Delta
Tau Delta, Delta Epsilon, Delta Phi Epsilon, Kappa
Alpha Theta, Kappa Delta, Phi Gamma Delta,
Sigma Kappa, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon and
Graham Hall.

| Poor 'Ole Bill:
if Charlatan Boss
Hit By Fuzz
By CHERYL KURIT
alligator Staff Writer
Charlatan Editor Bill Killeen
was arrested yesterday in Tall Tallahassee
ahassee Tallahassee for selling the magazine
on that citys streets without a
permit.
According to Sgt. James Whid Whiddon
don Whiddon of the Tallahassee Police De Department,
partment, Department, In order to sell a
magazine on the citys streets, you
must apply for a permit, which is
free. Killeen did not have this
permit.
However, Charlatan Tallahassee
Business Manager John Terlouw
said the incident leading to Kil Killeens
leens Killeens arrest was, a drive by
the Catholic Womans Club to flood
the Tallahassee Police Department
and local newspapers with phone
calls in protest of the magazines
obscenity.
As for The Charlatan, voted last
year the nations number one
college humor magazine, Whiddon
reported that Killeens arrest had
nothing to do with the content
and no action has been taken ag against
ainst against the magazine.
Killeen has been released on
$l5O bond, Whiddon said, and
will be allowed sale of his mag magazine
azine magazine only if he applies for the
permit.

<3 2* mi JX CM -V I
cal ea djirJ

CRICKET CLUB: Oct. 10,
2 p.m., Fleming Field, game. Any Anyone
one Anyone welcome. For any information
call Dick Gammage, 372-2195.
NEWMAN CLUB: Oct. 9 a.m.
Center. Picnic at Goldhead State
Park. Sign list at the Center
and meet there. Non-members
75 cents.
XEROX
COPIES
NEW LOW PRICES AT
QUIK SAVE
1-19 Copies, 10? ea.- 20 &
Over, 9?
COPIES MADE
WHILE YOU WAIT
Service Available From
8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK SAVE
1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.

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SHE LIGHTS PHI MU LIGHTS
Diane ODell, 2UC from Orlando, likes anything that Is fun. Her
greatest weakness is buying shoes and eating peanuts.

SPTA: Today, 7 p.m., Med
Center, Room A-91. Speaker:
Dr. Sam Banks.
VISTA: Movie, Small Mira Miracle,"
cle," Miracle," Today, Thurs., Friday, 10-4
p.m. Florida Union Aud., con continuous
tinuous continuous showing.
UF YOUNG REPUBLICANS:
Oct. 7,7 p.m., Florida Union,
Room 121. Regular meeting, pres presentation
entation presentation of proposed by-laws.
SEMINAR: Dr. Edward Hac Hacsakylo,
sakylo, Hacsakylo, Forest Physiology Lab,
Beltsville, Md., on Current Status
of Mycorrhizal Research," Oct.
8, 3:40 p.m., McCarty Hall, Rm 6.
SEMINAR: Today, 3:40 p.m.,
McCarty Hall, Room 343, Topic:
Biochemical Basis for Differen Differentiation
tiation Differentiation in Pines." Speaker: Dr.
N. T. Mirov, Professor Emertus
of Geography, University of Caliv.,
Burke ley.
GATOR ADS SELL SELLGATOR
GATOR SELLGATOR ADS SELL

Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Angel Flight
Deadline Today
Today is the last day that ap applications
plications applications for Angel Flight Rush
will be accepted at the Florida
Union.
Rush parties will be held Oct. 7,
ROTC Building third floor, 7-8
p.m. for A-l and 8-9p.m.for M-Z.
Those unable to attend 7-8 p.m.
meeting are welcome for the 8-9
p.m. meeting.
DOUBLE ALARMS
JOPUNE, Mo. (UPI)--Firemen
answered two alarms Thursday,
one at the home of Edward Trease
and the other at the home of
his brother. Arthur.
Both Edward and Arthur are
city firemen.
fN STITCHES
r lue Arts Committee of the Flo Florida
rida Florida Union Board will have its
first class on Stitchery in Paint Painting
ing Painting for Fun Series," Oct. 11,
at 7:30 p.m.
Six lessons are given at a cost
of $5. The limit on the class
is set at 30 people, with classes
held on consecutive Mondays.
All those interested, may sign
up in Room 315 Florida l/nion.

Page 3



Page 4

i, The Florida Alligator. Wednesday. Oct. ft. lflftft

"\V\ ioH
/v v\ sale
located in the HUB K

ATOMS AND THE UNIVERSE. By
G. O. Jones, et al. An account of
modern views on the structure of
matter and the universe. Among
the illustrations, which include
both plates and diagrams, are a
number of beautiful photographs
taken with the great 200-inch re reflecting
flecting reflecting telescope on Mount Palo Palomar.
mar. Palomar. Rev. ed. Pub. at $4.50. Sale
$1.98
UJS. Soviet Detente AST&A AST&A-TEGY
TEGY AST&A-TEGY OK INTERDEPENDENCE.
By Vincent P. Rock. Subtitled A
Program for the Control of Con Conflict
flict Conflict Between the United States and
the Soviet Union, this seminal
book calls for a "hew strategy of
common action, from space tech technology
nology technology to the arts, in order to
create a web of mutual interest
and community. Masterly, im impressive
pressive impressive synthesis Margaret
Mead. Pub. at $7.50. Sale $1.98
PEKING AND MOSCOW. By Klaus
Mehnert. The Wests leading au authority
thority authority on Russo-Chinese relations
probes deeper into the ideological
and power-political significance of
the Sino-Soviet conflict. A book
for the intelligent general reader
as well as the specialist Hugh
Seton-Watson. Pub. at $6.95. Sale
$1.98.
Edward Lasker's CHESS
RETS. Great champion reveals the
key moves, attacks and defenses
he learned from Emanuel Lasker,
Capablanca, Alekhine and other
chess wizards during a lifetime
of friendly competition. Illus. Pub.
at $5.00. Sale $1.98
RED CHINAS FIGHTING HORDES.
By Lt. Col. Robert B. Rigg. A
first-hand no-holds-barred ac account
count account of Red Chinas frightening
blueprint for the complete conquest
of Asia. Illus. Pub. at $4.00. Sale
.99
GREAT DRAWINGS OF THE
MASTERS. Ed. by J. E. Schuler.
Text by Rolf Hansler. Brilliantly
chosen, imcomparable reproduced
collection of 112 of the worlds
greatest drawings, from Leonardo
and Michelangelo to Picasso and
Matisse. Extensive notes discuss
the history of each drawing, as
well as style, school and technique.
A real contribution James
Humphrey HI, Metropolitan Mu Museum
seum Museum of Art. Pub.*t $25.00. Sale
$11.95
THE ECONOMISTS OF THE NEW
FRONTIER. Ed. by B. H. Wilkins
& C. B. Friday. Basic selections
from the works of Rostow, Gal Galbraith,
braith, Galbraith, Heller, Bell and others who
laid the groundwork for Kennedy-
Johnson program. Pub. at $5.95.
Sale $1.98.
PEACE THEORY. Preconditions
of Disarmament. By John W. Bur Burton.
ton. Burton. A noted authority on inter international
national international relations probes the vital
problems of war and peace and the
ways to avert a nuclear catas catastrophe.
trophe. catastrophe. Pub. at $5.50. Sale .99

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Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1965

EDITORIALS
guaranteed as
A n experiment last fall on an
alternative to the standard
grading system sparks the hope
that somehow, someday, something
will he done to improve a system
which has usually been regarded
as unfortunate, hut unchangable.
The rationale behind the present
system is that it provides an in incentive
centive incentive for learning and it mea measures
sures measures learning. Both theories have
been seriously questioned, even
contradicted. Many believe that
grade-grubbing inhibits learning.
In two General College courses,
275 students were guaranteed As
at the beginning of the quarter.
Control classes, taught by the same
instructors, were given the same
courses under the standard grading
system.
Performance of the two groups
was judged on various criteria and
according to one of the instructors,
the groups performances were
about equal. Though results may
be different in other classes, it
bears investigating.
We applaud the experiments, and
hope they will continue with an eye
toward developing a workable sys system
tem system for the University.
The Minnesota Daily
thanks
rjT he Alligator wishes to thank
the members of the Univer University
sity University Senate for their action yester yesterday
day yesterday in waiving the by-laws of the
Senate and opening their meeting
to members of the press.
We also wish to urge the Senate
to use this action as a precedent
and allow the press to attend and
report future meetings which per pertain
tain pertain to newsworthy educational
matters.
This action gives the press the
added opportunity of better under understanding
standing understanding the policies of the UF.
Further, it shows the interest
of those concerned in producing
an effective, up-to-date compre comprehension
hension comprehension of what is taking place.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Drex Dobson . assistant managing editor
Bill Lockhart editorial page editor
Andy Moor sports editor
Eunice Tall features editor
Gene Nail wire editor
Fran Snider student government editor
Peggy Blanchard coed editor
JUdy Miller greek editor
Associate Editors: Bob Wilcox, Bruce Dudley,
Terry Miller, Yvette Cardozo, Justine Hartman,
Cheryl Kurit, Edifo Sears.
Norma Bell Jim Bailey Susan Froemke
Sue Kennedy Leslie Marks Steven Brown
Elaine Fuller Mike Willard Kathie Keim
Kristy Kimball Judy Knight Jane Solomon
Suzieadleston Sharon Robinson Howard Rosenblatt
Dick Dennis Arlene Capian

The
Florida Alligator
Steve Vaughn Benny Cason
Editor Managing Editor
GARY CORSERIS
CUT OUTS OUTSis
is OUTSis name was Oscar and he wore a beard, and that was two strikes
against him right there without trying very hard, without being
a communist or having atheistic tendencies. He wore a beard and his
name was Oscar and he played chess and he wrote poetry and he was,
in all intents and purposes, an okay guy, a Guru amongst men.
To Oscar it was all a great chess game. Invisible cosmic forces
motivated the players, and the players moved according to design.
With Oscar it was simply a chess game with so many patterns, so
many designs, so many ways for the pieces to move, and after a few
billion years, after the sun had died and the lilacs ceased to bloom,
then all the patterns would have been developed, the pieces would have
moved Avagadros-number of times and would have been all worn out,
and the universe was going to explode, and it would start all over
again, time without end, hail, hail, full of grace, ad infinitum, the
gangs all here.

They werent going to let Oscar into school because they said he
wasnt becoming. Oscar wasnt certain what it was he ought to be
becoming. They had said he was unbecoming and they had left it at
that because Oscar was a poet and he wore a beard, and it was ob obviously
viously obviously unimportant anyway.
The cosmic forces sighed and deliberated and chuckled and wept,
and Oscar found himself in uniform in some country the name of
which he could not properly pronounce. And they told him to go and
fight and maybe mangle up a bit some people he didnt properly dislike.
And they told him to come back upon his shield because it was, after
all, patriotic to come back upon ones shield, and it would make in interesting
teresting interesting reading back home and would make his mother proud. Oscars
mother Jiad disowned him when he was six, when he had begun to write
his poetry and grow his beard.

The armies amassed and the cosmic forces went right on chuckling.
They shaved his beard and they told him to sack the poetry. But he
couldnt sack the poetry stuff because it was in him, and he couldnt
speak but the words came out music, and his fingers strummed the
weapon like a lyre, and the weapon sang out Rata tatat! Rata
tatat! And the enemy whom Oscar couldnt properly dislike came to
listen to the music, and stayed to listen to the music, and died with
the music still singing in their ears, and the insects, silent.
His name was Oscar and he was a poet and he was a killer, and he
loved the gentleness of life, and he loved to hear his weapon singing
in its strange strong voice in his firm and gentle hands.
A long time ago they had said he was unbecoming. He had wanted
to write poetry, and to wear a beard, and he had wanted to know a few
things. But he knew it all now. And the memory was fading. It had
happened a billion years ago, and it was destined to happen again, one
billion years hence. His name was Oscar, and the Cosmic forces
rejoiced and wept; and somewhere pawns were sacrificed, and the
music stopped, and people became, and people would become
Rata tatat! Ra tatat! Hail, hail, full of grace .

radically speaking I
.By ED RICHER J
y first month at the University of Florida B
ijjjjan all too quickly done four years ago B
ashamedly pushed me into shaving off a so-so walr
mustache and unashamedly writing a letter to Tfl
Alligator. We had arrived inauspicious ly, as bes isl
a new nobody instructor on his first teaching B
My 1955 Hudson would never recover its spirit aftfl
having hauled a badly ioaued trailer from Minne
polis not to mention myself, my eight- mont
pregnant wife, and our late, lamented black cal
Kate. We had S4O, a job, lots of books and record!
and like everyone else who first comes here,|
big-eyed optimism that cant wait for the actio!
WE DROVE around the campus, admittedly charm!
ed by the looks of the place. Whatever else one hal
to say about Florida, it looks like a college. En!
sconced in his Building D niche, upstairs from wher!
I was to stick it out for four years, was Mike Mean!
several years pregnant with his Ph.D. It was im!
possibly hot as the three of us talked, two stranger!
and an old hand, a fan blowing away what it coul!
of our sweat. A lot of men have gone grey in Buildin!
D, training for the educational chore, and gone wear!
and cynical, too.
Also on hand was the last issue of the Sum me!
Alligator, awaiting freshmen and newcomers alikeJ
I wrote my letter after reading a story that quote!
the schools head psychiatrist to the effect that!
freshmen should be wary of new ideas at college.!
I was green enough to be dismayed and angry; it
was my first exposure to that all-American program
of making students safe for ideas.
QUITE INDIRECTLY I ran into the same
psychiatrist later in my first year. She had called
the C-l chairman to inform him that, in her judgment,
the course content of American Institutions had ac accounted
counted accounted for a dozen or so emotionally disturbed
students. Might you not consider," she said sweetlj
thinning it down some? (As a matter of fact, C Ctoday
today Ctoday hasnt half the punch it had then)*When he tol
me about the incident, I was both annoyed and com complimented:
plimented: complimented: annoyed by the bankrupt notion that
teachers, texts, and ideas are the debilitating stress
on student lives, and complimented as a C-l teacher
who served deliberately what I called the intellectual
garbage man role. I used to tell my students, I
collect psychic garbage, I truck it out of your brains
every day, and the dump is nowhere near full. For
the most part I was joking, but in some manne r of
speaking its true: a well-educated graduating sei lor
is more emptied than he is full. Its the garbage they
bring with them to college that is the real challenge.

WE SHOULD be proud of ourselves, I told the
chairman, thats a real compliment to the course.
At the time I was convinced that the texts Parkes,
Hofstadter, Meyer, Heilbroner, in particular made
a difference. Now the best I have to say for texts is
that they can be a useful foil for teasing students;
thats about as far as you can go with a generation
that learns more from one another and from the
authoritarian experience of college as as institution
than they do from authors and teachers. After a year
of C-l, my C-5 sophomores couldnt even define an
institution, but they had become extraordin. ii 1 v
sophisticated in their defenses against a partied
one.
But carrying on within the myth that education
consists of books and course: are all sorts of
crusaders, censors, and cowards.
A RIGHTWING lady from Pensacola visited the
C-l chairman to complain about the ieftwing bias of
the course. She wanted to talk to the staff, probably
to test how seriously conspiratorial they were. The
idea of so honest a confrontation made immediate
sense to me, but the chairman balked. The fact was
that the best texts, unresponsive as the students were
to them, were leftwing, her interests were nowhere
represented in the curriculum, and nobody had the
nerve to publicly acknowledge it.
In another case an unlamented previous head of
C-5 had included in his text some selections from
Lenins State and Revolution. Secretly, he had made
the rounds of the radical right to manage a sophis sophistical
tical sophistical okay to its inclusion. Lenin himself would have
objected, the selections are so unconvincing to
American middle class students. To consult or not to
consult with the rightwing is hardly the issue it* s
the sham battles of administrators out of contact
with education and the students that is so embar embarrassing.
rassing. embarrassing. In both cases the sole motivation was to plot
in protective secrecy to avoid public disturbance.
THE NET RESULT of which is to maximize con conditions
ditions conditions that trigger uncreative private cT sturbances.
Research increasingly confirms what is implied by
Harold Websters findings at Vassar, A consistent
trend is for seniors to be higher than freshmen on
the following scales: Hypochondriasis, Depression.
Hysteria, Psychopathic Deviate, Schizophrenia, and
Mania. And Ferdynand Zweig, in his The Student
in **ie Age of Anxiety, concludes, there is little
doubt that the young are becoming old before their
time.
So are their teachers.



ditor:
Ed Richer and other local activists seem basic basicly
ly basicly convinced that theres no objective truth to be
arned from the social sciences. Most historians
old expressions such as failure of nerve .
cher does not even know If his cause is better*
d not simply new.
THEIR UNWARRANTED prescription is rebellion
r the sake of rebellion. Pretty innocent, right?
Wrong, in the Jan. 28th analysis The Lesson of
jrkeley, observed: The student leftist move moveonly
only moveonly here
Editor:
For those freshmen taking Freshman English
up here for the first (or second or third) time,
things arent as bad as they could be as des described
cribed described in a letter of a friend from another
college.
I HAVE HAD hysterics watching my Fresh Freshman
man Freshman English professor deliver a lecture on
poetry and throw things -- like paper airplanes
around the class ...
Here, at least, this only happens in certain
engineering courses. Take heart you all, things ft:
could be worse!
Rick C. Seid, 2UC $
he lied
Editor:
I do not go to football games, so I do not care if
Bruce Culpepper and his cabinet sit on the 50-yard
line, the concession stand, or the players bench.
Nevertheless, he promised last election student
government would not get preferential seating.
BUT TODAY I saw in the paper that he says they
will sit on the 50-yard line for the Homecoming
Game, and the two games following. He gave me the
impression that he always knew he would change his
promise of last year, in others words, he lied to
us when he was campaigning for president, and knew
he was lying.
I DIDNT VOTE last year, and now Im glad I
didnt. I might have voted for Culpepper!
If his actions reflect on the character of candidates
who are presently running for office, Ill make it a
point not to vote this year too.
Bob Jervett, 3AS
t
argument
Editor:
Argument against integration Why dont you
marry a Negro?
Argument* against Socialism Why dont you go
to Russia?
Argument against socialized medicine Why dont
you go to England?
Mr. Hardys awjl Mr. Vlnas argument against Mr.
Jordan and Mr. Wittschucks opinion on Viet Nam
Why arent they fighting in Viet Nam?
Gentlemen: These are arguments one would expect
to find given at a small town gas station, not at a
University.
William A. McCallum, 3AG
pleased
EDITOR:
If we, as'freshmen, were disappointed in Gator
spirit for the Miss. St. game, we were doubly pleased
with the upgraded enthusiasm shown against LJS.U.
Lets keep it up!
Stefan Lupkiewicz, iUC
Note:
All letters to the Editor will be accepted when
typed double spaced and not less than 250 words in
length. Please include your name and telephone
number. Names will be withheld on request. Editor

letters

wrong

ments are growing and probably will continue to
grow . The indifference to legality shown by
serious and dedicated students threatens the foun foundations
dations foundations of democratic order.
I WAS TALKING about two weeks ago, with Marilyn
Nobel, onetime secretary to Mario Savio, onetime
leader of the Berkeley rebels. I asked her about the
philosophy of that highly emotional movement.
It was something like existentialism, I was in informed.
formed. informed. After one or two more questions, she con confessed
fessed confessed that she really didnt know too much about
it yet.
BUT SAVIO and company proved to be great
improvisers. A typical subterfuge was the curious
definition of force as a legitimate way of dealing
with ones opponents, while violence was body bodyto-body
to-body bodyto-body contact (morally reprehensible). One com commentator
mentator commentator noted: If Savio seizes a microphone he
has no right to use, that is force; if a policeman
drags him away from it, that is violence.
Miss Nobel told me she was in Florida to look into
the possibility of starting a Savio-type movement
here.
I BELIEVE human life is too precious a cause
to be ruled by the frratlonal. Any student who agrees,
and is familiar with Ayn Rands Objectivism, is
invited to drop me a card (with return address):
214 N. W. 14th Street. If you take philosophy, lets
form a sftidy group!
Joe Scheb, 7AS
too lazy
Dear Editor:
In your too lazy editorial, you summed up my
feelings about student elections and student govern government
ment government in general. I dont give a damn, and I wont give
a damn until student politicos can offer me something
really important. Not good football seats, voluntary
ROTC, or the fence, but something similar to the
Oscar Woody case, or a Florida resident paying out outof-state
of-state outof-state tuition.
Since Student Government does not do anything
along these lines, and less than 25% of the students
vote, why have student government? lean not see that
it does any real good here on campus, except to
cause a lot of confusion and provide a stepping stone
for a few students in this states corrupt politics.
Wade Kane, 2UC
COW-COW I
Dear Editor:
With baited breath we scan your list of college >:j
football scores taking note of the progress of the ft:
likes of Florida, Notre Dame, Texas, Arkansas, X
and Nebraska, but we anxiously look to see who ft:
most recently felt the might of that national ft:
power the mighty COW-COW COLLEGE. For £
the uninformed the powerful COW-COW eleven
most recently crushed perennial power Burke, >
by the score of 30 to 0. This leaves COW-COW ft
with an unblemished record of three wins and ft
no losses as they march towards an undefeated
season, and their first national championship. ;>
We eagerly anticipate future COW-COW ft
triumphs. How now, COW-COW. What a Fink! ft
Jay Angert, 2UC ft:
Peter Jonas, 3BA jft
Larry Mackson, 2UC .'.ft
Cow-Cow never loses. EDITOR.
_ .. ..T.vmJ.T.i IluV'
art exhibit
Editor:
After recovering from a severe attack of revulsion,
I felt the public would appreciate a non pseudo pseudointellectural
intellectural pseudointellectural review of the so-called Art Exhibit.
If this trash is what is considered Art by the
teachers of future artists, Lord have mercy on our
cultural world! Art may be a form of expression,
but who cares to see the expressions of either
vulgarity or inanity? Art should be something beau beautiful
tiful beautiful that can be viewed with pleasure, not something
that reminds one of chicken intestines, or worse.
The only kind thing I can say about the exhibit is
that it provided a friend and me with a hearty laugh.
Name Withheld

the war
WICHITA, Ka. (UPI) A young Marine who wrote that Viet Nam is
worse than hell, said he had to kill a woman and baby.
In a letter to his mother, Wilson wrote:
There are so many Cong here that in three days we captured 12
and killed 33.
Mom, I had to kill a woman and a baby. We were sweeping the
jungle and all of a sudden the Cong opened up on us. People were
falling and Cong were clipping 81 mortars on us. The lietuenant had
us move out toward the firing. We killed eight Cong and about 30 got
away.
Anyway we were searching the dead Cong when a wife of the one I
was checking ran out of a cave and picked up a submachine gun and
started firing at us.
I shot her and my rifle is automatic, so before I knew it I had shot
about six rounds. Four of them hit her and must have bounced off the
rock wall and hit the baby. The baby was about two months old. He
didnt feel any pain, Pm sure .
I swear to God this place is worse than hell. Why must I kill women
and kids? Who knows whos right? They think they are and we think
we are ... I wish to God this was over.
You Can Count on Us...
Quality Costs No More at Sears
I Heres the Classic 1
Example of Smart 1
Cardigan Styling |
v ! V
Virgin Alpaca Sweaters f
SAVE $4,111 $12 m |
Reg. 516.99...3 Days Onlyl I
Feel the richness, elasticity and shape reten- m
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solids in small to extra-large sizes. 1
CHARGE IT ff
on Sears Revolving Charge v
Satufaction Guaranteed or Your Money Back
Shop at Sears Or< A|JO N.W. 23rd BLVD
and Save 0l!t/\I\.0 AT 13th STREET

Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator. Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1965

v ib | a
8F... W B
111 F 1 BLiJBHBPr
W : B
Bf h^|
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Kv
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A final check on security from Linda
Saunders lUC, assures her that her
money is in safe hands at University
City Bank.
There are two drive-in teller win windows
dows windows open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m., Monday through Thursday. The
main lobby hours are 9:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. and both the lobby and
drive-in teller windows are open
Friday until 6:00 p.m
I i
in
llb m ..b wH
B
It
K *B I a IV I B
..vyw :BBjB. ? jsjfs£v | B B B
Sherry Brush 4HS, calls on Mr.
Mort fashions from Silverman's to
meet the arrival of cool weather.
This 100% dark cotton print, ac accented
cented accented with white collar and cuffs
is perfect for school dates and
football games. You'll score with
your date in fashions from Silver Silverman's.
man's. Silverman's. Come in and see the fall
collection. You'll be glad you did!

University
City Bank
Silvermans

3 ML % wj J|
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Jerrys

Gators and)
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Blj
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I The tigers are coming! warns Tr
1 October 7, We suggest you dearth
bring them all down to Tropical Pom
The tigers, of course, are our ow
they dont bite. Were going to k
announcement day on October 7. Th(
get cl good close look at our 1966 ti
I invited



it Together
Gainesville
' im tiM§i3

> 11
&_, ', ~ 4lot Bi
f 11
C#*SV V B
bical Pontiac. They'll be in town 1
street of women and children and
2c for a tiger party."
Pontiac Wide-Track tigers and
ve a great party . to celebrate
\e will be refreshments, and you'll
ers." The showroom will be open
attending the tiger party. All are
* BBS
Pontiac I
MM With two locations on
13th Street Jerry's is
always ready to serve
you. Join Linda
Saunders, KD, for their
delicious Fresh Straw Strawmm
mm Strawmm berry Pie with whipped
cream. If you're in a
|4H hurry, phone for carry
||B||l out service. Your dinner
or snack will be hot and
ready when you arrive.
-- Now at the comer of
13th Street and 16 th
Avenue and 2310 S. W.
SUB 13th Street.

I think I'll take the
Ladybug home," says
Sherry Brush, KD.
You should check with
Donigan's too for all the
popular brand name
clothing and the latest
in campus fashions.
Personal service and a
friendly atmosphere
make Donigan's a fav favorite
orite favorite spot at which to
browse or buy.
Donigans

/ m m Ia /A W, mII Est
I Bi B li
1 amM
if i| fA
W B Bi l j B
If iH I|w #i' f
mj jtf ypjjp.; m
E-Z Wash

Twig
Perfect for Early Fall!
Fashion predicts a
beautiful way of campus
life for you this fall ..
with versatile sports sportswear
wear sportswear playing a most
important part. Dress in
good taste with that Twig
look - Just one
block from campus at
1131 West University
Avenue.

Wednesday,. Oct. 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator.

* 1 1 l- I
. p* Mfe -" ; a* SBt
* ft ft tm *T?. 'fli; L I Hi
Ml J I RW)< >#* .Jiof*' Hn W *|M BUB
*8 ? Km
, 's'&: | jff lA 'A j, wf ff§? f ; &
$ fs*. 4 "A **! H
pH|| gB : a:;
E?t r s a ,^^^HLJ||
-
v Tp ,> %kHH VliMfw JEWt v *** **
-gjA, -i ' -V
S I llli I I

\ fli i j p "
111 Audia
VPWRI, f

No one minds doing their
laundry in a completely
air conditioned coin
laundry! You can wash
anytime 24 hrs. a
day and the 14 lb.
washer is only 25 f. E-Z
Wash is brand new and
Mildred and Charlie
welcome all U of F stu students
dents students to come do their
laundry in comfort. It's
right across from the
street from the Twig at
1126 W. University
Avenue.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Oct. 6. 1965

6ATOR CLASSIFIEDS
w \

r
services
WILL DO IRONING in my home.
Call 376-4086 after 5:00 p.m.
(M-18-10t-c).
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios, 372-0300. (M (M---8-ts-c).
--8-ts-c). (M---8-ts-c).
EXPERIENCED TYPIST would like
to do typing In home. Especially in interested
terested interested In thesis and dissertation.
Call Mrs. B. E. Steptoe at 372-
5879. (M-22-st-c).
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Chaflie
and Mildred would like to say hello
and invite you to visit their brand
new, fully air-conditioned coin
laundry, E-Z Wash, featuring
Gainesvilles only 14 lb. washer
for 255. 1126 W. Univ. Laundry
next to McCollums Drugs. (M (M---18-l3t-c).
--18-l3t-c). (M---18-l3t-c).
for sale
1963 MARLETTE Mobile Home
10x55. 3 bedroom, air-condition air-conditioning,
ing, air-conditioning, washer, utility house, fenced
yard. Call 6-8896 after g:3O p.m.
Plnehurst Park. (A-20-10t-c).
1965 HONDA, 805 Super Hawk. 4
months old, never raced or in
accident. With Fiberglass saddle
bags & luggage rack. Has 8 months
to go on collision insurance. Call
6-4995 and leave number. Will call
back. (A-22-4t-c).
G. E. PORTABLE STEREO, record
player just over-hauled. Call
Wayne Rm 410 after 10:30 p.m.
376-9372. (A-22-4t-c).
ENGAGEMENT RING. New, never
worn, 65 pts. Retails for SBOO.
Will sell to first person with S4OO.
cash. May be appraised locally.
Guaranteed. Call 2-1076 around
noon or anytime after 5:00 p.m.
Or see Joe Reda in apartment
above Teds Tavern. (A-22-3t-c).
1 .r 1
1957 CUSHMAN EAGLE De Dependable
pendable Dependable transportation. 5 hp. S9O.
or best offer. Call FR 8-4280 after
7 p.m. (A-22-3t-c).

ANYONE
who purchased
a 1964-65 Seminole
last years)
pick it up
NOW
in Room 9, Florida Union.
EXTRA COPIES GO ON SALE
OCTOBER 15th.

for sale
GIBSON VANGUARD AMPLIFIER,
dual channel, tremolo, reverb
echo, only 4 mos. old, great shape.
Call Sol, 378-4781. Must sell.
Lets deal.
1965 PIEDMONT Mobile Home.
2 bedroom, 1 bath, automatic
washer. Pay closing and pick up
payment of S6O. monthly. At Pine Pinehurst
hurst Pinehurst Park, Lot 3. Call 8-2472
after 5:00. (A-22-st-c).
ROYAL TYPEWRITER. Sacrifice!
Need cash! Royalite 65, never
used. Will sell for $35. or best
offer. Originally cost over S6O.
Call David Singer, PILAM 376-
9365. (A-23-lt-c).
CLEGG 6 METER TRANSCEIVER,
SBS. Heath CW Transmitter $35.
Bow, arrows, etc., $lO. Call Leon
Morrison 372-6093, after 5:30 p.m.
(A-23-lt-p).
HOUSE TRAILER, 22, bath with
shower, stove and refrigerator.
Excellent condition. $750. Ideal for
1 or 2 students. See at 511 NW
14 Ave. (A-23-3t-c).
4 BURNER APARTMENT STOVE,
electric. l- 1 /2 years old. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. $75. Phone 372-
1315. (A-23-3t-c).
STEREOPHONIC TAPE RECORD RECORDER
ER RECORDER madeby Telectro, $175. Almost
brand new. Call Bill at 8-4248.
(A-23-3t-c).
64 HONDA SUPER HAWL, 305 cc.
Best offer. Call 376-0006 after 12.
(A-23-lt-p).
help wanted
TYPIST: Student or student wife
to work evenings on Alligator,
preparing copy on special electric
typewriters. 2 or 3 evenings per
week, 4 hours per evening. Good
typing skill mandatory. (E-23-tf (E-23-tfnc)
nc) (E-23-tfnc)
WAITER WANTED: Part-time
from 4-8 p.m. 5 day week. Apply
in person. Larrys Wonderhouse,
14 SW 1 St. (E-23-ts-c).

help wanted
WOLFIES RESTAURANT FULL
OR PART-TIME WAITERS AND
WAITRESSES. DAY OR NIGHT.
SEE MR. DERKAS OR MR. SCIG SCIGLIA.
LIA. SCIGLIA. (E-22-st-c).
PART-TIME SALESMAN wanted.
10% commission for sale of adver advertising.
tising. advertising. Call 2-6019 for appoint appointment.
ment. appointment. (E-22-ts-c).
ARE YOU EASILY discouraged?
If the answer is no and you want
to gain experience in meeting the
public, and be trained in handling
people, call Mr. Baker at 8-2966
between 10 and 5. You must be
able to work 20 hours per week
including 2 evenings. A S4O per
week salary will be earned by
those qualified. (E-19-ts-c).
personal
mi I. mm/m n
WELCOME, KYNRIC Pell, Jr.
Well miss your mommie, but
were glad ydure here The
St. Pub. Crew.
READY FOR THE NEW LOOK?
Tenas just returned from the
Jacksonville Trade Show with the
new short curly cut, fantasy eye eyedos,
dos, eyedos, Paris styled hair coloring
and make-up. For Appointment call
372-5549. 319 W. University Ave.
(J-21-ts-c).
ATTENTION STUDENTS: If you
purchased a Seminole last year
bring your receipt by Room 9 in
the Florida Union and claim your
book. All unclaimed books will go
on sale Oct. 15. (J-16-10t-nc).
RALPH WOULD LIKE TO INFORM
all his friends that the Loach is
coming. (J-23-lt-p).
lost & found
' |
LOST: Eye glasses with black
frames in vicinity of Florida Field
Saturday, Oct. 2. Reward offered.
Call Ron Christen 372-8836. (L (L---23-2t-c).
--23-2t-c). (L---23-2t-c).
$25. REWARD FOR RETURN of
Smokey, male, Sealpoint Sia Siamese.
mese. Siamese. Lost 9-2-65. No questions
asked. NW section. Call 372-8242.
(L-23-3t-c).
REWARD FOR THE RETURN of
Tommy, a dark gray kitten,
with white paws and stomach. Has
gold collar on. House mothers pet.
Vicinity of Frat. Row, Newberry
Road or Flavet HI. Seen near Mur Murphree
phree Murphree Area. Please call 372-0947.
(L-23-2t-c).

STARTS FRIDAY GAINESVUIE Sfff
ALAIN DELON-AN N-NIARGRET
VAN HEFLIN-JACK PALANCE
OnceaThief
H Jjft# w v ffl
HR H
s"SinkvilleSH

autos
1959 FORD CONVERTIBLE, V-8.
Good top and tires. Good price.
Call Bob Travis 378-3279. (G
19-st-c).
1956 PLYMOUTH, 6-cylinder,
standard shift, good condition
throughout. $225. or best offer.
Call 372-0297. (G-23-3t-c).
for rent
ONE BEDROOM Furnished lake
cottage. Lake Winnott, 23 miles
from Gainesville. Lake privileges
$35 monthly. Call Mr. Kaplan, 372-
0481. (B-l-ts-c).
PETER PAN MOTEL Only 20
minutes from Gainesville on U. S.
41 in Williston. Roomy and modern.
Spring Air Beds. Free TV, Air
conditioned. Coffee in rooms. Re Reserve
serve Reserve rooms now for University
events. Also special rates for
students by week or month. Phone
JA 8-3941. (B-19-7t-c).
MODERN-STUDIO-TYPE apart apartment.
ment. apartment. 1-2 people. Furnished. 212
SE 7 St. During day at 372-3617,
at dinner time 378-3289. (A-23-
3t-c).
r2H^9nm
rA MIJiHBiy
TostT Nites
is
H
DOUGLAS
n* OTTO PREMINGCft FILM

for rent
BEGINNING JAN. 1 2 bedroom
apartment. 1/2 mile from campus.
Furnished, air-conditioned, strip
heat, swimming pool. $l4O/mo.
Phone 372-5542. (B-23-2t-p).
Downstairs apartment for Univer University
sity University man. Furnished.lllSW3Ave.
or call 376-9864. (B-21-3t-c).
real estate
SSOO DOWN, 3 bedroom, 2 bath
carport and patio. Concrete block
construction. Central heating. New
air-conditioner and TV antenna.
Newly painted. 2008 NE 17th Terr.
Call 376-0549. (I-19-st-c).
wanted
ONE OR TWO RIDERS to New Or Orleans
leans Orleans on weekend of October Bth.
Leave Thursday night return early
Monday morning. Call Ford, 372-
7818. (C-19-3t-c).
RIDERS WANTED TO COCOA or
points between. Every weekend.
Leave Friday return Sunday. $3.00
each way. Call 372-6450 after 6
p.m. Monday Thursday. (C (C---18-3t-c).
--18-3t-c). (C---18-3t-c).
: j
: U 5.... dFfgf:
and find
answer
to the WZT 52:
: question
: ofthe JgEm
; year/
*
m presents
Peter Peter :
: Sellers 6 Toole :
Rornu Schneider \
Capudne :
: Pauta Prentiss :
sod least but not last
Woody Allen
j UrsulaAndress j
Theyre al together igwi!
(for the first time!)
ei
c TMSnCTUKM
.
Riiimd hv UMTED ARTISTS
TECHNICOLOR*
: 1:10 3:10 5:10 '
**.
GATOR ADS SELL SELLGATOR
GATOR SELLGATOR ADS SELL SELLGATOR
GATOR SELLGATOR ADS SELL
-



Senate Condemns Burns 9 Cabinet For Political Meddling

Continued From Page One
A loud Aye resounded
throughout the auditorium when a
resolution supporting Reitz finally
came to a vote.
Other organizations have also
commended the president. The
jainesville City Commission met
n special session and urged Reitz
iot to resign his position at the
jniversity.
UFs Legislative Council passed
i resolution endorsing Reitz last
light.
The Senate resolution passed
;aid the Senate views with dismay
he growing deadlock between the

El Contestants Entered
In Mrs. UF Competition

I Twenty-one contestants have entered Saturdays
prs. UF contest, sponsored by the Universitys
leneral Dames and presented by the Medical Dames.
Final judging will be at 8 p.m. Saturday at
1> K. Yonge Auditorium where entrants will appear
M\ sportswear and short cocktail dresses.
I Contestants will be judged on homemaking skills,
s well as be ity, poise, personality, intelligence
Mnd general knowledge. Judges will conduct personal
fcterviews and rate homemaking skills prior to
ieir final decision.
I Five finalists will be named and each finalist
Bill be asked two questionsone humorous and
ne serious. Judges then will name the winner
nd four runners up.
I Contestants are:

Matu re Audience
Mature Aud
Audience
THEATRE ADVERTISING ~ LX
I TO- GRAND
ISfelAl OPENING
TSSIf jpiyfJL
| | 23rt ROAD BIVO j Tomorrow: Open 12:30.
Cont. Shows Daily from 1 p.m.
I PAR AMOUNTP ,CTURES Lets Get 1
I John Wayne
Mon. thru Fri.
11DEMI WARmi[i^J
I I From the four winds they came,the four brothers, I
I their eyes smoking and their fingers itching... I
I MARTHA HYER MICHAEL ANDERSON, JR.
I ACRES ROCKING | [ ART
I OF CHAIR GALLERY
I FREE LOGE F OR
I PARKING SEATS UXAL
L ARTISTS

State universities of Florida and
the Budget Commission over the
issue of internal management of
educational matters at the univer universities.
sities. universities.
The Seante warned, in the reso resolution
lution resolution which will be sent to the
Board of Regents, the Budget Com Commission,
mission, Commission, the Board of Education,
and other state agencies, that the
entire status of higher education
in the State of Florida can well be
placed in jeopardy.
The action referred to the
meddling in the state university
budgets after they had been ap approved
proved approved by the university presidents
and the Board of Regents.

DAYTONA BEACHCindy Eden. EAU GALLIE
Robin Bissey, FT. LAUDERDALEBecky Black Blackwood,
wood, Blackwood, Noel Liles, Mary Morris, GAINESVILLE
Carolyn Daniel, GREEN COVE SPRINGS
Rose Marie McCall, JACKSONVILLEJoyce Bryan,
Joyce Lowe, SARASOTA--LynnEdgar, ST. PETERS PETERSBURG
BURG PETERSBURG Emily Safko TAMP ARoberta Aldrich,
Mary Ann House, VENICE--Duchess Hodson.
OUT OF STATE
CALIFORNIA, TorrancePatricia Wipf, GEOR GEORGIA,
GIA, GEORGIA, ThomasvilleJean Schwartz; WaycrossCat WaycrossCathryn
hryn WaycrossCathryn Morris, INDIANA, Bluffton Betty Parsons,
MINNESOTA, Excelsior--Virginia Lundquist, VIR VIRGINIA,
GINIA, VIRGINIA, Waynesboro--Patricia Whitaker.
OUT OF COUNTRY
PERU, LimaMadeleine Van Walleghem.

The principle involved is the
right of the universities to make
educational decisions subject to the
approval of the Board of Regents
and subject to regular state audit
of expenditures, the resolution
read.
It added the position taken by the
president is consistent with the
standard mode of operation in high higher
er higher education in the other 49 states.
It is not one in which he re requests
quests requests unusual powers or complete
autonomy for the individual uni universities.
versities. universities.
The meeting was called to a pe petition
tition petition signed by 93 of the 400-odd
members of the Senate, Dr. Man-

DOES MACY'S WELCOME
GIMBEL'S? WHO CARES?
ANYHOW
We like Gainesville...
We think Gainesville is
deserving of a new thea theatre.
tre. theatre. The Plaza is new
AND nice...
ERGO
WELCOME
to the PLAZA
from the SFA TE
BUT
just in case you
can't get out there t'nite,
WE'RE PLAYING
JULES BR/CKENpresents I
in JOHN ERANHENHE/MER S |
EXTRA!
1 "JK THE PINK i
> ssr-t PANTHER, i
-COLOR J
* iW UNtUD MUSTS it
|*s*|Dj*t*l*l*A
fgBW 1:30 4:00
Jiff

Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

ning Dauer, chairman of the
Steering Committee said.
Dr. Dauer also revealed the
Steering Committee passed a re resolution
solution resolution last Thursday on Floridas
budget and fiscal administration in
relation to higher education.
Dauer said the resolution goes
to the heart of the problem.
An amendment to strengthen to todays
days todays resolution died for lack of a
second.
The amendment, proposed by
Physics Professor Arthur Broy Broyles,
les, Broyles, read, The Senate feels that
the citizens of the State of Florida
should be informed that tax dollars
cannot be effective spent for the
operation of a university by state
officials in Tallahassee.
This statement applies to the
universities in the same way it
applies to any business in the State
of Florida.
Dauer said he thought todays
action spoke for itself. It showed

VISTA Reps
On UF Campus

By JUSTINE HARTMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Representatives of VISTA, the
domestic peace corps, will be
speaking to classes and recruiting
on the UF campus this week. They
are located in a booth next to the
Florida Union.
VISTA, which stands for Volun Volunteers
teers Volunteers In Service To America, is
part of the War on Poverty oro orogram
gram orogram and is headed by Sargeant
Shriver. It was begun in October
of 1964 when Congress funded the
Economic Activity Act.
Joan Larsen, field representa representative
tive representative for VISTA, is on campus un until
til until Saturday, along with Dr. John
Hutchinson, Marilyn Killeri, and
Catherine Green.
VISTA appeals to college stu students,
dents, students, said Miss Larsen, be because
cause because they are recruited for one
year rather than two, as in the
Peace Corps. Applicants must be
18 years of age and have letters of
recommendation.
VISTA takes care of living and
medical expenses of volunteers,
plus a resettlement allowance of
S6OO at the end o( the volunteers
year of service.
There are no tests for accep acceptance
tance acceptance into VISTA. We are more
interested in dependability, wheth whether
er whether or not the person can stick to
an assignment and work with peo people
ple people character rather than in intelligence
telligence intelligence tests, Miss Larsen
said.
VISTA has volunteers 82 and 85
years of age, who are doing psy psychological
chological psychological testing of children in
the Appalachian area. On married
couple is living with migrant work workers
ers workers in the Grapes of Wrath area
of California teaching. Marjried
couples without dependents are
welcomed as volunteers.
As a volunteer, one can specify
what he wants to do and in which
area of the country with what type
I i
I 2 BIG HITS I
fl .... COLUMBIA i HAROtO
| ; PiCtUttS_BWl HtCHI
I BALLOUI
(.n COLUMBIA COLOR ]
I PETER SELLERS IN I
IDr. Strangelovel
Or, How I Learned To Stop
Worrying And Learn To Lovel

k'v**** '***
MAUTZ: presides
that the faculty is completely be behind
hind behind the president and approves
of his position.

of people. Volunteers go through
six weeks of intensive training ac according
cording according to the type of area they
will be located In.
Communities must request VIS VISTA
TA VISTA volunteers, specifying the num number
ber number they want and their specific
economic needs, such as education,
sanitation and health, the teaching
of skills like cooking and carpen carpentry.
try. carpentry.
The categories of people which
VISTA volunteers are serving in include
clude include migrant workers, slum
dwellers, Eskimos, Indians. VISTA
has had a request for 22 volunteers
in American Samoa. Volunteers al also
so also serve in Puerto Rico and the
Virgin Islands.
At present, there are VISTA
projects with 49 different Indian
tribes, including the Semlnoles in
Florida, where VISTA has more
volunteers in training and working
than in any other state. There are
VISTA workers in 40 states, in including
cluding including Alaska, where the volun volunteers
teers volunteers were trained at the Univer University
sity University of Alaska and work on the
isolated village level.
Volunteers trained for Indian
work at the University of Arizona
lived right on a reservation while
in training. Indians help a great
deal by telling their problems over
the centuries and their drastic
needs. Often Indians themselves
are recruited, trained, and then
sent back to their own reservations
to help. This is true of poor people
in slum areas also.
Although a college degree is not
at all required by VISTA, the scope
of VISTA seems to fit the needs of
many college students. Since it
is only a year long serving volun volunteering,
teering, volunteering, students who wish to take
a leave of absence can do so.
* Sometimes students get tired of
reading about life out of books,
said Miss Larsen. They want
practical experience or time to
think over what they are doing.
Many change their majors to so sociology
ciology sociology or anthropology after
working with us. Perhaps they want
to do something more with their
lives or given more of themselves
to South America.
Miss Larsen spoke of a boy from
the University of California at
Berkeley who joined VISTA. He
said he was tired of protesting the
way things were done and decided
to do something himself. Sit-ins,
so frequent on the American col college
lege college scene, are an expression of
student discontent.
Miss Larsen quoted Vice Pres President
ident President Humphrey, Stop sltting-ln
and get in! She feels that today's
college students are a much more
socially oriented generation than
every before.

Page 11



Page 12

l, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1965

Victory Hats
Go On Sale
Victory hats will go on sale
again today at 10 a.m. in the
service booth across from the
Hub.
Student Government has just re received
ceived received a new shipment containing
all sizes, according to Hat Chair Chairman
man Chairman Patrick Kelley.
Alachua JC
Boss Named
The Alachua County School
Board voted yesterday to hire
Dr. Joseph Fordyce to head the
new Alachua-Bradford Junior Col College
lege College at an annual salary of
$18,500.
Fordyce, now president of
Central Florida Junior College
in Ocala, had been recommended
as president of the Duval-Nassau
Junior College but turned the offer
down recently.
Alachua school officials said
Fordyce was expected to accept
their offer today and the Marion
County School Board met to re release
lease release him from his obligations to
Central Florida Junior College.
'Drifters For
Homecoming
This years Homecoming Ball
will be 400 a Go-Go.
The Ball, to be held under the
stars at 9 p.m., Oct. 16 in the
parking lot adjacent to the Pi
Lambda Phi fraternity. Over 2,000
J>eople are expected to attend.
The origianl Drifters will be
the featured band. They will
sing many of their hits like Under
the Boardwalk.
Steve Cheeseman, Homecoming
Dance chairman, emphasized the
dance is being run for the in independents
dependents independents who have no functions
to attend on Homecoming Saturday
night.
Dress for the dance is casual.
In case of rain, Broward Drom
has offered the use of the basement.
Architecture Student
Wins Award
UF architecture student Edward
Marc Treib is the recipient of a
scholarship awarded for the 1965-
66 academic year by The American
Institute of Architects.
Treib, of 238 N.E. 54th St.,
Miami, received a SSOO Ruberoid
Scholarship, one of 20 given an annually
nually annually by the Ruberoid Company
through the American Institute of
Architects Foundation.
Presentation of the scholarship
was arranged by the Institutes
Florida North Chapter, president
of which is Gainesville architect
Myrl J. Hanes.
Treib was selected as a recipi recipient
ent recipient by AlAs Committee on
Scholarships, headed by S. Elmer
Chambers of Syracuse, N. Y.
PATRONIZE
GATOR
ADVERTISERS
THEYRE A
r.nop GROUP

i
MM
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I I Pj
Du m r
BEBta |"WPr B9ff|- fl Pi*
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life p| i IwbBMBB
BE-W, B fii a
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:>*;: B §'
1',.'2. i 'V. ./ !<; 1 is£*'s*: :. V Wli"jVr-A 'Hs-v-.-

Harold Dillinger, left, field secretary of the
UF Alumni Association, is shown interviewing Alan
Robertson, dean of University relations and devel development,
opment, development, as they prepared one of a series of 15-
minute programs for the Universitys promotional

'Miss UF Deadline
Set For Tomorrow

The 1966 Miss UF contest will
be held this trimester instead of
next.
Student government has been
trying for several years to change

Grinter Named President
Os Engineers Council

Dr. L. E. Grinter, dean of the
UF Graduate School for the past
13 years, has been named presid president
ent president of the Engineers Council for
Professional Development during
the groups meeting in Clearwater.
Dr. Grinter previously served
two years as vice president of
ECPDthe overall national engin engineering
eering engineering organization that speaks
for the technical engineering soc societieson
ietieson societieson the accreditation of en engineering
gineering engineering schools. In this re respect,
spect, respect, ECPD has the same res responsibility
ponsibility responsibility as the American Med Medical
ical Medical Association in regard to med medical
ical medical school evaluation.
Grinters name has been asso associated
ciated associated nationally with a 1965 re report

Still Sweltering?
Were Air Conditioned,
and well have room
for you
late next month in
UFs Off-Campus Ideal!
FOR INFORMATION, CALL 372-6720

the time of the contest to allow
more time to prepare the winner
for the Miss Florida Pageant in
Sarasota in July, 1966.
The deadline for entries is 4

port report on engineering education that
is credited with greatly strength strengthening
ening strengthening the scientific base of en engineering
gineering engineering studies.
During Grinters term as the
president of ECPD, the organ organization
ization organization should be moved from
the level of the bachelors
degreea move recommended
by one of the study committees.
Grinter expressed the opinion
that accreditation in engineering
at the graduate level is probably
desirable and also inevitable.
However, he noted that extended
discussions within both colleges of
engineering and professional soc societies
ieties societies will be necessary before
a working consensus can be
achieved.

television series, The Second 100. Dean Robertson
will discuss creative giving related to the UF at
10 p.m. tonight on WUFT-TV. The program will
be distributed to stations in Orlando, Palm Beach,
and Pensacola for showings later in the month.

p.m. Thursday, Oct. 8. They can
be submitted between 2 and 4 today
and Thursday in Room 311 of
Florida Union.
The contest, based on beauty,
talent and personality, will begin
Nov. 7 with the personality judg judging.
ing. judging. Talent, swimsuit and evening
gown competition will be Nov. 9
at University Auditorium. Ten will
be selected. The same show will
be held again on Nov. 10, open to
the public. Three girls will be
picked. The winner will be
crowned Nov. 12 at Fall Frolics.
Jinny Jasper, the present Miss
UF, will be one of the judges. There
are many prizes, including gift
certificates and trophies for the
winner, according to Jim Kincaid,
general chairman of the contest.

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Foreign Service
Interviews
Slated Here
Foreign Service Officer H. Earle
Russell will be on campus Friday
to discuss the wor£ of the U. S.
Foreign Service with interested
UF students.
The Unending Struggle, Ia 1 a film
shot in Quito and Guayaquil, Eca Ecador
dor Ecador depicting the manifold aspects
of Foreign Service work in a de developing
veloping developing country, will be shown
in connection with this visit. Fol Following
lowing Following the film, Russell will
answer questions on careers in the
Foreign Service Officer Corps,
with specific reference to his own
recent experience.
The next written examination for
the Foreign Service will be held
Dec. 4, 1965, at sites throughout
the country. Applications for the
examination must be filed before
Oct. 18. The same examination
is offered candidates for both the
Foreign Service of the Department
of State and USIA, although candi candidates
dates candidates must specify at the time of
application which agency they seek
to enter. Individuals successful on
the written examination will be
invited to take an oral examination
before a panel of senior officers
during the spring.
ritoooi
Grants
The Chemstrand-Pensacola :£
division of the Monsanto :£
:* Chemical Company has a--:*:
:$ warded two SI,OOO grants to :$
j:j: the Departments of Chemical::;:
and Mechanical Engineering in
£: the UFs College of Engineer Engineer£:
£: Engineer£: ing.
Sterling Turner, assistant :£
:£ to the director of Chem Chem
Chem strands nylon manufacturing
;X operation, visited the Univer Univers:
s: Univers: sity campus this week to *:
present checks to the two en en£:
£: en£: gineering departments.
Each grant is to be divided :>
on the basis of SSOO for a :£
:£ scholarship and SSOO as an $
ft unrestricted grant-in-aid for ft
ft use in improving departmental
ft programs.



short absence if the necessity
arises.
I shall, of course, be avail available
able available in Washington at all times
during the Presidents absence
from the White House.
The President also discussed his
condition with congressional
leaders and former President
Dwight D. Eisenhower, who during
his eight White House years l suf suffered
fered suffered three major illnesses.
Eisenhower will be 75 years old
Oct. 14.
Johnson said in his statement:
I have informed them that the
doctors expect there will be a
minimal time during which I will
not be conducting business
as usual.
W*' i| e I do not anticipate the

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I Campus Interviews Wednesday through Friday, October 13,14 and 15 I

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Operation
Continued From Page One

need for Presidential decision,
or actions during the short time
I shall not be available for the
purpose, the cabinet, and par particularly
ticularly particularly the secretary of state
and the secretary of defense, as
well as my White House staff
will always be in contact with the
vice president.
Johnson emphasized that his
staff, the cabinet and Humphrey
have been a party to and par participated
ticipated participated thoroughly in all major
policy decisions and they are
fully and currently informed.
Hallenbeck said that while the
surgery was quite clearly a major
operation, the effect on the Pres President
ident President of removing his gall bladder
should be undetectable.

Big Names
In Printmaking
On Exhibition
Some of the biggest names
in American printmaking are
included in an exhibit to be on
display for the next three
weeks at the UF Gallery.
The Plate, the Block and
the Stone includes original
prints illustrated with' the
plate, block or stone from
which they were made.
On display from last Sunday
through Oct. 24, the exhibit
includes works of 27 artists.
Among them are Leonard Bas Baskin,
kin, Baskin, Ninna Citron, Jack Le Levine,
vine, Levine, Gabor Peterdi, David
Alfero Siqueiros, Raphael
Soyer, Carol Summers and
Jacques Villon.
Prepared and circulated by
the Associated American
Artists Gallery in New York,
this exhibition was featured
in a recent issue of Time
Magazine.
The University Gallery is
open Tuesday through Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and
Sundays from 1 50 5 p.m.

Council Jumps On
Reitz Bandwagon

The most effective way to evaluate a com-
pany in terms of its potential for dynamic I
career growth is to examine its past rec- I
ord, its current status, and its prospects I
and planning for the future, together with I
the professional climate it offers for the
development of your individual capabilities. I
Boeing, which in 1966 completes 50 years
of unmatched aircraft innovation and pro- H
duction, offers you career opportunities as
diverse as its extensive and varied back- I
log. Whether your interests lie in the field
of commercial jet airliners of the future or
in space-flight technology, you can find at I
Boeing an opening which combines proses- I
sional challenge and long-range stability. I
The men of Boeing are today pioneering I
i evolutionary advances in both civilian and I
j military aircraft, as well as in space pro-
| grams of such historic importance as
America's first moon landing. Missiles,
space vehicles, gas turbine engines, trans- I
| port helicopters, marine vehicles and basic
| research are other areas of Boeing activity.
I There's a spot where your talents can g
mature and grow at Boeing, in research, g
! design, test, manufacturing or administra- B
tion. The companys position as world fl
leader in jet transportation provides a fl
measure of the calibre of people with fl
whom you would work. In addition, Boeing fl
people work in small groups, where initia- fl
tive and ability get maximum exposure. fl
Boeing encourages participation iry the I
company-paid Graduate Study Program at I
leading colleges and universities near fl
company installations. fl
We're looking forward to meeting engi- I
neering, mathematics and science seniors fl
and graduate students during our visit to fl
your campus. Make an appointment now
at your placement office. Boeing is an fl
equal opportunity employer. fl
(1) Boeings new short-range 737 jetliner. (2) fl
I Variable-sweep wing design for the nation's g
' first supersonic commercial jet transport. fl
| (3)tIASA's Saturn V launch vehicle will power fl
| orbital and deep-space flights. (4) Model of g
Lunar Orbiter Boeing is building for NASA. g
15) Boeing-Vertol 107 transport helicopter g
shown with Boeing 707 jetliner. g

Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator, 1

By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Legislative Council asked Did
He or Didnt He last night.
The council, concerned with the
present flutter around the state a about
bout about UF President J. Wayne Reitzs
rumored resignation, voted unani unanimously
mously unanimously to support the UF Presi President.
dent. President.
In a joint resolution from the
Leg Council and the executive
branch of the student body, the
Council said, Be it hereby re resolved
solved resolved that the Legislative Coun Council,
cil, Council, Student Government Officers
and their Cabinet do hereby rec recognize
ognize recognize the outstanding leadership
of Dr. J. Wayne Reitz in his un unceasing
ceasing unceasing efforts to promote the ad advancement
vancement advancement of higher education
within the University of Florida and
throughout the entire State.
We also wish to recognize the
devoted efforts of Dr. Reitz for
providing an audience for the Stu Student
dent Student Body and its elected repre representatives
sentatives representatives and striving always for
their benefit and the further
development of the entire Univer University.
sity. University.

Be it therefore resolved that
it be made known that as the rep representatives
resentatives representatives of the student body
we wish to add our support to his
efforts to secure further indepen independence
dence independence of our states system of
higher education in the matters of
their fiscal and academic develop development.
ment. development.
Be it further resolved that we
consider any termination of his
services to be a detriment to the
continued growth, development and
stature of Floridas system of
higher education and to the Univer University
sity University of Florida in particular.
The resolution was presented by
Pat Kelly, chairman of the rules
and calendar committee. It was
passed unanimously by the Leg
Council, but needs to be ratified
by the new Leg Council, which
will meet next Tuesday night.
Dick Thompson, student body
vice president, explained that, ac according
cording according to Roberts Rules of Or Order,
der, Order, the notice which calls a
meeting should notify the members
of the action to be taken at that
meeting.
The election results were vali validated,
dated, validated, although a question was
raise about the disputed Yulee area
results. The Yulee election was in invalidated
validated invalidated by Honor Court Chan Chanc
c Chanc llor Sid Stubbs. A new election
will be held next week.
The new Leg Council members,
read out by George Blaha, secre secretary
tary secretary of legislative affairs, are as
follows: off-campus members:
Henry Adkinson, Mark Berson,
Sam Block, Mike Bowen, Tom
Carnes, Jeff Chase, Tom Cushman,
Terry Moore, Ron Spencer and
Aubrey Ward. All off-campus po positions
sitions positions were won by Progress
Party.
In Broward Hall, Carol Sullivan
(P) and Gale Wolly (A), were elec elected.
ted. elected. Karen Kawas (A), was elected
in Jennings Hall.
Rawlings Hall elected Katherine
Falk (A). Jeane Long (P) and Gary
Goodrich (A) were elected from
Graham Area.
Hume Hall elected two Council
members. They were Gary Schaf Schaffel
fel Schaffel (P) and Augle Caesada (P).
Tolbert Area will be represented
by Mich Llneberger (P), Bill Pol Pollard
lard Pollard (P) and Tom Smith (P).
The Murphree Area representa representatives
tives representatives are Rick Brown (P), Bill
Chiara (P), Dana McGauun(P), and
Charles Shepherd (P).
In the married housing, Dave
Voslok (A) won in Diamond Village,
Terry Swyers (P) won in Schucht
Village, Mike Schaefer (A) won in
Corry Village and Art Norris (A)
won in Flavet 111.
Absentees
Less than half of the Leg Legislative
islative Legislative Council members
were present at last nights
meeting.
Those absent ftom the
meeting and the number of
absences this year: John i
Bartlett (2), Jackie Braun,
John Cooley, Gail Cox (2),
Eric Dogohne (2), George Gar Garcia
cia Garcia (2), Steve Gardner (2),
Lynn Hampton (2), Les Hardy
(2), Bill Llchter (2), Bing
Michael; Donald Murray (2),
Gene Peek, Ellen Roqueta (2),
Walter Robison, Sherry San Sanders,
ders, Sanders, Fred Shenkman, Carol
Schieckel, Jay Scheck (2),
Allen Trammell, Chuck Woh Wohlust,
lust, Wohlust, Linda Bowers (2), Dan
Davis (2), Sharon Keglovits,
Kay Lindquist (2), Chris Ben Bennlnger,
nlnger, Bennlnger, John Shipley (2), Doug
Gillis (2), Howard Jewett (2),
Bruce Flower (2), Paul Mott
(2), John Williams (2), Larry
Tyree, Dave Vosloh and Vic-
Vlctor Urrutia.

Page 13



Page 14

[, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1965

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THE MARK OF ZORRO?
**

. .Well, not quite. But this bunny, obviously
the mark of some enterprising young playboy, is
latest in a long series of decorations for the Dr.

Russians Make Big Profits
Off American Magazine Sales

By RICHARD C. DONG WORTH
United Press International
MOSCOW (UPI) lts a nice
little game and it goes like this:
ThQ Russians get a copy of
say Electronics magazine, an
American journal, through their
Washington embassy at $6 per
year or through a Soviet library
at S2O alnnual overseas sub subscription
scription subscription rate.
Then they translate it, edit out
Western propaganda, print it
up and send it out to Russian
subscribers. Since Russian sub subscribers
scribers subscribers number about 3,200 and
they each pay the equivalent of
S2B annually, the Russians real realize
ize realize potential profit of $89,594 on
this one magazine before trans translation
lation translation and printing costs. It is
pl&sant for the Russians, but
unpleasant for American magazine
publishers. No one is paying
them royalties and they say that
although they do not like the sit situation,
uation, situation, there is nothing that can
be done. An attempt to keep
the magazines out of Soviet hands
is doomed, they say, because they
are just too easy to come by.
What American publishers would
ilira is for Russia to join in the
international copyright agreement.
They hone recently uncovered de details

tails details about the size of the Rus Russian
sian Russian reprint industry and how it
goes about its business will put
the pressure on the Russians.
Western magazine sources here
say 154 American technical mag magazines
azines magazines are among the several hun hundred
dred hundred from the West that are re reprinted
printed reprinted on a regular basis. They
include such newsstand favorites
as Popular Science and Avia Aviation
tion Aviation Week and such more spec specialized
ialized specialized journals as Corrosion,
Automation, Cancer Re Research,
search, Research, and Construction Me Methods
thods Methods and Equipment.
The Soviet constitution guaran guarantees
tees guarantees freedom of the press. But
by Soviet logic, this applies only
to the free press. The West Western
ern Western imperial press, according
to the Soviets, is a lackey of the
monopolists. Thus, Western mag magazines
azines magazines may not circulate at all.
After Stalin s death, his suc successors
cessors successors realized Soviet progress
could hinge on keeping up with
Western developments. So they
began distributing the Western
technical journals after careful
cutting of non-contributory
material, that is, what they con considered
sidered considered propaganda.

Murphree statue south of the library. Come to
think of it, what a backdrop for a playmate of the
month picture!

This process has been going on
for years, Westerners believe.
Despite the rigorous editing, much
valuable Western technical inior iniormation
mation iniormation including defense data datahas
has datahas been served up to Soviet
specialists, and visiting American
scientists have found their Russian
counterparts well-informed on
UJS. developments.
Some Westerners believe these
reprints have helped the Soviets
take shortcuts in developing their
own industry.

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Great Americans
Hall Os Fame
Eyed By Prof

By TERRY MILLER
Alligator Staff Writer
Two hundred and fourteen nomi nominees
nees nominees are on the ballot. Not more
than seven can win, and then again
possibly none will win. In this elec election
tion election there are 90 more candidates
(all of whom are dead) than there
are voters.
Jefferson Davis, George Gersh Gershwin,
win, Gershwin, Will Rogers and Sylvannus
Thayer (founder of West Point)
are among the top contenders in
this election which takes place only
once every five years.
UF research chemist, Dr. A. P.
Black is one of the 124 electors
who is presently limiting his choice
to seven of the candidates for the
Hall of Fame for Great Americans.
Results of the voting will be an announced
nounced announced on Oct. 28.
Candidates need a majority of
the votes to win. Thus if all 124
electors vote this year, 63 votes
will be needed. Anywhere from
none to seven could be elected to
the Hall. In 1960, the last elec election,
tion, election, only Thomas A. Edison,
Edward A. MacDowell and Henry
D. Thoreau were elected.
In 1900 Dr. Henry Mitchell Mac-
Cracken, then Chancellor of New
York University, founded the Hall
of Fame. Bronze portrait busts of
each person are displayed in a
quarter mile long colonnade on the
NYU campus.
It is not limited to any one field
but honors men and women in the
arts, science, scholarship and
government, whose lives reflect
the highest ideals in American cul culture.
ture. culture.
**lt was established, realizing
that there ought to be some way of
recognizing great service to so society
ciety society in these many fields, Black
said.
A person who has been dead for
25 years may be nominated by any
society, group or individual and
once on the list of nominees is
never removed. Some on the list
have been there since the program
began 65 years ago, Black said.
There is some heavy campaign campaigning
ing campaigning for Jefferson Davis and Mrs.
Jane Addams (the founder of Hull
House and a great social worker)
by different womens groups
throughout the country. Military
leaders are campaigning just as
heavily for Sylvannus Thayer, the
founder of West Point, Black added.
Such groups write letters to the
different electors urging them to
vote for a certain person, Black
said reflecting on a sizeable stack
of letters he received in one week.
Black is one of nine scientists
among the electors. Others are Dr.
Jonas Salk, Dr. C. W. Mayo, Dr.
Robert Oppenheimer, Dr. Detlev
W. Bronk, Dr. Fairfield Osborn,

Dr. W. F. G. Swann, Dr. J. C.
Walker and Dr. Margaret Mead.
Dr. Mead is the latest scientist
appointed and alSo the first woman
scientist.
Various other fields are rep represented
resented represented among the electors. Many
are university presidents, profes professors
sors professors of history or literature,
authors, editors and artists, men
and women of affairs, high public
officials and national or state
justices.
Among these electors are Carl
Sandburg, Ralph McGill, Marian
Anderson, Thurgood Marshall, Dr.
Allan Nevins and Vice President
Hubert H. Humphrey.
Two other Floridians, besides
Black, are among the electors.
They are former Governor Leroy
Collins and Justice Millard F. Cald Caldwell.
well. Caldwell.
As senior faculty member of the
department of chemistry, Black is
completing his 46th year at the UF.
This is the third Hall of Fame
election in which Dr. Black has
participated.
Merit System
Interviews
Set Monday
A representative of the Florida
Merit System will hold personal
interviews at the campus place placement
ment placement office next Monday with
senior and graduate students in interested
terested interested in state employment.
The placement office has been
supplied with copies of a new bro brochure
chure brochure detailing college level posi positions
tions positions in state agencies whose
personnel are selected following
periodic statewide examinations.
Nearly 50 positions are listed with
salary ranges, duties, and degree
requirements shpwn. Students are
encouraged to review this publica publication,
tion, publication, complete an application blank,
and arrange for an interview with
the Merit System representative.
Opportunities are good for em employment
ployment employment in state agencies served
by the Merit System, especially in
the fields of accounting, welfare
services, and public health.
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Twins Try To Stop lA Pitching

MINEAPOLIS ST. PAUL
/ UP I) The rags-to-rtches climb
Minnesota Twins in the
baseball world today faces the
challenge of another Cinderella
team, the Los Angeles Dogers,
in the World Series opening Wed Wednesday*
nesday* Wednesday*
The betting was 7-5 that the
Dodgers will prevent the Twins
from adding World Series gold to
their American League pennant

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glitter.
Don Drysdale, a 2 3-game
winner, is the first possible stumb stumbling
ling stumbling block the Dogers are going
to throw into the path of the Twins.
The Twins are starting out with
their pitching star, Jim (Mudcat)
Grant, a 21-game winner.
In this battle of righthanders,
the Dodgers are favored 11-10
to win the first game.
Drvsdale. who never has lost

a World Series game, will be
on the mound for the Dodgers
because their ace of pitching aces,
Sandy Koufax, will be observing
Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of
Atonement. But the Twins will
have to face the southpaw strike strikeout
out strikeout artist, who won 26 games for
the Dogers on Thursday.
For the Twins it looked like
going from the frying pan into the
fire, for after Koufax looms

Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

another pitcherClaude Osteen, Washington Senators traded him to
who before he left the American Los Angeles, Osteen had beaten
League knew nothing but success the Twins five tiroes without a
against the Twins. Before the single setback.
MARQUIS Thc lce Break
Baeszler
ALLIGATOR COLUMNIST '^(P r
Every Friday, before all home football games, the Florida
football team goes through a routine or ritual that they have done
for years and is as much a part of a game as the toss of the
coin or the kick-off, \
At 7:30 p. m.on the last day of classes the whole varsity
team, about 50 strong comes together at the stadium to watch
a movie. The movie is usually old and quite bad and either
about the old west or a war of some kind. The less acting and
more fighting the bettor.
Defensive Coach Gene EHenson is usually left in charge of
the team that night and one can hardly wait for the movie to end
and hear what the old sea hawk has to say. Looking at him
he could be General Ellenson, Governor Ellenson, Senator
Ellenson, or Gene Ellenson, great enterpreneur. Luckily though,
he's Coach Ellenson.
It's hard to tell if its what he says or how he says it, but
what he says always is what we need to hear anyway. Sometimes
he will merely relate a war experience, or tell a story, or talk
about his college days. Other times he will act out a story hes
written especially for the occasion or recite one of his epic
poems.
Every week he tells us something different, because every
week is a different game. Different stories will have varying
effects and sometimes it takes a while for what he said to soak
in.
After the talk we drive to Williston on a bus in near silence
and go to our rooms where we have a Hershey bc.r, a coke, and
an apple. Then we try to sleep.
Pre-Game Meal
At 8:55 a.m. the phone rings and, when answered, a voice
tells us the time, and that the pre-game meal will be served
at nine-thirty.
Pre-game meal consists of scrambled eggs, a steak, a glass
of orange juice, dry toast and two peaches. Some may wonder
about the importance of such detail, but every little thing we
do is important and no minute detail can be left out, not even
the two peaches. There is no reason, as such, unless you wanted
to call it tradition. But it is so. It is fact.
Breakfast takes but a few minutes for somehow our appetites
leave us. After the meal we go to our rooms and watch Linus
the Lionhearted and Tom and Jerry and other such i ntellectual
stimulation. Often the cartoons are more gorey than the worst
war movie.
At ten minutes of twelve we come out of seclusion and head
for Gainesville and the dressing room. We arrive between
12:20 and half past.
How do traditions get started at a school as large as the Univer University
sity University of Florida anyway?
A few years ago some well meaning people brought a so socalled
called socalled victory bell into the stadium to be rung after each Gator
victory. Sometimes after a big win a small child will go by
and timidly ring it, but even that is rare. One doesnt start
a tradition, it begins by itself.
At 1:55 we go out to play a football game and almost always
winanother fine tradition of the University of Florida.
TYPHUS
LOW MONTHLY teems
S< *" > \ca^y
372-8658 211 W. Univrtity Aw

Page 15



Bennett Injured In Tuesday Drill

Florida safety man Bruce Ben Bennett
nett Bennett was injured at Tuesdays foot football
ball football practice and thus joined his
defensive teammate Allen Tram Trammell
mell Trammell on the disabled list.
Coach Ray Graves said Bennett
injured his hip, but the extent
of the injury isnt known yet.
Trammell has been slowed down
since the first game of the sea-
UFs Spurrier Gets
Fla. Back Award
MIAMI (UPI)~ Florida Gator
quarterback Steve Spurrier was
named the Florida Sportswriters
Associations first Back of the
Week today.
The writers also cited flanker flankerback
back flankerback T. K. Wetherell of Florida
State; Russell Smith, a Miami
back; Florida States Maury Bib Bibent,
ent, Bibent, a defnesive back and Florida
tailback Alan Poe.

_^MoorJPl
SPOR TS EDITOR K'Tsll
Yours truly found out first hand Tuesday why other SEC
schools dont like to play Mississippi at Oxford.
If the teams who play there go through the same routine
that I did yesterday, they must find it very hard to win. After
my experience, ir is very easy to see why Ole Miss has not
lost a homecoming in ages.
The whole thing started when I decided to call Oxford and
confirm reservations for passes for three writers and one
photographer. This, of course, would have been unnecessary
if th£ Mississippi sports information director had answered
the letter I wrote almost tjvo weeks ago.
Figuring that it was their responsibility to forward ME the
tickets, I called collect. Mistake No. 1.
Ole Miss Sports Information Director Billy Gates answered
his private phone (I suppose all Mississippi publicity men have
private phones), and the operator w it into her act.
I have a collect call for Mr. Billy Gates from Mr. Andy
Moor, Sports Editor of The Florida Alligator in Gainesville,
Florida, she said.
Don Know Mo
*
To this Gates replied, Ah don know no Andy Mo.
The operator explained that I was a sports writer (something
Gates had yet to come in contact with, I gathered) for The
Alligator, an honest to goodness newspaper.
Ah don see why I should cept no elect call, Gates replied.
Sensing the futility of going through any more of this routine,
I informed the operator that The Alligator would pay for the
call.
Mr. Gates, Im calling to confirm reservations for the
passes to Saturdays game, I said. Did you receive my
letter?
What letter wuzzat?"Gates asked.
Well, sir, I sent it over a week ago and thought maybe youd
have seen it, I explained.
Oh, you the one who asked me fo fo passes, Gates said.
We don give out fo passes to no one.
Hoped For Four
I explained that we hoped to get four, one for the photographer,
two for the men who would cover each locker room and one for
a sideline reporter who might be able to get a color story. (This
is the setup we use at all home games).
We don give fo passes to no paper, Gates said. Yacn
have one press box and one sideline.
What about our photographer? 1 asked.
The sideline pass IS fo yo photographer, Gates explained.
Then theres no possible way for us to get at least one more
pass, I questioned.
Aint none, Gates said. You get the same deal as the
school paper he ah and any other newspapah.
It wasnt hard for me to figure he meant the Mississippi
newspapers, those titans of the journalistic world.
Two Miss Trip
Sq, photographer Ron Sherman and I will make wie trip to
the Ole Miss game without the company of two other writers.
This of course, means two less Florida boosters In Oxford
and I suppose, makes things all the better for Ole Miss. ... not
to mention well be grossly understaffed.
I hope this episode of mine Indicates the spirit of good sports,
manshlp and toleration In Mississippi. It should Indicate just
the kind of treatment the Gators should get In Oxford. I hope
it gets the same reaction from them that It got from me...one
of rage.
Just for the sake of sportsmanship, Id like to see Florida
beat O; i Miss at its homecoming by about 40-0 and watch all
mast gracious people, and Billy Gates In particular,
cry their >
son when he injured his ribs.
Hal Seymour has been working
at safety this week, and he will
take Bennetts place until the de defensive
fensive defensive captain returns to duty.
Linebacker Steve Heidt was also
slowed down at Tuesdays prac practice
tice practice with a sprained ankle.
Middle guard Jerry Anderson is
the only other Gator on the injury
list. Graves said Anderson might
be back for the Ole Miss game,
but Tuesday the Florida coach
said Ron Pursell will definitely
alternate between linebacker and
middle guard even if Anderson
returns.
Well cut down on rough work
of defense starting Wednesday be because
cause because of the injuries, but we will
still have some contact work on
offense, Graves said.
We have viewed films of Ole
Miss, and we know that were going
to be playing a team that could

have been undefeated so far if
it hadnt been for bad breaks.
Because of the limited contact

The Florida Alligator^

a ffdPr fflr entire mWML &
jl mmW mmWSTANDING
STANDING mmWSTANDING OVATION: National Amateur Golf Champion, UFer Bob Murphy, re receives
ceives receives salute at halftime of LSU game.

Tide To Use
Three Teams
Alabama Coach Paul Bear Bryant
looking for new strength after
his one-point squeaker past Miss Mississippi,
issippi, Mississippi, threw out his two-platoon
approach Monday and in its place
introduced a three-team system
for his Crimson Tide.
Bryant broke his units into an
offensive team, a defensive squad
and a team that will play both
ways.
The Tide came through the 17-
16 victory over Mississippi with no
major injuries and Bryant sent
the squads through general drills
with the kicking game getting par particular
ticular particular attention in a night time
practice.
Another power in the Southeast Southeastern
ern Southeastern Conference, Louisiana, began
looking for ways to improve Mon Monday.
day. Monday. Coach Charles McClendon
devoted most of the Monday prac practice
tice practice session to the running game
and the search for 100
percenters."
McClendon, disappointed over
Saturday's loss to Florida, said
there would be some position
changes during the week based on
practice field performances.
At New Orleans, Tulane Coach
Tommy O'Boyle said lie was un unhappy
happy unhappy with the Green Wave's de defensive
fensive defensive play as he sent his squads
through a light workout in pre preparation
paration preparation for the encounter with
Georgia Tech.
AP TOP TEN
1. Texas 3-0 (25) 368
2. Nebraska 3-0 (10) ... 355
3. Arkansas 3-0 (l) . 285
4. Georgia 3-0(3) 250
5. Michigan State 3-0 , 21U
6. Purdue 2-0-1 (1) .... 182
7. Notre Dame 2-1 172
8. South .Cal if oi ilia 2-0-1 . 108
3. Mississippi state 3-0 . 47
10. FLORIDA 2-1

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1965

Page 16

work this week on defense, I
might decede to hold practice on
Friday before we leave for Miss Mississippi,

ENTER THE
FOOTBALL CONTEST
PRIZE: $25 n Men's or Ladies' Wear I
Place an "X" in the box of the team you think will
win Saturday, Oct. 9. Estimate total yards to be
gained by Florida, which will be the tie breaker.
Florida at Mississippi
Alabama at Vanderbilt
Clemson at Georgia
O LSU at Miami
FSU at Kentucky
North Carolina at N C. State
Pittsburgh at Duke
Oklahoma at Texas
Wisconsin at Nebraska
Illinois at Ohio State
Total yards gained by Florida
EN 1 HIES MUST BE IN THE "U SHOP BY FRIDAY, OCT. IST.
duplicate PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED IN CASE OF A TIE.
WINNERS NAME WILL BE POSTED IN:
Untwrattg
West University Avenue. Carolyn Plaza
NAME
address
C,TY STATE
I'RIES LIMITED, TWO PER PERSONHMi^^

issippi, Mississippi, but Ill decide this after
Thursdays practice. Graves
said.

SPORTS