Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
6 GO UF 9 Thafs How Hume Hall Feels About LSU
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Dorm lads throw light'on their sentiments toward Saturday's Bengal battle Photo-sun

The Florida Alligat#r

Gators Eye Rebound Against LSU

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Alligator Staff Writer
A capacity crowd of 47,800 is
expected to fill Florida Field
tomorrow for a gridiron clash
between the Gators and South Southeastern

Progress Sweeps
Leg Council Race

By DREX DOBSON
Alligator Staff Writer
Progress Party swept into
victory ranks again last night with
22 seats when it defeated Action
Party, Freedom Party and un unaffiliated
affiliated unaffiliated candidates in the fall
Legislative Council 30-seat race.
Action Party took seven seats
and Sue Williams, unaffiliated, won
in Yulee Area.
The constitutional amendment to
shorten the spring election cam campaigns

|Pay Phones:|
ieta Woods?!
S SHEFFIELD, England £
£(UPI) A society patterned :g
£ after Alcoholics Anonymous :£
:£ has been formed for Shef Shefg:
g: Shefg: fieiH University who g:
£ want heip resisting sexual £
temDtations.
The Anti-Free Love Society g:
£ was formed by June Heaton, g
£ a junior who,, said she was g
£ shocked at the standard of £
:! morality in the university. £
£ When a girl finds herself £
in difficulty resisting sexual ij:
:£ advances, she can telephone a £
:£ special number and reach g
another member of the society g
£ who will give her moral sup- g
£ port." :£
£ Anyone who feels, like me, g
£ that sex is something slightly g
:> sacred and not to be practiced g
g: out of marriage can join, g
£ Miss Heaton said. It is dis- g
£ ficult for a girl wanting to g
£ stay pure. £

Vol. 58, No. 20

eastern Southeastern Conference (SEC) rival
LSU.
The football Gators will be trying
to rebound from last weeks con conference
ference conference loss to a powerful Miss.
State Bulldog squad. With an
earlier victory over Big Ten foe
Northwestern, the Orange and Blue

paigns campaigns failed to pass because of
lack of the required one-fourth
student body ratification. The
vote was a 2,507 276, but failed
to pass the required one fourth
necessary vote, according to Sid
Stubbs, Honor Court Chancellor.
The amendment was pushed by
President Bruce Culpepper and
party leaders to take the stress
off the spring election time.
Progress Party emerged victor,
as it did in its first year on
campus in last years spring elec elections
tions elections when it took all major
posts.
Stubbs said the returns were to
be listed as unofficial because
the period allowed for protests and
official validity ends 5 p.m. Sat Saturday.
urday. Saturday.
He said one protest has been
lodged in the election so far. Pro Progress
gress Progress party filed a protest in the
Yulee Area voting precinct because
of irregularities. Progress
Sue Brutchyard and Miss Williams,
unaffiliated were the only
candidates in the Yulee race. Un Unofficial
official Unofficial precinct returns and vic victors
tors victors for the Leg Council seats
listed by Stubbs include:
OFF CAMPUS -- Progress:
Henry Adkinson, 1035 (victor);
Mark Berson, 1088 (victor); Sam
Block, 1059 (victor); Mike Bowen,
1054 (victor); Tom Carnes, 1073
(victor); Jeff Chase, 1113 (victor);
Tom Cushman, 1095 (victor);
Terry Moore, 1098 (victor); Ron
Spencer, (victor); Aubrey
Ward, 1092 (victor). Action: Wal Walter
ter Walter Bowden, 641; Cagney Brooks,
635; Bonnie Cawood, 644; Marc
Rodriguez, 644; Steve Toothaker,
iee 'ELECTIONS- Page 10

University of Florida, Gainesville

sport a 1-1 mark, with an SEC
slate of 0-1.
The Tigers enter Saturdays
tussle with a 2-0 record. They have
beaten Texas A&M and Rice, both
non-conference foes. Scores in the
two contests were 10-0 and 42-10,
respectively.

-1 W m MWfc- w
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THE STUDENT VOTE: A SWEEP FOR PROGRESS

Ex-Kennedy Aid Sorensen

Theodore C. Sorensen, former
counsel to President John Kennedy,
will speak here Oct. 25 in the
University Auditorium, the Florida
Union Board announced today.
Sorensen will speak on The
Kennedy Legacy.
Sponsored by the Florida Union
Board, Sorensen is a former
adviser and legislative aide of
the late President.
After Kennedys death Sorensen
left the White House to write the
account of his eleven years work
associated with the President.
Sorensen is the author of the
recent Kennedy and Derision-
Making in the Waite Mouse pub published
lished published in 1963. Excerpts from
Kennedy appeared in recent is issues
sues issues 01 Look magazine.

In the series history between
the two schools, LSU has won eight,
the Gators five, with one contest
ending in a tie. Since head coach
Ray Graves took over the Gator
helm, the Orange and Blue have
beaten the Tigers twice while
losing three.

To Speak Here Oct 25

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SORENSEN

Friday, October 1,196 b

The Bengals are currently
ranked sixth among the nation's
top collegiate football powers.LSU
mentor Charlie McClendon will be
in his fourth encounter with the
See CAPACITY Page 13

Mystery Dog
'Probably
Not Rabid
The dog that bit John Cole,
19-yearold student athletic trainer,
during the UF-Mississippi game
last Saturday has been found and
Is probably .not rabid, according
to Dr. William Hall, UF Infirmary
director, who examined the dog dogln-question
ln-question dogln-question Wednesday night.
Hall said the dog Is now in
confinement and will be abserved
to make sure of the diagnosis.
The dog was found after
numerous reports, arising from
press publicity, pinpointed the
See 'DOG' Page 10



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator/ Friday/ Oct. 1 7 1965

News Around
The World

from the wires of United Press International

International
BUILDUP CONTINUES IN VIET NAM . With more than 128,000
American troops now in Viet Nam and 11,000 due to arrive shortly,
South Vietnamese Premier Nguyen Cao Ky announced that he plans to
ask for more combat troops to fight the Communists in South Viet Nam.
Kys call has been expected even though American troop strength al already
ready already exceeds the 125,000 goal originally set by President Johnson.
POPE VISITS U. N. . On his visit to the United Nations Monday
Pope Paul VI will be seen by more people in one day than ever before,
but millions of Americans will be disappointed by the brevity of his
stay. On his 13-hour visit to address theU. N., between three and five
million curious and faithful Americans are expected to get a fleeting
glance of the pontiff.
National
RESERVES SHIFTED . Reserve Units
containing 55,000 men will be dissolved and
others containing 145,000 troops will receive
increased training Secretary of Defense Robert
McNamara announced The action in effect
accomplishes many of the objectives of the
National Guard-Army Reserves merger which
Congress refused to approve As 751 Army
Reserve units were wiped out, an additional
982 units were designated to receive stepped-up
training of 72 instead of 48 drills a year.
BIRCHERS DUMPED . .Senate Republican Leader Everett Dirksen
and House counterpart Gerald Ford denounced the John Birch Society
saying it has no place in the Republican Party. At the joint news
conference the two stopped short of demanding that the Birchers now
in the GOP be kicked out a policy urged on the Party Wednesday by
Senator Thurston Morton of Kentucky, the Senate campaign chairman.
In his statement Senator Dirksen said, . . in the American political
scene I do not believe there is any place for any organization that
operates on a secret basis to achieve its goals.
TRAINS ACT SIGNED . President Johnson T1 signed into
law a bill that would provide for the development i trains that
will travel at speeds of 125 miles-per-hour. Its vill be felt
immediately. Within two weeks the final specificatioi complete,
and bids for their construction will be let shortly ther The High
Speed Ground Transportation Act provides for S9O- ..illiontobe spent
over the next three years to provide an adequate means of mass
transportation.
CONTRACT AWARDED . Defense Secre Secretary
tary Secretary Robert McNamara Thursday announced the
awarding of a $2-million contract to Lockheed
Aircraft Corp of Marrietta, Georgia, The
massive contract is to build a fleet of the
world's largest jet transports. The aircraft,
which will be delivered to the Air Force start starting
ing starting in 1969, could carry as many as 700
passengers as a civilian transport and make
possible such fares as New York to London
for $75,
Florida
COME 1970 . Setting his political sights on 1970, Secretary of
State Tom Adams conceded that this will be the year hell decide
whether to remain on the State Cabinet or shoot for a higher office.
Adams made up his mind several weeks ago to run for re-election
as secretary of state so that his frequent cuttings of Gov. Haydon
Burns would not be interpreted as political. Adams is often mentioned
as a possible contender for governor or the U. S. Senate and has never
denied it.
PROPOSAL STUDIED . State Department
spokesman said in Washington that Castro's
offer to permit opponents of his regime to leave
for the United States will receive (( careful
study." Exiles called the offer a two-edged
sword" with both good and bad aspects whether
it is accepted or rejected by the United States.
POLICE AID SOUGHT . The Florida Sheriffs Bureau revealed
that it has inquired into the possibility of obtaining federal funds to
help run the Florida Police Academy in Tallahassee. The funds
though not yet available -- would be included in the Law Enforcement
Assistance Act bill pending in Congress. The Bureau will be butting
heads with another state group which is pushing to start a new police
training center in Bartow.

68-Year-Old
Banker Answers
'Duty Call
FOOTVILLE r Wis. (UPI) All
banks insure their assets, but the
68-year-old president of the tiny
bank of Footville went beyond the
call of duty Wednesday.
He chased a gunman who robbed
his bank and recovered the stolen
$2,000.
As soon as the young bandit
fled from the building with the
money, bank president W. A.
Canary flagged a friend in a passing
car, jumped in and took off on the
chase for 70 twisting miles of
rural roads.
The 80 mile per hour chase,
which also involved Canarys son
ended one and one-half hours later
when a posse of 60 policemen from
two states flushed the youth from
an Illinois corn field after his car
had run out of gas.
The good men won, the elder
Canary laughed.
The suspect, Ron Retzloff, 20,
Beloit, Wis., appeared before a
U. S. Commissioner in Rockford,
111., on federal charges of bank
robbery. He was held overnight
in Madison, Wis., pending a
scheduled court appearance today.

I Who wears the pants in the Flint family? I
\ fIHSf s y N R;
K We get lots of nice mail about Volkswagen Station I
I Wagons. But Mrs. Anidelle Flint of Fresno,Cal.,gave us fits. I
I Good grief! she wrote. And we shuddered I
I Was she going to tell us her Volkswagen didnt get I
I over 20 miles on a gallon? Or 35,000 miles on tires? I
It was much worse than that: She was angry because
wed said husbands are the only people who can appre appreciate
ciate appreciate a station wagon that looks like a bus.
When it comes to appreciating the homely virtues of
I our homely wagon, Mrs. Flint (mother of six) is the undis- I
puted man of the house.
I She not only appreciates it, but she made her hus- I
I band (father of six) appreciate it. To the point where he I
I went out and bought one. I
I I love the way it fits almost twice the I
I packing space of a big wagon into 4 feet I
I less parking space,' she said. But I'll bet I
you got the whole idea from your wife.
Maybe we did. And maybe we didn't. Pr W
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Journalism Student Not To Blame

By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Staff Writer
The Trini Lopez Lyceum Council
concert, x supposedly slated for
Florida Gym, Oct* 29, was never
scheduled.
A series of errors, beginning
wi*h a seemingly harmless
Journalism 301 story, compounded

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NO TRINI LOPEZ CONCERT

to bring out the story that Lopez
was coming to UF, when no such
plans had been made.
The story appeared in The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator and several other state news newspapers
papers newspapers before the facts were
revealed to the press by Reid
Poole, faculty adviser to the
Lyceum Council, who had read The
Alligator storv-

It started when a 301 story which
said Lopez would come, was turned
in to The Alligator this summer.
Since the summer Gator had ceased
publication, the story was passed
for use in the first fall issue.
The story was published ift the
Sept. 6 issue.
The day after the Lopez story
appeared in The Alligator, the
UF Informational Services picked
it up. Realizing that it hadn't been
released statewide, the Service
included it in another story on
Lyceum Council productions for
the year.
This story went out all over the
state and was also run by The
Alligator.
How did the whole thing get
started?
Poole said that Barry Diamond,
former Lyceum Council president
may have inquired as to the avail availability
ability availability of the Gym for Oct. 29.
Maybe the jOl student saw a
list of tentative gym bookings with
Lopez name after it and wrote
the story," Poole said.
How far did the council actually
go to get LopezY
It went no further than most
of the concert possibilities we
handle Poole said. We had a
list of 20 or 30 and Lopez on Oct.
29 was one of these.
Most of the time the acts won't
fit the university calendar due to
exam week, vacations or something
similar. In this case a contract
wasnt even drawn up.
Poole said he thought the whole
thing was an unfortunate series
of errors and that no one person
was responsible.

Friday/ Oct. 1/ 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

1 " 1
c am pus
cal e d

PRE-MED AND PRE-DENT STUDENTS: Registration has been
extended till Oct. 8. Please come to Room 111, Anderson at your
earliest convenience.
VICTORY DANCE: Today, 8-12 p.m., Broward Basement. Tolbert
and Broward Areas to host. Admission free, The Dynamics* will
be featured.
PROPELLER CLUB: Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., Library, Room 403.
Speakers: Dr. Allen and M. Sievers.
MENS A: Sunday, 2 p.m., Florida Union, Room 1 4. Organizational
meeting.
HILLEL DANCE: Saturday, 8:30 -1 p.m., Music and Food. Members
free, non-members 25 cents.
PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM: Today, 4 p.m., Williamson Hall, Room 133.
Speaker: Dr. Richard Landers, Department of Physics, University of
California. Topic: New experimental techniques in particle physics.
NEWMAN CLUB: Sunday, after the 11 a.m. Mass in the Catholic
Student Center.
THE BRASK-SCHIEBER DUO CONCERT: Sunday, 4 p.m., P.K.
Yonge Auditorium. Robert Schieber, viola, and Willard Brask, piano.
GATOR AMATEUR RADIO CLUB: Monday, October 4, 8 p.m.
Engineering Building. Room 527. All interested are invited to attend.
BOARD OF INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES: Monday, October 4,
7 p.m., International Center. All members are urged to attend.
CHRISTIAN SCIENTISTS: Sunday, October 3, 5 p.m., Johnson
Lounge, Florida Union. Guest speaker featured.

'Conservative To Publish
14 Times During Trimester

The Florida Conservative wilfl
be published 14 times during this\
trimester and the next, according
to Bob Zinn, business manager.
Zinn said that the Campus
Conservative Club, which nnh-
Daring Young Man
Doesnt Fool Police
ALEXANDRIA, La. (UPI) A
daring young man was in jail today
because his dare didnt work.
Police arrested Donald Berry,
27, of Odessa, Tex., at a motel
here Monday after he was identified
as the man who held up a service
station.
Berry had registered at the
motel under the name Johnny
Dare.

I $ CAUTION: SOn SHOULDER I
A lambswool classic pullover in the V- $
neck tradition. An easy going way of add adding
ing adding to your sweater collection that's avail*
able the Establishment a line-up of I
13 West University Ave.

lishes the periodical, feels it can
receive enough support to fulfill
this goal.
He pointed out that donations
can not be accepted for support
of the magazine due to restricting
laws, but it can pay for itself
by advertising if we can get the
people to work with us.
As of now the publication does
not have enough advertising space
sold. Zinn said he would like to
have S4OO of advertising sold be before
fore before printing each issue.
He added that the magazine needs
several more advertising sales salesmen
men salesmen to reach the business people
of the community. He noted that
the Conservative will pay a
10 per cent commission to any
students willing to work selling
ads.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator/ Friday/ Oct. 1, 1965

Handbook Will Introduce
Freshmen To Florida

By EUNICE I. TALL
Aitisator Staff Writer
Let us introduce you to the
University of Florida. Thats
what the UF administration is
saying through its new publication,
Student Handbook.
The 63-page orange booklet
which will be distributed this week
will go to all students and faculty
and administration, said Dean of
Student Affairs Lester Hale.
Students are expected to keep
tneir copy oi the handbook. Dean
Hale said during their stay at
the university.

ill ; <% t
ft, t
WELL LOOK HERE: Karen Madison and Dan Davis

Camp Wauburg
To Close At 6
Starting Today
Camp Wauburg, the UFs
recreation park, will close at 6
p.m. beginning today, according
to Levane Scott, camp director.
The camp, located nine miles
south of the campus on U.S. 441,
has been open from noon to 7
p.m. Tuesday through Friday and
9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday. It is closed on Monday.
Camp Wauburg is operated for
the exclusive use of students,
faculty and staff of the UF.
Facilities include a recreation
building, concession stand, bath
house, lockers and rest rooms.
There is a 144-foot dock with a
diving board, 10 boats, three
canoes and four rafts. A play playground
ground playground area is provided, and
equipment for volleyball,bad volleyball,badminton
minton volleyball,badminton and horseshoes may be
checked out.
Typewriters
AT KISERS
OFFICE EWUiPMENT
604 N. MAIN ST.
NEW OLYMPIAS
NEW PORTABLES
KMTTH-CORONA ELECTRICS
1 *SED -All Other Makes. Porta Portables,
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Low Down Payments
And Monthly Terms.

Hereafter the booklets will only
be distributed to incoming fresh freshmen
men freshmen and transfer students at the
beginning of each trimester.
The handbook is a source of
much general information, Dean
Hale stated.
It is my feeling that this booklet
has a different appearance than any
similar student handbook in the
country. It gives a comprehensive
view of the many facets of the uni univers
vers univers it y life that pertain to
students, Dean Hale commented.
While it includes regulations
in general, it is a natural resource
book.

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The handbooks vail be distri distributed
buted distributed through fraternities and
sororities, dormitory resident and
off-campus offices, Tigert Hall and
the Florida Union information
desks.
Five thousand UF freshmen and
transfers received these
handbooks during orientation this
year. The remaining shipment of
20,000 arrived this- week.
Hale explained that a faculty facultystudent
student facultystudent committee has been com compiling
piling compiling the information for publi publication
cation publication for the past four years.
The last publication of any kind
pertaining to a student life was
in 1956. This is the first time
a book of this nature has been
published, Hale continued.
The handbook is the official
UF publication as part of the
University Record series.
The booklet will not conflict
with the Womens Students Asso Associat
ciat Associat ions yearly publication,
Coedikette, Hale said.
That publication deals mainly
with matters pertaining strictly
to the girls and includes the WSA
constitution and rules.
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More Students Get Scholarships

The University of Florida
Alumni Association will honor 58
recipients of initial Coordinated
Local Alumni Scholarship Pro Program
gram Program (CLASP) scholarships who
are now students here during a
special luncheon tomorrow.
The 11:45 banquet at the Student
Service Center also will serve as
Alumni Club Presidents Rec Recognition
ognition Recognition Day for leaders of 42
University of Florida alumni or organizations
ganizations organizations in Florida, Georgia.

I TRADITIONALLY
the store FOR pw* JU
I CLASS RINGS
I fIX)VCI£bOO STUDENT
CHARGE
'T,," ~ ACCOUNTS
I 211 W. Un.ver.ty Are welcqme
T 73.8658
I 1 Campus scene!
>du Pont Reg. TM
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HC QUEEN WILL GET S6OO

Louisiana, New York and
Washington, D. C.
Parents of the students also have
been invited to the luncheon and will
be guests of the Alumni Association
for the Florida-LSU football game
at 2 p.m.
CLASP students and their home hometowns
towns hometowns are: Alachua Sandra Alday
and James W. Shaw; Avon Park
Sandra Kaye Biggs; Bartow
Thomas Howell; Belle Glade
Daryl Clyde Parrish; Cape Coral-

Sally Anne Bendroth; Chattahoo Chattahoochee
chee Chattahoochee Paul T. Presnell Jr.;
Clearwater John S. Heidt; Cocoa
Beach Terry Freeman; Coral
Gables Richard Reader; Daytona
Beach James L. Hickey and
Sandra Stupka.
East Palatka David B. Smith;
Ft. Pierce John Pipes; Ft. Walton
Beach Arnel Lee Wilson; Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Dale Brabham, Use Maria
Hegen, Robert Wilkerson and
James L. Parrish; Holmes Beach
Elinor Frances Maney; Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville Ronald Murphy, Frank D.
Flook Jr., Gary Eckstine and
Michael Burton.
Lake City John W. Red rick
and David E. Herndon; Miami
George E. Abdenour Jr.; Min Minneola
neola Minneola David C. Coggshall;
Naples Frederic Winter Jr.;
Neptune Beach Fred R. Wolver Wolverton;
ton; Wolverton; Newberry Andrea Kesler;
Ocala Fred P. Rice Jr.; Or Orlando
lando Orlando John J. Muller, James E.
Painter Jr., and James E.Collins.
Perry Allan Casey; Plant
City Rodney McGalliard; St.
Petersburg Arnold Carbuhn;
Sanford Joe Farless; Sarasota-
Ronald J. Schweid; Sebring-
Charles E. Weaver; Sneads-Sam Sneads-Samuel
uel Sneads-Samuel J. Hamilton; Tallahassee
Raymond Marsh Jr. and Theresa
Pons; Tampa William D. Frantz
and Robert Lee Ziegler.
Tavares Timothy Norris;
Titusville Barbara Galka; Verb
Beach Jeanne Jewell; Waldo
Margaret Griffin; West Holly Hollywood
wood Hollywood Robert L. Beck; Winter
Haven T. E. Lauter; Winter
Park Marian Langley; Savannah,
Ga. Cyndia H. Lauderdale;
Wayne, N. J. William Frykberg;
Washington, D.C.-Susan H. Miller.
Student Nabs
S4OO Scholarship
Lamar R. Soper of Homestead,
senior student in the UFs College
of Engineering, has been awarded
a S4OO scholarship from the
Western Electric Company.
Soper, who is majoring in
mechanical engineering, expects
to graduate in August, 1966. He
plans to apply the scholarship sum
to tuition costs throughout the
1965-66 academic year.
Western Electric contributed an
additional $l5O to the University
for use as a grant-in-aid
scholarship in the winter
trimester.

ISSHt
*1 igHt fa3SMfo
m
At
Humpty
FRIDAY All e
You Con Eat,
OLD-FASHIONED Hush Puppies,
FISH NIGHT Cole Slow 97 s
5 PM -9 PM
Fresh Cedar Key Fish
HUMPTY DUMPTY
DttVMN ft KSAUtAKT
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEA* S
FR2-5387 310 AW. I3t* St-

Friday f Oct. 1, 1965/ The Florida Alligator,


mm : m HMHHH I
/s'soMi!ii B f I -jk 9
> i
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IPq| '^^9
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H IB .jyilfc % V jM| Jh|HhK||P
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Homecoming finalists: Ann
Camp, Kathy Green and Paula
Hicks pictured with Jim Hodnut,
each have another reason for
hoping to be the one who will
wear the Miss Homecoming 65
crown. Hodnut, local distributor
for Royal Crown Cola has offered
the winner a S6OO scholarship.
Odysseus
The UF Department of Human Humanities
ities Humanities presents Odysseus and the
Women, Sunday, Bp.m in the Med Medical
ical Medical Sciences Building Auditorium.
The comedy, written by Didier
Graeffe of the Humanities Dept.,
has a cast of three people.
Six roles will be played by Mar Margaret
garet Margaret Beistle and six by Michael
Beistle, with Michael Doyle as
Odysseus.
Education Majors
All teacher education majors,
regardless of college enrollment
are required to satisfy the speech
screening requirement before en entering
tering entering the Advanced Professional
Sequence or the College of Edu Education.
cation. Education.
Appointments for these tests
are now being made in room
124 Norman Hall.

v V
Union
Slates
Movies
By KAREN MADSEN
Alligator Staff Writer #
Advise and Consent,#
:j:jThe Birds, To Kill a g
% Mockingbird, Charade, #
#Bye Bye Birdie, The g
.'.lnterns, and Under the Yum g
xYum Tree. g
These are Just a few of the >:
g movies being offered this year jx
vby the Films Committee of the #
£ Florida Union Board for Stu- g
v dent Activities. g
v The movies are shown at ::
£ 7 and 9 p.m. on Friday and g
gSaturday nights and at 3 Sun- g
$: day afternoon in the Medical #
# Center Auditorium.
Douglas Johnson, graduate
g assistant on the Board, said g
x the movies offered vary g
g considerably in age.
Occasionally the Committee g
£ gets a movie that is only eight g
gor 10 months old. It tries g
g to get the best films that it g
g can as quickly as possible, g
g Johnson said. :*
Fidelity Union
Life
% y|\
THE COLLEGE PLAN
Exclusively For
THE COLLEGE MAN
i
...Guaranteed By A
BILLION Dollar Co.
... Payments deferred
'til earnings increase
Campus Representatives
Mel Ward Geo. Corl
Dan Sapp Bob Si frit
d/6-1208

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator/ Friday, Oct. 1/ 1965

EDITORIAL
woody
771 he university administration
has taken upon itself to dis discriminate
criminate discriminate against a former student
for no official reason. Oscar Woody
Jr., has not been allowed to attend
the UF since 1963. He doesn't
know why and neither does the
ad m inistration.
Woody has gone to his depart department
ment department head, the president of the
UF, and the Board of Regents.
All have upheld the university
contention. But what is the uni university
versity university contention?
Woody's troubles started after
he was put on probation for
conduct unbecoming a UF student.'*
Although he was found notguilty"
the court held that Woody had
acted wrongly.
It seems that Woody's instructor
changed a course card and Woody
knew that the course should not
have been changed.
The court's decision was fair and
Woody was properly sentenced.
Woody was placed on probation
but this does not mean expulsion.
He has been continually stopped
by his college from completing
registration. The college maintains
that he would not take a pre prescribed
scribed prescribed course, the same course
which caused all the trouble.
Since this first encounter Woody
has agreed to take the course.
Once again he was stopped from
registration, and the ruling was
backed up by the Board of Regents.
What is the 'ruling?
Is the ruling that Oscar Woody,
student with an above average
scholastic record who complys
with university requirements,
can't get a degree?
He is a Florida resident and
as such is entitled to an education
at a state university if he can pay
for it. Woody can.
Woody has said that his rejection
is a personal matter that the
administration objects to his
attitude, dress, and beard.
What is the ruling now? Oscar
Woody, student who wears a beard
and has a personal conflict with
the UF administration can't have
a degree?
Pending now is Judge Hugh
Taylor's decision as to whether the
UF has an arbitrary right to dis dismiss
miss dismiss anyone without reason, or
if there are reasons, without
stating them.
It would be much better if Judge
Taylor did not have to make this
decision.
The university administration
should let Oscar Woody Jr.
register.

The
Florida Alligator
Steve Vaughn Benny Cason
Fditor Managing Editor

C'-
fNupseN

BRUCE CULPEPPER
this week week*
* week*
to our word in upholding our sacrosanct
lit platform. Student Government privileged
seating has been abolished. So last week we sat
on the twenty. To what avail? The only results
were snide remarks by the Grumbler, which were
literary but certainly not factual, and complaints
about the Mancini seating rather than the football
game. It seems that the privileged seating was the
biggest issue in the world until we abolished it,
and then there was only something else to complain
about. Not one word of praise or approval has been
voiced. I get the feeling that its only the complaining
that is important not the subject matter of the
complaint.
THIS WEEK were going to sit on the FIFTEEN.
Members of the Cabinet, and members of the Honor
Court, and members of Leg Council, I apologize.
For all of thjp-, hard work that you put in; for all of
the hours you spend in serving the University, *his
is a pretty poor way of saying thank you. I bent over
backwards to accommodate what some people really
made an issue, at your expense.
BUT TAKE HEART! For Homecoming and for
the last two games you are going to have the
PRIVILEGE of sitting on the FIFTY. If this
raises the roof and there are still petty people who
think Im doing this for myself, then Ill be glad
to sit in the end-zone with As for the hard hardworking
working hardworking members of student government, I appreciate
you even if they dont. It would be discomforting
if it is said v abjM me at the end of this short year
that I didnt express that gratitude. Unappreciative
football seating is, after this next year, ABOLISHED
for the rest of my term.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Drex Dobson assistant managing editor
Bill Lockhart editorial page editor
Andy Moor sports editor
Eunice Tall features editor
Gene Nail ....* wire editor
Fran Snider student government editor
Peggy Blanchard . coed editor
Judy Miller ....* greek editor
Associate Editors: Bob Wilcox, Bruce Dudley
Terry Miller, Yvette Cardozo. Justine Hartman
Cheryl Kurit
Norma Bell Jim Bailey Susan Froemke
Sue Kennedy Leslie Marks Steven Brown
Elaine Fuller Mike Willard Kathie Keim
Kristy Kimball Judy Knight Jane Solomon
Suzi Beadleston Sharon Robinson Howard Rosenblatt
Dick Dennis Arlene Capian

thinking
out loud
By JIM MOORHEAD
Mou havent had a thrill until y o uv e
ill president of Florida Blue Key on KP
iTnless its seeing a member of the Gator
basketball team on KP the day after.
The occasion was in August at Fort Jackson, S.BH
where a sterling representative group 0 f fine'll
scholars lent their talents to the two- week activeH
mission of Gainesvilles 3396th Reception Station
of the local U. S. Army Reserve units.
FBK President Stu Parsons and varsity basketH
stalwart Paul Morton were among the hapless
members whose unfortunate lot it was to
dreaded kitchen police detail for one day apiece b||
to back, as the 3396th made its customary
superior rating at the hands of the post
officers.
Surely the presence of such lofty figures at
sinks and grease traps of the unit mess hall
tributed significantly to the 3396ths winning of
superior rating for the 16th time in the past 17
You just dont see that kind of talent wielding
and brillo pads every day in Uncle Sams Arn||
IT SORT of gets you right here (thump heart
fist) to go through the chow line and see your
preparation and subsequent cleanup, of course
being handled by such competent and
individuals, especially when they take so
in their work.
Im really giving Stu and Paul a hard time at
expense can they help it if they havent
enough rank to thumb their nose at the first sergeai|
when the KP roster goes up? but it was somethin|
of a curiosity to see those two fine fellows so faH
removed from the third floor of the Florida Unio|
and the hardwood court of Florida Gym respectively!
Actually, being in the 3396th provides one with lotfl
of interesting sights and circumstances that contrasH
with what youre used to around the ol campiiH
Some more for instances: A lot of people know BolH
Cummings as a lineman on the Gator Golden EraH
football team of the late 40s and early 50s (they losl
13 straight), and nowadays as the affable head of th<
University Print Shop. But when you soldier with him
hes a man to be feared. Hes the first sergean
mentioned earlier, and a man not to be trifled with
when youre playing war.
LIKEWISE Ed Dunn, now a law student and, earlier,
also a member of the Gator football team. He got the
vote this year as one of our two most popular
officers. Poor Ed may never live down the good goodnatured
natured goodnatured ridicule he suffered forrfiling us out of the
barracks two or three mornings in a row at 4:30 to
do calisthenics. Fortunately, two or three mornings
was as long as it lasted or we may not have been
around to vote Ed the Lt. Fuzz Award!
A lot of people hereabouts know Jim Morgan as head
of machine programming in the Registrars Office in
Tigert Hall. Doubtless they would have to look twice
to recognize him in his majors uniform as he prowls
his way about the company area at Fort Jackson,
making his one-man efficiency studies to help the
unit function more smoothly.
And how many UFers would know Alumni Affairs
Director Bill Fleming if they were to see him at the
posts Initial Receiving Point, helping orient brand
new soldiers instead of attending various UF functions
in his job of enlisting alumni support for our alma
mater?
THEN THERES Roy Leilich, a member of the UF
College of Physical Education staff and adjutant or
the 3396th; Nick Karabinis, a staff member for the
UF libraries, but one of the ranking non-commission non-commissioned
ed non-commissioned officers in the local unit; Ken Kendall,
instructor on the campus scene, but sergeant
when hes waking up to the 3396th bugle; and eve
my ex-boss, former Publications Executive Seer
tary Bill Epperheimer, was a member of
ol 3396th (I was HIS boss
when we were in uniform) ii-V aBB
before he left for a job back
at Southern Illinois Univer- B|fr*
sity where he graduated. jM |
The list could go on and I 'WT V
on. I daresay nearly every- f B
body on this campus knows J life
SOMEBODY in the 3396th. yLfi
Weve got a regular UFhB
booster club of our own 1
going out there
armory on NW Eighth Ave.
Come to think of it, we've
even got a few select va- FBK'S STU:
cancies. Wanna come join
the fun? they also serve



disappointed
Editor:
SOMETHINGS ROTTEN in Gator land. We, as freshman, were very
disappointed at the spirit of the. students of the Florida-Miss. State
game.
We expected an excited student body to back up the Gators at
Saturdays game. But the only excitement, except when we were losing,
was on the field,
IT WAS AS if the students were dead. The band only played at
half-time and the cheers were made by the cheerleaders accompanied
by recorded music.
But maybe were wrong? Maybe this IS the usual Gator spirit?
Is it?
Robert Schick, lUC
William Boyd, lUC
Philip Schwartz, lUC
PJS. Florida, our Alma Mater. .All Hail, Florida, Hail! Sound
familiar? Hmm?
disturbed
Editor:
Did Mr. Jordan and Mr. Wittschuck realize in their letter to the
Alligator concerning the existing cowardice on campus (Wednesday,
Sept. 29, 1965) that not everyone shares their views on patriotism?
We are convinced that if a foreign force would attack the United
States the number of willing * .enders would be more than ample.
In the Viet Nam issue a problem of criteria is aroused. May we
have the audacity to suggest that an unwilling American fighting in
Viet Nam would not be defending his own country but would be
perpetuating a partisan foreign policy with which he may not agree?
IT IS TRUE tfiat the American belief is one of helping countries
in danger of a forced Communist takeover. But if this is an American
ideal why have issues such as Cuba been so evidently overlooked?
Many charge that the Cuban government never requested aid but may
we question the existance of any free Cuban government? The United
States failed to recognize a government in exile even after continual
appeals. And what is even more shocking, the American ideals the
same ones mentioned previously, were crushed more emphatically
in Cuba than in any other nation.
Let us not forget the Hungarian Revolution. Sixteen thousand
students were slaughtered even after requesting American assistance.
Os course this was in 1956 and should be long forgotten. The errors
of the American government are best thrown into oblivion.
IF MR. JORDAN and Mr. Wittschuck find the American student
reaction to Viet Nam so cowardly why arent they fighting in Viet
Nam? Capable patriotic soldiers are always welcomed by the
Vietnamese Government.
It is very easy to criticize nonconstructively, but it is even easier
not to do anything about it.
Theodore A. Hardy, 2UC
George J. Vinas, 2UC
Editors Note:
Please limit all letters to 250 words. Type all letters double
spaced. Letters will be printed when accompanied by authors
name. Name withheld on request.
I
I IT ALL .. FOLLOW if I
SBm THE "GOOD EATING" 11
| CROWD TO THE 1 1
m I
|yn CAFETERIA §1
VW 1212 N. Main St. jl
§' (4 minutes from campus) I
1 DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS
I DAILY DINNER SPECIALS g
* FREE BIRTHDAY & ANNIVERSARY CAKE
j§ (parties of 6 or more) £
* FREE SECONDS'ON COFFEE OR TEA
I MOST EXCELLENT ROAST BEEF IN TOWN
I BAKING FRESH EVERY 15 MINUTES
I FRESH SALADS
| FREEPRIVATyANQyEOOOM
I I UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL I ||
X*-XX->X-XvXj|j|

the lighter side 1
BY DICK WEST
:[: WASHINGTON (UPI) President Johnson is :[j[
[ reported to have complained recently about the [[[[
;[ quality of writing in government press releases, x
[[[known in the newspaper trade as handouts. :[:[
[:[: He is said to have remarked that in some cases :[:
[:[: high school seniors in Johnson City, Tex., could have :[:
[[turned out more readable prose. :[:
[:[[ The comment led to a certain amount of leg- [[[
:[:[ pulling. If you had a friend working in a government [:[
:[:[ information office, it was considered good sport to :[:[
[[call him up and ask if he were being replaced by :[:[
:[:[ a senior from the Presidents hometown. :[:[
:[:[ This was done in a jocular manner, of course. :[[[
[[[: Nobody really expected the President to start [[[
[:[: importing information specialists from the Johnson [[[
[:[: City senior class. [[:
[:[: Nevertheless, some rather strange things have [:[:
[:[: been happening lately. A magazine correspondent [:[:
[:[: reports that the Office of Economic Opportunity [[[[
[:[: (OEO) started sending him press releases marked :[[[
[:[: for immediate release* [[[[
He notified the agency that these handouts were :[:[
x[ of little use to him because he had to write his :[:[
x articles about six weeks in advance. Thereupon, :[;[
:[: change was made. :[:[
:[: He still gets releases marked for immediate [[[
:[: release, but now they are delivered by a messenger [[[
:[: who arrives in a car. [[
[:[ A similar experience was reported by a corres- :[:
[:[ pondent for Western newspaper who lives in the :[:
:[:[ suburbs south of Alexandria, Va. :[:[
:[:[ He told me that OEO press releases are being [[[:
:[:[ delivered to his home, which is about a 30-minute [:[:
:[[ drive from Washington. They also arrived via a [:[:
:[:[ motorized messenger. This one wears a uniform. [:[:
[:[: Once he caught a glimpse of the license plate [[[;
[:[: and it appeared to be one of the numbers used by :[
:[: the White House, he said. [[[;
[:[: Thus far I havent had any use for the releases, :[:[
x[ but I must say they are well written, he added.:[:[
The odd thing is that when I called the OEO to :[:[
:[:[ inquire about this far-flung handout delivery service, :[:[
:[:[ I couldnt find anyone who knew anything about it. [[;[
:[:[ It is however, well known that the antipoverty ;[;[
x program, which the OEO directs, is one of the [[[[
[:[: Presidents pet projects. [[[[
I suppose it would be too far-fetched to speculate [:[:
[:[: that high school seniors have invaded the place and [:[:
[:[ started their own handout production. [:[:
:[:[ But if I were a government information specialist, x
:[:[ I would be giving some though* to job security. [[[
X .....* r .v.v.v.v.7Z i\ ,r r , r*# r .v. !v

Are you still wearing those
creasy kid slacks?"
1
g From
$6.98
Press-Free* slacks
by h.Ls*
no ironing needed
u£ 7 L. (fampusljamt SHQP
Store nours: 9-
5:30, Mon. thru C \
Thurs.; 9to 9 X I /
Fridays Ss ~* w/

Friday, Oct. 1, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

Teens Caught
In Burglary
To Fight Reds
POMPANO BEACH (UPI) Four young boys who
said they wefe Inspired by a television spy thriller
were arrested for burglarizing homes to get weapons
to fight Communists police revealed.
Police Detective Jack Rily said they were inspired
by a television show Man From U.N.C.L.E. and
when they found themselves without funds to buy
equipment to fight Communists, they started breaking
into homes.
The boys, all in their early teens, called themsleves
The Agency for Communist Enforcement (ACE).
They were arrested last weekend after one of their
parents found a stolen television set and returned
it to its owner, who then notified police. Riley
said most of the stolen property, which included
a tape recordehy television set, short wave radio
and money has been recovered. The youngsters
were placed on probation and have been turned
over to their parents. It started out as a high highminded
minded highminded club but they got caught up in their
daydreaming, Riley said.
Pharmacy Conference
To Begin Tomorrow
Florida pharmacists will meet here Sunday for
the 1965 Pharmacy Conference at the University
of Florida.
The conference, conducted by the Bureau of Pro Professional
fessional Professional Relations in the College of Pharmacy
and the University of Florida Division of Con Continuing
tinuing Continuing Education, will be conducted at the Uni University's
versity's University's J. Hillis Miller Health Center. It is
an in-service training program which will include
discussions on oral contraceptives, enzymes and
diuretics. .. 1
The conference opens with a welcome at 9 a.m.
by Dr. Perry A. Foote,dean of the College of Pharm Pharmacy,
acy, Pharmacy, in the Medical Sciences Building Auditorium.

Participants in the sessions
include: Dr. John E. Baer, dir director
ector director of phafmacological chem chemistry,
istry, chemistry, Merck Institute for Thera Therapeutic
peutic Therapeutic Research, West Point, Pa.,;
Dr. Harry Prystowsky, Chairman
of the Department of Obstetrics
and Gynecology in the Universitys
College of Mecidine; Dr. Vincent
G. Stenger, assistant professor of
obstetrids and gynecology; Dr.
James Allen Olson, acting chair chairman
man chairman of the Department of Bio Biochemistry
chemistry Biochemistry in the College of Med Medicine;
icine; Medicine; Dean Foote and Charles
S. Haupt, associate director of
she Bureau of Professional Re Relations
lations Relations in the College of Phar Pharmacy.
macy. Pharmacy.
Tomorrow evening preceedlng
the sessions, the College of
Pharmacy will hold an informal
reception and dinner honoring the
25th anniversary of its class of
1940. The event, beginning at
6:30 p.m. at the University lon,
' also will recognize the classes of
1950 and 1960.
Cooperating agencies for the
meetings are the Florida Board
of Pharmacy, the Florida Stpte
Pharmaceutical Association, the
Northeast Florida Pharmaceutical
Association, the Florida Podiatry
Association and the College of
Pharmacy Alumni Association.
Payday 3-S6OO
MONEY
Marion Finance Ca.
376-5333 223 W. Uni*.

Page 7



Page 8

1/ The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 1, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS
' X

for sale
GOLF CLUBS, First Flight. 2 thru
9 irons, pitching wedge, sand
wedge, 3 woods and bag. SBS. Phone
378-3706. (A-20-lt-c).
MOVIE CAMERA, Yashica H Hmatic,
matic, Hmatic, F 1.8 zoom lens, lens lenscoupled
coupled lenscoupled exposure meter, battery
powered, pistol grip. Excellent
condition. $55.00. Call 378-3161
after 5:30 p.m. (A-20-3t-c).
ELECTRIC GUITAR and amplifier
$30.00. Heath Mohican receiver,
$40.00. Low-pass filter, $5.00.
Knight T-60 Transmitter, V.F.O.
and mike, $30.00. Call 372-1771,
6:30-7:00 p.m. ask for Gary. (A (A---20-1
--20-1 (A---20-1 t-p).
45 YARD-LINE Tickets to theLS>U
game. One student and one date
ticket, $2.60. Call Bill Lytle, 376-
9102. (A-20-lt-c).
FOLK GUITAR. Fine condition.
Beautiful tone. Two years old.
Will yield for $45. Call Matthew
Schur, 378-4303 after 5 p.m. (A (A---
--- (A--- 3t-c).
1963 MARLETTE Mobile Home
10x55. 3 bedroom, air-condi air-conditioning,
tioning, air-conditioning, washer, utility house,
fenced yard. Call 6-8896 after
5:30 p.m., Pinehurst Park. (A (A---20-10t-c).
--20-10t-c). (A---20-10t-c).
CUSTOM BUILT Harmony Classic
Guitar with case, capo, beginning
guitar book, new strings Orig.
S9O, will sell for S7O, or best
offer. Contact Joel Montgomery,
Box 7116 (Room 2038) Hume,Phone
2-9496. (A-19-2t-p).

I LAST TIME TONIGHT I
I ROCK HUDSON !{jjjnijH
LESLIE CARON
WOHARLES BOYER
CO-STAIWINC o
SHAWN larry storch -NITA TALBOT TECHNICOLOR J
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jll^praraNEmjmM^S^S
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for sale
TRAILER Elcona 10x55, full
foot expansion on living room.
Carpet throughout. Take over
payments and pay closing cost.
Call between tk-4, at 376-3736.
See at Progress Mobile Home
Park, Lot 57. (A-18-3t-c).
services
PINE WOOD SCHOOL, 1704 NE 9th
Street, 372-3343, open 12:30 p.m.
to 5 p.m. for all U of F home
games. Excellent playground, re refreshments.
freshments. refreshments. $2.00 per child.
Registered nurse in charge. (M (M---20-1
--20-1 (M---20-1 t-c).
ALTERATIONS of all kinds on
mens and womens clothing. 35
years experience. Prices reason reasonable.
able. reasonable. Call Mrs. Stella Manookian
at 376-1794. 1824 NW Ist Avenue.
(M-7-15t-c).
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Charlie
and Mildred would like to say hello
and invite you to visit their brand
new, fully air-conditioned coin
laundry, E-Z Wash, featuring
Gainesvilles only 14 lb. washer
for 25£. 1126 W. Univ. Laundry
next to McCollums Drugs. (M (M---18-l3t-c).
--18-l3t-c). (M---18-l3t-c).
WILL DO IRONING in my home.
Call 376-4086 after 5:00 p.m. (M (M---14-10t-c).
--14-10t-c). (M---14-10t-c).
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios, 372-0300. (M (M---8-ts-c).
--8-ts-c). (M---8-ts-c).

autos
1959 FORD Convertible. V-B.Good
top and tires. Good price. Call Bob
Travis 378-3279. (G-19-st-c).
1955 CHEVROLET, stick shift.
Good transportation. Must sell,
S2OO. Call after 5 p.m. 8-2152.
(G-19-2t-c).
1959 MERCEDES-BENZ, Model
2205, 4 door sedan, white side
walls, air-conditioned, with gas
engine, black with red interior.
Excellent condition, SBOO. Call
376-0549. (G-19-st-c).
HEARSE -- Cadillac Meatwagon.
Perfect running condition. Com Complete
plete Complete except for corpse. $250.
Need cash. Phone 2-1076 or see
Joseph Reda in Apartment above
Teds Tavern. (G-19-3t-p).

|S>fflJlll*Slails Tonilel
X 9 TAD UITC JL. I
1 2400 Hawthorn* Road Rt2O Fhooe fR 6-5011 1 I EXCLUSIVE FIRST AREA SHOWING I
I
pill mi JpE
I hmnnus
l nwmMSWAj mKt\
I MULA PRENTISS fu-ivi
I tHHIKYFOWM I
I
ROBINSON I
s THE WHITE HUNTER
1 ' iA/T

' (Follow us(.( and find the answer to the
i ~
Charles HFeMman .// \>
mmmMmmmm presents
* Peter Sellers Peter dhole w >
Homy Schneider
Capucine f ~,
Paula Prentiss
Woody Allen :
! UisuiaAndress = 10,3:10,5:10,7:10,9:10:
npMPMni
/ Fightin 1 >! M for You \
* -- a -- mHKSA--~ ls -A



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

1965 MG 1100
WHITE WITH RED INTERIOR, HEATER & W.S.W:
; 0 -7
1964 MG 1100
RED WITH GREY INTERIOR, HEATER & W.S.W.
Demonstrator
1963 MG 1100
BLUE WITH BLUE INTERIOR, HEATER
LOW MILEAGE $795
Tropical Pontiac
220 NW EIGHTH AVENUE

"gatorXdT'sellT'''''''''"
" ,,wiiiiii i I WHY I
IST Showing I Win I I
I in 500 block of I I
1 W. Univ. Ave. I I I
SB Other than the fact that flying an airplane by yourself is one of I
the most exciting and personally satisfying experiences you can
ever have, what usefulness could being a pilot be to you? YOUR
WORTH TO AN EMPLOYER automatically goes up when you have
this ability added to your accumulated bag of tricks. YOU ARE
PERSONALLY CAPABLE OF BEING MORE PLACES FASTER --
at your convenience which gives you an edge on a competitor.
you BECOME a MEMBER OF ONE OF THE MOST ELITE AND
SELECT GROUPS IN AMERICA less than .4 of 1% of the nations
I population can fly. Aud the most unbelievable and
I true facts is that in the course of a year, THE COST OF FLYING
IS LESS THAN USING ANY FORM OF TRANSPORTATION to
cover the same amount of miles and time consumed. AND BY
far THF SAFEST -- and this has been proved statistically.
ls a university siuden. ARE IN AN IDEAL POSITION RIGHT
NOW to budget time and money to take advantage of the most
economical flying school opportunity available to you today.
in a nutshell, THE MOST VALUABLE ASSET YOU HAVE IS
I 'ttiv/tit in iiqp thpse college years to your advantage. PERHAPS
I llarning to flI is one of the most important I
I eduwtonal accomplishments you could take with
I YOU These are jusl a of the many reasons which may apply
Ito vour Plans for your future. If you feel that these may be
I interesting to you, come out to toTe if I
for OIIR $5 INTRODUCTORY FLIGHT LESSON to see u H
I c r,r I
I pTeT'wr'U ta /o o :ai:: I CASSELS-IN-THE-AIR I
I -a, I
MUNICIPAL

wanted
ONE OR TWO RIDERS to New
Orleans on weekend of October
Bth. Leave Thursday night, return
early Monday morning. Call Ford,
372-7818. (C-19-3t-c).
DRIVER OVER 21 needed to drive
car to New York as soon as
possible. Phone 378-4644. (C-19-
3t-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share 1
bedroom apartment close to cam campus.
pus. campus. Call 2-6485 between 5-7 or
after 10 p.m. (C-19-3t-c).
WANTED _ Mans 26 bicycle.
Preferably English style. Call 372-
3863. (C-19-2t-p).
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share 2
bedroom house close to Med
Center. $35 per month. Call 376-
8961 after 5:30 p.m. (C-19-2t-c).

Friday, Oct. 1, 1965, The Florida Alligator/

wanted
WANT TO BUY CHEAP, Used
motorscooter in good condition.
Call Judy Miller, 372-6381, Jen Jennings
nings Jennings #2244 anytime after 5 p.m.
NEED NOW! (C-20-lt-p).
PEOPLE WHO CARE about a Free
University. See you Monday night,
at the Law School Auditorium, 7:45
and on. Your ideas can help. (C (C---20-lt-c)
--20-lt-c) (C---20-lt-c)
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom apartment at
Butler Garden Apartments. Color
TV and swimming pool. Graduate
or upperclassman preferred. Call
FR 8-1991 or2-5048/C-19-lt-nc).
help wanted
MALE STUDENT Needed for early
morning work. 5:00 a.m. 9 a.m.
or 6:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m. Good
hourly wage. Contact Mr. Johnson
between 8 a.m. 9 a.m., 372-
5406. (E-20-st-c).
ARE YOU USUALLY discouraged?
If the answer Is no and you want
to gain experience in meeting the
public and trained in meeting the
public, call Mr. Baker at 8-2966
between 10 and 5. You must be
able to work 20 hours per week
including 2 evenings. A S4O per
week salary will be earned by
those qualified. (E-19-ts-c).
PART-TIME Secretary for Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday and Thursday. Typing required.
Experience preferred. No evening
hours. Apply Hillel Foundation,
16 NW 18th Street or call 372-
2900. (E-19-3t-c).
TV Bench man, full or part-time.
Apply at Allience TV Service, 817
W. Univ. Ave. or call 376-9955.
(E-18-ts-c).
PART-TIME Student help. Work in
2 hour shifts. Hours, 11:30 1:30
or 4-8. LONGS CAFETERIA,
313 W. Univ. Ave. (E-16-st-c).
real estate
120 ACRE PECAN GROVE. Over
950 producing trees. Fronting on
nice deep lake. 20 miles from
Gainesville. Priced right for quick
sale. Roberts C. Smith, Reg. Real
Estate Broker, U. S. Hwy. 441,
Micanopy, Phone 466-3120. (1-20-
3t-e).
23 ACRES, good location on paved
road, SB,IOO dollars. Roberts C.
Smith, Reg. Real Estate Broker,
U. S. Hwy. 441, Micanopy. Phone Phone-466-3120.
-466-3120. Phone-466-3120. (1-20-3 t-c).
SSOO DOWN. 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
carport and patio. Concrete block
construction. Central heating. New
air-conditioner and TV antenna.
Newly painted. 2008 NE 17th Terr.
Call 376-0549. (I-19-st-c).
FOR SALE or long term lease.
5 room CBS house by owner.
Good condition, large we 11
elevated lot. City sewage. Low
monthly payments on FHA Mort Mortgage.
gage. Mortgage. Phone 2-3118. (I-17-st-c).,
3 BEDROOM 2 1/2 baths, near
school. Living room, dining room,
family and Florida rooms,kitchen,
built-in oven,stove, refrigerator,
dish washer. Central Heating.
Large lot. Call 2-8175.(1-16-tf-c).

lost 8c found
FOUND a pair of dark frame
glasses at 15 Terr, and 3i*d Ave.
Owner please call 8-4991. (L-18-
3t-c).
LOST Mortar Board pin on
campus Wednesday. Call Judy
Huggins, 2-9188. Reward. (L-20-
3t-c).
LOST -- Womans dark brown
framed glasses in beige case.
Lost on or around campus. Call
378-4135. (L-20-2t-c).
LOST White gold ring with blue
oval stone, Peru Central School on
front. Initials L.F.L. on Inside.
Reward. Call Jim, Room 619 at
2-9280. (L-18-st-p).
for rent
WILLISTON MOTEL: Rooms by
week or month. Single or double.
Students rates. Television, phones,
and daily maid service. Rooms
available for all University events.
Phone Williston 528-4421. (B-20-
lt-c).
PETER PAN MOTEL Only 20
minutes from Gainesville, on U.S.
41 in Williston.Roomy and Modern.
Spring Air Beds. Free TV, Air
conditioned. Coffee In rooms. Re Reserve
serve Reserve rooms now for University
events. Also special rates for
students by week or month. Phone
JA 8-3941. (B-19-7t-c).
ONE BEDROOM Furnished lake
cottage. Lake Winnott, 23 miles
from Gainesville. Lake privileges
$35 monthly. Call Mr. Kaplan, 372-
0481. (B-l-ts-c).
f
2 ROOM SUITE, with refrigerator,
for 1 or 2 males. One block off
campus. $175 per trimester per
person. Call Pat Trescott, Unlv.
Ext. 2177. (B-18-3t-c).
personal
BEN MIZELL would like to let
his friends know that he is back
at McDavlds Barber Shop, 1716
W. Univ. Specializing in good hair
cuts and satislfled customers. (J (J---18-st-c).
--18-st-c). (J---18-st-c).
ATTENTION STUDENTS: If you
purchased a Seminole last year
bring your receipt by Room 9 in
the Florida Union and claim your
book. All unclaimed books will go
on sale Oct. 15. (J-16-10t-nc).
Confidential
$255600
MONEY
Morion Finonct Co.
3765333 222 W. Untv.

Page 9



Page 10

l # The Floirda Alligator/ Friday/ Oct. 1, 1965

fpatemal 1 y
speaking

By JUDY MILLER
Greek Editor
Mrs. Ruth Woods, the Sigma Chi's new housemother, was officially
made a member of the chapter Wednesday night when she was presented
with the Gamma Theta Chapter pin. The chapter sang "The Sweetheart
of Sigma Chi" as "mom" Woods accepted the pin.
Mrs. Woods originally comes from Nashville, Tenn., and comes
to the UF from Miami where she was in the hotel business.
E&, HRn | | jR
4 W& t M
SIGMA CHI: Housemother Receives Pin
The Sigs presently have a pledge class of 71 and have 90 active
brothers. They also have the largest membership in Florida Blue
Key with eight.
In other Greek news, Alpha Epsilon Pi is having a dinner social
with the Alpha Omicron Pi's tonight featuring the C. O.D. band.
The Alpha Tau Omegas are having a social with the Tri-Delt's
when the girls will be picked up on motorcycles and swept over to
the ATO house.
After the game on Saturday night will be a Toga party for the
Delta Sigma Phis. Alpha Epsilon Phi will be the guests of Sigma Nu
for a Friday evening social. Pi Lambda Phi is having a luau Saturday
night with full Hawaiian dress and food.
Florida Retail Sales
Jumps Since 1964


Total retail sales in Florida for
the first six months of 1965 re reflected
flected reflected a 9.1 per cent rise over
the January-June period of 1964,
a UF study has reported.
Sales totaled $4,404,827,000this
year and $4,034,601,000 in 1964.
The increase is a reflection of
hikes in gross national product
and personal consumption expendi expenditures,
tures, expenditures, both of which were about six
per cent greater during the second
quarter of 1965 than in the
corresponding three-month period
a year ago.
Food store sales in Florida for
the first half of 1965 amounted
to $895,270,000 in comparison with
$794,466,000 for the same months
in 1964 an increase of 12.6
per cent.
This upward movement pre prevailed
vailed prevailed in all parts of the state
except Orange and Pinellas

I THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of
the University of Florida and is published five times weekly except
during May, June, and July when it is published semi-weekly. Only,
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator)
is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
I at Gainesville.
Let us lock in 24-hour I
A R o || if On Protection from Odor** i
H w on 'IOCKED-IN M i
s w " DEODORANT M I
Used In All I
I S Laundered Wearing Apparel
* Body Odor
M- Mr- I M Mildew Resistant
nNtimm cleaners
O 315 NW 13th St.

counties, where they dropped 1.1
and 2.8 per cent, respectively.
Organization
Report Due
October 15
All organizations have been re requested
quested requested to turn in their annual
yearly reports by Oct. 15, accord according
ing according to Andy Hall, secretary of
Student Organizations.
The information should include
officers of organizations and fac faculty
ulty faculty advisors.
This information will be used
to compile an organizations dir directory
ectory directory which will be distributed
throughout major student and ad administrative
ministrative administrative offices in the univer university.
sity. university.

644; Wes Watson, 650; Ann Weim Weimer,
er, Weimer, 639. Freedom: Dennis Arnold,
102; Brian Ashley, 124; VicCom VicComras,
ras, VicComras, 125; Ted Cooper, 115; Jim
Fine, 108; Dan Goodman, 115;
Bonni Greenspan, 114; Alan Levin,
168; Joel Starkey, 140; Joseph
Weiss, 135. Unaffiliated: Harry
Hayes, 152.
BROWARD HALL Progress:
Carol Sullivan, 134; Alice Cohen,
145 (victor). Action: Sue Morgan,
94; Gale Wolly, 143 (victor).
Freedom: Eloise Leeks, 50.
Unaffiliated: Liz Johnson, 31.
JENNINGS HALL - Progress:
Diane Edwards, 71. Action: Karen
Kawas, 159 (victor). Unaffiliated:
Carole Riley, 8.
RAWLINGS HALL -- Progress:
Linda Webb, 58. Action: Kather Katherine
ine Katherine Falk, 64 (victor). Freedom:
Leslie Patricia Weiss, 7. Un Unaffiliated:
affiliated: Unaffiliated: June Mahn, 58.
YULEE AREA Progress:
Sue Brutchyard, 105. Unaffiliated:
Sue Williams, 110 (victor).
GRAHAM AREA -- Progress:
Woody Wesley, 180; Jeanne Long,
195 (victor). Action: Gary Good Goodrich,
rich, Goodrich, 203 (victor); Marcia Ann
Roth, 158.
HUME HALL Progress:
Gary Schaffel, 197 (victor); Augie
Quesada, 204 (victor). Action:
Chuck Berrier, 54; Gary Mi Michaels,
chaels, Michaels, 101. Freedom: Ernest
Lent, 34. Unaffiliated: Robert
Benson, withdrew; Elmer Posnick,
54; Clinton Runco, 172.
TOLBERT AREA MichLine MichLineberger,
berger, MichLineberger, 193 (victor); Bill Pollard,
216 (victor); Tom Smith, 271 (vic (victor).
tor). (victor). Action: Allan Casey, 146;
Robert Podgorski, 117; Jeff
Scurran, 153. Freedom: Keys
Rhodes, 129.
MURPHREE AREA Prog Progress:
ress: Progress: Rick Brown, 275 (victor);
Bill Chiara, 265 (victor); Dana
McGauun, 277 (victor); Charles
Shepherd, 330 (victor). Action:
Timothy Blake, 255; RickHorder,
197; Rhett Rednour, 185; Tom
Watkins, 227. Unaffiliated: Ed
Matz, 186; Barry Diamond, 87.
Dog
(Continued from Page 1)
dogs location in the Gainesville
area. Officials withheld exactly
where the dog was found.
Hall said, "I'm sure the dog
does not have rabies but were
watching him just to make sure."
The dog is being held by county
health officials who will determine
when the dog can be officailly
pronounced "not rabid.
B.C. Pafford, county health of official,
ficial, official, said the dog must be ob observed
served observed for several weeks before
they will be positive about his
condition.
If the dog dies durfhg this per period,
iod, period, an examination of its brain
would be the only positive way to
find rabies, said Pafford.
Hall complimented the commun community
ity community on it's responsiveness. "The
news media and the people of
Gainesville cooperated whole wholeheartedly
heartedly wholeheartedly in finding the dog." he
said.

+ univeSity 4
luthepan chuch
wfer the Sixteenth Sunday Aften tninity,
/t The Service With bacrament V and II A.M.
Inquiry And Confirmation Class 10A.M.
Supper Forum 6 P.M.
The bacrament Os The Altar 9P. M.
_ (Always Open For Prayer)

iSG Elections

(Continued from Page 1)
CORKY VILLAGE Progress:
Bob Shaffer, 13. Action: Mike
Schaefer, 27 (victor).
FLA VET HI Progress: Pepe
Hernandez, 10. Action: Art Norris,
20 (victor).

United Chupch op Gainesville
(United Church of Christ: Congregational--E. & R.)
extends to students and faculty
A New Adventure
an invitation so
e/n Christianity
Sunday 10:00 a.m. Worship
and Sunday School
Florida Union (temporary meeting place)
EHMRASED W
Spaces ik ym Bookshelf?
LMt F. W* !W* It 6
-per (~78
Cm/w U.L
WERE COOLING IT
and well soon be I
POOLING IT at J
Well also have
brand new units
available late Oct.
FOR INFORMATION CALL 372 6720

DIAMOND VILLAGE Prog Progress:
ress: Progress: Mary Garcia, 25. Action:
Dave Vosloh 46 (victor).
SCHUCHT VILLAGE Prog Progress:
ress: Progress: Terry Swyers, 4 (victor^



leitzI eitz Staff Sets Fund Drive Pace

I sident J. Wayne Reitz and his staff set the
for early compliance with the United Fund
goals among university personnell by com comine
ine comine their donations Wednesday.
Imv and Air Force ROTC departments met
K eoal yesterday making the third consecutive
E that they have met their goal before the drive

n I # a 'w
I Just call him Sam y I
HES WEARING DACRON &-ORLON 1 V
Ultramatic Prest Haggar dress slacks. Even
when the humidity hangs hot and heavy,
or hes soaked in a sudden shower, 70 c
DACRON polyester-30% ORLON" acrylic \HMR
I keeps these fine dress slacks smooth and sharply I
| creased. They even take repeated washings lang^^Kl
| without a wrinkle. And Haggar styling gives y N I I
| him the trim fit he wants in fine dress slacks. No \ I
I wonder the gals go for Smooth Sam 10.95 j
I WIN A FORD MUSTANG or one of 50 other big WjKJ
, prizes. See your Haggar dealer for detai
GET HAGGAR SLACKS AT: r
BELK LINDStY Gainesville Shoppy Center
I WILSON'S -- 22 North Mam Street
. *
I ';/. THE STORE WITH MORE JT .^'
I ; .* GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER ."*

ROTC DEPARTMENTS SECOND

kick-off date.
The first employee contribution came from Walter
Wise, a civilian property custodian.
c
Col. William N. Boaz Jr., campus chairman
for the drive, expressed delight over the early
donations. The drive officially begins Monday.

Friday, Oct. 1, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

'| Min * uitnunmi 1 V.
I ITS CHRISTMAS EARLY HOI HO! f
Hr VHHnDf w
1 Vrl "" slP'
..- Bsn\l l~ ^ y y> *£? SANTA CLAUS COMES EARLY: Jan Baldwin, 2UC from Pensacola,
was left by Santa at the Delta Delta Delta chimney. Jan was an
entrant in the Gator Gras Queen Contest and was are editor for
coedikette.

Gator Band To March
To 'Blues Saturday
:;i: Saturday, the 170 strong Gator band will feature the distinctly .;
American music known as the blues. *:'.
*: An entirely different concept in precision drill will be employed .;
:: as the bands men perform intricate maneuvers to St. Louis Blues
x ; arranged especially for the show by the noted Director of Bands, :;
ft Richard W. Bowles. . :;
*: The All-Star Twirling Corps, the Gatorettes, f will be featured ;.
Si next in a special routine for another Richard W. Bowles special ;j
8 arrangement Blues in the Night. The Gator Bands fine trumpet ; :
ft section will be featured with an original composition by Director
g Bowles, Marching the Blues, as the band spells out DIXIE ;
v. across the field. ;.. ;
\£SX BILLYS
n* butcher shop
I OLD FASHION SERVICE
I Call Order In-Pick Up Later
I Swift Premium Rib Steak 69p lb.
I 3 lb. Lean Ground Chuck Beef. . .$1.19
I Small Lean Spare Ribs 59 I Dell, Grade A Stewing Hens
2 1/2 lb. average 39y ea.
I 6 oz. Filet Mignon ea.
I
11 lb. Oleo I
f Margarine... ,U/0|

I |with this coupon and $5 order. |
I I Good Friday 4 Saturday |
I 504 ** Ph 376-8905
I c> Weekdays BAM 'til 6:30 PM
I Fridays BAM 'til 9:00 PM
Saturdays 8 AM *til 7:00 PM

Page 11



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator/ Friday/ Octo 1/ 1965

Honor Bananas You Must Be Fooling!

Bailey To Talk
At Conference
Outgoing State Superintendent of
Public Instruction Thomas D.
Bailey and his successor, Floyd
Christian, will be featured
speakers today at the Ramada Inn.
They will address the County
Superintendents Conference. Gen General
eral General consultant for the session is
Dr. R. L. Johns, chairman of the
Department of Administration and
Supervision in the UFs College of
Education.
About 100 participants are ex expected,
pected, expected, including 67 county
superintendents in Florida. The
conference convenes three times
annually and is co-sponsored by the
University and the State De Department
partment Department of Education.
Also featured will be State
Comptroller Fred Dickinson who
will discuss Property Revalua Revaluations
tions Revaluations -- When, How and By What
Means Friday morning.
Bailey will speak Thursday
evening--the day he leaves office
and Christian will address a lun luncheon
cheon luncheon session Fridayhis first
day as state superintendent.

By PEGGY BLANCHARD
Alligator Staff Writer
Curls and color
mark the fall hair style
fashion this year.
After a long ab absence,
sence, absence, curls and the
feminine look are
coming back to girVs
hairstyles.
Hair coloring, here
for some time now is

Social World Spruced Up

By ALEX GALENES
Alligator Staff Writer
The Bent Card Coffee House,
1826 University Ave., has brought
a unique kind of entertainment to
the UF.
It features folk music, mono monologues,
logues, monologues, poetry reading, open de debates
bates debates and informal discussions.
Refreshments to go along with the
entertainment include coffee, cider
and soft drinks served with pret pretzels.
zels. pretzels.
The Bent Card was originated
by the Rev. Frederick D. Caster,
pastor of the University Lutheran
Church, and Roxcie Meyer, student
director of the First Lutheran
Church of Gainesville. The coffee
house opened last June, and is
now open every Friday and Satur Saturday
day Saturday from 9 p.m. until 1 a.m.
According to the Rev. Caster
the Bent Card was built from
donations and is operated on a
now-profit basis. Although the
first three months of operation
produced a deficit, the coffee house
has been self-sufficient since the
opening of the UF fall term.
Each Friday and Saturday night
the place is packed, reported
the Rev. Castor.
The Bent Card is run by a
steering committee whose mem members
bers members handle such matters as enter entertainment,
tainment, entertainment, refreshments, and the
operating staff* The members

Fall Hair Styles Feminine

NEW COFFEE HOUSE OPEN

f Bel- v W
m w VJBhm .JR
if? f :r
B B Kj
S^Bf
IPX H|ilf7
B B sbi ,/< .>
BUB BB NPBBBBBMBBBBBBBBBBBBBBI BHBBBBBBBBBBBBBWW^WBiWHiI^M^^*
CHECK IT OUT: Coeds look over the 'honor stock'

even more in vogue,
with just about every everyone
one everyone trying it.
High style this year
dictates heart-shaped
bangs with the cut fol following
lowing following the eyebrows.
The bangs are longer
in the middle and this
style has a short back
and longer sides

11 I ?
I* | + A M "Bjl §MR AM a s,#** 1
:. 9 9 jtrw I 11 MVVv. ttxS.vip't
Is H "> .* 1
J*. A
t hrttfCft
% v |jn f
"> ; >

BENT CARD NOW OPEN: for weekend shows

of this committee serve on a vol voluntary
untary voluntary basis, as do the waiters
and waitresses.
The Rev. Castor noted two
effects of the Bent Card's first
several months of operation.

For everyday wear,
the page boy flip is still
the old standby Every
coed can get by with
this one with waves on
sides and a high flip.
Although the style is
for mostly short hair
girls with short hair
often find themselves
wanting long hair or at

First, he said, the Bent Card
is bringing faculty and students
together. Second, the Bent Card
is bringing togetherpolar groups'
on the campus, individuals of op opposite
posite opposite extremes of social life.

least hairdos which
look like they have long
hair.
This problem is
solved simply by using
a hairpiece the same
color as natural hair.
To use a hairpiece, the
hairdo is usually
started with a simple
updo or French twist
and the hairpiece is
hidden under the real
hair.
Key words, however,
to this year f s hair
fashion are: short,
curls and color.
Keeping these in
mind, according to the
Central Hairstyling
College, the coed can*t
go too far wrong Any
local beauty shop, they
said, can give these
styles quickly and
easily.

Miss UF Contest Deadline
Set For Next Thursday
Deadline for entering the Miss University of Florida contest,
sponsored by Student Government, has been set for Oct. 7
Competition will be held in the University Auditorium on Nov. 9-10.
This contest, according to SG Secretary of Public Relations Jim
Kincaid, will not interfere with Homecoming activities so any girl
who entered the Homecoming Sweetheart contest or who wins the
contest may enter the Miss UF contest.
Qualifications for Miss UF contestants include:
--At least a 2.0 overall average.
Signing a contract form with Student Government to serve as
UFs representative for a year.
Paying a $5 entry fee.
Contestants, Kincaid said, will be judged on the basis of talent,
beauty and personality. A trophy will be given to the organization
who is the sponsor of the winning contestant.
Winner of the contest will be announced at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 12,
during Fall Frolics. The new Miss UF will have to enter the Miss
Florida Contest in Sarasota next July. r

Apple MahAdds
Something New
By JOHN WINN
Alligator Staff Writer
Honor bananas?
Why not? asks Rod Rodden Roddenberry,
berry, Roddenberry, UFs Honor Apple Man.
There are lots of times when
Td rather have a banana than an
apple, so I figured other people
might like them, too.
As a result of Roddenberrys
taste for bananas, his seven fam familiar
iliar familiar white stands on the UF campus
are graced each morning with their
usual 100 apples, topped off by a
bunch of bananas.
Honor apples have become a
tradition at UF. I have yet,
said Roddenberry, to talk to
someone who remembers when
they werent here. This is only
my second year in putting them
out, but theyve been here at least
20 years.
Contrary to what apparently is
popular belief, Roddenberry oper operates
ates operates his apple stands without con connection
nection connection to Student Government.
Everybody seems to think student
government puts out the apples.
Well, they dont; but when I lose
as much money as I have recently,
I sort of wish they did, Rodden Roddenberry
berry Roddenberry mused.
Every day the apples test the
Honor Code, he continued. And
every day at least one out of four
students disregard the Code. Im
going to see if there isnt some
way that I can bring the honor
apples to the attention of the
Honor Court. Then if we catch
someone stealing, well be able
to do something about it.
Roddenberry pointed out that his
25 per cent shrinkage was about
normal. But there are some days
when it runs even greater, he
contends .When its around one
out of four, I can break even and
sometimes even collect a little
extra for my trouble. But when
its any more than that, Im
hurting, he said. It costs Rod Roddenberry
denberry Roddenberry about S4O a day for his
apples. If I dont get that back,
he continued, then, eventually,
Im going to have to stop putting
out apples. I just cant afford to
lose that kind of money.
No Rabbit Stew
LAS CRUCES, N.M. (UPI)
An Army Special Forces group
undergoing guerrilla training in
the southern New Mexico moun mountains
tains mountains was supposed to trap wild
rabbits for their meals.
But the area turned out to be
practically rabbitless. The Army
was forced to buy tame ones and
release them to be caught by the
trainees.



capacity Crowd To Pack Stadium

I Continued from page I
ors since he became head
Kch. Formerly he was offensive
[ under Paul Dietzel at
K He took over as head coach
The 'most recent clash between
I se two football teams took place
It Dec. 5- Before 65,000 partisan
Is at Tiger Stadium in Baton
luge, the Gators stunned the
lored Tigers by a 20-6 score,
le Bengals closed the season with
BOth place national ranking and a
Ictorv over Syracuse in the Sugar

rUnitarian-Universalist Fellowship
"IN PRAISEAND REAPPRAISALOF LIBERALISM"
A Discussion Series
OCT. 3 DISCUSSION LEADER:
Roy Ivan Johnson, University Consultant, Author
(Mr. Johnson's talk is 4th in the series)
SUNDAY, 11 A.M.
EVERYONE INVITED 324 FLORIDA UNION |

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Bowl.
In that night contest, Florida
opened with a touchdown in the
first quarter to take an early 7-0

Three TDs Will Win:Graves

Well definitely find out how
good we are Saturday, said Coach
Hay Graves, as his football team
went through its last day of drills
before playing Louisiana state.
We really didnt find out how

lead. They then went on to score
two more six-pointers and an
extra-point kick while holding the
talented Bengals to two field goals.

good we are in the first two games
in victory or defeat, he said.
This game Saturday will tell
ue what a lot of persons have
been wondering about.
It will also give our offensive
a tough test. I think it will take
three toughdowns to win the game.
We have a good passing offense,
and LSU has come up with a passing
offense that we hadnt counted
on before the season started.
The team has done a good job
of putting the Mississippi State
game behind them, and I think
were ready for the test Saturday.
Weve prepared as much as
possible and now its just a question
of being able to apply what weve
learned.
The Gator football team usually

Friday, Oct. 1, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

On the ground, the Gators were
outrushed 181 to 143 in total yards.
But by the air routes, the Orange
and Blue recorded 114 yards to 8

practices on Florida Field
Thursday, but with rain still com coming
ing coming down in Gainesville, Graves
had his team on the practice field

SPORTS EDITOI^fU^^
MKKKmmm
The Gators may or may not nave gotten over the agony of the
Mississippi State loss, but they wont have much chance to
think about that tomorrow.
They must concentrate all their efforts in the direction of ah
awesome bunch of Bayou Bengals the LSU Tigers.
This is a MUST game for UF if it is to stay in contention for
the SEC crown or high national ranking.
It is probably the roughest test the Gators will face all year.
LSU is a team without a weakness. It has a huge offensive line,
a multitude of top-flight running backs and a top receiver in multi multitalented
talented multitalented Dougie Moreau, the flanker who scored 73 of the teams
115 points a year ago.
From the first of the season, the Bengals problem appeared
to be at quarterback. Billy Ezell, who called the signals for most
of the past two years, was only mediocre both as a passer and
runner. Injury-prone Pat Screen had had great things predicted of
him since he was a sophomore, but these forecasts had never
materialized.
Last week, from out of nowhere, a sophomore named Nelson
Stokley appeared on the scene. He promptly proved he deserved
his chance by almost singlehandedly walloping Rice 42-14. Stokley
completed 9 of 13 passes for over 100 yards and two touchdowns.
At the same time he scrambled to 85 yards rushing, one of the
weeks top ground performances.
This may have been greeted with surprise In some circles,
but not at LSU. Stokley had put on a slmil show in the Intra Intrasquad
squad Intrasquad spring game. He completed 9 of lu for 14 passes and
three touchdowns. He also pitched in with 85 yards on the ground
in 12 carries. Stokley is little (5-11, 170) but very explosive.
Defensively, the Tigers are as strong as ever. Its true they
lost three top-flight performers in tackle f emi Prudhomme,
linebacker Ruffin Rodrique and safety White Graves. They return
standouts Mike Vincent at linebacker, George Rice at tackle and
Beau Colle at cornerback.
LSU has the team which could be No. 1 In the nation. Florida
is its first acid test of the season. For this reason, its a good
bet that the Tigers will be sky high tomorrow.
Florida has a fine football team. It may well be the best In
the schools history. It is capable of beating the best team in
the country on a given Saturday.
The Mississippi State loss hasnt changed that. The Gators
are capable of scoring on anyone, Including the awesome Bengals.
The defense has shown flashes of brilliance and could, with a
Herculean effort, hold LSU. If UF can do both these things
tomorrow, it can win.
LSU,on the other hand, has the defense to stop the Gators.
There can be no doubt of their ability to score on the Gator
defense, which has allowed five touchdowns in two weeks.
Figuring the Bengals will be sky high and the Gators need
the game badly, it should be a whale of a game.
LSU will win by something like 24-7 on their overall strength.
The game will be closer than* the score indicates, nowever.
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for the Bengals. The Gator defense
completely throttled the Tiger a|r
game, allowing only one completldn
in 13 attemDts.

in an attempt to preserve the reg regular
ular regular field.
The Gators will hold no practice
Friday.
0

Page 13



Page 14

1/ The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct 1, 1965

LSU Strong On Offense And Defense

By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Staff Writer
Its just like war. Your ground
forces cannot move the football
against defense-minded Louisiana
State. There is but one resort
aerial bombardment.
Head Scout John Eibner, who
viewed the Bayou Bengals 42-14
creaming of Rice, relates this
about the nations sixth-ranked
eleven.
LSU has always depended on
its defense for victory. Its solid
: sis A 1
v ya-v .y JS*;
JSett
r-' uJByB
jjr JL ._.
yHRIr
DON SCHWAB:
LSUs Top Runner
defense earns good field position
for the offense, and forces the
opposition to make the big, game gamedeciding
deciding gamedeciding mistake. This philosophy
is still evident in the Tigers
emphasis on punt returns and pass
interceptions, Eibner contended.
Indications are, this season, that
Coach Charlie McClendon may
have fashioned his finest offense
yet. McClendon revamped his of offense
fense offense late last year, but LSU
managed to score only nine TDs
in 10 games. In the 1965 season,
after two games, the Bengals have
crossed the goal line 7 times.

Harriers Open '65 Season
' Against South Florida
Coach Jimmy Carnes sends UFs 1965 cross-country team out
against the University of South Florida tomorrow at 10 a.m. in their
first meet of the season.
Eugene Cote, a Junior College transfer from New York, is the
teams No. 1 hope. Senior Bob Halliday joins Deiter Gebhard,
Austin Funk, and Larry Powell as the Gators next four top harriers.
Were looking forward to doing real well. The boys have been
progressing speedily and are eager to get into actual competition.
Carnes commented.
The race will begin near the UF track and will wind through
Beta Woods and around campus for a distance of four miles.
The talented Gator Freshmen engage Jacksonville Paxon High,
defending state champions, in a practice meet at 5 oclock this
afternoon. Harry Drake, who holds the course record of 14:22
(three miles), will leaf! the freshmen.
High schools can furnish some of the best competition. They
have been running together for more years than have the freshmen,
Carnes pointed out.
The freshmen have already defeated both Pensacola and Manatee
Junior college this season.
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LSUs powerful split-1 attack
features an exceptional split end
and an outstanding Strongback.
Depth is obvious elsewhere in the
backfield.
All-SEC ace end Doug Moreau,
6-1, 195 (No. 80), set a team rec record
ord record for receptions and led the SEC
in scoring. His kicking ability alone
makes him a dangerous threat. A
senior, he booted a field goal in
States opening contest, and caught
a TD pass against Rice.
Anytime LSU reaches our
thirty-yard line, watch the score scoreboard.
board. scoreboard. Its practically a sure three
points. Moreau is sure to punch a
field goal through, Eibner said.
LSU relies heavily on their
Strongback (comparable to a
wingback) for both running and
passing-receiving duty. Huge Billy
Masters, 6-5, 225 (No. 25), a jun junior,
ior, junior, has proved himself qualified
for the position.
Running mainly in tough-yardage
situations, Masters has carried
five times for 24 important yards.
In addition, he has snared 2 of
States 12 completions (Moreau has
3) for 15 yards.
McClendon played his second of offensive
fensive offensive unit more than the first
eleven. Depth became apparent,
and a couple of lineup changes
may be made. Billy Ezell, who
saw most of the action at quarter quarterback
back quarterback last season, has been
relegated to the defensive unit.
Senior Pat Screen, probable
starter as signal-caller, may see
a lot of action as safetyman. The
big surprise has been sophomore
Nelson Stokley, 5-11, 170 (No. 14).
He ranks fourth in the SEC in
rushing yardage (126 yards in 17
attempts) and ninth in passing.
LSU may well take to the air to
take advantage bf Stokleys arm.
Like Mississippi State, LSU can
count on good inside and outside
running. The UF Gator coaching
staff has not forgotten fullback Don
Schwab (No. 42). In 1963 at Florida
Field, Schwab scored both tallies
on fourth and goal situations in a
14-0 LSU triumph. Last year, he

gained 143 yards against the
Gators. This season, he has rushed
12 times for 73 yards.
Reserve fullback Danny Le-
Blanc, 5-10, 205 (No. 26), is an another
other another proven power runner. He
should also see action at tailback.
Quick and elusive tailback, Joe
Laruzzo, 5-9, 175 (No. 22), is
tough to contain. He is always a
threat for a long gainer. Against
Rice he broke loose for an 82-
yard touchdown on a punt return.
He has amassed 70 yards in 14
thrusts.
Sophomore Jim Dousay (No. 28)
has been the workhorse, helping
LSU to a ranking of first in the
conference in rushing offense. He
has gained 81 yards with 25 car carries,
ries, carries, and scampered 12 yards on
one pass reception.
One apparent weakness lies in
the Tigers punting game. Buster
Brown (No. 43) has great leg power
and has earned renown for his
timely coffin corner boots.
However, the ball has a tendency
to slide off the side of his foot.
His average for two games is 32.2
yards.
LSUs defense varies little from
week to week its always tough.
They use the Oklahoma forma formation
tion formation 5-4-2.
They dont care where your
strength is; they just dig in and
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HILLEL FOUNDATION
SATURDAY. OCT. 2
8:30 P.M.
EVERYONE IS INVITED
SHIRTS
WORI6R
mm
At the Gainesville Livestock Market
5001 N.W. 13th St.

once in a while theyll rush
linebacker, Eibner said.



Alligator Staffers Pick The Winners ~
% H |h| S I .sbfel Bh I-1~1- I-' U-
I 667 .639 I .61, 5 gV I I i I 4 I 19 17 ~* I 19 17 -' I 18-,8-4 16-20-4 19-15-4
J 583 I 556 1 I -528 I .500 .444 559
LSU-Florida F FIF I F L L F F L F L F T
Baylor-FSU B B B B F F B B B B B B B
Kentucky-Auburn I K K A A K K K K A K K K K
Miss.-Alabama A A A A A A A A' A A A A A
UCLA-Penn St. P P P P P P P U P U U P P
Syracuse-Maryland S M S M M M M M M S M M M
Virginia-N.C. IVI NI N N N N N N N N N N N
Miaml-Tulane IM I M MI M M M M M M M M M M
Pitt ,-W.Va. W P W P P W W W W P W P W
Ohio St.-Wash. O O W W O O W O W O O W O
111.-Mich.St. I IIMI MI M M M M I M M I M M
Missouri-Minn. Min Mo Mo Min Mo Mo Min Mo Mo IMo Min Min Mo
NW-Notre Dame ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND
Navy-Oklahoma 0 0 0 0 O O O O O O O O O
lowa-Wisconsin II I 111 |||||| l|l|l| I I I
I I -. I I I' I I I
TCU-Arkansas A A A A A A A T A A A T A
Duke-Rice D D D R D D RID R R D D D
Tex.&AM-Tex.Tech TA TT TT TA TT TA TT TT ITT TT TT TA TT
Ore.-St.-USC U oluuUOU U UU U U U
Clemson- Ga. Tech |G|G |G | C G| G G C G G G C G
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Friday, Oct. 1, 1965, The Florida Alligator/

Tide, Ole Miss
Renew Rivalry

ATLANTA (UPI) Alabamas
Crimson Tide and Ole Miss Rebels
hold their first regular season
meeting in 21 years Saturday and
its a do-or-die struggle for both.
These two perennial powers us usually
ually usually dominate the Southern college
football scene. But each has al already
ready already suffered a league loss and
Saturdays loser will be knocked
out of the running before the South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference campaign
really begins.
Alabama was upset In its opener
with Georgia and the Rebels lost
last week to Kentucky.
A similar duel to the death lies
immediately ahead for the Florida
Gators another pre-season title
contender. The Gators, upset by
Mississippi State, will be host to
sixth-ranked Louisiana State which
is making its conference debut
after beating two teams from the
Southwest.
The SEC has a third headliner
at Auburn where the Tigers will
Soccer Club
Opens Year
Tomorrow
The UF Soccer Club may seek
to gain equal footing against the
St. Petersburg Soccer Club this
Saturday at 10 a.m. at Fleming
Field.
The game is as yet unconfirmed,
but the club is looking for a
chance to avenge their defeat to
St. Pete in the Suncoast Tourna Tournament
ment Tournament last year.
Coach Alan C. Moore cites the
stimulating workouts the team has
held and maintains this team is
vastly improved over last seasons.
Last years unit compiled a
creditable 8-8 record.
The squad boasts participants
from twenty countries. David
Weaver, England, is President.
Leslie Unger, Miami Springs, is
Secretary of Public Relations.
Co-captains are Mario Leiva,
Costa Rica, and SamShaya, Isreal.
Budget $255600
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be host to eighth-ranked Kentucky.
In other Saturday action:
The SEC leader, llth-ranked
Georgia, visits sth-ranked Mich Michigan;
igan; Michigan; 12th-ranked Mississippi
State will be host to small-time
Tampa; Tulane will be host to
Miami; Vanderbilt will be at
Wake Forest; Georgia Tech will
host Clemson; Florida State will
host Baylor; and Southern Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi will ho>t Richmond.
Alabama and Mississippi met
often before 1933 but their only
regular season meeting since then
was in 1944 when Alabama won
34-6. Their lone meeting since that
date was in the 1964 Sugar Bowl
and Alabama won 12-7 thanks to
four field goals by Tim Davis.
The I7th-ranked Crimson Tide,
defending national champion, lost
to Georgia when Steve Sloan was
off target on his passes. Sloan
regained his eye last week against
Tulane and this plus the recovery
of hard-running halfback Leslie
Kelly makes Alabama the favorite.
The LSU-Florida game should
be a bruiser. These are two teams
loaded with talent, experience and
depth. Gator quarterback Steve
Spurrier is tied with Sloan for the
league total offense lead with 319
yards.
Kentucky expects to have injured
Rodger Bird back in action this
week. With Bird, league rushing
leader Larry Seiple and passing
leader Rick Horton all in the Wild Wildcat
cat Wildcat backfield, its hard to see how
Auburn, which lost to Baylor and
tied Tennessee, can cope with the
offense.
Georgia has been a surprise but
it will take more than this to over overcome
come overcome the Wolverines. Tampa has
no business playing the likes of
Mississippi State and the contest
could be a rout. The Miami Hur Hurricanes
ricanes Hurricanes upset Syracuse by a
convincing 24-0 score last week
and that offers little solace to
hapless Tulane, which has yet to
score.
Vanderbilt is tough defensively
and the Commodores arent ex expected
pected expected to have a great ideal of
trouble with Wake Forest. Georgia
Tech is in its longest non-winning
streak (five games) in 25 years
and the Yellow Jackets are under underdogs
dogs underdogs to Clemson which has a 2-0
mark.
Florida State must gear its de defenses
fenses defenses to halt Baylors Terry
Southall, the Nations fourth
passer. And Southern Mississippi,
led by Vic Purvis, the nations
second leading rusher, is heavily
favored over Richmond.

Page 15



Page 16

7 The Florida Friday Oct. ], 1965

HONDA SUPER 90
: tom-. w^w ww .v,..%-...v.-.-...-.v.w.. ~.W...-. --- 8-. -SHERWOOD' ... FROM ENGLAND %
1 I The Harmon Football Forecast I 1
BUM I TOP 20 TEAMS (Forecasting Average: 276 Right, 92 Wrong 750) 8
I -TEXAS 6 -ARKANSAS 11 NORTH CAROLINA 16-TULSA
A 8: 2-PURDUE 7-L.S.U. 12-FLORIDA 17-KENTUCKY J /i #
8 3-NOTRE DAME 8 -GEORGIA 13-SOUTHERN CAL. 18-OREGON /I // ll#
8 4-MICH. STATE 9-MICHIGAN 14-ILLINOIS 19 MIAMI, FLA. 8 V/Tr/*-* g n S
§ 5-MISS. STATE 10-ALABAMA 15-NEBRASKA 20-BAYLOR f\Vu/ft> f g
i| hr q je ma m Saturday, October 2 Major Colleges
188 fIE L Alabama 17 Mississippi 7
-A m m W ft Arkansas 22 T. C. U 7 highlights W
Baylor 15 Florida State ;. 14 66 *:
;:] Boston College ...... 26 Army 13 AWI
jij: $ Brovin* 8 Green fg p|nn n 7 Its an old saying that the best way to $ |
81 8 California 20 Kansas 14 earn the #1 spot in the nation is to beat the A; Ift
ft _ eg Colgate 16 Yale 6 #1 team. Well, the Riveters of Purdue did, \^Wm
MeSSSdostate u;.: 8 SSf^JSSS*.: d but they didn dulte make t 0 the tdp
| |f| |A; Connecticut 13 Rutgers 8 theyre Number Two. They should give S.M.U.
iv Dartmouth 20 Holy Cross 8 a 32-point rapping this week. %;
|:ji 8 0u^ son Citadel 13 Texas did make it, however, and the new This fabulous new four-ply super-
X; 8 East Car0iiriii"............ 26 o #1 throne-holder will be too tough for the 8 lambswool has a luxurious, full ft
| 8 Georffa VVast m ? on 15 MichiUn".'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'.'.'..'/. 14 Hoosiers of Indiana Saturday.. .the Longhorns 8 handle plus wonderful wearing 8
8 ::! Georgia Tech 14 ciemson 8 by 28 points over the Big Tenners. 8 ability. .features the English jA
YE B $ Illinois 21 Michigan state 20 Heres a real little dog-eat-dog tea party: saddle shoulder specially designed
~ l_ 8: m Sm 10 The Southeastern Conferences top Bulldog, by Alan Paine. A truly outstanding
_jt_ l. s. u 20 Florida 17 Bth-ranked Georgia, meets the Big Tens sweater. Sizes 38-46. In exclusive
p. * Us 8 Massachusetts 20 iuffaio B ... ZZ'.'.'.'.'. 13 biggest Wolverine, 9th-rated Michigan. With Alan Paine colors.
1-- m_ I m!S% BL§ S- Michigan l tongue m cheek (swollen aut from last week), f g
Minnesota 13 Missouri 10 well go with a Georgia victory by one small
X: Miss. State 38 Tampa 0 n
ft ft. Montana 15 Idaho State 12 point. ,v.
8 #ir l A / .. A x Nebraska 31 lowa State 8 Notre Dame, still rated third, in spite of 8 I W IJni\A Ave 8
I 615 W. Un.veis.ty Ave. § S J^nl" estern ::: its loss to Purdue, will resound with an 18 | 123 W. Uni'T. Ave. g
[J!!t5 Texas i| (£^J tern point win over Northwestern, and 7th-ranked
; Tke College Life | HJ yi; ="= :i | 01 Come, You 1
ft A pacme 16 Hawafi m Young 13 Also in the Southland, a Mississippi State $ X XpAAinnll
pAAinnll XpAAinnll Capa#m#A Penn State 15 u. c. L. A 7 team that did as we predicted (not many E. H )| IJ T
rOOIDQII forecast f Rgggf =:r g S m v b ;r la l 2 teams did, believe mo!) against Florida, is | DOB t HIV 610
S /\ |i SoSh e carolina : ?! N. State iS in the #5 spot this week. They'll have a bit ::i 1
a- ;X southern Cal 21 Oregon state 8 of a breeze Saturday as they are heavy six- >x U R*
| /ytEji §1 Miss :g SIfPSS iS touchdown tavorites over Tampa. Have Tour >|
a>/ *x Temple 19 Boston u. 13 Nebraska, 15th in the nation, gets down to _
HD a; Texas Tech 17 Texas a& m 13 serious business in the Big 8 Conference, If H
I TCila 0 it Oklahoma State X 7 and will slip the needle to lowa State by 23. 8: MWWIW
\ L 8 y ta h s^ e S? 1 ? J l e st ate T 3 6th-ranked Arkansas also goes to work in
: A 8 v an p. f. 1 15 wfiiiam and Mary' 6 defense of its Southwest Conference Crown, D6llV6r6ll*
§! | SJStSKS S,ate & Arfzona State l! and sp > T.C.O. by about 15 points. |
j:|: Wyoming 15 Arizona 13 Just a reminder to the many new readers
EAST (small colleges) of T he Harmon Ratings: games won and lost
8: 8 Amherst 21 Amn. intemati o have no bearing on a teams national ranking. 8 Although he loves to show off the
: : : : THE GAMES A- Cortland 19 Bridgeport 14 A teams power quotient is determined by the 8 speed and efficiency of his mes- 8:
8: Delaware 18 Gettysburg 14 average of its past performances against all $ sengers, Alan wont mind if you 8
| | **Ealt stroldsburg 20 WeS'chester i! opposition. As evidence, there are no less | decide to come by the Cubana |
.... Miami vs. iuiaie Edmboro 18 Slippery Rock 15 than seven teams in the Top Twenty this A and pick up the delicious sandwich
p Ala. vs. Miss. [Jafne 17 Vermont r 13 week that have already lost one game. And Bof your choice in person. In fact 8 :
p l ?1fV: S B a e v inr Cky is
8: oayiur .... Northeastern 24 Colby 13 quotients arent high enough to place them iv in the Cubana) and it wouldnt hurt A;
g. Arkansas v s. T.C.U. g Oberiin 13 i| among the top teams in the land. | you to get out more. Alan would $
8 Georgia vs. Mich. g
8 linois vs. c . j... Susquehanna 16 st. Lawrence 13 Illinois, in spite of its 1 and 1 record, is A*: have been his telephone customers A*
I hio r S \- I s I USm 51 §&., 1 ranked 14th this week. And the Illini are f g
| g MIDWEST (small colleges) just an extra point. (We took enough § /
*:: 8 Ashland 30 Defiance 7 lumps last week not to worry about one I b oo l%
A > Augustana, 111 19 Carthage 14 more!) I I /A
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lifi ST Collefle Life jal j 9 (k' ojl^U
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