Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida Allie:at#r

Vol. 58, No. 7 University of Florida, Gainesville Tuesday, Sept. 14. 1965

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activity cards for the coming gridiron season. Four windows just can't handle the load
resulting in daily people-jams like this one yesterday.

Florida Begins Requests
For Betsy Disaster Furjds

tJJIAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI) ~
request for federal dis disaster
aster disaster funds to help repair damage
Hurricane Betsy did in 10 counties
iMi§ Started on its way to Washing Washington
ton Washington Monday. Total estimated
damages, including agriculture
losses, came to $11,201,550.
Mai Ogden, assistant to Gov.
Haydon Burns and civil defense
officials who helped compile the
figures, said they expect to hear
from the application this week, but
i|t probably will be a little longer
before any money is actually re released.
leased. released.
There is only $9,244,550 in
public property damage for which
federal disaster funds can be made
available.
No total amount was requested
in federal funds, but the applica application
tion application to the Office of Emergency
planning estimated that $1,710,000
is needed immediately for debris
clearance, emergency repairs and
temporary replacement of essen essential
tial essential facilities.
This included $975,000 in Dade,
$276,000 in Monroe, $310,000 in.
Broward, $40,000 in Palm Beach,
$25,000 each for Martin and Col Collier,
lier, Collier, $20,000 in St. Lucie and
sls ,000 each for Hendry and
Glades.
The state received in the neigh neighborhood
borhood neighborhood of $lO million in federal
aid to clean up after
Hurricane Cleo and Dora last year.
Wind damage from Betsy was light
but there was a lot of water damage,
officials said.
Betsy, carrying winds in excess
of 130 miles an hour and accom accompanied
panied accompanied by rain and high tides,
Struck the keys and the south
Florida area before moving into
Hie Gulf of Mexico creating con considerable
siderable considerable high tidal action on the
Florida west coast.
It took a toll of eight lives in
this state, then moved to Louisi Louisi-1
-1 Louisi-1 where it took a heavier toll

of life and property in the New
Orleans and low-lying areas.
The breakdown of total dam damage
age damage included $9,244,500 to pub public
lic public property and $109,960,000 to
private property including agri agricultural

Betsy Death Toll
Now Stands At 64

NEW ORLEANS (UPI) Falling
flood waters raised the death toll
Monday in the wake of Hurricane
Betsy.
The official count was 64 dead,
including 53 in Louisiana. Most
drowned when the killer storm
swept across Florida and into
Louisiana, Mississippi and finally
Arkansas.
Officials raised the possibility
of another 38 bodies being found
in Plaquemines Parish.
More victims of Friday's 125-
mile-an-hour blast were found as
flood waters began falling. Parts
of New Orleans still were from six
to eight feet under water.
Mud, misery, and confusion were
everywhere.
New Orleans Coroner Dr. Ni Nicholas
cholas Nicholas Chetta said he tentatively
confirmed reports that 250
persons had drowned in Plaque Plaquemines
mines Plaquemines Parish and he,, made room
in the New Orleans morgue for the
bodies.
Chapin Perez, a Plaquemines of official
ficial official and son of segregationist
leader Leander Perez, radioed that
he had heard of only 38 deaths
and that was not official.
As for the 250 dead, I dont
believe we lost anything like that,
Perez said.
Refugees were returning to their
homes in some areas and rescue
i workers streamed in to help.
The federal government was
1 passing out wheat, flour, corn

cultural agricultural crops.
The small business adminis administration
tration administration has already declared a
disaster so loans can be made
available at small interest rates
to help private businesses.

meal, canned beef, dried milk,
rice, beans and butter.
The Red Cross reported 918
homes destroyed, 770 house housetrailers
trailers housetrailers smashed, 1,104 homes
badly damaged and 131,689 homes
less seriously damaged.
See BETSY on p. 5

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HOMECOMING STICKERS ARE HERE...
&
And Lynda Lippman, Homecoming Queen contes contestant,
tant, contestant, puts the first one on some lucky guy's car.

O range Peel:
No Answer Yet

After a four-hour Board of Student Publications meeting Monday
afternoon, the Orange Peel issue remained exactly where it started:
up in the air.
Several motions were made during the session, but most of them

died for lack of a seconding motion.
Board Chairman John V. Webb,
journalism professor, chided the
Board for its lack of action.
I'd say the Board is a little
negligent for not doing anything
today," Webb said.
Webb read four recommenda recommendations
tions recommendations made by a three-man com committee--Student
mittee--Student committee--Student Body Treasurer
Steve Cheesman, Ex-New Orange
Peel Editor Don Federman and
former Board member A1
Leonard--which studied the humor
magazine situation during the sum summer.
mer. summer.
The committee recommended:
Selection in the fall of a
magazine" editor and managing
editor.
One publication of the maga magazine
zine magazine for distribution ator the
Friday before home football
games, a procedure which would
replace Alligator supplements for
the games.
Since this is a temporary
measure, if a new charter is
necessary, adopt a temporary
charter for the fall trimester,
leaving as much freedom of con content
tent content to the editor as possible.
Impress upon the editor
applicants that their work will
include formulating a new and
permanent charter and name for
a substantial college informative informativehumor-literary
humor-literary informativehumor-literary magazine at the
UF beginning in January, 1966."
Board member Ron Spencer
moved the recommendations be
passed, but his motion died for
lack of a second.
As Webb put it, We're moth mothballing
balling mothballing the Orange Peel until next
trimester."
There was a discussion about
changing the name of the magazine
after it became apparent the Peel
can never be returned to its ori-
See PEEL on p. 2

Leg Council
Agenda Lists
Appointments
Three Student Government Cab Cabinet
inet Cabinet appointments will be up for
approval during the trimester's
first Legislative Council meeting
tonight.
The Council will meet at 7:30
p.m. in Florida Union Room 324.
Up for approval will be Doug
Thompson as administrative
assistant; Pete Zinober as secre secretary
tary secretary of labor and Erick Smith as
secretary of men's affairs.
SG President Bruce Culpepper
is to address the session.
Progress Party members will
caucus at 7 p.m. in Room 324 and
Action Party delegates will meet
at 7 p.m. in Room 218.
Handball Lights
Still Not Up
The UF finally has lighted tennis
courts, but the rumored lighting
of the handball courts hasnt taken
place.
We're waiting for the gen generator,"
erator," generator," explained Bruce
Culpepper, president of the student
body. He said the handball courts
are going to be lighted as soon
as possible.
The problem is finding a gener generator
ator generator that will fit the area of the
handball epurts. The lights for
the courts are in the process of
being made, but the SIO,OOO
generator isnt available.
Its out of our hands now,"
Culpepper commented. He couldnt
estimate the amount of time, but
thought that it "WGuld be a couple
of months.
The student body waited around
two years for the tennis courts to
be lighted, Culpepper commented.
Revamp Book Sale
Student Government is trying
to revamp the Student Government
book sale.
Right now, there are just too
many books. They're stored in a
closet after the book sales.
Many of them are obsolete,
so were just trying to get rid
of the surplus books, Student Body
President Bruce Culpepper ex explained.
plained. explained.
Last year, there was talk of
abandoning the student government
book sale. Culpepper says he is
not in favor of this plan.
There's a lack of space, not
lack of Interest," he said. Wed
like to find permanent room in the
new Union for a book sale."
The book sale is now being
conducted on the third floor of
Florida Union.
The book sale is selling books,
but none are being bought at this
time, Culpepper says.



The Florida Alligator, Tuesday/ Sept. 14, 1965

Page 2

r THE WORLD
(THIS MORNING
(From The Wires Os United Press International)
Indians Near
Pakistani Base
NEW DELHI lndian troops and tanks have driven to within 3,000
yards of the key Pakistani military base of Sialkot in the biggest
battle of the Indo-Pakistani war, Indian military reports said Monday
night. The battle was reported in the decisive stage.
An Indian spokesman said Pakistani forces were battling tenaciously
against an Indian armored column that has stabbed seven miles south
from the Kashmir border city of Jammu in a week-long drive toward
Sialkot, 10 miles inside Pakistan.
The spokesman said Indian troops have had to fight for every inch
of ground in the push on Sialkot, a once-flourishing commercial city
now virtually a ghost town.
In Karachi, the official Pakistan radio claimed Pakistani forces
have destroyed one-third of Indias armored strength in what was
described as possibly the largest armored encounter since World
War II.
The Pakistani broadcast said India had faced an impregnable
wall when it had thrown the bulk of its armored strength into the
Sialkot battle in a desperate attempt to achieve a breakthrough.
It said, The battlefield is strewn with twisted metal of what was
Indias armored strength and with bodies of Indian troops.
While the fierce fighting continued, United Nations Secretary General
Thant met for the second day with Indian leaders in New Delhi in his
effort to halt the undeclared border war.
Informed sources said Thant may stop off in Moscow on his return
trip to New York, to confer with Soviet leaders on the conflict. The
report coincided with a new Kremlin appeal Monday for international
efforts to end the India-Pakistani conflict. At the same time the
Soviet government accused Red China of helping fan the conflict.
Indian military sources described the fighting for Sialkot as grim,
with the Pakistani army staking all it can to halt the Indian column
advancing slowly from the Kashmir frontier.

Troops Now Number
125,000 In Viet Nam

SAIGON (UPI) -- U. S. military
manpower in Viet Nam Monday
soared past the 125,000 mark when
5,000 more of the air
mobile Ist Cavalry Division
poured ashote at Qui Nhon.
In Washington, Secretary of State
Dean Rusk said arrival of the di division
vision division would boost the total of UJS.
troops to somewhat higher than
the 125,000-man goal previously
announced by President Johnson.
Advance units of the 20,000-
man division already were
reported to have made contact
with Viet Cong guerrillas around
Demonstrators
Hold Protest
Inside Capitol
WASHINGTON Civil rights
demonstrators held a 20-minute
silent vigil inside the Capitol
Monday as hearings began on an
attempt to unseat Mississippis
five congressmen.
The southern-dominated House
Administration subcommittee on
elections met privately for three
and one-half hours without deciding
on the latest seating challenge by
the predominantly Negro Missi Mississippi
ssippi Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party.
More than 250 party supporters
most of them Negroes, were ad admitted
mitted admitted when the Capitol opened.
A light rain was falling.
The demonstrators were per permitted
mitted permitted to go to the Capitol rotunda
on the second floor, where they
stood silently in street clothes
in a line stretching to the empty
house chamber.

an inland base rearmed for the
strike force being thrown into the
war against the Communists.
U. S. spokesmen refused on se security
curity security grounds to give any details
of the contact. They also refused
to disclose the location of the
8,500-acre base but are expected
to do so when the division com completes
pletes completes the move from Ft. Benning,
Ga.
Another major American mili military
tary military redeployment was being com completed
pleted completed at Okinawa, about 1,500 miles
northeast of Qui Nhon. A dozen
U. S. Navy transport ships and
LSTs crammed ports to leave an
estimated 7,000 Marines of the Ist
Marine Division from Camp
Pendleton, Calif.
The Ist Marines were ordered
into the U. S. administered Pa Pacific
cific Pacific island bastion to replace the
3rd Marine Division which was
moved into Viet Nam earlier this
year. Military sources said the
Ist Marines will remain in Okinawa
where they can be shifted to Viet
Nam for action within hours if
necessary.
Old Export Rule
May Change
WASHINGTON The Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
voted today to hold hearings on
regulations requiring that half of
grain shipments to the Iron Cur Curtain
tain Curtain nations be carried on
American ships.
At issue is a presidential order
requiring that the 50-50 shipping
rule apply to wheat exports to
Russia and her allies. Grain state
lawmakers have complained that
the regulation has kept the United
States from sharing in recent Com Communist
munist Communist wheat purchases.

/ .
,ipw
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v
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SWA RTS EL
Swartsel:
Peace Corps
In India
Vernon Swartsel, April UF grad graduate
uate graduate and campus leader, has
completed 12 weeks training at St.
Johns College, Annapolis, Md. in
preparation for duty in the Peace
Corps..
Swartsel is at his Mount Dora
home until Sept. 18, when he de departs
parts departs for his assignment in India.
While there, he will be involved
in poultry extension and community
development work.
As a UF student, Swartsel was
elected to the Hall of Fame, Florida
Blue Key and Whos Who. He was
president of Sigma Chi social fra fraternity,
ternity, fraternity, chairman of Religion-in-
Life Week and chairman of World
University Service.
He also was a member of Pi
Sigma Alpha and Sigma Delta Chi.
Swartsel was recipient of the
1965 Most Outstanding Leader
award, given annually by the
Florida Union Board.
Computer Center
Offers Course
The university computing center
is again offering a course in For Fortran
tran Fortran programming language for
interested faculty, staff, and stu students.
dents. students.
According to Jim Marcum, in instructor
structor instructor in the course, the course
is designed primarily to assist
faculty and graduate students to
quickly learn Fortran. This is used
in research projects on the IBM
709 computer.
The course will include design,
punching cards, and running sev sever
er sever a 1 programs on the 709
computer.
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* ?
ginal 100 per cent humor for mat
because of an Administration edict.
But no action was taken on this
proposal, either.
About the only thing the Board
seemed to agree on was, as Webb
put it, I think this campus has
got to have a magazine of some
kind.
Also during the meeting, the
Board:
Decided to contact the
English Department to determine
the interest in putting out a lit literary
erary literary magazine.
Gave approval to a plan by
Earl Kicliter, 2UC, to make a
survey of the UF campus to find
out what kind of magazine the stu students
dents students want. Kicliter, ex-literary
editor of The Phoenix at Emory
University, told the Board hell
complete the survey by January 15.
Appointed a sub-committee
to study aspects of a proposal
to get The Alligator an adviser.

ALANS CUBANA
("MISTER SANDWICH")
IN CAROLYN PLAZA
Delivers FREE!
376-1252
378-1230
Just A Sample:
HOT ROAST BEEF
In Natural Gravy on The Freshest French Bread
55<
WATCH THE ALLIGATOR FOR LIST OF
SANDWICHES (Subs & Reg.) EACH DAY
Try us inside at Alans for Lunch or at all Class Breaks
See Whats ew n
The Browse Shop
READER ed. by Mizener
5>
THE HAMLET William Faulkner
5LEEPWALKER5................ Herman Brock
THE VANISHING HERO Sean O'Faolain
WONDER THAT WAS INDIA. A.L. Basham
THE PUBLIC ARTS Gilbert Seldes
SAINT GENET J.P. Sartre
TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
NUCLEI AND PARTICLES..... Segre
- : :: j
ATOMIC AND SPACE PHYSICS.. .Alex. E.S. Green
ELEMENTS OF TOPOLOGY Hu
Campus Shop A Bookstore^

Orange Peel
(Continued From P. 1)

Agreed to change the pub
lications bookkeeping system to
meet recommendations of th
University auditor.
Naval Reserve
Courses Resume
The Naval Reserve Officers
School in Gainesville has resumed
operations for the 1965-66 aca academic
demic academic year with two courses beinZ
offered.
A course in Oceanography i s
being taught by Dr. J.c. Dickinson
Director of the Florida state
Museum. This course is open to
officers of all ranks and carries
twenty-four (24) promotion points.
A course in International Relations
is being taught by Dr. Frederick
H. Hartmann, Professor of Po Political
litical Political Science and Director of
Institute of International Relations
of the UF,



Angel Flight Makes Drill
'Fun For Cadet White

One boy on campus isnt com complaining
plaining complaining about ROTC drilling be because
cause because he works with 32 beautiful
women.
Bill White, 23-year-old 4JM,
says he got the job everybody else
wants, but cant get. Hes the
liaison officer for Angel Flight,
a womens auxiliary of the Arnold

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Air Society and tke ROTC detach detachment.
ment. detachment.
A handsome and smiling publics
relations major, White might get
to practice a little PR on the drill
field.
In this group, inspection will
be fun, says the new advisor. But
Im a little dubious on how to

check the gig line on the girls,
he confessed.
For those not militarily
oriented, the gig-line is the
straight line of the jacket buttons
in line with the middle of the skirt.
This obstacle, however, hasnt
got White too worried.
Im not sure whether theyre
more scared of me, or me of
them, he said after meeting his
32 females for the first time
last Thursday.
At the weekly meetings, White
will instruct the girls in drill
sequence, and assist Commander
Sue Hunt in a leadership capacity.
A cadet major, White has been
with the ROTC program for four
years and admitted that the Angels
really help boost morale on the
drill field.
Have any problems come up
yet?
Nothing more than what youd
expect from a group of that many
women, he said. But Ive never
worked with a group of girls be before.
fore. before.
With a sparkle in his brown
eyes, White has turned down about
200 pleas for an assistant.
Im keeping this job to myself myselftheyre
theyre myselftheyre a nice bunch of girls, he
mused.
UF Students
Wanted For
Tutor Program
The UF Tutorial program needs
tutors.
The program, which helped 92
underpriviliged children this sum summer,
mer, summer, will start again In October.
Mike Malaghan, secretary of the
interior, has asked for all students
who are interested in helping
under-privileged children to apply
in Room 311 of the Florida Union.
The goal this year Is to recruit
100 students to work withapproxi withapproximately
mately withapproximately 400 children. The UP
supplies tutors and training fa facilities
cilities facilities in the Florida Union. Dr.
Anthony Humphreys, head of the
Gainesville Tninrial Program
supplies the children.
Malaghan said the training
program started last year under
the direction of Jim Harmeling,
who graduated this summer. Har Harmeling,
meling, Harmeling, candidate for president
of the student body in last years
student government elections, is
presently undergoing training for
the Peace Corps.
Isabelle Barton, 2UC, is running
the program this year. x
ine deadline for applications Is
Sept. 24.

PORK CO
BASKET Jfk
SPECIAL
With French Fries, Slaw, Rolls
590 Regularly 75? I
TODAY ONLY
T ~

Tuesday Sept. 14, 196 5, The Florida Alligator

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HE LIKES HIS JOB
Bill White meets Executive Commander of Angel Flight
Linda Weinbera.

Chicken Catching
Cops Not Called
Dean of Men Frank Adams said
he saw a chicken behind Tigert
Hall a few days ago.
He admitted it could have been
a rooster, but it looked like a
chicken.
The first thing I thought of was
to call the campus police and then
the Alligator and get a story say saying,
ing, saying, Campus Cops Catch
Chicken*, ** said Dean Adams.
But he just watched the chicken
walk around for a while and then
left smiling, and maybe a little
puzzled.
Archery Club
To Meet Today
The University Archery Club is
now planning its Fall schedule.
The club meets every Tuesday,
starting today at 4:30, at the range
behind Broward Hall. Plans now
include several out-of-town tourn tournaments
aments tournaments and an intercollegiate meet
and hunting trip.
Everyone associated with the UF
is invited to attend. Equipment will
be furnished, and no experience
is necessary.

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Page 3



, The Florida Alligator/ Tuesdays Sept. 14, 1965

Page 4

shame
7t[he search for a vice-president
of the University of Florida
would not be easy under any cir circumstances.
cumstances. circumstances.
With little money to offer, the job
becomes a monumental task.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz has
the tough assignment of finding a
replacement for the departed Harry
Philpott, and students can be assured
he'll find the best man available.
Which is where, sadly, the money
problem comes in.
Reitz originally thought he'd have
$22,500 to offer the new man a
salary already well below the going
rate for vice-presidents of univer universities
sities universities of this size and importance.
Then, without warning, the State
Budget Commission three weeks ago
sliced the salary to $20,500.
Reitz believes, and The Alligator
agrees, that the University of Flor Florida
ida Florida deserves nothing less than the
best vice-president possible.
At $20,500, Reitz will find it diffi difficult
cult difficult to get the best. Other compar comparable
able comparable universities pay $5,000t0
SIO,OOO higher.
The State Budget Commission
should hang its head in shame.
LETTERS
Editor:
u is absolutely amazing how we students attempt
to maintain a facade of normalcy. We talk of our
football team, fraternities, parties, and many other
items of similar significance. But all the time, with
each increase in the draft, we ask ourselves privately,
Will they call me?" and a few bold ones further
ask Why?
Now it seems that Americans (especially young,
aspiring students) do not usually become concerned
over issues of any nature unless they are personally
affected and then, by motivation of self-interest,
they will stir. All over the country, students are
demanding to know Why is our nation becoming
involved in a war that, short of total committ committment,
ment, committment, cannot be won? And even further, they
are asking Why are we there?* They no longer
accept the official and worn-out cliches We are
fighting for freedom and We have been invited
by a sovereign nation to protect it against
aggression.** Thes answers are so hypocritical that
I dont think our government leaders believe them.
I will not go into the merits of the Viet Nam war
because anyone with any perception at all can (if
he goes beyond his student and local newspaper)
discover for himself what is involved.
These students (and the number of dissenters is
growing) who will probably be the ones fighting
the War have been motivated in the past by idealism
and ideology. Now they are responding because they
are involved. By posing many questions (embar (embarrassing
rassing (embarrassing to the authorities) and by taking part in
protest projects, these students, against official
hostility, are perhaps the real patriots of the day.
They see us on a disaster course; they see us alone
with no real allies; and worst of all, they see us
accepting all this and going to the slaughter like
sheep.
This dissent (I pray it is not too late) can possi possibly
bly possibly influence Washington to seek a realistic solution
instead of attempting to obtain a military victory
at all costs. Richard Nixons warning to China,
that if she sends troops to Hanoi, the United States
will bomb her, is and will be the next step. Our
so-called success has convinced us that the Com Communists
munists Communists (NLF, Hanoi, Moscow, Peking, and soon
Paris ) are on the run and, flush with victory, will
rush on at any price (the world) to save U. S.
prestige. It is our duty as citizens and supposedly
educated people to question this course of action.
For if we remain silent and acquiescent to our
Increasingly belligerent government, their crimes
will be ours. Blind obedience to your country is
not enough: maybe for Nazi Germany, but not here,
unless it has been only lip service all the time. And
if for lack of any other reason than self-interest,
ask yourselves, 41 Why must I go?** and For what
must I sacrifice years of college?*
Jim Fine, 3AS

The
Florida Alli? a tor
Steve Vaughn Benny Cason
Editor Managing Editor
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GARY CORSERIS
CUT OUTS
f youre a freshman and want to succeed, youd better not read
any columns in any college newspapers, because if theres
one certain road to squalor, degradation, and the all-round hairy
life, youre going to find it right there where some befuddled, half halffledged
fledged halffledged character starts presuming upon you, setting down rules of
conduct and the like, telling you how to lead your own bloody life,
what to eat, what to wear, and how much alms to give.
The first week back at school, Im sort of looking forward to the
new crop, want to see whats up, do some cultivating, raise a few
gardenias. Phaeton and I figure well wander around Rawlings a
while, checking things out. Not long after weve been there, old
Phaeton reminisces on sunnier days, a few chicks by-pass us,
Phaeton giving them the nod.
Hows it go?* says Phaeton, polite and mannerly like.
The girls say were crude. They say theyve been reading all about
our sort in the newspaper, and theyre not coming up to our room no
matter how nicely weve got it set up. We tell them we never asked
them up to our room anyway. They say theyre going to keep their
shades drawn, and they know our type.
PHAETON MEANTIME, always impatient, advises we move onto
fairer game. Im about to agree with him 100% when a stone hits me
in the head, rattling the grey stuff a bit. Turning around quickly,
while plummeting to the concrete, I vaguely discern the form of Imean
Short, champion, protector and unchallenged guardian of the fairer
freshman sex.
Imean, mounted gracefully upon her Harley Davidson, runs over
my head and sprays a can of Raid all over me. Phaetons a little bit
incredulous. He asks me if Im all right. I think Im dead, I explain.
He asks Imean what is going on, what we ever did to her?
Imean, thinking Phaeton has abused her good name, begins to
scream. Immediately 2,000 freshman girls appear, armed with spears
mounted on Harleys, eating Food Service Egg Omelets. The sight
is revolting. Phaeton gets a little sick. Im a little sick myself. The
both of us are soon sick all over the place, and all those omelets
dont smell so trood.
THERE ARE certain times, rare and monumental events in the
course of the most diffident beings most diffident existence when
nature itself is overruled, the monarchy of Order is oerthrown
the impossible becomes a thing of putty to be molded by the capable
to be shaped into a grand design, a similitude of glory. Looking at
Phaeton praying, listening to the Harleys as Imean gathered her girls
readying them for the kill, I knew the time was now at hand and
summoning all the courage within me, forlorn amongst th Dlanets
I raise my hands, and speak: ? Planets,
IMEAN, GIVE US A BREAK, FOR CRYIN OUT LOUD'
My words do the trick. The girls look at Phaeton and me crvirar
and terrified, and their maternal instincts are aroused. They take
up the chant and they want Imean to give us a break. Imean is un
yielding. She orders the girls to charge. The girls start closing in
around Imean screams. Phaetons laughing again. I m laughing
too. The girls throw their omelets at Imean. After a while iUs
over, the only sound being the intermittent staccato of the HarW
smothered under omelets. ariey
We thank all the girls from the bottom oi our hearts. Thev think
were sort ol cute. Phaeton looks at roe and laughs. I laugh too tirS
shyly, then with abandon. It'sgoingtobea good year for harvesting

RON
Spencer
The Florida Alligator has had its Our Towns
(An Editorial), its Political Potshots ( a i a Hug h
McArthur, practicing campus politician), it s p^ r
Sams Almanac, its Political Echoes and various
other columns on the editorial pages. But never has
The Alligator carried a column similar to that
below.
Long missing from the pages of this austere
publication has been a column for the lovelorn and
curious females similar to Dear Abby. At last
Deliverance Day is here. Weep no more, fair
damsels. In pursuance of its policy of equalling the
state daily newspapers and one-up-manship, the
Alligator presents Dear Ron.
Dear Ron:
Is it true what they say about Century Tower? l
mean, will a brick actually fall when a virgin walks
beneath it? I was just wondering, since I haven't
spied many bricks beneath its base and wonder
if I should thereby conclude that this campus is
what my grandmother warned, a vicious den of
iniquity and corruption. Please let me and interested
others know the truth.
Fern Frosh
Dear Fern:
Tis refreshing to realize that innocence stm
exists.
Unfortunately, in the long history of the institution
there is not a known instance of a coed walking
beneath the tradition-bound tower being knocked
down.
Until next time, sincerely yours
Dear Ron
Dear Ron;
I have a vexing problem. As an entering freshman
coed living in Broward Hall, I was prepared for an
enjoyable fall in pursuance of my degree. However,
my bubble has burst suddenly with the discovery
that something about me seems to drive the boys
away here on campus.
Everything is fine when I meet a boy at one of
the freshman mixers until that time when he asks
me where Im staying. Broward, says I, then he
disappears into the woodwork like a termite whos
spent the past year in a petrified forest.
What about the name Broward turns the males
off on this campus? Can anything be done to
counteract this vicious phenomena? Or are the proud
women of Broward to be hounded and burdened by
this tag of discriminative inferiority forever? Please
come to our aid, since our patience is growing quite
thin.
(Signed)
, Petunia Veale, lUC
Dear Pet
Unfortunately, this sad phenomena is a part of
Florida tradition. Sometime, perhaps years ago,
Broward Hall was peopled by a group of girls
known for their ability to repel would-be male
suitors with their sheer homeliness. Right or
wrong, this horrible condition was allowed to exist
and it became common campus slang to tag Broward Browardites
ites Browardites as pigs, a non-palatable word to say the
least. Alas, the tradition, once begun, has managed
to outlive such things as Albert the Alligator (ori (original),
ginal), (original), the two-day a week Alligator, the Orange
Peel (original), Vice President Philpott, the twist,
Larry Dupree and other old landmarks.
Certainly it is blatant discrimination and highly
discreditable to brand an entering freshman such
as you with the characteristics of coeds long since
departed. Witness the admirable behavior of
Browardites during the panty raid which accompanied
last year's LSU Riots. A new page needs to be
written in the Broward annals, but it must be one
written by you women. When a Browardite manages
to win the Miss Florida beauty crown, perhaps
the old image will begin to fall by the wayside.
Until then, simply smile disconce rtedly and ignore
the rude Phi Gava Krud when he walks by Browar
on his way to Yulee and utters a gut ter al Oink.
Hes probably just an obnoxious drunk.
Anyhow, talk is that Homecoming dates this y ear
will be selected vice-versa by a Sadie Hawkins
like procedure. Chin up!
EDITORIAL STAFF
Drex Dobson, assistant managing editor
Andy Moor, sports editor
Peggy Blanchard, coed editor
Eunice Tall, features editor
Fran Snider, Student Government Editor
Bob Wilcox Justine Hartman Jane So 10
Carol da Bra J<*f *
Joe Hilliard Brace Dudley Dick Dew* 5
Sue Kennedy Susan Froemke Taylor Gra
Sandy Waite Fred Woolberton Jim Bailey
Elaine Filler Steven Brown Leslie
Peter Bakos Cecil Tlndel Jane Steen
Kristy Kimball Kathie Keim Lana Harr
Jeff Denkewaiter Cheryl Cur



m*
*-smh- ' wy^^S^H
Peggy Rosenberger, 1 UC, tries out new straw hat.
By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Spirit hats are dangerous instruments, claims Student Government
Treasurer Steve Cheesman.
Cheesman was cut on the cheekbone by a girl orientation leader
wearing one of the hats.
Theyre worse than long fingernails, he says.
Student Body President Bruce Culpepper, whose brainstrom created
the spirit hats, says he didnt plan for them to be weapons for defensive
females, as Cheesman claims. But he says he does hope the spirit
hats will catch on as a tradition on the UF campus.
I just got the idea and worked on it all summer, Culpepper
explained. He worked with Jack Rutledge, assistant director of the
student book store.
Culpepper ordered 1,000 hats on a test basis to see if they were
acceptable to the UF students. He said 136 out of 138 group leaders
bought the hats.
The company making the IW C ,c the Zipper Cap Co., in Miami.

Hanna Chairs Philosophy Dept.

Rv RAY COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Author, traveling fellow and re refugee
fugee refugee club founder are just a few
accomplishments of the new
philosophy department chairman.
Dr. Thomas L. Hanna decided
to interrupt his graduate study at
the University of Chicago in order
to travel to Europe. While in Paris
he set up a refugee club for people
who escaped from behind the Iron
Curtain. Dr. Hanna also did some
international student work while
there and worked as an assistant
orphanage director in Brussels,
Belgium.
In addition to humanitarian wont,
Dr. Hanna was a traveling fellow
for the University of Chicago in
Germany for a year. There, he
attended the universities of Goet Goetingen
ingen Goetingen and Mainz.
In 1958, he received his Ph.D.
frona the University of Chicago.
Since then he taught at Hollins
l in Virginia where he
also headed the philosophy de department.
partment. department.
Dr. Hannas first impressions
of the UF? it is big, he said,
adding students here look in intense,
tense, intense, open and free.
Dr. Hanna said the philosophy
department has two major voca vocational
tional vocational goals: to produce philosophy
teachers and to prepare students
for broad or specialized graduate
work.

As department head, Dr. Hanna
will have three major duties; to
advise philosophy majors, to
handle department finances and to
suggest programs for the depart department.
ment. department.
At his suggestion the depart department
ment department will soon offer revised and
broader programs. In the future,
he added, offerings will be broad broadened
ened broadened to include courses of interest
to students in the humanities as
well as to those in the sciences
and mathematics.
Dr. Hanna is a strong believer
in academic freedom.
Philosophy, he stated, must
operate in a situation of complete

MAKE BETTER GRADES
Study To
Fine Music 'fENITif
With A
FM/AM RADIO fro*
GAINESVILLE'S PIONEER FM DEALER
608 N AMN
CL/Uwll 3 Ph. 376-7171
WITH A COMPLETE ZENITH FM SERVICE
DEPARTMENT TO ASSURESATISFACTION

r Spirit Hats Go On Sale
Today At Service Center

A limited supply of straw Spirit
Hats will go on sale from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. today at the information
booth across from the Student
Service Center.
The 500 hats will sell for $3.50
on a first-come, first-servp hasis.
Little Ringo
Drums In
LONDON (UPI) Beatle Ringo
Starr is a father. His 19-year-old
wife, Maureen, gave birth Monday
to a son.
Mother and son were reported
in good condition at Queen Char Charlottes
lottes Charlottes Hospital here.
The 25-year-old drummer for
the long-haired singing group mar married
ried married his wife, a hairdresser and
his longtime sweetheart, early this
year.
The weight of the boy was not
announced, nor was it disclosed
whether a name had been chosen.
The boy is the second Beatle
child. John Lennon and his wife,
Cynthia, have a son, Julian.
Beatles Paul McCartney and
George Harrison remain bache bachelors,
lors, bachelors, although periodic rumors say
McCartney has secretly married
his friend, Jane Asher,
Fatherhood constitutes another
milestone for Ringo, formerly
Richard Starkey from the Bingle
section of Liverpool.
Betsy
Continued from page one
The Public Housing Adminis Administration
tration Administration regional office at Fort
Worth asked Louisiana authorities
to open public housing units on an
emergency, temporary basis to the
flood victims.
Nuns, veils flying in the wind,
bumped into New Orleans on trucks
and stationed themselves at shel shelters
ters shelters to nurse the sick and injured.
Roadblocks turned back many
returning refugees from St. Ber Bernard
nard Bernard Parish outside New Orleans.
Police checked outgoing cars for
looters.

academic freedom. There is no
idea too radical or blasphemous
to teach or discuss. Broad dis discussion
cussion discussion is the central value of a
philosophy department in a large
university.
He also favors good relationship
between students and faculty. I
like a friendly, formal and serious
atmosphere between myself and the
students.
Beside humanitarian work,
travels and teaching, Dr. Hanna
has written several books. He is
the first to write a book in English
on the French philosopher Albert
Camus.

Tuesday, Sept, 14, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Four hundred more have been
ordered and are expected to arrive
in three weeks.
The student government spon sponsors
sors sponsors this non-profit drive and the
hats may be worn at sporting
events, parties and other social

XfROX
NEW LOW PRICES At QUIK SAVE
1-19 Copies, 10$ ea. -20 & Over, 9$
COPIES MADE WHILE YOU WAIT
Service Available From 8 a.m. to 11 p.m.
StvtN DAYS A WPPK
QUIK SAVE
CAROLYN PLAZA
Big Boy I
I Double-deck HAMBURGER I
I I
NOW OPEN |
Game I
Billiards I
NO ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES SERVEdI
GIRLS, BRING YOUR GUY IT'S GREAT! I
MODERN ATMOSPHERE, AIR CONDITIONED I
Open 11 a.m.-12 Midnight Every Single Day I
*Closed Sundays* I
LOCATED AT I
110 S.W. 34th ST. I
West Side Shopping Center
Just 15 Blocks From Campus
IF YOU CAN'T PLAY, WELL SHOW YOU! I
Sandwiches, Potato Chips, Soft Drinks, Etc, |

activities. Pat Kelley, campaign
chairman, explains, The idea of
the hats is to lend some identity
to Florida students and alumni so
that at home and out of town games
or events, people will recognize
the UF supporters,

Page 5



Page 6

?z The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
LAFAYETTE Stereo amplifier and
turntable. Call 376-1563, after 6
p.m. (A-6-3t-c).
MOTORCYCLE. 1963 Yamaha, 250
cc. Blue with white wall tires. Good
condition. $350. Call 376-8863.
(A-3-ts-c).
TAPE RECORDER: Wollensak T T-1616,
-1616, T-1616, 4 track, automatic rewind rewindplay
play rewindplay back, 2 speed, 10 watt output.
See at Couchs Inc., 608 N. Main
St. or call FR 2-1866. (A-5-st-c).
MEMBERSHIP AT BRIARCLIFF
COUNTRY CLUB. Good until May
30th. Paid SIOO plus taxes. Will
sell for $75. Call 378-1407. (A (A---5-5-t-c).
--5-5-t-c). (A---5-5-t-c).
MOTORCYCLE.ReasonabIe shape.
Harley Davidson sprint (modified)
S2OO. Call or visit Bill Oswald,
Delta Sig House. 2-0491. (A-3-
st-c).
VW TRAILER HITCH. $lO. Call
376-8675 after 5 p.m. (A-6-2t-c).
SCUBA EQUIPMENT: Order U.S.
Divers, Voit, Healthways and
Dacor equipment at 25% discount.
Regulators, tanks, fins, masks etc.
Delivery in 7 days. Call Robin
Lewis at 2-6410 for further
information. (A-5-3t-c).
GUITAR: Gibson LG-0 steel string
guitar with case, capo, picks and
extra strings. One year old. $75.
Call Robin Lewis, 2-6410. (A-5-
3t-c).
ONE HURST shifting-linkage for
Sting Ray. Call 372-6078, evenings.
(A-5-3t-c).

- T f w ~ w V ~ ~
.1 -
Ug 80s fry ENDS^
IwIMJEO IIU New York Tim*4 -r y~. rN *V y 1
- r ;> l|gyp% PI TODAY
Daughters \
/ I Written ATYAIIT ray flj
AH hhh hhhh r I
FOR A K.C.
STRIP STEAK,. n
starting at*pl.DU
I SERVED Wl TH CHOICE OF POTATO
I (Sour Cream or Butter for Our Bakes)
SALAD AND ALL THE HOT ROLLS
YOU WANT!
WHERE?...
UMn WOHDERHOUSE
FR 2-2405 Larr y ,s All y 14 S.W. Ist St.
SECOND COFFEE OR TEA ALWAYS FREE

for sale
REPOSSESSED HOUSE. 3 bed bedrooms
rooms bedrooms 2 baths. Central heat,
built in kitchen, newly painted
inside and out. Call 372-3826. (A (A--7-ts-c).
-7-ts-c). (A--7-ts-c).
AIR-CONDITIONER, $25. Mitchell
7000 BTU, 115 V. Needs S2O fan
motor. Call 376-2365. (A-7-lt-c).
1956 FORD Truck-Tractor,
suitable for hauling semi-trailers,
flat bed parade floats, etc. Good
tires, engine rebuilt in 1963.5475.
Call 376-7511. (A-7-st-c).
MOTORCYCLE 1963 Tohatsu
50cc. Excellent shape, new tires.
S2OO. Quit walking and call 376-
7998, after 6 p.m. (A-7-st-c).
1963 YAMAHA, 250 cc, electric
starter. Red with white wall tires.
$340. Phone 376-0894. (A-7-st-c).
BICYCLE 26 with basket and lock.
S2O. Call Bill at 8-4248 after 1:00
p.m. (A-7-3t-c).
MOTORCYCLE: 1963 Ducati, 250
cc Monza. Original adult owner.
6,000 miles, good condition. Must
sell. Best offer over $375. Call
378-4413. (A-6-st-c).
TRIANGLE FLYING CLUB shares
for sale. Fly for $ 3/hr. Get license
for about S2OO. Call 378-3568. (A (A--6-st-p).
-6-st-p). (A--6-st-p).
SOFA BED SSO; VW trailer
hitch sl2; bumper hitch $2.50;
Federal Enlarger with accessor accessories
ies accessories $75; G. E. photo timer
$25; 1962 HILLMAN SUPER MINX
SBOO, firm. 378-4260. (A-6-st-cL

for sale
KENMORE Portable Oven-Broiler;
Used six months; sls. Call 2-1575.
(A-6-3t-p).
ALMOST NEW 17 aluminum canoe
with new 3.5 hp Johnson.lncludes
paddle, 2 life vests, car top
carrier. S3OO. Call 8-2032.
(A-6-2t-c).
for rent
ONE BEDROOM Furnished Lake
cottage. Lake Winnott, 23 miles
from Gainesville. Lake privileges.
Two trimester lease. S4O monthly.
Call Mr. Kaplan 372-0481. (B-l (B-l--ts-c).
-ts-c). (B-l--ts-c).
FURNISHED lake cottage on Lake
Winnott. 23 miles from Gainesville
3 bedrooms, 2 bath. SBS per month.
Two trimester lease. Call Mr.
Kaplan 372-0481. (B-l-ts-c).
APARTMENT available for two.
1824 NW 3rd Place. See manager
Apt #l. (B-7-st-c).
3 ROOM Cottage for couple with
no pets. S6O per month with water
furnished. Phone 8-2338. (B-6-
3t-c).
WILLIS TON MOTEL: Rooms by
week or month. Single or double.
Students rates. Television, phones,
and daily maid service. Rooms
available for all University events.
Phone Williston 528-4421. (B-6-
ts-c).
SUBURBIA
Drive-In Theatre
N.W. 13th St. 372-9523
2 Color Hits
oOo O o O v o Oog {
\wo Footloose
Americans
of Love o
playground o
plJp Gam
SoMme
ypt DiCKlNSttl
MeRMaN sr-jl'f I
l PLUS J
ICAry GRaNT j
psLie Caton I
j [fiTMeGoosej
v c&ttKtwf aiia n m

ft
personal
STUDENT NUMBER, student body,
your identity is barred from any
recognition til you tear or bend
your card. Friday, 9 p.m. THE
BENT CARD re-opens! (J-7-2t-c).
TALENT?! THE BENT CARD
seeks musicians, dramatists, and
poetry readers. Auditions Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, 7:30 p.m., 1826 W. Univ. Ave.
(J-7-2t-c).
TENA FAFARD would like to
inform all her friends she is now
at 319 W. Univ. Ave. Phone 372-
5549. Specializing in hair coloring,
cutting natural curly hair, also
specializes in childrens hair cuts.
(J-6-ts-c).
MUSIC ENTHUSIASTS! Register
Now! For Your University of
Florida Student Discount On
Musical Instruments And Access Accessories.
ories. Accessories. Derda Music Co., 622 N.
Main Street. (J-5-15t-c).
services
ALTERATIONS of all kinds on
mens and womens clothing. 35
years experience. Prices reason reasonable.
able. reasonable. Call Mrs. Stella Manookian
at 376-1794. 1824 NW Ist Ave.
(M-7-15t-c).
GUITAR LESSONS in Folk, Blue
Grass, Finger Style, Blues, and
beginners. $2.50 per lesson. Con Contact
tact Contact John Tilton at Top Tunes
Record Bar. FR 2-2728. (M-7-
ts-c).
SIEWART*^p
nBoM
yfjfTftnww
**OH~*<*w . HI *Jtl
3 COLOR
HITS
FIRST AREA SHOWING
its the wild West
AT its WACKIEST!
pMb I
HHGUENN HENRY
Rrdnm
absseaed.%s ) j&
uotr

autos
1958 FORD VB. Red and White.
Power brakes, power steering,
radio and heater. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Call 372-9732 after 5:00
p.m. (G-4-st-c).
1962 STUDEBAKER Lark conver convertible.
tible. convertible. Auto, trans. power steering,
radio, heater. 289 V-8, extras.
Good condition. 36,000 miles. Call
after 6, 376-0491. (G-7-st-p).
1965 GTO. Fully equipped. Must
sacrifice. Call Lake Butler, 496-
3041. (G-6-ts-c).
1961 VOLKSWAGEN. Radio,
heater, white walls, sun roof. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition, clean. $995. 14
NW 13th Street after noon or call
2-8978. (G-3-st-c).
1964 VOLKSWAGEN SEDAN.
Exceptionally good condition. Ser Serviced
viced Serviced regularly by owner. Priced
for quick sale $1395. Call 376-
8863. (G-3-ts-c).
M. i i.
1963 MG 1100 sports sedan. Low
mileage. Excellent condition. Only
$895. Call 376-8863. (G-3-ts-c).
1962 CHRYSLER 300. Com Completely
pletely Completely loaded. Good condition.
Less than dealer cost. Call 376-
4*04 or 376-4201. (G-3-st-c).
1965 VOLVO, P 1800. Brand new,
including air-conditioning. Less
than dealer cost. Call 376-4404
or 376-4201. (G-3-st-c).
1961 VOLKSWAGEN,'2B,OOO miles.
Radio, heater, white walls. Very
clean. SBSO. Call 376-3563 after
6 p.m. (G-2-ts-c).
1961 RAMBLER, 4 door, straight
shift. Four new tires, radio,
heater. Good condition. Call Fred
Neal at 378-4767, Thursdays after
5 or weekends. (G-3-st-p).
lost-found
LOST at Laundry Land a green
leather wallet with hand clasp.
Reward $lO. Call 378-3556. (L (L---7-lt-c).
--7-lt-c). (L---7-lt-c).
wanted
MALE ROOMMATE to share mod modern
ern modern 10x50 trailer, with graduate
student. Shady Nook Trailer Park.
$35 monthly plus utilities. Ken
Rymal, Ext. 2991 or 372-5248.
(C-5-st-c).
MALE ROOMMATE. One bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, air-conditioned apartment
5 minutes drive from campus.
$45 monthly plus utilities. Call
376-4429. (C-5-3t-c).
WANTED: a second-hand piano in
good condition. Phone 378-3173
after 5 p.m. (C-7-3t-p).
NEED THIRD Roommate, share
large 2 bedroom, clean house with
2 girls. 5 blocks from library.
S3B monthly, share utilities. Call
Perry-Sue 378-4930. (C-6-3t-c).
RIDERS TO MIAMI: Leave Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Friday afternoon return Sun.
afternoon. $5 each way. Call 378-
3141.) (C-6-st-c).
WHITE HOUSEWIFE desires days
work. Cooking, sewing and
cleaning. Week days only. Own
transportation. Call 2-5269 before
9:30 p.m. (C-5-ts-c).



help wanted j
WAi-RE 885 8 WAITED: Full
time. All shifts available. Famous
estaurant chain. See manager at
Savarin Rest. 1802 W. Univ. Ave.
(E-7-4t-c).

rri pAvtD
PARKING FOR 40 CARS
£
V
<=>*
I, ii.._ v ii
. VwTMMrt
x CAR wash
T llflf a [-
f NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICE Tire * waxing t V
| CENTER i,
d <= => c- J Co\*' ..u
THREE-BAY BRAKE s. a !£tP
TUNE OEPr. d#* 1 1 £
I A - Li U (j
[ (y 5
SALES a SERVICE ALIGNMENT CFRONT tWD n A
[ U.S.RfJYyOirt. OEPT 0
!' v =m= T-Jh a n o =-!
>i n 0
i* ;' i o o l
i ""v ;v ctmL
at Ml mm ,w inttfr. .y- ' otAmm:
AAA Representative for this area. Call for
night wrecker service at 2-5643 and 6-3458
U.S. Royal Distributor Dial 372-0455
NEIGHBORHOOD fS)
SERVICE CENTER
637 NW I3TH STREET

PIZZA PALACE
608 N.W. 13th Street
Tables CarryOutFree Delivery
Free delivery on campus with $2.00 order or more or within 20 blocks
I of Pizza Palace in city until 9:00 p.m. thru Dec. 20, 1965.
DELICIOUS ITALIAN PIZZA
Un. 12-in. Wn. IS-in.
I 1
CHEESE IJO *IJO MUSHROOM IM SLM
ONION .98 IJB ANCHOVY I.l# MO
| PEPPERONI M 0 M 0 BACON U* M*
I I SAUSAGE 1.10 1.70 COMBINATION IM US
I 1 GREEN PEPPER 1.10 1.70 HAMBURGER IJO 1.00
SPECIAL
25< OFF 9-In. 50* OFF 12-In.
10t & 20< OFF on Cheese
PHONES
372-1655 372-1546
| j
608 N.W. 13th Street
The Not that Hal* Pl TamtmT

| Help wanted]
CAMPUS JOBS, part-time. Per Persons
sons Persons interested in plant biology
research, lab, and clerical, and can
qualify under Federal Work Study
Program. 8-2600. (E-6-2t-c).

help wanted
PART-TIME Student help, serving
line. Longs Cafeteria; 313 W.
University Ave. See Mr. Ambrose,
between 11:30 1:30. (E-7-st-c).
EXPERIENCED Secretary needed
for immediate employment. Must
be proficient in shorthand and
typing. Good salary for qualified
person. Scruggs & Carmichael.
3 SE Ist Ave. Phone 376-5242.
(E-5-ts-c).
CAMPUS JOBS, full-time. Persons
with background in Biology and
Chemistry, to work in plant
Physiology Laboratory. (1) Senior
lab. technician and (2) Lab Assist Assistant
ant Assistant I. Call 8-2600. (E-6-2t-c).
HAVE SOME OPENINGS for full
and part-time waitresses. No
experience necessary. Above
average hourly wage. Apply 1430
SW 13th Street. Kings Food Hosts.
(E-5-3t-c).
1 111 y-"i
STUDENTS NEEDED to assist
manager. QUALIFICATIONS: (1)
U of F student in good academic
standing. (2) Can work evenings.
(3) Can work 18-22 hours per
week. $35.00 per week salary (S9O
on full-time basis). Call Mr.
Malaghan at 8-2966 between 9:00
and 5:00. (E-l-ts-c).
CARRIERS WANTED for routes
on and adjacent to campus. Call
GAINESVILLE SUN 378-1411. (E (E---4-7t-c).
--4-7t-c). (E---4-7t-c).

Tuesday Sept. 14, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

H3B2EBBB
HBnBBBBB
FREEDOM PARTY: Will hold its first political convention tonight
in the Florida Union Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. to elect candidates for
Fall elections and ratify its constitution. All students are invited to
participate.
CIRCLE K: Tuesday, Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m., 212 Florida Union. Organi Organization
zation Organization meeting for all old members.
PI BETA PHI ALUM FALL MEETING: Wednesday, Sept. 15, home of
Mrs. Glfenn Farris, 4120 NW 13th Ave., Westmoreland. Call Mrs.
Carter Gilbert (376-8152) or Mrs. Keith Bu*son (372-1015).
GATOR RAIDERS: Wednesday, Sept. *.>, 2:30 p.m., Quadrangle Mili Military
tary Military Building. Tryouts for Gator Raiders. All candidates are to wear
old clothes and combat boots.
DEBATE SOCIETY: Tuesday, Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m., 331 Tigert Hall.
FOOTBALL SEASON KICK-OFF PEP RALLY: Thursday, Sept. 16,
University Auditorium Lawn, 7;30 p.m., sponsored by Forums Com Committee,
mittee, Committee, Florida Union.
UF YOUNG DEMOCRAT CLUB: Tuesday, Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m., 118
Florida Unioli. General business and organizational meeting.
NEWMAN CLUB: Thursday, Sept. 16, 7:30 p.m., Library of Catholic
Student Center. Discussion of the laymans place in the church today.
PI MU EPSILON, Mathematics Honorary: Thursday, Sept. 16, 7 p.m.,
218 Florida Union.
ASME (MECHANICALS): Tuesday, Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m., 319 Florida
Union. Film on fluid drag.
COLLEGIATE COUNCIL FOR THE UNITED NATIONS: Wednesday,
8 p.m., Florida Union Auditorium. Topic: Should Red China Joir
the United Nations?
KAPPA PSI PHARMACEUTICAL FRATERNITY SMOKER: Tuesday,
Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m., Med Center.
FLORIDA PLAYERS: Tuesday, Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m., Norman Auditor Auditorium.
ium. Auditorium. Production meeting; members for backstage technical crew is
invited.
Dixie Governors
r The Last Frontier

SEA ISLAND, GA. (DPI)
Southern governors happly fell into
line today with a theme that the
South is the last frontier in the
nation."
There was a threat of racial
clouds over the annual session of
the Southern Governor's Confer Conference,
ence, Conference, now in its second day, but
conference leaders viewed them as
portending only a shower and not
a downpour.
"Race no longer deserves any
consideration by us," said South
Carolina Gov. Robert E. McNair.
But he was one of at least three
delegates supporting a possible
resolution rebuking Congress for
passage of the 1965 registration
act.

Col. Sanders Says: I
Try it by the box, TOjSf
bucket or barrel ZJilr
DINNER BOX i
& Re 9- D.lO ft*
only o"(
with this coupon |
GOOD TUES. & WED.
OFFER EXPIRES SEPT. 15, 1965' |
%*
rvtf.rrio* ..#- . *. *.*'.'V. V
Kentucky fried tfkieim
it's finger-lickin' good' 9
214 NW 13th St. 376-6472
207 NE 16th Ave. 378-2959

It was reported that a strong
resolution may be offered Tuesday.
Gov. Carl E. Sanders of Georgia,
considered likely to become new
chairman for the 16 Dixie gover governors,
nors, governors, began the "frontier theme"
and his fellow chief executives
quickly up the refrain.
Texas Gov. Jonn Connally, re retiring
tiring retiring conference chairman,
strongly endorsed the "frontier"
description of the new South.
"We have the manpower, cli climate,
mate, climate, water resources and other
raw materials," Connally said in
an interview. "I think this is the
great hope the states in the south
will have unprecedented growth and
expansion in all fields.

Page 7



Page 8

>/ The Florida Alligator/ Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1965

BRUCE
ALLIGATOR COLUMNIST
he Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner.*
The title of Alan Sillitoes 1959 novel has nothing to do with
the University of Florida, but it perfectly describes the plight of
the cross country runner here.
When the fall madness of Florida football flexes its muscles
in Gainesville with its 25-cent game Cokes, tight-suited majorettes,
vodka filled oranges, doctored activity cards and unbiased bloc
seating, there is little but loneliness for the Beta Woods men.
Few Florida students would recognize the name of Coach Jimmy
Carnes, and even fewer would remember that his track team finished
second in the Southeastern Conference last year.
NOW CARNES is trying to come up with a championship cross
country team, but it isnt an easy task. Besides playing in the fall
shadow of Pappa Football, the runners have been crippled with some
serious injuries.
Dave Wilson, one of our best runners of last year, is definitely
out of the picture; and this is going to hurt us badly, reports
Carnes.
If it hadnt been for Wilsons injury, we would have been right
up there, but now we are hurting. You have to have at least five good
distance runners for a good cross country team, and Wilson was our
fifth man.
But were still going to be in there fighting, and I think we should
be in the top four again.
LAST YEAR the Gators finished in fourth place in the conference
in the cross country competition.
Carnes said that his best runner right now is Gene Cote, a junior
college transfer from New York. Cote was a National Junior College
cross country champion.
Cote is going to have a lot to do with how well we do in the
conference this year, the Florida track coach reports.
Dieter Gebhard will be another top runner for the Gator cross
country team, but Gebhard is slowed down with an injury presently
and didnt participate in a practice meet Saturday.
The big stars of the Saturday meet were the freshmen who placed
five men in the top seven finishers to beat the varsity and the Florida
Track Club.
FRESHMAN STEVE Atkinson finished first in the meet with a
new three mile course record of 14:58.7. Other freshmen finishing
in the top seven were Harry Drake, Greg Henderson, Chris Hosford,
and Steve Bass.
The show by the freshmen is certainly an indication that the Florida
cross country team is going to be something to contend with in the
future.
However, when the runners take off on their four to five mile ob obstacle
stacle obstacle runs on the Florida course through Beta. Woods, they will still
have to fight the popularity of the crowd-gathering Florida Field
attractions.
Varsity runners facing the awesome task of putting Floridas
cross country team in neon this year are Cote, Gebhard, Bill Brinson,
Dan Wells, Austin Funk, Bob Halliday, Mack Johnson, Gary Mahla,
Jim Woods and Larry Powell.
THE GATOR cross country team opens its season at home against
Florida Southern October 2. Check those football schedules. The
Gator football squad is playing host to Louisiana State the same day.
Alumni will pack into Gainesville to see these two Southern football
giants clash; and as two former Gators huddle together in the west
stands of Florida Field and add that extra something to a 25 cent
Coke, one might comment, You know with a football game today,
some guys were actually out running around in the woods this morning
when I arrived and didnt even seem interested.
This is The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner.

Baeszler Now
First Fullback
Two toucnaowns will be enough to
wi n the Florida-Northwestern
game Saturday, Coach Ray Graves
predicts.
It will probably take two touch touchdowns
downs touchdowns to win the game, and in
an opening game like this you can
usually expect one touchdown for
each team on mistakes, Graves
said. However, we are aware of
the task ahead of us, and I think
we have the offense that can score
the necessary points to win.
The starting offensive backfield
that will be called on to do the
scoring will be quarterback Steve
Spurrier, flankerback Alan Poe,
tailback Jack Harper and fullback
Marquis Baeszler.
Baeszler moved into the full fullback
back fullback spot after filling in for three
Injured Gator fullbacks in a scrim scrimmage
mage scrimmage game Saturday.
Baeszler is looking real good,
and he is our number one full fullback
back fullback right now and will start
against Northwestern.

NOW CAROLYN PLAZA
BARBER SHOP
7 Barbers In Carolyn Plaza
Razor Haircuts
Expert Mens Hairstyling
162^ESTUNIVERSIT^^7^9129^^^^^
Gulf Hardware
Gainesville Shopping Center
IMMERSION HEATER
Great For Coffee Breaks
98c zJj
Regularly $1. ly
19 til 9 Weekdays
9 til 7 Saturdays

Wildcats Shift Personnel
In Preparation For Gators

Northwestern Coach Alex Agase
has been shifting his players like
chessmen in preparation for Sat Saturdays
urdays Saturdays opener against UF.
Agase has geared the shifting so
that the teams fastest personnel
will be on defense, where he feels
quick reaction and pursuit are
vital.
Most of the shifting has been
done in the line, said Agase.
We feel were pretty well set in
the offensive backfield with vet veterans
erans veterans Dave Milam at quarterback,
Ron Rector and Woody Campbell
at halfbacks and Bob McKelvey at
fullback. The_same applies to the
DAVE MILAM
Northwestern Quarterback
defensive backfield, where weve
got three experienced boys Phil
Clark, Mike Buckner and Bob
Hampton to go along with two
promising newcomers, Tom
Garretson and Denny Coyne.
Line assignments, on the other
hand, have undergone one of the
most thorough reshufflings in re recent
cent recent years. Among the key moves
have been those that resulted in
three of last years starters
shifting to the opposite platoon:
offensive tackle Jim Burns going
to defense and linebacker Jim
Haugsness and defensive guard
Jeff Brooke to offense.
As a result of the shifts, the
offensive line has been completely
rebuilt, with the exception of
starting ends Cas Banaszek and
Mike Donaldson. The tackles will
be a pair of 240-pounders, senior
Jerry Oberdorf, a part-time
starter last year, and John Brlas,
a junior who did not letter last
year. Another non-letterwinner,

235-pound senior Mike Shea, fig figures
ures figures to start at center. Pressing
Brooke and Haugsness for a start starting
ing starting guard assignment is2Q6-pound
senior Tom has
logged limited playing time.
The other major rebuilding area
is defensive end, where no exper experienced
ienced experienced man returns. Junior Bob
Tubbs, a halfback last year who
played little because of injuries,
was shifted to defensive end in
the spring and his outstanding
play brightened the picture. Walt
Geister, who lettered at guard as
a sophomore last year, was moved
to end and is likely to start. Back Backup
up Backup men are John McCambridge, a
junior with limited playing
experience, and Roger Ward, a
promising sophomore.
If the new ends come through,
the defensive line could be solid.
Burns, who may play some offen offensive
sive offensive ball, too, will share the tackle
posts with junior letterman Ken
Ramsey. Mike Beinor, a starter
at defensive tackle last year, is
listed at guard with Justin Ramp,
a senior of limited playing experi experience
ence experience who was one of the most
improved players in spring
practice.
Fencing Club
Opens Program
The UF Fencing Club opens its
1965-66 program Friday, with re registration
gistration registration for beginning foil
fencing.
Classes will be conducted for all
interested men and women (faculty
and staff included) and the club will
provide all equipment and
protective clothing.
The lessons win be given each
Tuesday and Friday at 5 p.m. at
the Norman Hall Gymnasium.
Dressing rooms, showers and
lockers are provided.
Participants must provide their
own sneakers and should wear
clothing which provides freedom of
movement to assume the familiar
fencing stance.

GRAND OPENING!
NEW management
NEW menu
NEW personnel
SAME
GREAT LOCATION!
Savarm Restaurant
1802 W. University Ave.

Linebacking appears to be in
good shape. Back are Bob Otter Otterbacher,
bacher, Otterbacher, who closed last season on
the first string, and Denny Yanta,
who lettered as second string
offensive center last year but was
shifted to capitalize 01 what Agase
considers his outstanding
defensive potential.
[ WE'RE I
UNDER
NEW OWNERSHIP
(FORMERLY OLOF'S)
FROSTING
SPECIAL M2 50
Includes Shampoo and
Set. Offer Good far
One Week. Four Ex Experienced
perienced Experienced Hairstylists
JUST OFF ON 13TH
CAMPUS STREET
AGNES'S
HAIR
STYLIST
Telephone 376-9922
16 NW 13th Street