Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
208 Families
I In New Village
By SUE KENNEDY
Alligator Staff Writer

Two hundred and eight UF student families are now occupying the
11 apartment buildings in semi-completed Emory Diamond Memorial
Village. Begun last Fall and opened for occupancy August 25, Diamond
Village is the most modern of UF*s facilities for married students.
Construction is still going on within the complex, although the main


No
I Parking!
Sfesidents of Emory Diamond
Memorial Village sent up a cry
thursday when the University
Mlice Department began issuing
Bbkets to all cars parked inside
Be new housing complex for mar marled
led marled students.
Because of continuing
JBnstruction on the grounds, resi residents
dents residents had previously been allowed
b bring their cars into the area
Bnly to unload groceries. However,
Bccording to Manager Robert
Biefzger, parking became a hin hindrance
drance hindrance to construction and
dveryone seemed to be ** unloading
proceries.
' Residents were warned of the
Krackdown on parking, Nefzger
aid, but nevertheless, many re received
ceived received tickets and some received
more than one citation in a day.
One woman resident was notea
carrying a heavy carpet which
had just been cleaned toherapart-
Iment. The policeman was paying no
heed to her objections as he wrote
(out her ticket.

Annual Leaders 9
Retreat Is Held
In an informal spirit of mutual cooperation, select UF adminis administrators
trators administrators and student leaders this weekend hashed out problems
concerning the infirmary, a new women's honorary, the trimester
and students* rights at the seventh annual Presidents* Retreat.
The retreat, held at Park of the Palms camp area in Keystone
Heights, began Friday after dinner with a welcome from Dean of
Student Affairs Lester Hale.
Thorough discussions between the student and faculty leaders
continued until Saturday afternoon.
We must remember that the central role of a university is teaching
good instruction to students at an undergraduate level to see that
people develop in the right capacity, said UF President J. Wayne
Reitz.
We will continue to promote a strong quality program of under undergraduate
graduate undergraduate education,'* he said, but we must also support a strong
program of graduate study and research considered to be our mission
as a state university and land grant institution,* he said.
Basic and underlining all of this in any university worthy of its
name is to maintain a strong liberal arts school, he continued.
The annual trip, began in 1959 when President Reitz learned of a
(Continued On Page 3)

Medical Center forms backdrop for new UF housing facilities Photo Hon German

buildings are finished. Sidewalks
and roads are still sandy plots
and landscaping is yet to begin.
The village is fully occupied de despite
spite despite the continuing construction,
which is to be completed in early
1966.
Consisting of one-bedroom and
two-bedroom apartment units,
Diamond Village is not set aside
for any particular student group.
Living in the complex are stu students
dents students from various colleges,
including some foreign students.
I think we have a good cross crosssection
section crosssection of the student body in
the village, commented Assistant
Director of Housing William E.
Neylans.
New facilities in Diamond
Village include study cubicles in
the two-bedroom apartments.
These small rooms are located
off the master bedroom and are
large enough for a desk and chair.
A community building which
houses a laundry, vending ma machines,
chines, machines, village store, and an air airconditioned
conditioned airconditioned study library is
another facet of the new complex.
The study library can be convert converted
ed converted to a meeting hail.
Rent for the apartments is S6O
for one bedroom and S7O for two.
In order to get a two-bedroom
apartment, a couple must have a
child.
(Continued On Page 2)

Tlie Florida
Alligatr

Vol. 58, No. 6 University of Florida Monday, Septi 13, 1965

|j ** v -I'- Wmjm
ijfl
j ConstrucMr-n continues on th
CF's new rriiaate research li library
brary library for completion
*ext y i\r. Worker at top inches his
way alone webb of boards that will
Soon turn into a portion of the
fscond floor.

FOR FALL ENROLLMENT
Its Official:
New Record
The UF has established another record enrollment level with a
tentative fall trimester total of 16,804 students announced by Registrar
Richard Whitehead.
This figure includes gdl students who had enrolled at the con conclusion
clusion conclusion of late registration, Whitehead said. Our final total may
vary a few but this is a fairly accurate estimate.
The previous record was set last September when 15,701 students
attended classes at the University. The Increase of 1,103 represents
a seven per cent hike in the student population since 1964 and nearly
2,000 more than the 14,810 enrollment in 1963.
Whitehead said a complete numerical summary of the student
body by colleges and schools will be available later this month.
Pep Rally To Kick
Off Grid Season
UF students will help kick off the 1965 football season two days
early Thursday with a pep rally and bonfire on the University Audit Auditorium
orium Auditorium lawn.
The 7 p.m. event will serve as a send-off for the Florida grldders

who depart Friday for Evanston,
111., and their opening game
against Northwestern the following
afternoon.
All University students and local
residents are invited to attend the
rally which offers an opportunity

The Orange Peel
Life or Death?
The Board of Student Publications meets today at 2 p.m. bv.Florida
Union to decide the fate of the Orange Peel, UF's humor magazine.
A special committee consisting of former journalism student
A1 Leonard, Student Body Treasurer Steve Cheese man and ex-New
Orange Peel Editor Don Federman -- studied the magazine's standing
during the |ummer and will report its findings to the Board.
Board Chairman John V. Webb, Journal is n* professor, says the
Board will weigh heavily" the recommendations of the committee.
He did not say, however, that the Board will necessarily follow the
re com mendatlons.
The Orange Peel officially is still alive end BBn wf has been
allocated for it, but whether or not it's actually published will be op
to the Board this afternoon.
Ever since a gag rule" was put into effect several years.ago years.agorestricting
restricting years.agorestricting the magazine to no more than 40 per cent humor content contentthe
the contentthe Orange Peel has received a cool reception from the student body.
If the Board decides today to publish the Peel, applications will
be accepted soon for editors and plans for publication will go into
effect.

for freshmen and other campus
newcomers to meet Coach Ray
Graves and the Gators.
Pep rally chairman Jane Shelly
will begin th* program by lntfo lntfo(Continued
(Continued lntfo(Continued On Page 2)



Page 2

!, TTie Florida Alligator/ Monday / Sept. 13, 1965

! THE WORLD I
(THIS MORNING!
§ (From The Wires Os United Press Internationa!)
Giant Armada
Ashore In Viet
SAIGON (UPI) Combat troops of the 20,000-strong U. S, Army's
First Cavalry Division, the largest single American unit ever to
arrive in Viet Nam, landed Sunday at the coastal city of Qui Nhon.
Arrival of the world's first "air mobile" division pushed American
armed strength in Viet Nam to about the 125,000 mark ordered by
President Johnson last July. Officers said it will take about a week
to get the 20,000-man division ashore from a 15-ship armada.
As the First Cavalry headed for a secret base somewhere in South
Viet Nam, ground and air action against the Communists continued
without let up.
In the central highlands, three companies of the Ax y's 101st
"Screaming Eagles" Airborne Brigade ended a two-day sweep through
the dense jungles 10 miles north of An Khe, suffering "light" casual casualties.
ties. casualties.

Pakistan Claims Win

KARACHI, Pakistan (UPI)
Pakistan claimed Sunday its troops
supported by planes, artillery and
anti-tank guns have beaten back an
Indian armored offensive in the
Sialkot area of Pakistan.
Pakistan Radio said Pakistani
forces destroyed 45 Indian tanks
in the battle in the Sialkot Sector,
50 miles northeast of lahore, and
six miles inside the Pakistani
border.
A Pakistani broadcast said India
had thrown about 50,000 men into
the battle, and had suffered heavy
casualties. On one sector, it said,
seven Indian officers and 300 men
who had infiltrated Pakistani posi positions

200 Death Toll Feared
From Savage Storm Betsy
NEW ORLEANS (UPI) -- Armed National Guardsmen, police and
Coast Guardsmen kept watch for looters Sunday in flooded com communities
munities communities ravaged by Hurricane Betsy.
Thousands grew restless to return to their homes and the death
total mounted.
Louisiana counted 45 persons dead from the tempest and the overall
count was 56 in Betsy's two weeks of rampage through the Caribbean

Ants Bug
Miss America
ATLANTIC CITY, NJ. (UPI)
The new Miss America, 19-year 19-yearold
old 19-yearold Deborah Bryant of Kansas,
confided Sunday that her aversion
to ants when she was a 12-year
old girl living in Europe helped
her win the title.
But God and her mother, were
vital to her success she said during
a news conference less than 12
hours after she was crowned Miss
America for 1966.
"I was 12 when I first started
dreaming about it," she said. "I
was a little chubby and had frec freckles.
kles. freckles.
We used to have a lot of
picnic lunches in Italy and I couldn't
stand the ants. Because of them,
I couldnt eat,
"Since then," she said with a
smile, "I've had no weight
trouble." Her measurements are
36-23-36.

Typewriters at KISERS
604 NORTH MAIN STREET
EXCLUSIVE OLYMPIA DEALER
75 USED TRADE-INS
PORTABLES, STANDARDS, ELECTRICS
DOWN PAYMENTS AS LOW AS $15!!
MONTHLY PAYMENTS FROM SB-sls
T his Is Our September Special

tions positions surrendered without firing a
shot.
In New Delhi, where U.N. Sec Secretary
retary Secretary Thant arrived on his peace
mission Sunday, India reported its
troops were advancing on all three
of the lahore front despite heavy
counter-attacks by Pakistani
forces.
The mid-day Indian "war bulle bulletin"
tin" bulletin" also claimed Indian successes
on the Sialkot Sector to the north,
but made no claims of actual ad advances
vances advances there. It said "Indian
forces have destroyed substantial
quantities of Pakistani armor and
equipment and have also captured
substantial quantities of armor and
equipment, including tanks."

Sea, the upper Gulf of Mexico,
Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi,
Arkansas and Tennessee.
The huge basement at New Or Orleans
leans Orleans Central Police Headquarters
was converted into a morgue and
all unauthorized personnel were
told to stay out.
New Orleans Coroner Dr.
Nicholas Chetta has said the death
toll might run as high as 200
from the storm.
"It is going to get a lot worse
before it gets better," he said.
"Well probably be bringing in
bodies for a week."
Damage was expected to run
into the hundreds of millions of
dollars, but officials said it was
too early to give an estimate.
There were reports of looting
in the flooded communities of
nearby St. Bernard Parish Coun County.
ty. County.
New Orleans police issued a
warning that all persons caught
in unauthorized boats would be
arrested and treated as looters.

Bp -MRU
- yjffji
' B 9 nr : *- WBm
JijHHH MiaM^^^^^Mk
I : '§!
; \ I x: :
ROTC Boss
Gary W. Arnold, 4BA, is new
Brigade Commander of the UFs
Army ROTC. Arnold, president'
of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity,
will graduate in December. He
is a graduate of Edgewater High
in Orlando.
FLORIDA FIRST
The University of Florida Press
scored a national "first" when it
produced the 12-volume Florida
Quadricentennial Edition re reprints
prints reprints of 12 rare classics on
Florida history dating back as far
as 1563. The books, in preparation
eight years, represent the first
time in over 100 years that a state
has sponsored the reproduction
of its own history and cultural
beginnings for the use of the public.

I ALANS CUBANA
I THE FAMOUS
I "MISTER SANDWICH" of Gainesville in....
I CAROLYN PLAZA
(Across from campus on W. University Ave.)
I FEATURES
DINING IN (Just the fastest service for the student on the go)
| FREE DEUVERY-TAKEOUT 0f...
I THE MOST DELICIOUS SANDWICHES IN THE AREA
FEATURING ALL VARIETIES OF:
I SUBMARINES, HEROES, WEDGES, HOAGYS, AND REGULARS
I ALL ON A CHOICE OF DELICIOUS BREADS (FRESH EACH DAY)

I HOT ROAST BEEF IN NATURAL GRAVY £££
I THE FAMOUS CUBANA (3 MEAT TREAT)
I ITALIAN SUBS, LOADED JJa
I RIB EYE STEAK SANDWICHS ISt
I THE BEST TASTING BAR-B-Q JQ*
I HOT DOGS ALL WAYS Ofr
I SIDE DISHES AND V
I 4 9 OTHER GREAT SANDWICHES
I CALL OR VISIT
ALANS CUBANA
I "BEST IN DIXIE"
I U of F s Favorite For 6 Years
I Phone 6-1252 or 8-1230
1620 W. University Ave,
IN CAROLYN PLAZA

Residents of the village have
begun to organize and have elected
a provisional mayor, Ernie Euler,
who is a past mayor of Flavet
H. A secretary has also been
temporarily appointed and each
building has a commissioner. For Formal
mal Formal elections will be in October.
The usual number of complaints
have come from the residents,
according to Robert Nefzger,
6EDP, manager of the complex
and also a resident. However,
according to another resident of
the complex, these complaints have
been mainly from people who feel
they are living in their own home
and forget they are still subject
to university regulations.
The most common complaints
mention inadequate closet spaed
and a University Police Depart Department
ment Department regulation barring all cars
from the complex until construc construction
tion construction is completed.
Diamond Village was named for
a past president of the UF student

Gulf Hardware
Gainesville Shopping Center
IMMERSION HEATER
Great For Coffee Breaks
98c zJj
Regularly $1 o 19
9 til 9 Weekdays
9 til 7 Saturdays

Village
(Continued From P. I)

body and mayor f Fla vet 11. Emor
Diamond was Air Force Pi
in Korea and was killed in t
crash of a private plane in the la
PEP RALLY
(Continued From P. 1)
ducing Alvin Alsobrook, interi
director of the Division of Alum
Services, who will introdu
President J. Wayne Reitz for
short talk.
Music by the Gator Band, a
companied by the University gl
club, and a demonstration of chee
to be used throughout the seas
will follow Dr. Reitz comment
After a presentation of col
slides on a special screen
Graves and a talk by the Gat
mentor, the bonfire will be light
by Dr. Reitz and Student Bo<
President Bruce Culpepper.



Presidents Retreat
-v / v -_ 1 : : -
(Continued from Page I)

similar get together at the Kansas
State University.
Originally starting out as a gripe
session, President Reitz said, We
have the same basic approach
today to problems of the same
concern but the manner in which
we discuss them has improved over
the years.
Expenses for the trip are pro provided
vided provided from the Concession Fund
compiled from vending machine
profits. This money is put aside
to benefit the university in other
ways such as rewarding scholar scholarships.
ships. scholarships.
Those invited to participate in included,
cluded, included, students: Bruce Culpepper,
SG president; Dick Thompson, SG
vice president; Steve Cheeseman,
SG treasurer; Doug Thompson,
administrative assistant to the SG
president; Kay Lundquist, WSA
president; Lynn Wolly, Mortar
Board president.
Alison Conner, secretary of
womens affairs; Eunice Tall, Alli Alligator
gator Alligator writer; Jim Hauser, IFC
president; Bill McCollum, presi president

Looks like
Feels like cashmere.
Wears like crazy.
Costs like nothing.
Must be Burlington Gold Cup.
There's no sock quite like Gold Cup, and weve seen
them all!
Its made for fun. Comfortable. Luxurious.
But don't let the feel fool you. Gold Cup Socks are
machine washable and as rugged as their special
75% Orion* acrylic, 25% nylon blend. There s even
a heel-shield of extra nylon to assure longer wear.
We have this buttery sock in no less than 41 different
colors. Heathers. Brights. Darks. Lights. Even whites.
Buy a collection. Theyre just $150"".
Campus & Career Shop
1227 W. University Avenue
DuPont T. M.

dent president of the Florida Union Board;
Jake Dyal, attorney general of the
Honor Court; Nancy Calhoun, sec secretary
retary secretary for the retreat; and Bill
Mcride, assistant to SG pres,
retreat student and Mrs. Bruce
Culpepper.
Faculty members were: J.
Wayne Reitz, UF President, Marna
Brady, dean of women; Frank
Adams, dean of men; Lester Hale,
dean of student affairs; Robert
Mautz, vice president of academic
affairs; Ernest Cox, asst, dean;
Bill Elmore, associate business
manager; Tom Graham, assistant
registrar; David Stryker, of uni university
versity university college; Fred Hartman,
Ira J. Ross, Spurgeon Cherry,
Emily Maclachlan, and Rev.Thax Rev.Thaxton
ton Rev.Thaxton Springfield, members of the
student affairs committee.
Alan Robertson, dean of uni university
versity university relations and development;
Dr. William Hall, head of the
university infirmary; Richard
Whitehead, registrar; William
Bryan, advisor to fraternities, and
Melvin Sharpe, assistant to theUF
president.

' 3* is JJm : Hl BBf aj
She Fires Us Up
Our photographer was headed up this fire escape to photograph
a fire. Down the escape came Rosemary Sparkman. The lad forgot
about the fire, but came back with this picture of Rosemary. Shes
a Chi Omega majoring in English and history.

Coed Leadership Group Eyed

By PEGGY BLANCHARD
Alligator Staff Writer
Women campus leaders may
soon benefit from a proposed new
leadership organization.
Student government officials are
promoting the new leadership or organization

The BEST-LOCATED
Restaurant In Town is
Re-Opening Tuesday,
Sept. 14, under
NEW management,
with NEW menu and
..
personnel. Watch for
our opening-day ad
in
tomorrows Alligator.
V o
Saoarin Restaurant
1802 W. University Ave.

Monday / Sept. 13, 1965/ The Florida Alligator,

ganization organization which would open its
membership to girls with 2.0
overall averages who are outstand outstanding
ing outstanding campus leaders.
SG Secretary of Organizations
Andy Hall and Secretary of
Womens Student Affairs Janet
Stoddard have been working to set

Grid Tickets
Available
Tickets for the Mississippi State
game are available daily at the
student ticket windows at Gate 4.
Windows are open from 9 a.m.
to 12 noon and from 1:30 to 4:30
p.m.
Activity cards may still be
picked up at Gate 3 during the
same time. Next Monday,
Louisiana State seating assign assignments
ments assignments may be picked up.
15,331 activity cards were made
during privileged, regular, and late
registration. Most of the remaining
students are part-time and do not
get activity cards.
Photos will be taken at Gate 3
on the west side of the stadium
this week.
Swim Fins
Want Help
Swim Fins and Aqua Gators, a
swimming chib open to anyone,
needs help in staging its Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming show.
Anyone interested, who can swim
or would like to work with make-up,
props and designing, public rela relations,
tions, relations, or music is welcome to Join
by going to Florida pool at 7:00
p.m. Monday.
This year's show is to be enuueu
Rippling Rhythms." Aquatic
numbers are being written to a
variety of rhythms, from blues to
waltzes. Orchesls, the modern
dance group, will assist In numbers
staged around the pool.

up this organization.
As yet unnamed, the proposed
honorary would need approval
from the Student Faculty
Committee on Social and Academic
Affairs before It can accept Its
charter membership.
Plans call for the first charter
class to be named shortly after
Homecoming, Hall said.
Plans are also being made to
send speakers to sorority houses
explaining the organizatiQn.
Membership will be chosen by
a student-faculty committee and
Interested women student leaders
may apply for membership more
than once, Hall said.
WE'RE NO. ONE
More than 1,100 Ph.D. degrees
have been awarded by the Univer University
sity University of Florida since 1934 when the
first awards were made. Since
that time, the graduate program
has grown to rank 28th among the
nations colleges and universities
in the number of Ph.D. degrees
granted annually, and first in the
Southeast.
FUNLAND
AMUSEMENT
CENTER
WHERE STUDENTS
MEET FOR RECREATION
GAI NESVILLE'S
LARGEST SELECTION
OF GAMES
101) W. University Ave.
2 Blocks From Comous

Page 3



7 The Florida Alligator, Monday, Sept. 13, 1965

Page 4

l iBoV-. mlEm By
\T

KNOD3EN
j jere we go again.
2+The Orange Peel an institution oh! so
many years on our tradition-hound campus
once more is facing a life-or-death situation.
Once more, the Student Board of Publications
will decide the fate of the Orange Peel.
In its glory days under Editor Don Addis,
the Peel rode high among the nation's college
humor magazines. It became, yes, a part of
the soul of the University of Florida; the humor humorbox,
box, humorbox, if you will, in a place which badly needs
to laugh at itself.
Ever since the UF Administration and the
Board of Publications put in a rule prohibiting
more than 40 per cent humor in the magazine,
the Orange Peel has been but a sterile ghost
of its old self.
The question we ask is: Has the Adminis Administration
tration Administration lost its sense of humor completely?
Certainly we hope not, and we think not.
With this in mind, The Alligator urges the
Board of Publications to either return the
magazine to its original 100 per cent humor
format or to change its name and quit pre pretending
tending pretending it's the Orange Peel.
As an old Orange Peel editor might say:
Give me humor or give me death.*'
DR. ROBERT tt a i
Hutchins
established that the American university is a combined
mill, center of research and home-away-from-home
for adolescents, let us set about the task of making it into a community
of who think.
i- everybody can understand. Let us begin with the material base of a
thinking community. Let us begin with the professors ana tneir
rewards, it will be admitted, I think, that a university has to have
professors and that if it is to be a community the professors have
to be there,
THEY ARE unlikely to be there now. Perhaps my sense of their
absence *is slightly exaggerated. On a recent visit to an eastern
campus, I planned to see five of them. They were all away consulting,
conferring or lecturing. We may hope these engagements were more
important to the future of mankind than the teaching and research
they were alleged to be carrying on. But we have no way of knowing.
They may have been after money.
I mention this in no censorious tone. Every self-respecting citizen
is supposed to be after money. This is, as I understand it, the basis
Df the free enterprise system and the American Way of Life. But we
are trying to figure out how to have a community with professors in
it, and our problem is how to reconcile their normal, self-respecting
desire for money with our somewhat unusual ambition to have an
academic community.
The answer is perfectly clear: pay them properly for the worx
they are expected to do. And, since we must encourage writing,
traveling, conferring, consulting and lecturing whenever and wherever
the cause of learning demands these activities, we shall interpose
no objection when our professors engage in them provided they
turn the money over to the university. My guess would be that this
simple arrangement would lead professors to discover that 90 per
xent of their trips were unnecessary.
THE WORKABILITY of this modest proposal turns on what is
meant by proper payment. Professors have a certain security,
a certain leisure and, in scientific and technical fields, a certain
dignity that are denied most of the population and that should be taken
into account in determining their compensation. Nevertheless, even
with these items thrown in at a fair cash value, the best professors professorsand
and professorsand we want nothing but the bestare paid about half what they ought
to be receiving.
By aouDUng proiessoic salaries we would seem to be committea
to doubling the payroll, with only a trifling deduction for the money
earned from those outside activities which the professor thought
worthwhile on scholarly grounds. But this is not so. The thing to
do is to cut the number of professors in half. How to do this I shall
tell you another time. (Copyright 1965, Los Angeles Tames)

Grumbledon Federman

/f*hameleons change their skin color in order
blend with their surroundings. This is one
of natures ways of protecting its small creatures.
At the UF, political parties change their names
in order to forget their past. This is one of natures
ways of protecting its small people.
In the last few years the existing political parties
have remained the same, except for the name.
Progress (formerly Gator, formerly Student, for formerly
merly formerly United) is currently in power. Action (formerly
LETTERS
As I dress my wounds, it has
come to my attention that many
Florida men and women could use
a lesson in etiquette when carrying
their umbrella in close quarters
with their fellow students.Numer- jK j iJ(wJysu'
ous informal jousting matches flVlm/fln
occur with these formidable J Gr\h'
weapons when inconsiderate people L j %
insist in carrying them parallel f |
to the ground. Alas! Must we I I .//If*
innocent bystanders be forced to V V Ilk
wear armor and safety glasses to
If only students would take a little
extra time, foresight and patience A W
to carry that lance perpendicular
to the ground, many embarrassing \
and painful incidents could bepre- /fqr/
vented. If one feels that compliance
with this act of mercy is a vio violation
lation violation of some inalienable right,
at least, maybe, get a cork for
the tip of that collapsable para- Y
bloid you carry in the advent of
Gregory Decker 2UC
EDITORS NOTE: Look out for
that lady in Tigert who uses it as
a crowd-scatterer.
Gthe Campus Cops |
Job keeping North- 1
Gators scrimmage f
re scrim maging, the
chickens with their
rybody that got into
tly after the scrim- J
r of gym shorts on
>tball nearby. I was 1
>ut the ID.
; in through another
tilous to assume the
i actually keep out I
in bad enough. And I
kicking out obvious
a little bit too far.
g people sneak in,
i sweating hard to
S So,te I
i i

Tlie Florida Alligator
SteV Ll ghn Be *ny Cason
Managing Editor
Drex Dobson, assistant managing editnr v
Andy Moor, sports editor Pe K&y Blanchard, coed editor
Eunice Tall, features editor
; ~ l' ' '... -.. : .: /'

VOTE, formerly United and no relation to the other
United, it just happens to be a voguish name)
controls the minority bloc, which doesnt mean much
since they wont be getting many 50 yard line seats
this fall (spoils of war and all that rot)
The two parties play a game whicn is known as
political monopoly, unique in America since neithei
side loses. Thus, each perpetuates the other in an
endless round of mediocre administrations. Each
partys name is good for only two years one
year to win on a reform ticket, the next to lose to
its collaborator who novf has become the reform
party. The losing party then changes Its name and,
VOILA, instant reform and new vigor. In nature,
we call this a cycle; by any other name, we call
it corruption.
Even if this system is a bit perturbing, you must
admire it for its beauty. What's more'it embraces
one of Americas most sacred fetishes it works...
at least for the 25 per cent of the student body In
Greek social clubs. The other 75 per cent of you
well, to borrow a little from a novel, you get to
operate the elevator.
Now the existing political parties are quite aware
of the fact that this 75 per cent could easily over overthrow
throw overthrow their regime given a candidate and a platform
which really represents a healthy and refreshing
break from the past. So, the existing parties pack
their slates with independents, but running for SG
is one thing; running it is another.
In recent years, there have been two challengers.
One was named John Grant who ran a $29 budget
and an eloquent protest campaign. With more con confidence
fidence confidence from the student body, he would have won
(he was expected to get only 400 votes, but he
pulled 1,500).
I was a freshman that year. The bloc vote was
in favor of Student Party (thats Progress less two
cycles). Facing a rise in independent support for
Grant and United (thats Action less two cycles),
they went to desperate means. I met their candidate
for president, Bill Trickle. You remember Bill
he married Dean Hales daughter (such marriages
can only be made in heaven). Anyway, I told Bill
I represented a group of 39 freshmen in Hume and
Graham interested in SG. Poor Bill; he believed
me. He was quick to offer our group an appointment
so he could cue us in. Needless to say, all 39 of
me voted for Grant.
Now there is Freedom which is more organized
but a little too top heavy with civil rights. But I
hear things are changing here, and tomorrow night
in the Florida Union Auditorium at 7:30 p.m., the
campus will be able to see organized dissent and
reform in action.
For those of you who consider this a commercial,
I will be glad to give equal space to the existing
power structure (of course, there are no such
things as real conventions in the existing power
structure).
If nothing else, Freedom is bringing up two
important issues involving political parties. One is
the open convention; the other is the fact that they
are pushing for permanent political status, that is
year-around operations.
Oh, thats another thing I didnt mention about
political monopoly. The game is only to be played
for six weeks followed by a rest period of 46
weeks in which the? body politic carries on a
paperwork existence. The attitude during thP eo
six weeks is promise them anything, but give
them nothing. In nato*e, we call this camouflage,
by any other name, Id rather hot say.



street
poll

Question: Do you think the
Orange Peel should be brought
back in its original all-humor
format?
Wl : : :
l|W ?
CHARLES LEE
Charles Hume, 4LW: Yes, I
think that in its original format
the Peel did a great deal for
school spirit.
Lee Alexander, 3AS: Yes. I
think there are other fine outlets
for literary work.
********
W tfflwnw'fa
M I sf?i* ?tiff it** /*#>
JUDY RICHARD
Judy Anderson, 2UC: No, the
literary aspect adds depth.
Richard Schekter, 3AS: I en enjoyed
joyed enjoyed reading the Peel both ways.
* SHARI
John Meyer, 7AS: Yes, I would
like to see the Orange Peel better
than it was last year.
Shari Thieman, 3JM: Yes, I
enjoyed it as a campus humor
magazine.

kVa w~M
M Have a heart that is made entirely
HH
II Twenty magnificent diamonds are set
mm in 14K gold, creating a breathtakingly
MM beautiful pendant. All heart, a 13 |H||B
H monds ... all yours at one low price. HjN
$l5O
EV convenient terms
illustration enlarged 111
f, T IJJ JI i ~~

ACROSS:
I Argentine Pack Animal
6 Choir Voice
10 Culinary Specialist
14 Small Shed or Hut
15 City in NW France
(Normandy)
16 Military Assistant
17 Oat Family Genus
18 Ships Laborers
19 Beech or Birch
20 Important Spanish Verb
21 Chess Piece
23 Be in the Audience
25 Goddess of Wild Nature
(Gk. Myth.)
27 Type of Fastener
28 Midriff Accessory
of Apparel
29 Dress Marking
30 Specialty of Keats
or Shelley
33 Piece of Satire
36 Submarine Weapons
38 The A in Chester
A. Arthur
3.9. Hair Ornament
40 Part of 39 Across
41 Cuddly
44 Dinner Wine
46 Understand a Principle
47 Wrath
48 Easy Elegance in Style
49 Went Like Sixty
50 Game Sportsmen
54 Arouses Anger or
Resentment in
57 Breathe Heavily
58 Blame For a crime
(Slang.)
59 Man Devoted to Sensual
Pleasures
60 is the Forest
Primeval. .
62 Smooth in Actions
64 State (French)
65 Facility
66 Balance Sheet Item
67 Remunerates
68 Asterisk
69 Adolescent Years
DOWN:
1 Capital of Tibet
2 Amorous Companion
3 Avoid (As Tragedy)
4 Homo Sapiens, Etal.
5 Disturbed
6 To Approach With
Intent to Speak
7 Happy Bird
8 Place From Which to
hit a Golf Drive
9 Where Jesus Once
Walked (2 Wds.)
10 Slyly Spiteful
II Give Jobs To

crossword puzzle

BE* 7 E- BEr BErwatr
watr- BErwatr ""
3* Jr BM " """" ""*
T~
~ 4 ~'
|mIBmI V

Just call liim Smooth Sam
HES WEARING DACRON u -ORLON J! lj|g|||||||H
Ullramatic Prost Haggar dress slacks. Even 1
when the humidity hangs hot and heavy,
or he's soaked in a sudden shower, 70% 1
DACRON polyester-30% ORLON" acrylic YIMPIBBrI
keeps these fine dress slacks smooth and sharply MB I
creased. They even take repeated washings \lip IB
without a wrinkle. And Haggar styling gives \I!P 1
him the trim fit he wants in fine dress slacks. No HUH
wonder the gals go for Smooth Sam. 10.95 ¥9^ll
4 WIN A FORD MUSTANG or one o( 50 other bij{ j W& \
prizes. Sec your Haggar dealer for detail* J
yfia'/r/iZ&L B
. c c\i 1302 N. Main St.
C.EI HAGCAK SLACKS A I
, WILSON'S DEPT. STORE
22 E. University Avenue

12 Former British Prime
Minister
13 Nourisn
22 Greasy
24 Drive Down By Re Repeated
peated Repeated Strikes
26 Polished Black Wood

Monday. Sept. 13, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

27 Movie
30 Scent
31 Portal
32 Catch Sight of
33 Average Golf Scores
34 Plant of the Lilv

Family used In Med Medicine
icine Medicine
35 Abnormal sounds in
Breathing
36 Plaything
37 Put into Office
39 Exuded from a Wound
42 Vessel for Carrying
Water, Steam, etc.
43 He Slew his Mother
in a Famous Trilogy
44 Avoid (People)
45 Gives Indications to toward
ward toward (2 Wds.)
48 Drink Following Ano Another
ther Another Drink
49 Bird Food Made
From Cows Kidneys
51 Expunge
52 Omnious Black Bird
53 Small Barracuda
54 School; Sub-
College Education
55 Greek Letter
56 Stretch of Paved Bank
for Loading
57 Tower City of Italy
61 Formal Wear Item
63 Utilize
(Alan Weiss, 3JM, will
produce two crosswords
this trimester.)

Page 5



Page 6

Florida Alligator, Mondays Sept. 13, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
MOTORCYCLE: 1963 Ducati, 250
cc Monza. Original adult owner.
6,000 miles, good condition. Must
sell. Best offer over $375. Call
378-4413. (A-6-st-c).
TRIANGLE FLYING CLUB shares
for sale. Fly for $ 3/hr. Get license
for about S2OO. Call 378-3568. (A (A--6-st-p).
-6-st-p). (A--6-st-p).
LAFAYETTE Stereo amplifier and
turntable. Call 376-1563, after 6
p.m. (A-6-3t-c).
1960 VESPA, 150 cc. Good con condition,
dition, condition, windshield. $l4O. Peter
Granoff, Pi Lamb House. (A (A-6-lt-p).
6-lt-p). (A-6-lt-p).
SOFA BED SSO; VW trailer
hitch sl2; bumper hitch $2.50;
Federal Enlarger with accessor accessories
ies accessories $75; G. E. photo timer
$25; 1962 HILLMAN SUPER MINX
SBOO, firm. 378-4260. (A-6-st-c).
KENMORE Portable Oven-Broiler;
Used six months; sls. Call 2-1575.
(A-6-3t-p).
ALMOST NEW 17* aluminum canoe
with new 3.5 hp Johnson. Includes
paddle, 2 life vests, car top
carrier. S3OO. Call 8-2032.
(A-6-2t-c).
28 TRAILER and Cabana. Furn Furnished.
ished. Furnished. Ideal for single person or
married couple. $895. Call 376-
2119. (A-4-3t-c).
MOTORCYCLE. 1963 Yamaha, 250
cc. Blue with white wall tires. Good
condition. $350. Call 376-8863.
(A-3-ts-c).
CLEANING HOUSE -1 hpFedders
220 volt window air-conditioner.
Compressor needs repair. As is,
$25. 2 Hensoldt-Wetzlar 4 power
scopes, sls each, 1 wagon, $3.
1 wheel barrow, $3. Phone 376-
9992, after 6 p.m. (A-3-ts-c).
MOTORCYCLE: 1965 Yamaha, 125
cc. Several months old. Was $530
new, will sacrifice for $395. Call
376-8863. (A-3-ts-c).
TAPE RECORDER: Wollensak T T-1616,
-1616, T-1616, 4 track, automatic rewind rewindplay
play rewindplay back, 2 speed, 10 watt output.
See at Couchs Inc., 608 N. Main
St. or call FR 2-1866. (A-5-st-c).
MEMBERSHIP AT BRIARCLIFF
COUNTRY CLUB. Good until May
30th. Paid SIOO plus taxes. Will
sell for $75. Call 378-1407. (A (A--5-st-c).
-5-st-c). (A--5-st-c).
MOBILE HOME, 2
large lot. OK Trailer Court. Small
equity and assume payments.
Phone 372-7798. (A-4-3t-c).
MOTORCYCLE .Reasonable shape.
Harley Davidson sprint (modified)
S2OO. Call or visit Bill Oswald,
Delta Sig House. 2-0491. (A-3-
st-c).
>'" AM
James -mSA
sregm

for sale
VW Trailer Hitch. $lO. Call 376-
8675 after 5 p.m. (A-6-2t-c).
SCUBA EQUIPMENT: Order UJS.
Divers, Voit, Healthways and
Dacor equipment at 25% discount.
Regulators, tanks, fins, masks etc.
Delivery in 7 days. Call Robin
Lewis at 2-6410 for further
information. (A-5-3t-c).
GUITAR: Gibson LG-O steel string
guitar with case, capo, picks and
extra strings. One year old. $75.
Call Robin Lewis, 2-6410. (A-5-
3t-c).
ONE HURST shifting-linkage for
Sting Ray. Call 372-6078, evenings.
(A-5-3t-c).
i i in
POST VERSALOG slide rule and
instruction book. sl3. Charvaz
Rooz deluxe mechanical-architec mechanical-architectural
tural mechanical-architectural drawing set. Cost S3O. Will
sacrifice sls. Excellent condition.
Call 378-2238. (A-5-lt-p).
for rent
3 ROOM Cottage for couple with
no pets. S6O per month with water
furnished. Phone 8-2338. (B-6-
3t-c).
- 1
WILLIS TON MOTEL: Rooms by
week or month. Single or double.
Students rates. Television, phones,
and daily maid service. Rooms
available for all University events.
Phone Williston 528-4421. (B-6-
ts-c).
AIR-CONDITIONED,wood paneled,
efficiency apartment. Walking dis distance
tance distance from UF. 1,2, or 3 Juniors
Seniors or graduate students. Call
Charlie Mayo, FR 6-4471. (B-4-
3t-c).
ONE BEDROOM Furnished Lake
cottage. Lake Winnott, 23 miles
from Gainesville. Lake privileges.
Two trimester lease. S4O monthly.
Call Mr. Kaplan 372-0481. (B-l (B-l--ts-c).
-ts-c). (B-l--ts-c).
FURNISHED lake cottage on Lake
Winnott. 23 miles from Gainesville
3 bedrooms, 2 bath. SBS per month.
Two trimester lease. Call Mr.
Kaplan 372-0481. (B-l-ts-c).
*
wanted
MALE ROOMMATE to share mod modern
ern modern 10x50 trailer, with graduate
student. Shady Nook Trailer Park.
$35 monthly plus utilities. Ken
Rymal, Ext. 2991 or 372-5248.
(C-5-st-c).
MALE ROOMMATE. One bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, air-conditioned apartment
5 minutes drive from campus.
$45 monthly plus utilities. Call
376-4429. (C-5-3t-c).

dHHH^pAB^NDOFPOETICCREOTIONHI
lITHAT IS ALMOST
MAJESTIC!" ENDS 1
BmlDaughters 4

' |
I
wanted
NEED THIRD Roommate, share
large 2 bedroom, clean house with
2 girls. 5 blocks from library.
S3B monthly, share utilities. Call
Perry-Sue 378-4930. (C-6-3t-c).
m 1 1 '
RIDERS TO MIAMI: Leave Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Friday afternoon return Sun.
afternoon. $5 each way. Call 378-
3141. (C-6-st-c).
WHITE HOUSEWIFE desires days
work. Cooking, sewing and
cleaning. Week days only. Own
transportation. Call 2-5369 before
9:30 p.m. (C-5-ts-c).
help wanted:
CAMPUS JOBS, full-time. Persons
with background in Biology and
Chemistry, to work in plant
Physiology Laboratory. (1) Senior
lab. technician and (2) Lab Assist Assistant
ant Assistant I. Call 8-2600. (E-6-2t-c).
CAMPUS JOBS, part-time. Per Persons
sons Persons interested in plant biology
research, lab, and clerical, and can
qualify under Federal Work Study
Program. 8-2600. (E-6-2t-c).
STUDENTS for part-time employ employment.
ment. employment. Hours 1 p.m. 6 p.m., 6
days a week. Call Larry Levin
at FR 2-2405 before 8 p.m., after
8, call FR 8-2132. (E-5-3t-c).
HAVE SOME OPENINGS for full
and part-time waitresses. No
experience necessary. Above
average hourly wage. Apply 1430
SW 13th Street. Kings Food Hosts.
EXPERIENCED Secretary needed
for immediate employment. Must
be proficient in shorthand and
typing. Good salary for qualified
person. Scruggs & Carmichael.
3 SE Ist Ave. Phone 376-5242.
(E-5-ts-c).
PART-TIME student help, serving
line. Longs Cafeteria; 313 W.
university Ave. Call 376-4992. Mr.
Ambrose. (E-2-st-p).
STUDENTS NEEDED to assist
manager. QUALIFICATIONS: (1)
U of F student in good academic
standing. (2) Can work evenings.
(3) Can work 18-22 hours per
week. $35.00 per week salary (S9O
on full-time basis). Call Mr.
Malaghan at 8-2966 between 9:00
and 5:00. (E-l-ts-c).
PART-TIME SECRETARY for
Tuesday and Thursday. Typing
required. Experience preferred.
Apply Hillel Foundation, 16 NW
18th Street or call 372-2900. (E (E--
-- (E-- 3t-c).
CARRIERS WANTED for routes
on and adjacent to campus. Call
GAINESVILLE SUN 378-1411. (E (E---4-7t-c).
--4-7t-c). (E---4-7t-c).

autos
1965 GTO. Fully equipped. Must
sacrifice. Call Lake Butler, 496-
3041. (G-6-ts-c).
1961 VOLKSWAGEN. Radio,
heater, white walls, sun roof. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition, clean. $995. 14
NW 13th Street after noon or call
2-8978. (G-3-st-c).
1964 VOLKSWAGEN SEDAN.
Exceptionally good condition. Ser Serviced
viced Serviced regularly by owner. Priced
for quick sale $1395. Call 376-
8863. (G-3-ts-c).
1963 MG 1100 sports sedan. Low
mileage. Excellent condition. Only
$895. Call 376-8863. (G-13-ts-c).
1962 CHRYSLER 300. Com Completely
pletely Completely loaded. Good condition.
Less than dealer cost. Call 376-
4404 or 376-4201. (G-3-st-c).
1965 VOLVO, P 1800. Brand new,
including air-conditioning. Less
than dealer cost. Call 376-4404
or 376-4201. (G-3-st-c).
1961 VOLKSWAGEN, 28,000 miles.
Radio, heater, white walls. Very
clean. SBSO. Call 376-3563 after
6 p.m. (G-2-st-c).
1960 SIMCA, Deluxe Grand Large.
25,000 miles. Excellent condition.
White wall tires, two-toned white
and blue exterior. Call 372-8735.
(G-2- st-c).
1965 CORVETTE Sting Ray. 5500
miles. Silver/red. 165 hp. AM AMFM,
FM, AMFM, white walls. Post 3.70. Call
378-4678. (G-4-3t-c).
MUST SELL: 1965 MONZA. Air Airconditioned,
conditioned, Airconditioned, automatic transmis transmission.
sion. transmission. Still under factory warranty.
Call 376-0794. (G-4-3t-p).
1961 RAMBLER, 4 door, straight
shift. Four new tires, radio,
heater. Good condition. Call Fred
Neal at 378-4767, TTiursdays after
5 or weekends. (G-3-st-p).
rfimmnw
3 COLOR
HITS
FIRST AREA SHOWING
its THE WILD West
ATITS WACKIEST!
MsoGupm-wm p wb I
Fordnm
Clarence** fY
CfosseyedLAA
VV-tr couOR yx

personal
TENA FAFARD would like to
inform all her friends she is now
with Rame, 319 W. Univ. Ave.,
Phone 372-5,549. Specializing in
hair coloring, cutting natural curly
hair, also specializes in childrens
hair cuts. (J-6-ts-c).
MUSIC ENTHUSIASTS! Register
Now! For Your University of
Florida Student Discount On
Musical Instruments And Acces Accessories.
sories. Accessories. Derda Music Co., 622 N.
Main Street. (J-5-15t-c).
S " v
WE GOT
SO BIG
J
'CAUSE WE
CHARGE SO LITTLE
rent a car from p
ECONO-CAR
399 //
per business day
plus pennies a mile
We feature Valiants & other
CHRYSLER built cars. Gas Gasoilinsuranceall
oilinsuranceall Gasoilinsuranceall included!
PHO NE 376-3644
SUBURBIA
Drive-In Theatre
N.W. 13th St. 372-9523
2 Color Hits
o <>o o o 00. Oos
Footloose
. Americans
TURN THE O
Jll|p£ of Love o
PtAYG p oundq
ftnW
SOMWR
R&* me I
|p*S Dicueon I
PLUS 4mm
ICAry GnaNT J
psue Catqn 1
I [fiTrie Gopsej
co-starrwe IVAIfATI U!



Freedom Party
Convention Set

reedotn Party, the UFs not yet
war-old political party, will
its second convention
orrow.
his fall convention is open to
Students and will take place
ho Florida. Union Auditorium.
i officers will be elected,
constitution will be ratified
candidates for the fall elections
be nominated.
reedom Party was organized

XEROX I
COPIES
NEW LOW PRICES At QUIK SAVE
1-19 Copies, 10<: ea. -20 & Over, 9<;
COPIES MADE WHILE YOU WAIT
Service Available From 8 am. to 11 p.m.
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
QUIK SAVE
CAROLYN PLAZA

I Eliminate I
I Profound I
I Mental I
I Anguish. I
I I
I reduced evening telephone rates on Long
Distance calls as early as 8:00 p.m. each
night and all day on Sundays.
A most pleasant and frugal way to main-
I tain communication. H

in January. This new party was
created and nominated a slate of
candidates with a political plat platform
form platform before the four days were
completed.
Although their presidential can candidate,
didate, candidate, Jim Harmeling, failed to
get elected, the relatively new
party managed to capture more
than 10 per cent of the student
vote.

c arm. -
ale

ORCHESIS: Tuesday. Womens
Gym, 7 p.m. Closed business
meeting. 8 p.m., dancing.
AMERICAN SOCIETY < CiVIL
ENGINEERS: Tuesday.
Room 328, Engineering m ing.
Speaker: Gator Ray or assistant.
Film: Gator highlights of 1964.
WOMENS TENNIS CLUB: Wed Wednesday,
nesday, Wednesday, Broward classroom.
ALPHA DELTA SIGMA: smoker,
Tuesday. 7 p.m., Johnson Lounge
1 Florida Union. Speaker: Kenneth
Small, executive secretary.of
F l or !.d Association of
B. r ').ido,asters.
lAI BETA PHI: Thursday,
Room 512, Engineering Building.
BENTON ENGINEERING
COUNCIL: tonight, 7p.m., Walker
Auditorium. Speaker: Dean
Thomas Martin of Engineering
College. A Welcome Smoker for
engineering freshmen and trans transfers.
fers. transfers.
PRE-MEDICAL, DENTAL STU STUDENTS:
DENTS: STUDENTS: registration for pre preprofessional
professional preprofessional counseling begins
today through Oct. 1. Bring
instructors full names and course
and section nr nbers.

Monday, Sept. 13, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

ENGINEERING DAMES:
Wednesday, Sept. 15, 8 p.m., at
Perry House. Speaker: Courtnay
Roberts of Gainesville Police Dept.
FLA. UNION BOARD: interviews
for committee chairmanships,
Tuesday and Wednesday, 3:30p.m.,
Room 315, Florida Union. Chair Chairmanships
manships Chairmanships available: International,
International Host, Special Pro Projects,
jects, Projects, and Public Relations.
ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY: rush
smoker, Tuesday, 7 p.m., library
of the ROTC Building.
FACULTY CLUB: opens today.
All academic staff invited. Lun Luncheon
cheon Luncheon 11:30 a.m.-l:30 p.m. Private
dining rooms available for group
meetings.
NEWMAN CLUB: record hop,
Friday, 8:30 p.m., at Catholic
Student Center.
UNION BOARD FINE ARTS
COMMITTEE: print sale,Tuesday-
Saturday, Florida Union Social
Room. Sale hours 9-9 on Tuesday
and 1-9 on Wednesday-Friday.
FLORIDA RIFLES: all ROTC
cadets interested in joining will
meet in Room 16, Military
Building, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF
AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAU ASTRONAUTICS:
TICS: ASTRONAUTICS: organizational meeting,
tonight 7:30 p.m., Room 328, En Engine
gine Engine House. Film: Four Days of
Gemini 4."
ENGLISH SCREENING EXAM:
for engineering students, Tuesday,
1 p.m., Walker Auditorium.
ELECTION DEPUTIES: deputy
list of three persons from each
registered campus political party
required before 5 p.m. Wednesday,
at Office of the Interior, Room 311,
Florida Union.
ABSENTEE BALLOTS: all per persons
sons persons needing absentee ballots for
Sept. 30 elections should register
in Room 311 of Florida Union
before 5 p.m. Wednesday.
Alsobrook
Takes Reins
For Alumni
Alvin Alsobrook, assistant di director
rector director of the UF's Division of
Alumni Services, has been named
interim director of the Division
by President J. Wayne Reitz.
Director Bill A. Fleming has
been granted a leave of absence
to return to the College of Law
and complete his requirements for
a law degree. It is anticipated
Fleming will finish his work during
the fall and winter trimesters.
Alsobrook has been on the
University staff since 1961.
Swingline
UiflFMENls
can * . woods?
Answer* below)
[2l A storekeeper
had 17 TOT Staplers, p*
All but 3 were sold. I £|>
How many did V
he have left? /T\ N Cvs^^N
This is the
Swingline
Tot Stapler
I (including 1000 staples)
\ Larger >ire CUB Dk
Stapler only $1.49 I
No bigger then a pack of gum-but pack*
the punch of a big deal! Refill* available
everywhere. Unconditionally guaranteed.
Made in U.S.A. Oat it at any stationery,
variety, book store!
INC
Long Island City, N.Y. 11101
{UMO uea noX ute); 100140* epii] tse;
-puen a 14) ej.Xeip ipued poe 14000.400 a
04 txeu emneq Xzbjo *314 iu.141 luiXnq
w wapU '*j*|de4s XOJL J dM
am JO Xjo)* a 144 inoqv nf *,40*44 pay
l****4JL l |*poaM *144 jo no Suiuuru st
H !* *njy Xe**-j|OH 1 SU3MSNY

Page 7



Wages Leads 44-8 Varsity Rout

By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Staff Writer
i
Sophomore quarterback Harmon
Wages led the varsity to a 44-8
rout over the combined B-team
and freshmen forces in a full game
scrimmage at Florida Field
Saturday.
Wagefe led Gator rushers with 74
yards and topped the passers with
95 yards through the air. The
Jacksonville native scored one
touchdown himself and was directly
responsible for two others.
The lone score against the
varsity came in the final quarter
when talented freshmen Larry
Rentz and Larry Smith hooked
up on a 57-yard pass.
All six varsity TDs came on
long plays. Shortest was a 15-
yard pass from Steve Spurrier to
Gary Thomas for the games first
score. Longest was a 56-yard
pass from Wages to Richard Trapp.
Marquis Baeszler led the other
backs with 52 yards rushing and
one touchdown. Other scores came
on a 47 yard pass from Kay
Stephenson to Thomas, a 39-yard
Independent Murals
Open With Bowling
The Independent Leagues first
two sports for this trimester will
be bowling and flag football, re respectively.
spectively. respectively.
Any team wishing to participate
in these sports must register with
the Intramural Department in
Room 229, Florida Gym. Regis Registration
tration Registration deadline for bowling is
Wednesday, September 15 at 12:00
Noon. The deadline for flag foot football
ball football is Friday, September 24 at
5:00 p.m. Five men are required
for the bowling team.

New Gator Problem: Fullback

By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Staff Writer
Fullback was once regarded as
the Fightin Gators strongest po position.
sition. position.
But, after all the tape and ban bandages
dages bandages used last Saturday, its clear
b the UF Infirmary has more
fullbacks than Head Coach Ray
Graves.
The final blow
came in Sat- I
unlays control- BlSl, /|||§§f
led scrimmage. W
Already sopho- W%L*. if *1
more smash
Wayne Barfield
and experienced
junior John
Feiber had been HHT raraT
relegated to the \W $ WS&lLmim
sidelines with McKEEL:
painful leg
injuries. Oone
Freshmen Shine
In Cross Country
Freshmen took five of the first
seven places in a three mile cross
country run against the varsity
and Florida Track Club Saturday.
Steve Atkinson, a Columbus, Ga.
native, outdistanced everyone else
with a time of 14:58.7, nearly a
half-minute ahead of the nearest
competitor, Harry Drake, a Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville frosh.
Drake finished at 15:25 and was
followed closely by Bill Opperman
of the Florida Track Club at 15:26.
Other top ten finishers in order
were: Greg Henderson, freshman,
15:46; Gene Cote, varsity, 15:46;
Chris Hosford, freshman, 15:49;
Steve Bass, freshman, 15:57; Aus Austin
tin Austin Funk, varsity, 16:10; Frank
Heffernan, freshman, 16:14, Gary
Siebert, Florida Track Club. 16:23-

The Florida Alhgat.orj

run by Wages, and on a four yard
jaunt by Barry Brown after Wages
handed it to him after running 17
yards himself Five points were

gsi Mb. VM frl
set Jib

RENTZ GAINS:
Elusive Frosh Brought Down By Jersey.

Steve Spurrier began the var varsitys
sitys varsitys first offensive series with
a handoff to 6-0, 197, blonde
Graham McKeel.
McKeel went down, struggled to
his feet, and had to be helped off
the field. McKeel underwent a
spring operation to repair a torn
ligament. But this was a new hurt,
cartilage trouble.
Late Saturday night McKeel
stood a second operation. The
news was announced that he would
be lost to the Orange and Blue for

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RENTZ, SMITH CONNECT FOR TD

, Monday, Sept. 13, 1965

Page 8

added on a safety by Lynn Mathews
and a 33-yard field goal by Don
Barrett.
Coach Ray Graves said that on

the balance of the season.
This is a real blow to our
football team, Graves bemoaned.
I conside '"cKeel to be one of
the finest fv ack prospects we
ever had at Florida.
Journeyman junior Marquis
Baeszler will see a lot of work
in the fullback slot. He had been
spending most of his time lately
as a tailback. Promising sopho sophomore
more sophomore Tommy Glenn will also move
into fullback contention.
Feiber and Barfield should
return to the practice field today.

SPORTS

the whole he thought it was a
satisfactory scrimmage. This
was, of course, before he learned
of the loss of Graham McKeel
for the season.
I was most pleased with much
of the defensive play, Graves
said. They started slowly but
played much better during the
second half.
The first team defense allowed
but two first downs.
On offense, I was very happy
with the small amount of penalties
called, Graves commented. We
were only charged with 45 or 50
yards. Usually, in the first game
with SEC officials, there would be
about 100 yards or even more.
The Gators top passing combin combination,
ation, combination, Charlie Casey and Spurrier,
saw limited action but looked good
while in the game. Spurrier com completed
pleted completed 8 of 12 passes for 81 yards.
Neither saw second half action.
I had planned to only use Steve
and Charlie for a little while,
Graves said. Actually they saw a
bit more service than I had
anticipated.
Most ragged in the scrimmage
was the defensive secondary. Rentz
often hit receivers for key gains
in the varsity backfield. No less
than four pass interference pen penalties
alties penalties were called on the
secondary.
We had some problems in the
defensive backfield today, Graves

K I
rff
At the Gainesville Livestock Market
5001 N.W. 13th St. 1
>' ? H

said. I think it was partially
attributed to I believe
the defensive backs will hold their
own when the season starts.
Graves was pleased with the
kicking of John Preston, who
boomed four of six kickoffs deep
in the end zone.
The kicking game looked all
right today except for the extra
points (three were missed) but,
dont forget Barfield wasnt doing
the kicking today, Graves noted.
Graves added that most of the
rough work was now over and the
team would settle into routine
drills this week in preparation for
Northwestern.
Oilers Jump
In AFL Race
Second year quarterback Don
Trull passed for three touchdowns
to Willie Frazier yesterday to
lead the Houston Oilers to a 27-21
American Football League victory
over New York.
It was the first regular season
game for both teams.
More than half a million dol dollars
lars dollars of Jet talent watched from
the sidelines. Joe Namath, who
commanded $400,000, was on the
bench and John Huarte, a $200,000
player now on the taxi squad, spent
the game on the telephone helping
spot plays.
San Diego defeated Denver 34-
31 in Saturday night action.
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