Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
FLOODED OUT: 12 months ago
Dora Howled
One Year Ago
By YVETTE CARDOZO
Alligator Staff Writer
Starting off the fall trimester with hurricane threats seems to
be habit forming.
Exactly one year ago tomorrow, UF students gathered around
portable radios with slopping coffee cups, wrinkled pajamas and
grumbled mutterings waiting for the 6 a.m. news to tell them whether
or not to attend classes.
Outside, hide-and-go-seek Hurricane Dora played a cat and

mouse game with Gainesville.
Students fresh from vacation
had been greeted with a welcome
present of 55 mile per hour winds
and four straight days of rain.
No one knew for sure exactly
where the storm was. And de depending
pending depending upon the particular
weatherman tuned in, Hurricane
Dora could be located anywhere
from Gainesville to Jacksonville.
It was to be recorded that the
U F came out of the storm
swimmingly.
Students swam in the presently
dry Graham area sink hole. They
swam around flooded fraternity
houses, and waded through "flooded
basements to classes.
For the finally wide awake lis listeners
teners listeners of that 6 a.m. broadcast
came the news that classes would
be cancelled for the day of Sept.
10.
But during following days bare
student toes sloshed through
flooded basements in Matherly,
Anderson, Tigert and Flint Halls.
State Climatologist Keith Butson
said 11 inches of rain splattered
on soggy Gainesville streets within
four days. The usual quota for all
September is five inches.
Meanwhile, during the night of
the big storm, bicycles, small
(See DORA on Page 2)

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MATHERLY HALL: wet feet last year

Prof Says College Students Will Riot

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (UPI) College students throughout
the nation are likely to stage riots this fall protesting the
slave labor of the military draft, a University of Michi Michigan
gan Michigan business economist said Wednesday.
Ths tempers of many college students are high enough
over the vicious injustices built into the draft system that
there is a potential for violence comparable to the Los
Angeles riot on American campuses, Associate Profes Professor
sor Professor Ross Wilhelm said.
He said left wing student organizers protesting the Viet
Nam war were using the draft as bait to recruit demonstra demonstrators.
tors. demonstrators.

The Florida
Alligator
Vol. 58, No.*P University of Florida Tuesday, Sept. 1965

3 Negroes Rush
UF Fraternities
By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
Three Negro freshmen, with the help of UF fraternities, have broken
another color barrier at the UF.
The boys attended fraternity rush parties last week. It was the first
time in the history of the UF that Negro boys have ever attended rush
parties.
Wayne Fulton, Percy G. Brown and Henry Crowell we accepted and
treated as rushees at several UF fraternity houses.
Fulton, 17, first attended a rush party last Thursday night at the Tau
Epsilon Phi fraternity house. He said he didnt think there would be any
trouble.
Im very naive, he grinned. He said he was slightly apprehensive,

Betsy Damage Heavy

But The Lady
Had A Heart
By LEON DANIEL
United Press International
MIAMI BEACH (UPI) Hurri Hurricane
cane Hurricane Betsy had too many muscles
to be a lady she pitched a 441-
foot tanker high and dry on a beach.
But her destructiveness was tem tempered
pered tempered with mercy.
Betsy was a water baby. Her
flood waters, weathermen said,
were the highest in south Florida
in 20 years, perhaps since the
great storm of 1926.
Yet Betsy spared the densely
settled heart of the gold coast in inland.
land. inland. She did her worst along the
seashore.
It takes a helicopter flight along
the gold cost between Miami and
Palm Beach to see the character
of Betsy.
Flying east to the coast from
a few miles inland, you see few
evidences of the hurricanes march
from the air, other than scattered
debris and occasional toppled
trees.
(See BETSY on Page 2)

but said the reception he recieved
at the TEP House made him decide
to continue in Rush.
Fulton and Brown attended sev several
eral several rush functions at the TEP
house. Over 350 people were at the
party according to TEP Chancellor
Fred Schenkman. 4Ed.
Schenk man said the boys were
treated as all other rushees who
went through the TEP house.
I thought that a great majority
of the boys were receptive to them.
Not all the boys got to meet them,
(See NEGROES on P. 5)

While most students support our countrys position in
Viet Nam, the latent anger over the slave labor aspects
of the draft is so strong they probably will follow this
left wing leadership, Wilhelm said.
He said Students for a Democratic Society, a left wing
organization, was planning a nationwide student strike over
Viet Nam the first 10 days of December to include sit-ins
and protests at campus military and research installations.
Actions such as these are as dangerous as smoking
in an ammunition dump in view of student attitudes toward
the draft, Wilhelm said.

Sweetie Deadline
Set For Today

.\o.
MARYARLIS
last year's sweetheart

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* Given a time when students are under pressure as with
exams, little more would be needed than a group running
through the dorms at night shouting, 4 Lets riot against
the draft.
44 The students rallying to such a cry wouldn't know, or
care, if the ones at the head of the mob were carrying signs
protesting Viet Nam.
Wilhelm made his comments in a broadcast over the
campus radio station. He proposed Congress end the draft
and give all servicemen pay raises of S3OO a month to
build a career fighting force.

40 Homecoming
Lovelies Eyed
Deadline Is today for entries
in the UF Homecoming Sweetheart
Contest.
Any recognized organization
may submit an entry to the Florida
Blue Key office prior to 5 p.m.
in the Florida Union.
The judging will be held Sept.
17 at the University Inn with the
bathing suit competition at Cypress
Gardens the following day.
A. J. Barranco chairman of the
contest, has asked the entries to
m*et tonight at 7 p.m. in the
Johnson Lounge of the Florida
Union. H bring high hec*. shoes.
Barranco, 3 LW, said that
approximately 40 of the UFs
loveliest coeds are expected to
enter the contest to vie for what
could amount to over SSOO in
prizes.,
Among the prizes is an outfit
for the sweetheart from Donigans.
The Lake Wales Law student said
that three finalists will be selected
but the winner will not be announced
until Gator Growl Oct. 15.



The Florida Alligator/ Thursday, Sept. 9, 1965

Page 2

THE WORLD
THIS MORNING
(From The Wires Os United Press International)

Indian Paratroopers
Dropped On Pakistan
KARACHI Indian paratroopers are believed to have been dropped
near a dozen cities in Pakistan Wednesday night, including Karachi and
the capital of Rawalpindi, the government radio announced.
An earlier government radio announcement said the Indian paratroops
descended on the suburbs of Karachi Pakistans largest city near
the international airport.
But later broadcasts said only that the paratroopers were believed
to have been dropped.
Authorities sounded an all-clear for this city of two million at 10:15
p.m., local time, about two hours after the first alert.
The broadcasts gave no indication of how many Indian paratroopers
were believed to have landed, or what their objective was.
More Than 100 Cong Die
SAIGON American and free Vietnamese forces Wednesday press pressed
ed pressed the ground war against the Viet Cong Communists on three fronts,
killing more than 100 guerrillas in continuing operations in central
and northern South Viet Nam, a U. S. military spokesman reported.
There was no letup in the air war against the Communists. Command
bombers pounded suspected Viet Cong strongholds 20 miles north of
Saigon, and Navy and Air Force planes blasted targets in the Communist
north.
At the same time, the spokesman disclosed military strength in South
Viet Nam totaled more than 100,000 as of last Thursday. He said the
total did not include about 7,500 Army personnel who arrived between
Sept. 1 and 7.
Britain Imposes Embargo
LONDON Britain Wednesday imposed a temporary embargo on
delivery of arms to India, government sources said.
The embargo did not affect Pakistan because there are no contracts
for supply of British arms to that country, officials said.
In Washington Secretary of State Dean Rusk announced the United
States has ceased all arms shipments to India and Pakistan.
The British embargo was disclosed following lengthy London talks
Wednesday between U. S. Undersecretary of State George W. Ball and
British Prime Minister Harold Wilson and Foreign Secretary Michael
Stewart.
Ball and the British leaders agreed on an all-out support for the
U. N. Kashmir peace initiative to avert a major war in Asia. They
feared such a war could benefit only Communist China.
Red China Accuses India
TOKYO Communist China accused India in a strong protest note
Wednesday of committing serious violations of Chinese territory at
the Himalayan mountain frontier between the two countries.
The Peking regime demanded withdrawal of Indian military installa installations
tions installations and armed forces from disputed areas of the frontier, notably in
the Sikkim area near embattled Kashmir.
The protest, reported by the official New China News Agency, came
in the midst of an undeclared war between India and Pakistan. It followed
a Peking broadcast Tuesday declaring Red Chinas firm support for
Pakistan.
Betsy

(From Page One)
The areas along the beaches are
\ different story. I have never wit witnessed
nessed witnessed the full thrust of a hurricane
before, and what Betsy did was
Impressive.
She turned the glittering resort
>f Miami Beach with its famed
Collins Avenue row of hotels into
i malestrom of shrieking winds,
orrential rains and when it was
>ver one big mess.
She tossed five-foot-tall con concrete
crete concrete planters around like bowling
>alls, and methodically smashed
t-by-12 foot windows in a beach beachront
ront beachront hotel lobby.
She carved great hunks of sand,
,riceless to hotels who use their
leaches to lure tourists, out of
;ome spots and dumped it others
,ften cascading it across seaside
lighways.

Key Biscayne, the populous resi residential
dential residential island in Biscayne Bay,
showed heavy water damage from
Betsys passage. An airboat could
be seen skimming along a main
highway Betsy turned into a canal.
Two barges loosened from their
moorings by Betsy nearly col collapsed
lapsed collapsed the causeway connecting the
island to the mainland, cutting it
off until repairs could be made.
Flying north from Key Biscayne
and Miami Beach above scenic
highway AIA with Betsys trail trailing
ing trailing squalls still kicking u$ huge
seas the road was still covered
with water at several points north of
Fort Lauderdale, although the high
tide that coincided with Betsys
strongest winds had long since sub subsided.
sided. subsided.
Residential islands between the
beaches and the mainlands, the se secluded
cluded secluded dwelling places of the
wealthy, were awash.

c P u
.[l j e

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCI ASSOCIATION:
ATION: ASSOCIATION: Organizational meeting.
6 p.m., Sept. 12 at 1833 W. Univ.
Ave. All Lutheran students wel welcome;
come; welcome; refreshments.
1965 FOOTBALL SEASON PEP
RALLY: Sept. 16, Univ. Auditor Auditorium
ium Auditorium Lawn, 7:30 p.m., bonfire.
FLORIDA RIFLES: Sept. 9,
7:30 p.m., Room 16. Military Bldg.
Open only to Army ROTC cadets.
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT
CENTER: Sept. 10. 6 p.m., supper
for 75 cents, followed by a dis discussion
cussion discussion on Education and Person Personal
al Personal Growth.
FLORIDA UNION DANCE: Sept.
10, 8-10 p.m., in Florida Union
social room. D. J. Larry Havill
will be at the dance.
Guevaras
In Cuba,
U.S. Says
WASHINGTON (UPI) Ernesto
Che Guevara is now in Cuba and
has been ever since his return
there from Africa in March, offi official
cial official U. S. sources affirmed Wed Wednesday.
nesday. Wednesday.
Officials denied a report by a
Cuban exile group in Mexico that
Guevara was killed in the Domini Dominican
can Dominican Republic and his body burned.
The claim was later given ad additional
ditional additional weight when Gen. Antonio
Imbert Barerra, leader of the Do Dominican
minican Dominican junta which resigned last
week, said he had information that
Guevara had died fighting with the
rebel faction.
Many observers feel it would
be extremely difficult for a man
of Guevaras stature to slip into
the Dominican Republic unnoticed
and then fight side-by-side with
Dominicans without them knowing
it.
Officials said that most of the
reports that Che Guevara had been
seen in other parts of the world
were nothing more than deductions.
However, a U. S. official said:
No one from the outside has
seen him since his return from
Africa except a Panamanian journ journalist
alist journalist Leopoldo Aragon.
Dora
(From Page One)
cars and Flavet residents moved
to temporary quarters.
Wall to wall Flavet and frame
dorm refugees carpeted the floors
of Florida Gym and Florida Union.
Brick dorm doors were locked
tight and an occasional off campus
hurricane party sprouted.
After four days of windy drizzle
Dora finally decided to sweep out,
but not without leaving a few calling
cards.
Their names were Ethel and
Gladys, numbers five and seven
of the season.
You're Invited To A
Student
Chnnen
At Grace
Presbyterian
vSptsSj Church
NW 13th St.
<£ IMMEDIATELY AFTER
MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE
SUN., SEPT. 12th.
Transportation available from
Pres. Univ. Center 9:30 and
10:30 A.M.

PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM: tomorrow, 4 p.m., Bless Auditorium, H
Williams Hall, Speaker: Dr. Luis Muga, assistant professor
chemistry. Topic: Recent Developments in Ternary Fission.
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS: Sept. 14, 7:30
Room 328, Engineering Building. Speaker: Gator Ray or assistan^B
BENTON ENGINEERING COUNCIL: today, 7:30 p.m., Room 3lfl
Engineering Building. Organizational meeting.
PARKERS I
COMPLETE OFFICE OUTFITTERS!
GAINESVILLE'S MOST COMPLETE I
OFFICE MACHINE, OFFICE EQUIPMENT I
AND OFFICE SUPPLY STORE I
TRY US FOR YOUR DESK LAMPS, I
DRAFTING SUPPLIES
OR PERSONAL NEEDS I
PH. 372-2555 601 W. UNIVERSITY
Fast And Convenient Service
At The NEW
B&B TAKE OUT
Featuring
Shrimp Hamburgers
Chicken French Fries
Boxes To Go
The Drive-In Window saves
you the trouble of leaving your car
B&B TAKE OUT
412 S.W. 4th Ave.
STUDENT
INSURANCE
Plan provides coverage
during vacation periods
anywhere in
the world-unless you
are a member of
'
the armed forces
<
m
Act now-only $17.25
.. i
contact
student govt, office.



Law School Names Top Brains

Richard M. Robinson of Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville and Jerome R. Wolfe of
Jacksonville were named the two
leading scholars in the University
of Floridas College of Law for
the recently concluded spring
trimester.

(JJMsIJ
hi gang.. .glad to see you back...it's been a
looong hot summer here in g'ville without you
.. .but we haven't idled away our time
we've made preparatiorts to supply you this fall
with the looks you've been longing for... and
from names you're familiar with.... so, don't
be the last gal on your floor to shop twig
there may not be anything left I you know
where we are come see us...
twig

COLLEGE LIFE
Is Proud To Announce The Appointment Os
JAMES A. LaBREC
As Unit Supervisor
*Graduate, U of F *Averaged Over
Economics $1,000,000 Busi-
I ness Delivered,
*Completed Ad- 1963, 1964
vanced Training In | ~ Jfk:;
Life Insurance 'President's Club
1964
Nation's Out Outstanding
standing Outstanding New *National Quality
Agent, Award
/ Representatives
SeJjifar the a nesv^*e
' Breece McCray
1105 W. University Ave.
Security Bldg. Suite 4
'

Each student won three awards
Robinson for top grades in civil
procedure, property and criminal
law and procedure and Wolfe for
his performance in comparative
law, unfair trade practices and
labor law.

Five other law students won two
awards apiece for leading grades
in various courses. They were
Robert M. Lloyd, Gordon H. Har Harris,
ris, Harris, Gerald T. Bennettj Paul C.
Huck and Daniel Scarritt.
In addition to the seven scholars
I with multiple awards, 29 others
were designated for single honors
in their classes. They included:
John P. Hyman in, Charles L.
Hume, Stanley R. Andrews, Pat Patrick
rick Patrick W. Doyle, Ransford C. Pyle,
Richard H. Adams, Ronald Al Aldrich,
drich, Aldrich, Charles W. Alford, David
Gluckman, William R. Middelthon
Jr., David E. Ward, and Ronald
E. Dusek.
Also Hume F. Coleman, Charles
F. Henley Jr., Robert W. Morri Morrison,
son, Morrison, William O. Scalfe Jr., Susan
S. Harrell, Richard L. Horn, Her Herbert
bert Herbert T. Schwartz, Charles P.
Pillans in, Bruce E. Lazar, David
A. Tegethoff, Reuben C. Dyal Jr.,
David D. McFadyen, Thomas G.
Freeman Jr., Harry H. Root ID,
William D. Goddard, and Wilfred
K. Smith.
FUNLAND
AMUSEMENT
CENTER
WHERE STUDENTS
MEET FOR RECREATION
GAI NESVILLE'S
LARGEST SELECTION
OF GAMES
1011 W. University Ave.
2 Wneks From Comnus

Thursday/ Sept. 9, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

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OFF TO EUROPE: on Union trip
Florida Union Trips
*>
Each year the Florida Union arranges various trips that students
may take at reduced rates.
Through planning and by buying tickets and accommodations in
large numbers we are usually able to save the students up to one-third
of the usual cost,** said Union Program Director Del Sterrett.
A trip to Cape Kennedy and Merritt Island is planned for each
trimester. For the day long trip, students travel to the Cape, and
inspect the space center by bus. The cost for the trip not including
meals runs around eight dollars, according to Sterrett.
Durrlng Christmas vacation the Union runs a trip to New York,
where students tour the city visiting the United Nations Building,
attend a Broadway play and visit the various museums.
The cost runs around SIOO to $125 and includes a round-trip
train ticket, hotel room, and tickets to the various events.
Each year between summer and fall classes, an out-of-the country
trip is made, usually to one of the Caribbean Islands. The group
travels by plane and the cost including hotel room and various tours
is usually around $l5O.
During the summer a group flight to Europe is made with a savings
of one-third on the usual cost of the flight.
Library Has Art For Rent

The UF Library has a large
circulating collection of fine art
reproductions which students and
faculty may rent for the trimester.
These framed and ready to hang
color prints sell for $1 $1.75
per picture, depending on the size
and quality of the picture.
The prints are on display in
the Library In the Humanities
Room, the Browsing Room, the
second floor lobby and at the cir circulation
culation circulation desk. A number of new

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AAA Representative for this area. Call for
night wrecker service at 2-5643 and 6-3458
§U.S. Royal Distributor Dial 372*0455
I NEIGHBORHOOD /)
[ SERVICE CENTER
637 NW I3TH STREET

prints were recently purchased
and added to the collection which
includes works by Modigliani,
Klee, Picasso, Toulouse-Lautrec,
Van Gogh, Mlro, and many others.
The pictures are ideal for adding
a touch of interest and color to
the students' room and the size of
the collection makes it possible
for the borrower to select from a
wide variety of styles and
techniques from classical to
modern painting.

Page 3



... % s
brotherhood
In race relations the record of
the UF has matched favorably the
record of practically all Southern
universities bettering most.
One black mark which blots an
otherwise favorable record oc occurred
curred occurred in 1957 when the Supreme
Court ruled against the University
and the state for their actions in
refusing to admit a Negro to the
UF law school.
However since this incident and
since the first Negro students ap appeared
peared appeared on campus in the early days
of the 6os, no violence and very
little if any excitement has re resulted.
sulted. resulted. Integration was accepted on
campus with little or no difficulties.
Supreme Court decisions and
laws however do not erase from
persons minds and hearts the feel feelings
ings feelings bred by centuries of racial
hatred. Being allowed on campus is
a far cry from being assimilated
and' accepted.
The Alligator reports today that a
campus social fraternity has opened
its doors to freshman Negro students
for rush functions.
Admittedly this is nothing to get
overly-excited about nor is it some something
thing something for which campus liberals on
the race question should beat their
breasts.
That such steps result from
voluntary actions and not from
federally-applied forces is a valid
reason to rejoice. Those legislators
from the South who filibustered a against
gainst against the 1964 Act were correct
in one thing: one cannot in the long
run ever legislate a feeling or
mood.
Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity open opened
ed opened its doors to several Negro stu students
dents students during the rush and rumors
are that one or more may be
pledged thereby breaking the so socalled
called socalled color barrier 99 in campus
fraternity affairs.
It is hoped the penetration of the
so-called race barrier this fall
during rush will be followed by
additional harmonious relations on
campus in a field where harmony
is sorely needed to counter ex explosions
plosions explosions elsewhere.

Editorial Staff
Drex Dobson, assistant managing editor
Andy Moor, sports editor
Peggy Blanchard, coed editor
Eunice Tall, features editor

Bob Wilcox
Fran Snider
Joe Hilliard
Sue Kennedy
Sandy Waite
Elaine Fuller
Peter Bakos
Kristy Kimball

Justine Hartman
Carol de Bra
Jeff Denkewalter
Bruce Dudley
Susan Frocmke
Fred Woolberton
Steven Brown
Cecil Tindel
Kathie Keim

Jane Solomon
Judy Knight
Dick Dennis
Taylor Grady
Jim Bailey
Leslie Marks
Jane Stecher
Lana Harris

, The Florido ANigator, Thursday,. jepK 9, 1965 y

Page 4

The Florida Alligator
Steve Vaughn Benny Cason
Edi tor Managing Editor

) i 11
Simon Says
1 DEAN LESTER 1 'Jj?| |
Steve has asked me to write a column for inclusion
each week on the editorial page. I appreciate this
opportunity to discuss with the students some of
:$ the outstanding problems, attitudes, ideas andinfor- £
x mation that should concern us. If this column does
no more than to provide one more channel of
communication, it will prove itself worthwhile.
;X The current talk about the need for better com communi
muni communi cation is not new. Barriers to the tidal flow
X; of information and breakdowns in problem solving
$: through persuasion have plagued every generation,
every age bracket and every society.
X; When, as a Professor of Speech, I was asked to
:* become a dean and to concentrate my efforts on
:$ the welfare of students, it seemed to me that this £:
;X was one of the major approaches that should be
made. To that end, I wrote and there was printed
X; in the June 28, 1957,Suipmer Gatorthe following
X; letter:
$: There is little question but what the problem x
£: of communication itself is one of the most x
X; consuming and universally significant concerns
v of our generation. Society has become $:
exceedingly complex, and all segments of it x
£ depend more and more upon intricate com muni- £
£ cation systems. But the heart of these systems
X is always the integrity and temperament of $
:j: the persons sending and receiving the messages. $
No instrument for transmitting ideas can x
successfully convert evil intention into good
purposes. Quite to the contrary, insincerity
and mischief may be magnified when enlarged £:
X; f or public consumption. The radio does not $:
improve the voice nor the language of the
i-j: speaker; it simply transmits it. The telephone
X; does not initiate courtesy nor discourtesy; it : : : :
simply focuses it upon the ear. The newspaper
;X does not make the news; it only reports it. ;*x
g Again the accuracy of the reporting depends*'
X upon the persons involved in the progress of
:g sending, editing and receiving the information. X
For there is to be real understanding among
;X people and groups of people between manage management
ment management and labor, government and citizenry : : : :
jx school administration and student body -- there S
£: must be an honest desire to understand as well S
X; as t 0 be understood, and a willingness to use : x
g: every reasonable and dependable means for S
;X keeping each other well-informed, x*
statement is perhaps even, more timely X
X; today. Certainly it must be underscored that co- x
: : : : operation and understanding of mutual problems
stems not just from the better use of external media S
x: of communication such as the columns of this
newspaper, but from attitudes within the individuals
;X themselves. ; x
Whether or not we have effective mutual under- I
standings on the campus of the University of Florida
depends in large measure upon whether this is what : : :
|X; we want. X

DON Federman

Grumble
he other day (Monday) while cogitating f 0
column ideas (hmm, sounds like a goodprote t
cry for fink Alligator columnists COGITatf
FOR COLUMNS), who should walk into the Allig ato
office (the scene of my cogitations) but that ma/
Mona Lisa, the leader of we the students, that
pace-setter, idealist, and gentleman of the third
floor, Poopie Culpepper.
Well, I bump into him, not noticing him at first.
He smiles. I acknowledge the smile. He tells me
he read my last column and says most humbly (h e
may also have been mocking me, but I think hes
too sincere for condescension), I want you to know
I took your column personally/ Hes still smiling
all the time.
I was floored, needless to say, believe me, deeply
floored. And so I got to thinking, was I too harsh
too cynical about SG (student government)? gy
midnight, the guilt had become unbearable.
Tuesday morning rolls around. I run down to the
Publications business office, straight to the files
where the old Alligators are being stored. My
intention: to look up all the speeches, all the articles
all the things that have been documented for pos posterity
terity posterity on SGs greatest defender all this to
create a PORTRAIT OF A MAN!
It begins on Jan. 27, 1965. Poopie writes his first
column during the heated winter election. He talks
of responsibility, streamlining SG, and discussing
what SG is. His words are few but cogent. He is
from the start, a man of action (whoops, progress).
Only a Cheerio has more go-power than a Culpepper
speech.
The next memorable moment is Feb. 1, 1965
remember it for your childrens sake. In this
column, accompanied by a smiling mug shot, Poopie
talks of the three SGs. The first is as it is, the
second is as it is understood (which is, of course,
different than the one that is), and the third is as
it can be. What follows is some of his great goals,
a progress report of which follows.
1. The straw vote on the trimester (rather
useless since it reflected few graduate student
votes and no faculty people, both groups being
hurt the most by the trimester).
2. A true picture of the voluntary ROTC possi possibilities
bilities possibilities (SG has since failed, as the Alligator has
also, to inform the student body of the 54-50 vote
against voluntary ROTC and that concerted action
could bring an almost immediate vote on the matter).
3. SG stimulating academic atmosphere (a few
on the Zabeeh case later).
4. Re-instituting the student-faculty coffee
hours which have been going on informally for
years.
Poopies final profound utterance came on election
eve. He said that there are going to be some changes
made (no one expects this, except Poopie). He
goes on to say that his is an ACADEMIC com community,
munity, community, populated by PEOPLE. .(truly perceptive
and indicating he has outgrown his football days).
He adds, the ritual of politics for politics sake
must go also (only a frat man could say that).
The next day Poopie wins by 449 votes.
Hes a good sport, though. Jim Harmeling, Freedom
Party loser, is offered to head the SG Tutorial
Program for underprivileged children. Harmeling
is even promised SBOO, then this figure is cut to
SIOO, then to nothing. Early this summer, $16,000
is appropriated out of the reserve fund for handball
court lights. True, the lights are nice and not many
people care about underprivileged children in Alachua
County, but there is such a thing as ethics.. .or
is there -- this wasnt talked about in the campaign.
This summer too saw the Zabeeh and Philosophy
Department cases brought out into the open. It was
obvious that ever, a casual glance at the case
revealed something stank, and a lot of the smell
came from Tigert. But Poopie, totally oblivious
and not even venturing to investigate (such was his
undying faith in ethical behavior), issued a now nowfamous
famous nowfamous statement backing Tigert. Among other
things, he said students should learn to support,
not ridicule; to understand, not agitate. Poopie
dismissed student interest in the Zabeeh case as
a small group of students running a feverish
campaign against any policy of the administration.
And Poopie didnt even bother to come to an open
forum on the case which was attended by 150- -00
students and faculty who braved a cloudburst.
The rest is history. Poopie got us attractive
trash cans, spirit hats, handball court lights, and a
summer frolics. The problems of ROTC, fighting
for a better Lyceum facility in the near future,
allowing all speakers (regardless of ideology) on
campus, the nature of campus political parties,
and the possibility of too much power in the han
of the Administration go untouched, but then
is for service.
And so, I will always think of Poopie, one foot
atop the wooden bench outside the Union, smiling smilingand
and smilingand saying, Dick, my lance, my visor, my spin
hat, my toothbrush, my horse. .
And to think I was telling my friend Da Vtn
the other day, Leo, baby, Monas just too muc



scene on campus

HL
n Jflf 1 ,y- itiifiii iMi ii i
T/// .wl: ftv I m.lKM*jS 1
MILES OF SM/t£S; THEWILES / ANDSMILES )---
Os AEPhi Ellen Miles, amply displayed on sofa.
Students Play Negroes
Augustine Part (From Page One)

By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students have played a part
in the celebration of the 400th
Anniversary of the founding of St.
Augustine, Fla.
Faculty, staff and students were
among the cast and technical crews
associated with the premier sea season
son season of the symphonic drama, Cross
and Sword. Written by noted author
of outdoor drama, Paul Green,
Cross and Sword was presented in
the 400th Anniversary Corporation
amphitheatre, five miles south of
St. Augustine on Anastasia Island.
The drama played nightly except
Friday for three months. All the
color and pageantry of Cross and
Sword, which tells of the first two
years of settlement of the city,
will return to the amphitheatre
stage in June of 1966.
The job of director of Cross and
Sword was given to Dr. L. L.
jZimmerman, director of the Uni University
versity University Theatre Department. Dr.
Elwood Keister, director of the
University Choir, held the position
of director of music for the drama.
Mike Beistle, instructor of CEH
131-132, played in the role of Chief
Oriba, leader of the Timucuan
Indians. Mrs. Margaret Beistle,
Residence Counselor at Rawlings
Hall, portrayed Eva Gonzales, the
Spanish love interest. Sherry Penn,
a graduate student, participated as
a dancer.
Miss Loretta Friedman, a dance
instructor for the University Phy Physical

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sical Physical Education Department, was
also a member of the dancing
troupe. David Petersen, an assis assistant
tant assistant in the speech department,
assumed the responsibilities of
stage manager and Ron Jerit, a
former instructor here, was stage
designer and technical director for
Cross and Sword.
Students having character roles
were Marshall Thomas, Domingo
de Florida; Michael Doyle, Don
Heron de San Vicente, and John
Culligan, King Philips Chamber Chamberlain.
lain. Chamberlain.
Participating as dancers or
singers were students Leo Dryer,
Seth Wright, Ruth Krienke, Kay
Huffmaster, Ann Johnson, Donna
Faxon, John Skye, and Alan Arm Armstrong.
strong. Armstrong.
Holly Howard assisted in the
costuming department. Gerald
Jones was a technical assistant
and Stein Johannsen was assistant
stage manager.
The general manager of the
amphitheatre is Tom Rahner, a
graduate of the University and
former member of the Florida
Players.
Today is the official birthday of
the city which was founded by Don
Pedro Menendez in 1565. For the
past 12 days, there have been
events leading up to the cake cutting
and birthday proclamation which
will conclude festivities tonight.
A 400 pound birthday cake in the
shape of the ancient fortress,
Castillo de San Marcos, has been
created for the occasion.

which is normal under a rush
situation, Schenkman said.
He didnt get to spend very much
time with the boys, he said, be because
cause because as chancellor he had to meet
everyone he could.
Fulton said that the only trouble
he ran into was at the Kappa Alpha
fraternity house. He said he went
over with several friends and
started to fill out a name tag when
one of the KAs approached him
and said, Excuse me, I think
theres a problem. Would you step
outside?
Fulton said he went outside and
the KA told him politely that the
fraternitys charter excluded all
but white Christians. Fulton then
left the fraternity house.
I wasnt hurt very much, he
stated. The guy was polite and I
was impressed that he said it was
a rule of the fraternity and not
something done undercover.
Ed Gross, vice president of KA,
told The Alligator that certain
clauses in our national charter
limit our selectivity to white
Christians.
Our fraternity goes by Presi President
dent President Johnson's ruling, Gross
claimed.
William G. Cross, assistant dean
of men, said this was the first
time a Negro boy has ever gone
through rush as far as he knows.
He said he wasnt aware that the
boys had attended rush functions
last week.
Fulton, who plans to major in
sociology, said UF students have
been very friendly and nice to him.

Thursday / Sept. 9, 1965/ The Florida Alligator,

How To Succeed As
A Freshman Coed
By EUNICE TALL
Alligator Staff Writer
Today's article concludes this years series about hints for fresh freshman
man freshman girls.
To decorate your rooms, don't forget to visit the Florida Union
Print Sale next week where you can buy popular reproductions of famous
paintings.
The Florida Union also sponsors movies every weekend which are
shown in the Medical School Auditorium. The cost is 30 cents ad admission.
mission. admission.
A good breakfast meal is a scrambled egg omlet with bacon and
melted cheese. Specialty of the Food Service.
The campus police are on hand to assist the resident assistants in
their caring for the sick. They will be glad to take you to the infirmary
any time if you need the proper care.
A good place to meet people is through committee work in the Florida
Union or in the dorm.
If you'd like to usher at the Lyceum Council or Florida Players
events, call the respective offices to volunteer.
If you have any further questions on What Every Freshman Girl
Should Know, address a letter to the Florida Alligator, in care of the
Florida Union. There are several experts here, not to mention the
many mature law students who have enjoyed this column.
fe DARN I
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The Browse Shop
THE COLLECTOR John Fowles
A DICTIONARY OF MIND, MATTER AND
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EXISTENTIALISM 4 MODERN LITERATURE
...Davis McEJroy
THE NO PLAYS OF JAPAN Waley
THE LONG CHRISTMAS DINNER Wilder
SEAMARKS St. John Perse
SPIRITUAL SAYINGS OF KAHLIL GIBRAN
TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
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PROBABILITY 4 STATISTICS FOR BUSINESS
DECISIONS Schlaifer {/
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Casnpes Shop & Bookstore

Page 5



Page 6

>, Hie Florida Alligator, Thursday, Sept. 9, 1965

for sale
22 CAL. Sears bolt action with 4X
scope* $35. 12 Gu. HARbolt action.
$45. May accept automatic pistol
In trade. Can Gary t-1400 after
6:00. (A-4-2t-c).
MOPED MOTORBIKE. Excellent
ftransportatloti. SBA English
Bicycle. Good condition. $25. All Allchannel
channel Allchannel Ante pan. sl2. Call 6-2805.
(A-4-2t-c).
MOBILE HOME, 2 bedroom on
large lot. OK Trailer Court. Small
equity and assume small payments.
Phone 372*7798. (A-4-3t-c).
DACHSHUNDS, red, male and fe female,
male, female, 6 months old. 7 champion
pedigree. Suitable for show and
breeding. Make outstanding pets.
Phone 372*7062 after 5:30 p.m.,
2817 NE 15th St. (A-4-2t-c).
28* TRAILER and Cabana. Furn Furnished.
ished. Furnished. Ideal for single person or
married couple. $895. Call 376-
2119. (A-4-3t-c).
MOTORCYCLE. 1963 Yamaha, 250
cc. Blue with white wall tires .Good
condition. $350. Call 376-8863.
(A-3-ts-c).
ALLSTATE Motor scooter, 1958.
Runs good, just overhauled. Needs
a little paint. $95. Phone 2-6019.
CLEANING HOUSE I hpFedders
220 volt window alr-condltloner.
Compressor needs repair. As is,
$25. 2 Hensoldt-Wetzlar 4 power
scopes, sls each, 1 wagon, $3.
1 wheel barrow, $3. Phone 376-
9992, after 6 p.m. (A-3-ts-c).
MOTORCYCLE: 1965 Yamaha, 125
cc. Several months old. Was $530
new, will sacrifice for $395. Call
376-8863. (A-3-ts-c).
GIBSON Electric Guitar and Gibson
amplifier. Hard shell leather case.
$125. CaU Roy, FR 2-9353. (A (A-3-3t-p).
3-3t-p). (A-3-3t-p).

jj k
ox Office Or At The
or...BEFORE SATURDAY 1
STARTS FRIDAY n JS GAINESVILLE
ITS COWBOYS, BRONCS AND BABES!
SSjN BKEUSL**
Bw raw
SSS GAINESVILLE SSSS
e^

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
MOTORCYCLE .Reasonable shape.
Harley Davidson sprint (modified)
s26QtCall or visit Bffl Oswald,
Deltth Slg House. 2-0491. (A-3-
POST OFFICE SCOOTER. Com CompWMI
pWMI CompWMI rebuilt engine, excellent
condition. Great transportation,
rahher shine. Over 1 OOmpgJSacrl OOmpgJSacrlflce.
flce. OOmpgJSacrlflce. Call after 5:00 p.ro. 2-7134.
(A-3-Bt-c).
AUTOMATIC WASHING Machine.
Almost new. Best model Norge.
Only $75. See at 604 N. Main
Street before 5:30 p.m. only. (A (A--1-ts-c).
-1-ts-c). (A--1-ts-c).
1964 HONDA 150, electric starter.
Excellent condition. Best offer
over S3OO. Phone Mrs. Kip, Ext.
2651 or 372-6241 after 6 p.m. for
appointment. (A-l-st-c).
MOTH CLASS Sailboat. Good con condition.
dition. condition. Like newSeldelmann dacron
window sail. Only S2BO complete.
Will be happy to demonstrate. Call
6-9786. (A-l-st-c).
MICROSCOPE. Spencer, monocu monocular,
lar, monocular, excellent condition. With
carrying case and sub-stage lamp.
$245. Phone 372-3572. (A-l-st-c).
lost & found,
LO6T: 3 month old Siamese kit kitten.
ten. kitten. Female. Might be wearing
blue collar. If you know anything,
or saw, please phone FR 2-9591
between 8:30-5:00. (L-4-lt-c).
personal
FREE KITTENS 2 males, one
yellow, one gray. Call 2-6018 after
5:30 p.m. (J-l-tf-nc).

services
RAME* HAIR STYLING, 319 W.
University Avenue. Four operators
specialising in every farm of
beauty culture. We also sell ancfc ancfcservice
service ancfcservice wigs. Free parking in
Longs Cafeteria parking lot. For
appointment call 372-5549. (M-l (M-l---ts-c)
--ts-c) (M-l---ts-c)
MOTHERS care and guidance In
private borne for infants and pre preschoolers.
schoolers. preschoolers. If interested dial 6-7673
for appointment for interview. (M (M---l-stc).
--l-stc). (M---l-stc).
SKY DIVING: Licensed instruction,
equipment rental, low rates,chute
automatic. For information call
Dave Henson 6-9221, Room 691.
(M-l-st-c).
PROFESSIONAL TYPING done In
my borne. 12 years experience.
Medical Terminology passed. On
approved Graduate list. Students,
graduate students, offices on
campus call Mrs. Lyons any anytime,
time, anytime, 6-7160. (M-4-4t-c).
SEPTEMBER 9th AND 10thONLY:
Free hair cut with shampoo and
set. Must bring clipping. Tena at
Rame, 319 W. University Ave.
Phone 372-5549. (M-4-2t-c).
EXPERIENCED hand ironer will
do your Ironing in my home. 413
SW 3rd Avenue. Phone 372-1177.
(M-3-2t-c).
for rent
AIR-CONDITIONED, wood paneled,
efficiency apartment. Walking dis distance
tance distance from UF. 1,2, or 3 Juniors
Seniors or graduate students. Call
Charlie Mayo, FR 6-4471. (B (B-4-3t-c).
4-3t-c). (B-4-3t-c).
ONE BEDROOM Furnished Lake
cottage. Lake Winnott, 23 miles
from Gainesville. Lake privileges.
Two trimester lease. S4O monthly.
Call Mr. Kaplan 372-0481. (B (B--1-ts-c).
-1-ts-c). (B--1-ts-c).
FURNISHED lake cottage on Lake
Winnott. 23 miles from Gainesville
3 bedrooms, 2 bath. SBS per month.
Two trimester lease. Call Mr.
Kaplan 372-0481. (B-l-ts-c).
TWO BEDROOM Furnished
apartment. 319 N. W. Ist Street
Suitable for three. $65 monthly
for 3, $75 for 2. Two trimester
lease. Call Mr. Kaplan 372-0481.
(B-l-ts-c).

HmwowT
9:52

autos
1965 CORVETTE Sting Ray. 5500
miles. Silver/red. 165 hp. AM AMFM,
FM, AMFM, white walls. Posit 3.70. Call
378-4678. (G-4-3t-c).
MUST SELL: 1965 Monza. Air Airconditioned,
conditioned, Airconditioned, automatic transmis transmission.
sion. transmission. Still under factory warranty.
Call 376-0794. (G-4-3t-p).
1954 CHEVROLET Bel-Aire.
Four door sedan. Exceptionally
clean, fine lookffig. Very good
condition throughout. S2OO. Call
376-4736, after S:3O. (G-4-3t-c).
1958 FORD VW Red and white.
Power brakes, power steering,
radio and heater. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Call 372-9732 after 5:00.
(G-4-st-c).
1961 RAMBLER, 4 door, straight
shift. Four new tires, radio,
heater. Good condition. Call Fred
Neal at 378-4767, Thursdays after
5 or weekends. (G-3-st-p).
1952 DODGE. Good transporta transportation.
tion. transportation. $95. Phone 376-7910. (G (G---3-3t-p).
--3-3t-p). (G---3-3t-p).
1961 VOLKSWAGEN. Radio,
heater, white walls, sun Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition, dean. $995. 14
NW 13th Street after noon or call
2-8978. (G-3-st-c).
1964 VOLKSWAGEN SEDAN.
Exceptionally good condition. Ser Serviced
viced Serviced regularly by owner. Priced
for quick sale $1395. Call 376-
8863. (G-3-ts-c).
1963 MG 1100 sports sedan. Low
milage. Excellent condition. Only
$895. Call 376-8863. (G-13-ts-c).
1962 CHRYSLER 300. Com Completely
pletely Completely loaded. Good condition.
Less than wholesale. Call 376-
4404 or 376-4201. (G-3-st-c).
1965 VOLVO, P 1800. Brand new,
including air-conditioning. Less
than dealer cost. Call 376-4404
or 376-4201. (G-3-st-c).
1961 VOLKSWAGEN, 28,000 miles.
Radio, heater, whitewalls. Very
clean. SBSO. Call 376-3563 after
6 p.m. (G-2-st-c).
1960 SIMCA, Deluxe Grand Large.
25,000 miles. Excellent condition.
White wall tires, two-toned white
and blue exterior. Call 372-8735.
(G-2-st-c).
1962 AUSTIN HEALEY 3,000 Mark
H SI6OO. Call 372-4113, after 5
p.m. (G-l-ts-c).
1960 DODGE, actual miles 38,000
Second set of tires are brand new.
Four door, white, standard trans transmission,
mission, transmission, economy six cylinder,
excellent condition. Only $550. Call
2-9607 or 2-3251. (G-l-ts-c).

autos
1964 TR-4, immaculate condition,
low milage, fully'equipped. White
with blue interior. Will sacrifice.
Call 376-8714. (G-l-st-c).
1959 SPRITE. SSOO or best otter.
Inquire Apt. 35, Colonial Manor
Apts, between 4-6 p.m.(G-l-st-c).
wanted
DESPERATE: Need a place to
live. Would like to share apart apartment
ment apartment with female roommate. Call
Claire, 378-2238 or 378-2602. (C (C---43tc).
--43tc).tc). (C---43tc).
ROOMMATE WANTED: 2 bedroom
apartment. SBS per month- 3 ways.
See Tom or Ted at 319 NW Ist
Street, Apartment #l. (C-3-3t-c)i
FEMALE ROOMMATE. Share\
house, own bedroom. Deposits
paid, utilities 3 ways. $45 monthly.
Must have own transportation. 4401
SW 13th Street (5 min. from Univ.)
378-4371. (C-2-ts-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE. One bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment. sss.ooper month.
1824 N. W. 3rd Place, Apartment
11. (C-l-st-c).
help wanted
PART-TIME student help, serving
line. Longs Cafeteria; 313 W.
University Ave. Call 376-4992. Mr.
Ambrose. (E-2-st-p).
STUDENTS NEEDED to assist
manager. QUALIFICATIONS: (1)
U of F student in good academic
standing. (2) Can work evenings.
(3) Can work 18-22 hours per t
week. $35.00 per week salary (S9O
on full-time basis). Call Mr.
Malaghan at 8-2966 between 9:00
and SK)O. (E-l-ts-c).
PART-TIME Secretary for Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday and Thursday. Typing
required. Experience preferred.
Am>ly Hillel Foundation, 16 NW
18th Street or call 372-2900. (E (E---4-3t-c).
--4-3t-c). (E---4-3t-c).
CARRIERS WANTED Mr routes
on and adjacent to campus. Call
GAINESVILLE SUN 378-1411. (E (E---4-7t-c).
--4-7t-c). (E---4-7t-c).
SUBURBIA
Drive-In Theatre
N.W. 13th St. 372-9523
f' 4
Now Showing
INDISCREET
Also-Hit #2
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wist Premium Round Steak 79$ lb. I
Grade A Whole Fryers. . .29$ lb. I
vdft Premium Chuck Roast 49$ lb. I
1/2 lb. Cello Bag Weiners 99$ lb. I
'resh Picnic Pork Roast. .... .39$ lb. I
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nMBMI MB

The Florida

v
Gator Safety Bennett
S£
Is All-America Pick

By BRUCE DUDLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Safety man Bruce Bennett is one
of few bright spots on the Florida
football team's defensive unit
which is shaping up as Coach Ray
Graves' biggest problem.
Defensive captain Bennett re reports
ports reports its too early to tell if the
Gators secondary will be able to
repeat again this year as one of
the best in the nation.
However, if Bennett comes
through with an average perfor performance
mance performance in each game, the Florida
squad wont have to worry too
much. Last year, Bennett was
second only to middle guard Bill
Richbourg in tackles.
The Gator defensive specialist
has also intercepted eight passes
to tie a school record held by
Jimmy Dunn, and is also tied with
Dunn and Waiter Mayberry for
most interceptions in a single sea season
son season with six.
Bennett has already been men mentioned
tioned mentioned on several All-America
lists as a safety man, and Coach
Graves has been pleased with his
work at practice even though he
hasn't been Intercepting too many
passes.
In the Gators' scrimmage game
Saturday, Bennett almost picked
off a pass with a clear shot at the
opponents' end zone, but the ball
bounced in and out of his arms.
You played that just right, but
you should have been in the end
zone with it, said Defensive Back Backfield
field Backfield Coach Billy Klnard when
Bennett returned to the bench.
However, there was no need to
worry as the B-team kicked to the
varsity, and Allen Trammel ran
the ball back 63 yards for the
Gators. Trammell also ran
another punt back 65 yards for a
touchdown during the scrimmage.
Bennett and Trammell are help helped
ed helped out in the backfleld by George
Grandy, Hal Seymour, Bobby
Downs and monster" Dick Kirk.
Graves reports that the secon secondary
dary secondary and the linebackers have been
performing as he expected at this
time, but says the secondary have
been forced to make too many
tackles after men have broken
through the defensive line.
Im not worried about the sec secondary,
ondary, secondary, but they usually cant
manage to stop a big man before
hes picked up six or eight yards
because they're so small," re reports

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Page 7

i Thursday, Sspl. 9, 1965,

ports reports the Florida coach.
Graves has a lot of reason to
say he has confidence in his
secondarys tackling with Bennett
being the last Gator between an
opponent's runner and the end eone.
Last year the Southeastern coaches
voted Bennett the best safetymun
in Hie conference, and he made Hie
second team of the Associated

.... jf :;y|aK
am mjtf
>.;
/£X v
BRUCE BENNETT: Key To Gator Defense
Independent Murals Offers
Multiple Sport Program

By ERNIE UTZ
Alligator Staff Writer
UF Intramurals for the men's
dormitories will start with table
tennis in Hume, Graham and Tol Tolbert
bert Tolbert Areas, and with tennis in
Murphree Area.
Dormitory intramurals, which
has rapidly become more rabid and

Press* defensive All-American
team.
**lt*s just too early to tell bow
good we are/* he reports. We'll
have to wait until we really start
playing somebody.**
Bennett was slowed down Toes*
day with a sprained muscle, M
Is expected bad: In shape soon.

enthusiastic among male students
over the past several years, pro promises
mises promises to bring an even larger,
more active crowd of participants
this year.
Other sports to be played this
fall by the dorms Include football,
handball and basketball.
Last year's winners for each
sport are as follows: Table Ten*
nls: Hume, Yocum; Tolbert,
East I; Graham, Newln. TeonlSi
Murphree, Murphree G.
Football: Hume, Yocum; Tol Tolbert,
bert, Tolbert, Tolbert 0; Graham, Bless;
Murphree, Thomas G. Handball:
Hume, Blgham; Tolbert, Weaver
I; Graham, Atkins; Murphree,
Thomas G. Basketball: Hume,
Turlington; Tolbert, East 1; Gra Graham,
ham, Graham, Bless; Murphree, Murphree
B.
In Independent League Action
sports to be played will be bowl bowling,
ing, bowling, handball, football and volley volleybalL
balL volleybalL Winners here last year were:
Bowling, Physics; Handball, Latin
AmerlcaiA; Football, Newman
Club, and Volleyball, Flavet I.
The Engineering and Law Lea Leagues
gues Leagues will play football and volley volleybalL
balL volleybalL



, The Florida Alligator/ Thursday, Sept. 9, 1965

Page 8

BRUCE F^%
Dudley Jkt*m
ALLIGATOR COLUMNIST
Q efensive players have the numbers stacked against them when
it comes to getting honors of the All-America variety or any
other kind.
The numbers belong to Florida sports publicity man Norm Carlson
and are part of a study he made while handling publicity for Auburn.
Edwin Pope, assistant sports editor of The Miami Herald, brought
attention to Carlsons number system in a column earlier this week,
and closer attention has been given to the Gators jerseys since that
time.
The whole system is actually quite simple. Carlson simply found
that the majority of spectators at a football game remember the
players whose jersey numbers end in a zero or a five or have a
double number, such as 11, 20 or 35.
However, the magic number system has left many of the defensive
personnel out in the cold with odd numbers. Carlson admitts that
there are exceptions to the system that he used at Auburn before
coming to Florida.
A good example is defensive safetyman Bruce Bennett who is
attached to number 14. Bennett wore number 14 in high school at
Valdosta, Ga., and when he came to Florida he asked for the same
number and got it.
. Bennett has already been mentioned as a possible All-America
in defensive ranks even with the off-beat number.
The familiar 89 which is usually connected with end Charles
Casey is another example, except for the fact that Casey hasnt
been wearing 89 in practice but has exchanged it for the magic 35.
He just wanted to be with the right crowd, explains Carlson,
with a grin.
Last year, 35 and Floridas first All-America back Larry Dupree
went together.
This year there are also several good Florida prospects who
will be wearing magic numbers arranged by Carlson. The most
obvious is quarterback Steve Spurrier and number 11. Other players
with Carlson-touched numbers include Jack Harper, 33; Jimmy
Jordan, 20; Larry Beckman, 66; Richard Trapp, 44.
Carlson also had offensive end Barry Brown dressed out in number
80, but then it was decided to put offensive ends in odd numbers so
Brown became 87. Sophomore defensive end Brian Jetter became 80
so great things can be expected from him this year. Maybe the change
was made because coaches thought Brown was so good he didnt need
the number, but there has been no comment to this effect.
Finally, this number system probably seems to be a big joke and
even Carlson will laugh about it on the practice field. But the fact
remains that seven Auburn players who Carlson assigned magic
numbers are now playing professional ball.
This is a pretty good average in any numbers game.
Yanks Rehire Johnny Keane
NEW YORK (UPI) The New York Yankees, struggling through
their worst season in 40 years, Wednesday rehired manager Johnny
Keane for 1966.
The announcement of Keanes retention came as the Yankees
were wallowing in a seven-game losing streak, their longest in 12
years, and were on the brink of being mathematically eliminated
from the American League pennant race.
Keane replaced Yogi Berra as the Yankees pilot after leading
the St. Louis Cardinals to the National League pennant and victory
over the Yankees in the World Series last year.
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Florida Rifles Look
For New Frosh Talent

By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Staff Writer
Men Have you often dreamed
of leading UF to victory in the
intercollegiate athletics field?
Probably so, but like many
others, youve probably found the
spirit willing, but the flesh weak.
Now theres a sport for everyone
except chain smokers and heavy
drinkers.
All thats necessary to be on
UF Army ROTC Rifle Team is a
steady trigger finger. The first
meeting of the Florida Rifles
is tonight at 7:30 in Room 16 of
the Military Building.
Recruits Wanted
In Cross Country
The only major inter-collegiate
sport which competes in the fall
besides football is cross country.
Gator coach Jimmy Carnes, who
aims to put UF on the map in both
track and cross country, is looking
for more recruits for the 1965
team.
Were interested in getting a
lot more freshmen and upperclass upperclassmen
men upperclassmen out for the squad, Carnes
said. However, we want people
who are willing to work. If they
dont want to, they need not come
out.
The team works out briefly each
morning with an intensive session
in the afternoon. This is necessary
since the men run from three to
five miles in varsity competition.

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i ii 1 ' *t,

MEETING TONIGHT

Major Harvey M. Dick, advisor
to the Rifle Squad, feels that if
you like being on a winning outfit,
this is the year to join the ROTC
Rifles.
Most of last years top guns,
along with several promising pros prospects,
pects, prospects, are returning. Toby Muir,
last years No. 1 shot, joins Lee
Young, the No. 2 rifle, Major
Dick enthused.
In addition, Pat Gravely, the
top shot two years ago, is back.
Freshman Bill Waugh, a talented
Olympic tryout, should be a big
help this year, Dick continued.
The Florida Rifles, fresh from a
resounding triumph in the 1964
All-Florida Rifle Meet, have a
schedule of 20 tough meets for

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the coming season.
The Shootin Gators take dead I
aim oh such opponents as Missis- I
sippi, Auburn. Citadel, Miami, I
Florida State, Georgia, Florida 1
A & M. They will find themselves
barreling down the road toward
home and home encounters with
many of these schools.
We consider the Rifle Team
as important as any other sport
at the University of Florida. The
fierce competition involved is good
for young men, Dick commented.
The Rifle Team practices on the
UF Rifle Range. Meets are held
at the Gainesville Police Station.
All participants are exempt from
attending drill.