Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida Alligator

Fall Term Opens UF's 113th Year

Orientation
Shows Frosh
Where To Go
By FRAN SNIDER
Alligator Staff Writer
The largest orientation program
in the history of the UF was con concluded
cluded concluded last week with the new
freshmen going to their first lec lectures.
tures. lectures.
The C-l and C-3 departments
presented introductory lectures on
Thursday and Friday to approxi approximately
mately approximately 2,700 students. The stu students
dents students were required to read sev several
eral several books over the summer in
preparation for the courses.
Student Director of Orientation
Frank Glinn, ILW, and Orientation
Director Bill Cross directed the
136 group leaders throughout the
week. The program was compress compressed
ed compressed into a three day schedule. In
past years, orientation has covered
a five-day period.
This may have been too difficult
for the orientees, Glinn com commented.
mented. commented. He said the program will
be evaluated later by a committee
headed by Cross.
Some groups had to go directly
from one meeting to another and
it was rather hectic,*' Glinn said.
The 3,400 freshmen and transfer
students went to orientation activi activities
ties activities including a student affairs for forum,
um, forum, the presidents welcome, men
and womens forums, and various
academic testing.
Glinn said the only confusion
during the program involved a mix mixup
up mixup with registration times. But
we were able to make adjust adjustments,
ments, adjustments, he claimed.
The orientation group leaders
and 30 staff personnel stood out
from the rest of the campus with
their Spirit cap, straw hats
banded with orange and blue, which
will be sold at the football games.
Glinn said that special credit
should go to Byron Groves, asso associate
ciate associate director for traffic and group
control, and Mike Berke, associ-
ate director for office and technical
help. He also commended John
(See Orientation p. 12.)

Gone: Those Lazy Hazy Days Os Summer

a welcome, and a little advice

fiTbe Alligator wishes to add a hearty welcome
U|to the University of Florida class of *69.
- As a freshman, youve probably already re received
ceived received greetings, warnings and advice from every everyone
one everyone this side of Yeehaw Junction. Or maybe it
just seems that way.
At any rate, the greetings are finished now nowand
and nowand the wort begins.
We do have a few specific suggestions, namely:
0 Study consistently. Set up regular study
times for each course and follow this schedule
day-in, day-out. If you study consistently, you
wont be frantically attempting to make up lost
time when exams begin.
0 If you are a slow reader, go to the UFs

Vol. 58, No. 1

GETTING ACQUAINTED: Freshman Sandy Sadler, UF Campus
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University of Florida, Gainesville

speedreading clinic. Even if you are a better betterthan-average
than-average betterthan-average reader, the reading clinic can help
you. You'll find reading speed and comprehension
may be the key to better grades, or the difference
between passing and falling.
0 Take advantage of tutoring services on cam campus.
pus. campus. If youre having difficulty with a particular
course, ask your professor abort tutoring.
0 Dont be afraid to ask questions. Professors,
registrars, campus police and all other UF em employees
ployees employees are here for your benefit.
0 Always remember your primary purpose
for being here: to get an education. Dont be side sidetracked
tracked sidetracked by less important, but perhaps more in interesting,
teresting, interesting, diversions.

By DREX DOBSON
Alligator Staff Writer
*
Summer activity hastened with
the onslaught on the Fall trimester,
but the lazy, hazy days eked out
meager news to make the Spring
trimester one of success, disap disappointment
pointment disappointment and acclaim.
A record of some 6,800 students
registered for the trimester.
Bill Fleming, administrative as assistant
sistant assistant to UF Student Body PresU
dent Bruce Culpepper, died from
Injuries received in an automobile
wreck in April.
Edward Richer, controversial
former huma nll ie s instructor,
continued the case of his disputed
dismissal from the faculty.
(See SUMMER on P. 12)

Monday Se/>f. 15^5

Enrollment
Record Eyed
By Officials
The UP' begins its 113th educa educational
tional educational year today with the beginning
of fall trimester classes.
The 2,000-acre campus has been
invaded by an invasion of more
than 16,500 students. The record
enrollment of 15,701 was estab established
lished established last fall, but is certain to
be surpassed as the student popu population
lation population total moves steadily toward
the 20,000 level predicted by 1970.
Seven major construction pro projects,
jects, projects, valued at nearlysl7 million,
are in various stages of progress,
ranging from the newly completed
married students housing village
($1,567,000) on SW 13th St., where
208 units are now available, to
initial groundwork on the spacious
College of Engineering complex
($5,354,0Q0) and childrens psy psychotic
chotic psychotic unit ($898,400).
The four-story classroom build building
ing building ( $1,388,500), just south of Ti Tigert
gert Tigert Hall, is being rushed toward a
January opening and the $4,490,000
Florida Union is on schedule for
its mid- 1966 completion.
The heart of the Florida campus
is filled with the sounds of struc structural
tural structural toll with both the graduate
research library ($1,786,700) and
chemistry research unit
($1,425,000) jobs in full swing.
Bidding is expected later this
year and in early 1966 for a new
College of Law complex, a multi multistory
story multistory dormitory and expansion of
Florida Fields east side stands to
give the stadium 56,000 seats.
University President J. Wayne
Reitz is especially pleased over
receipt of three major grants to totaling
taling totaling $5.98 million.
**Within the past year, the Uni University
versity University has received substantial
financial support from both federal
and private agencies,*, Ur. Reitz
noted, referring to the recent $4.24
million awarded by the National
Science Foundation, $1.19 million
from the National Aeronautics and
Space Administration for a new
space sciences research building
(See DOORS on P. 15)

Frothman Girls
First W**k
See story on p. 10
V / ~



Page 2

z The Florida Alligator/ Monday, Sept. 6, 1965

Deadline Set
Homecoming
Queen Contest
Entries in the University of
Floridas 1965 Homecoming
Sweetheart Contest will be ac accepted
cepted accepted until 5 p.m. on Sept. 9,
Chairman A. J. Barrance has
announced.
The annual event, one of the high highlights
lights highlights of the Universitys festive
Homecoming weekend calendar, is
scheduled at the University Inn at
7:30 p.m. on Sept. 17 and at Cypress
Gardens the following day from 10
a.m. until 3 p.m.
Contestants must be full-time
students with a 2.0 overall average
academic
at the Uni UniiMi
iMi UniiMi versity unless
gs they are first tri tri
tri mester freshmen.
Organizations
K sponsoring girls
HP in the competition
Mary must submit a sls
entry fee along with the application
form to the Florida Blue Key of office,
fice, office, Room 314, Florida Union,
prior to the Sept. 9 deadline.
The initial judging at the Uni University
versity University Inn will be in evening
gowns. The Cypress Gardens por portion
tion portion of the two-day even will in include
clude include personality and swim suit
judging, as well as a photographic
session at the famed showplace
near Winter Haven.
From the anticipated starting
roster of 40 coeds, judges will
choose three finalists at Cypress
Gardens. The successor to 1964
Sweetheart Mary Arliskas of
Clearwater will reign over Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming activities here Oct. 15-16
and will receive a tuition scholar scholarship
ship scholarship from the Royal Crown Cola
Company.
Slogan theme for this years
reunion of alumni is Gators Cheer
Floridas 400th Year, in line with
St* Augustines quad rice ntennlal
celebration.

Betsys Still A Threat
j
(From Wires of United Press International)
Hurricane Betsy, packing winds of 125 miles an hour, was des described
cribed described as both powerful and stationary last night.
Small craft from Cape Kennedy to Sandy Hook, New Jersey, have
been advised to stay in port, and seas are running from six to ten
feet offshore. Tides are one to three feet above normal from the
upper east Florida coast to the North Carolina coast.
There are still no indications as to the track of the large hurri hurricane,
cane, hurricane, which is centered near latitude 28.7 north and longitude 75.4
west.
Dr. Schweitzer Dies
s : r ", a .v-' \
Nobel Peace Prize winner Dr. Albert Schweitzer died last night
right in the jungle hospital he founded over 50 years ago.
Schweitzer, after being bedridden for 10 days, died and was buried
in the small cemetery of the hospital, next to his wife Helena.
They arrived at Lambarene, Gabon, in 1913 to establish a medical
center and later a hospital.
Schweitzer turned his back on a brilliant career in music, theo theology
logy theology and philosophy to take up work among African lepers in Equa Equatorial
torial Equatorial Africa. His action appeared to reflect his basic belief in what
Schweitzer termed Reverence for life.**
A picturesque figure, with a mane of white hair, Schweitzer was
described by his friends as the greatest humanitarian of his time.
Recognition of his achievements came in 1952 when he was awarded
the Nobel Peace Prize.
St. Augustine Anniversary
Dignitaries from Spain, Latin America and the United States
gathered in St. Augustine yesterday to help celebrate the 400th
anniversary of the nations oldest city.
Gov. Haydon Burns, U. S. Sen. Spessard Holland and Interior-
Secretary Stewart Udall were among those attending the ceremonies.
About 15 Negroes, consisting mostly of teenagers, picketed a
luncheon at the Monson Motor Lodge, where part of the day's cere ceremonies
monies ceremonies took place. It was the second day of marching by young Ne Negroes,
groes, Negroes, who were protesting the exclusion of members of their race
from the celebration.
They marched peacefully without incidents.

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Pauline Popoff, the girl with the
unusual name, is a sophomore from
North Miami. A member of Alpha
Epsilon Phi sorority, Pauline plans
to major in speech therapy.

Flunk Rate Wont Change

By CAROL de BRA
Staff Writer
UF officials expect the same percentage of begin beginning
ning beginning freshmen to flunk out this year as did last.
Last year, of 2,800 beginning freshmen approximate approximately
ly approximately 4.5 per cent withdrew before the end of the first
term and 2.4 per cent were suspended at the end of
the term.
After late registration ends for this term it is ex expected
pected expected there will be 3,350 students composing the
freshman class. To remain at the UF each of these
students must pass more than one-half of the hours

UF Library
Will Change
Name In 66
UFs University Library will be become
come become the College Library with the
dedication of the new research
library in 1966, according to Dr.
Margaret K. Goggin, assistant di director
rector director of university libraries.
The main reason for the name
change, which will be formalized
with the estimated completion and
dedication date of August 1966, is
to avoid confusion between univer university
sity university libraries, Dr. Goggin said.
Dr. Goggin added, Either lib library
rary library could technically be called
the university library since both
will be under the control of the
Committee of University Lib Libraries.
raries. Libraries.
Approximately 100,000 volumes
of books will remain in the College
Library which will consist of cas casual
ual casual reading material, periodicals
and reference books.
The College Library will stress
undergraduate reference work and
the research library will primar primarily
ily primarily be for graduate students.

PALANS CUBANA
I THE FAMOUS
I "MISTER SANDWICH" of Gainesville in....
CAROLYN PLAZA
(Across from campus on W. University Ave.)
I FEATURES
I FREE (Just the fastest service for the student on the go)
I DINING IN Delivery And Take Out of:
I THE MOST DELICIOUS SANDWICHES IN THE AREA
FEATURING ALL VARIETIES OF:
I SUBMARINES, HEROES, WEDGES, HOAGYS, AND REGULARS
I ALL ON A CHOICE OF DELICIOUS BREADS (FRESH EACH DAY)
I HOT ROAST BEEF IN NATURAL GRAVY
I THE FAMOUS CUBANA (3 MEAT TREAT) ££*
I ITALIAN SUBS, LOADED 7%t
I RIB EYE STEAK SANDWICHS 7St
I THE BEST TASTING BAR-B-Q
I
I HOT DOGS ALL WAYS ACa
I SIDE DISHES AND
I 49 OTHER GREAT SANBWIi~hf<;
I CALL OR VISIT
ALANS CUBANA
I "BEST IN DIXIE
I U. of Fs Favorite For 6 Years
I vj ,N CAROLYN PLAZA
I 1620 W. University Ave. p, loco Q 199 n
LPhone 6-1252 or 8-1230

6.9 PER CENT TO GO AFTER 1 TERM

he attempts. Physical Education is excludedfr
If this is not done, the student becomes oneofthi
6.9 per cent that leave after the first trimester
Students may become dropped- students statistics
in other ways. Any student dropped from a course
because of excessive absences will be suspendedfron
the UF if the class suspension reduces his total course
load to below the minimum number of required hours
Transfer students, as well as previous UF students
who have received grades in 48 semester hours of
work from any college or university must maintains
2.0 average here.

l DhIMTO LLGIN l
SHHj Here is a masterpiece of design. Twelve BHB
HHffi shimmering diamonds surround the face HH
of this magnificent 17-jewel F.lgin. Case
of rich 14K gold. $69 95 HB
CONVENIENT TERMS Isl
l^Eas^BH2KsHnH3H3HiUni^^Ave!i



I Hi

mgm MM
I
f
LOPEZ

Nancy Jane
School of Dance
NOW REGISTERING FAU CLASSES
TAP* ACROBATIC'BALLET* BATON
For Information, Call 372-2589
->> ,_

o /
NAMES EVERY COLLEGIAN SHOULD KNOW
IJ6 8&
f DESIGNS, INC.
v**'* 09
MuMfi, *=* a 1 \~il
*** Vk
N
beltsltd. s\ j= 'l hu 1 I
& r ffIDONIGANs||
S V lii --^l9-58^ j V I
** v ffc f / '*J '
- r--- -. ..-, .. ,-
The com P^ e f e curriculum of correct names in college clothing
4rt /W\ uJ t is located just 1-1/2 blocks from campus, at 1123 W. Univer Univer"
" Univer" sity Ave., where Bill Donigan and the rest of the Donigan's
family are waiting to welcome you back to Gainesville and to
- v the store which sets the UF standard for style and good taste.

MANCINI

Symphony, Mancini, Lopez
Top Lyceum Entertainment

Let Me Entertain You should
be the theme song for this years
Lyceum Council which has sche scheduled
duled scheduled over 30 attractions to come
to campus during the coming school
year.
Henry Mancini, Trini Lopez, and
the Chicago Symphony are just
three of the attractions which will
come to campus this fall.
Other entertainment scheduled
thus far includes a large cross
section of concerts With several
soloists, a large orchestra, a ser series
ies series of chamber music, and a ballet.
In the past the Lyceum Council
has presented Ferrante and
Teicher, the Chad Mitchell Trio,
Peter, Paul and Mary, Dave
Brubeck, Shelley Berman, the
Philadelphia Orchestra, and the
San Francisco Ballet, to mention
just a few.
Students may look forward this
year to Henry Mancini on Septem September
ber September 25 and Trini Lopez on October
29.
The Lyceum Council which is

Monday, Sept. 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

x jjjk v
H f jjfl
MITCHELL
responsible for providing this
entertainment is a non-profit or organization
ganization organization set up for the purpose
of bringing cultural entertainment
to campus.
UF students can take advantage

of most of the entertainment simply
by presenting their student activity
fee cards and attaining reserved
seat tickets. There is a charge
for some of the performances but
most are paid for by the Council
which gets its money from a small
percentage of the student activity
fee.
The Lyceum Council has many
responsibilities which include
choosing the entertainment, pro providing
viding providing the facilities for the
entertainer, distributing tickets,
and taking care of the entertainer
and the show in general.
QUESTION: How is the UF dif different
ferent different than you thought it would be?
CLAIRE HAILEY
CLAIRE TYLANDER, lUC: "I
expected to be more on my own, but
the big sisters go out of their way
to* be helpful. Life in the girls'
dorm is like one big slumber
party."
JIM HAILEY, JR., lUC; "The
general atmosphere of campus life
motivates additional studying. The
girls are more sociable and easy
to become acquainted with than I
thought they would be."
BLUME PAM
PAM THOMAS, lUC: "The uni university
versity university is not as impersonal as I >
had heard. Everybody is so
friendly."
JOHN BLUME, lUC: "I find
the upper classmen are very help helpful.
ful. helpful. They take more time and in interest
terest interest in the freshmen than I
thought they would."
K/ flflt
KAY CONLEY
KAY CRAIG, lUC: "There are
a lot more guys than I thought there
would be. Otherwise it's pretty
much as I expected."
BILL CONLEY, lUC: "I was
surprised to find that most of the
students here are friendlier and
eager to help than 1 expected."

Page 3



, The Florido Alligator, Monday, SepP. 6, 1965

Page 4

_ 1 and bookstore I
THE OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA BOOKSTORE I
ADJOINING THE HUB I
- -! HH
BRANCH STORES MEDICAL CENTER, BROWARD, TRI SHOP & JENNINGS I
HB
r
_ l
I SELF SERVICE 1
OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY t \ I
TEXTBOOKS & SUPPLIES r\
USED l NEW TEXTBOOKS M
THOUSANDS OF PAPERBACKS V/J l^jL
THE BEST Os EVERYTHING AT THE LOWEST PRICES
V Check Our List For Your Needs
: f
TEXTBOOKS NE.W AND USED 111
ARCHITECTURAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES .
ART SUPPLIES MAGAZINES AND PAPER BOUND BOOKS ~ ^^^l
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STUDY LAMPS '
FLORIDA RECORD ALBUMS
GYM OUTFITS
NORCROSS GREETING CARDS
SWEATSHIRTS
/ COLLEGE JEWELRY AND CLASS RINGS
COLLEGE PETS v.u\oi kiinw
COLLEGE SEAL WRI VIrSJ? U^ MENT BY SCHAEFFER PARKER, ESTERBROOK,
OULLtGt StAL ___ r ; NORMA, SCRIPTO AND PAPERMATE
s>-> r ... Z"~' . .
w MASCOT STATIONERY PENNANTS AND DECALS
)
FILM AND DEVELOPING SERVICE COMPLETE LINE OF GENERAL SUPPLIES
*. DRUGS AND SUNDRIES
I TEXTBOOK PRICE POLICY
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USED BOOKS SOLD AT 25% DISCOUNT FROM NEW BOOK PRICE
ws PAY iO% £ N To e s A £ T E rs ood condition if
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GET YOUR BOOKS AND SUPPLIES ONTaMPOT aND SAVE



Yonge Named Test Center

The Association for Childhood
Education has selected the P. K.
Yonge Laboratory School oftheUF
as one of 10 special test centers
established throughout the United

IT F & COUNTRY CLUB |
* H
Announcing Social membership for Students ../ I
21 years of age or over. I
S2O each trimester. I
Swimming Pool Sailing I
Locker Room 2 Championship I
Tennis Courts I
Entertainment I
Nightly I
TUMBLEWEED RANCH I
MICANOPY Phone 466-3151 I

y
iGold Coast Restaurant
I Specials Every Day of Choice Dishes Except Saturday; Closed All Day Saturday I
I Hours 5:45 A.M. to 11:00 P.M. Sunday through Friday I
Dinners Fresh Pastries including
709 ri,,k Stonlr 95c Donuts, Sweet Rolls, and Many Others.
I 85C Variety of Sundry Items: I
I Pork Chop" 95 < Shaving Cream p> f fee
I Fried Chicken 85< After Shave Lotion SchoolSoppl.es |
All Above Orders Served With t Razor Blades Handkerchiefs
Vegetables, Rolls & Butter Shoe Polish Toothbrushes
I Spaghetti with Salad, Rolls & Butter 60c J Many Other of These Items Here For You.
I Ph. 2-6160 Located Across From Fletcher Dorm 1720 W. Univ. Ave.l
188
Iml o. f ..>;* - j* _____ 'V "
Wm . i jflg;

States and Canada.
Equipment and supplies for
Childrens use in homes, pre preschool
school preschool facilities and schools will
be tested and evaluated in actual

use at the centers.
The Association for Childhood
E d % u cat io n is an
organization dealing with children
aged two through 12.

Monday. Sept. 6, 1965, The Florida Aiiigator,


ORCHESIS: Tuesday, 7 p.m.. at Womens' Gym. Closed business
meeting.
SWIM FINS, AQUA GATORS: Today, 7 p.m., Room 201 of Florida
Gym.
: i. % T--
ARTS AND SCIENCES DAMES: Wednesday, 8 p.m., at home of
Mrs. Clark Cross, 5016 N. W. 20th Place. Call Reta Boyd at 6-9096
for further information.
BENTON ENGINEERING COUNCIL: Today, 7:30 p.m., Room 319
of the Engineering Building. All delegates and Society Chairmen
are required to attend. All engineering students welcome.
INTERNATIONAL WOMENS' CLUB: Today, 8 p.m., at University
Womens' Clubhouse. Each woman is asked to bring a covered dish
from her own country. For rides, call Mrs. Farris at 2-5830 or Mrs.
Boyd at 2-2247.
UF DAMES: Fall Welcoming Tea, Sept., 18, 3:30-5:30 p.m. at home
of President and Mrs. J. Wayne Reitz.
EDUCATION DAMES: Wednesday, 8 p.m., at home of Mrs. William
Alexander, 2014 N. W. 11th Road. For transportation: Mrs. A. W.
Strickland.
AIR FORCE ROTC: First class meeting, Aerospace Studies 100,
Sept. 8, 2:30 p.m.; Sept. 9, 2:30 p.m. in University Auditorium.
GATOR SAILING CLUB: Tuesday, 7 p.m., Room 121, Florida Union.
1,000 To Benefit
From Student Loans

Over 1,000 UF students will re receive
ceive receive financial aid during the fall
trimester, according to Assistant
Dean of Men H. K. McClelland.
Three main types of student
loans given at the UF will provide
the majority of this aid.
The Florida State Scholarship
Loan, the UF Short Term Loan
and the UF Long Term Loan are
still available to students, but the
National Defense Loans will not
be open again for application until
November, 1966.
A student should have a 2.0
average or better to apply for
these loans, but in some cases a
student will be considered even if
his average is below a 2.0. If a
student's average is below a 2.0
he must have a letter from the
dean of his college.
The UF short term loan is avail available
able available to all students. A student can
borrow up to $l5O on this loan. It
must be paid back in 90 days or at
the end of the trimester, whichever
comes first. A two per cent service
charge will be deducted from the
loan.
The short term loan maybe used
for tuition or living expenses and
may be applied for at any time.

The UF long term loan is avail available
able available to upper division students who
have been here for one trimester.
A student who is within two years
of graduation may borrow $250.
A student who is within one year of
graduation may borrow S3OO, This
loan must be paid back in install installments
ments installments or all at once starting about
three months after graduation.
There is a four per cent interest
charge starting when the loan is
received.
A student ifi required to have
three character references and an
endorser.
The National Defense Loan, a
federal loan, is open to any UF
student. Students majoring in math,
science, engineering, education
and modern and foreign languages
are given preference, however.
The maximum amount of this loan
is SI,OOO per year and $5,000 total.
A student must start paying this
loan back one year after gradua graduation.
tion. graduation. This may be after a student
earns his bachelor's degree,
master's or doctor's degree. If
a student enters the armed
services upon his graduation, he
may pay it back when he gets out.

Page 5



one promise
todays copy of The Alligator
is a little different from other
first-of-the-school-year issues,
win a quiet sort of way.
d J' -V
Usually, each year at this time,
there is great fanfare, a blaring
of trumpets, sweeping promises
and, yes, even a New Look a It
is a time of high hopes and wild
dreams on the part of student
editors.
We come in quietly today, making
no promises except one:
Under the University of
Florida*s archaic system of stu student
dent student publications, with its inherent
faults and limitations, we*ll
attempt to give you -- the students
and the faculty -- as good a student
newspaper as is possible.
It*s obvious the UF needs better
communication betw ee n the
various departments and colleges.
With this in mind, we hope to
stimulate more inter-college dis discussion
cussion discussion and exchange of ideas.
The editorial page of The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator will always remain an open
forum. We invite honest criticism.
On controversial issues, we*ll
attempt to present both sides. We*ll
take sides, too, when sides should
be taken.
We don*t claim to know all the
answers to problems facing our
University, our state and our
nation. We do, in fact, believe
there are no simple answers to
these problems.
If The Alligator has a goal,
it is to attempt in a very small
way to make the University of
Florida a better place in which to
live, learn and teach.
true leaders
if ts hard enough to success successfully
fully successfully help one lost freshman find
his way around the UF campus.
Directing over 3,000 is another
thing entirely.
But a hard-working group of UF
student-orienters did it. For one
week they led freshmen across the
campus, into the gym, back across
the campus, into tests, HBHHIH
to Tigert Hall, to the
Century Tower and to
just about everywhere
else there was to go on
this plot of real estate
known as the I
University of Florida. || m
They did more hiking flv I
than the Boy Scouts. Glinn
Orientation leader Frank Glinn
and his straw-hatted group of sign
holders did their jobs. Their suc success
cess success can be measured by the fact
most freshmen will be able to find
their way to class this morning.

/
Steve Vaughn Benny Cason
Editor Managing Editor
||[ I
.says he was a group leader back in '2B /
grumblli
don Federman
Peel is dead. Actually, disemboweled is a better word.
Once coveted by black market specialists in need of gain and selected
greeks and independents in need of release from the frustrations of
a disproportionate ratio of males to females, it had become a magazine
suitable for reading by Dondi. Which would be all right if Dondi could
laugh.
Actually, there are those who will tell you that the Peel is not
dead. They will say that the present Peel is non-operative for at
least a year because of an inadequate staff and so that changes can
be made in the Peels charter, one which is generally conceded to
be the central reason for the Peels fall from grace, grace being a
state of sales* and not necessarily of excellence.
IF YOU questioned these people further, they will tell you that
specifically what the Peel needs is a new name and liberalization of
the charter regulation which permits but 40 per cent humor (and this
must be of a purient variety). Os course, there is a contradiction
here. To change the name (and this, I suspect, would not be a difficult
task) implies a concession to the fact that the new name must reflect
a new kind of magazine. But then to attempt to liberalize the 40 per
cent restriction clause implies an attempt to return to the Peel in its
original form. Os course, this latter change in the charter is hopeless.
President Reitz, more than ably assisted by that untainted soul, Dean
Hale, has promised that the Peel will never be an all-humor magazine
so long as he is president. Since the students of this campus want
nothing but a humor magazine, you can see how the circle has come
full round.
No, the Peel isnt officially dead in the sense that Tigert has taken
action to kill it, but then neither is a pithed frog.
BUT TO put the blame on Tigert alone is really being unfair
much as I would like the opportunity to do so. Actually, the students
had a hand in it too.
In 1962 when the Peel was banned, the students actually were
shook up. There was concern about an issue, no matter how insignificant
it may seem to some. At the height of the students wrath, there was
talk of a march on the presidents house to protest the killing of the
Peei. H never materialized. It seems that boys leaving the dorm had
their IJD.s checked.
The implication was clear if there was trouble, possible
disciplinary action might be taken. So the student body chickened
out on its beloved publication which all goes to show you how subtly
the rules are managed at this institution for the perpetuation of the
existing power structure. I might add the students should have called
the Administrations bluff just to show how arbitrary power cantaT
In other words, the students were then and are now being used*
WELL, THERE still remained student government, the politicians*
junior varsity. But they didnt think they could do anything buTof
course, when youre a pawn. j mean it really is a sad state nf
aff '* lrS J Vhen 016 1)654 student government can do is procure trash
cans and spirit hats (I suppose if there were an element of rebellion
in these acts, Tigert wouldnt even allow that). on
And then there is the case of the editors. None of them had the
guts to completely defy the charter. It should have been defied
maybe great issue of nothing but satire and cartooneri
should have been produced. Os course, this would have rneaTim
mediate banning, but oh! how much better to be defeated thu
than to continue playing this game with lich
sis* ~
rc* ~* *
'

>, Monday jiept. 6, 1965

Page 6

Dr. ROBERT P VM
Hutchins r m
Til W|H
American university has been
described by all kinds of people. It is now
understood that this institution is a factory
production of degrees, a depository of funds
scientific research and a home- away- from-hometoi
adolescents. Since these activities, however
torious in themselves, are unrelated, the confusuM
within and without the university has reached su*H
proportions as to endanger its prosperity. nerh 2
even its existence.
When a regent of the University of California cyl
say in open meetings that members of the faculty gl
that great seat of learning should be required to stat*H
their belief in the capitalistic system, weseethatH
he has the adolescents on his mind. He has, of cours* fl
forgotten that the teachers who are relied onto griujH
out the degrees and the investigators
posed to produce the research would deeply resell
being asked to express their adherence to a system
the regent himself probably could not define.
WHEN THE citizens of California can flock to I
their typewriters to bang out letters to the editor I
threatening a tax strike because the university isei.
periencing some internal difficulties, we seehou-far
the confusion has gone. The university is simply
Dr. Robert M. Hutchins, one of the worlds I
leading educators, will appear weekly in The I
Alligator this year. Hutchins is president of I
the Fund for the Republic Inc. in Santa Barbara, I
Calif, and is in charge of the Fund's Center for I
the Study of Democratic Institutions. He is past, I
president and chancellor of the University of I
Chicago and dean of the Yale Law School. I
another state agency, and state agencies are supposed I
to run smoothly. Efficient operation becomes the
standard by which the university's claims caiibe
measured.
What we have had on the other side is oratory, We
are told that the American university is the principal
ornament of our country, that its independence must
be guaranteed and that its income should be increased,
If it suggested that professors are not in residence,
that teachers are not teaching, that students are not
learning and that the intellectual community has dis disintegrated,
integrated, disintegrated, the answer is to exhort professors to
stay home, teachers to teach, students to learn and
everybody to practice togetherness.
But the fact is, unless the American university is
drastically altered, none of these things can happen,
If you are rewarded for traveling, why stay home?
If you are promoted only for research, why teach?:
If the curriculum is a mess, and there is nobody toj
teach you anyway, why learn? And how can 30,000 s
souls, all highly specialized and all going off in dif different
ferent different directions, practice togetherness?
WE NEED some practical proposals for change
the American university in such away that it will
make sense. If it makes sense, it may command the
allegiance of professors, students and the public,
If it continues in its confusion, resounding expres expressions
sions expressions of pious aspirations will simply add hypocrisy
to its other vices.
In my next few columns I hope to advance some
workable suggestions that might make it possible for
the American university to become what it ought to be,
(Copyright 1965, Los Angeles Times)
LETTER
Dear Editor:'
I am an out-of-state student. During my first
week on campus, our Orientation Group had to take
the tests that in-state students took during high
school and another series of tests strikingly similar
to the series of tests we took in the ninth and 11th
grades.
I had already taken the S.T.E.P. and S.C.A.T.
tests twice and the college entrance exams twice.
My question is: Why is the information from our
previous tests not sufficient for placement in Uni University
versity University College?
I would also like to know why there is the large
amount of difference between state and out-of-state
students in the area of tuition. The University
f lorida is not only supported by the State of Florida;
it is also supported by the United States government,
to whom almost everybody's father pays taxes.
I Nancy Dalton. lUC
Editorial Staff
Drex Dobson, assistant managing editor
Andy Moor, sports editor
Peggy Blanchard, coed editor
Bob Wilcox Carol de Bra Eunice Tall
Fran Snider Jeff Denkewalter Judy Knight
Joe Hilliard Bruce Dudley Dick Dennis
Sue Kennedy Susan Froefeke Taylor Grady
Sandy Waite Fred Woolberton Jim'Bailey
Elaine Fuller Steven Brown Leslie Marks
Beter Bakos Cecil Tindel Jane Stecher
Kristy Kimball Kathie Keim Lana Harris __



Mondoy, Sept. 6, 1965, The Alligator,

DURING ORIENTATION SPEECH
Hale Urges Responsibility

New students at the UF were
advised during orientation to forget
the luxury of being mixed up
and concentrate on mature
judgment and responsibility in
their next four years of college
if they hope to succeed in life.
Dean of Student Affairs Lester
Hale challenged the Florida Gym Gymnasium
nasium Gymnasium audience of nearly ,3,400
students participating in
Et 4J| orientation week
i activities not
1B|to make the
safe for
Sjf democracy, but
Jill to make demo demojLjsM
jLjsM demojLjsM cracy work for
world.
HH Dr. Hale noted,
HHHYou cannot be
MAI F neutral. What Whatever
ever Whatever your mixed
up past, let it clearly be under understood
stood understood that the nature and conduct
of your presence here today can
turn our country into a defeated
nation or into continued world
leadership for peace and dignity
of man.
The administration leader
advised students not to feel they
have to bend their identification
card to get attention on the campus.
The use of numbers and the
machines they trigger is theo theoretically
retically theoretically to free more people to
work with more people, Dr. Hale
continued. If they don't
accomplish this, it isn't the
machine's fault, it is the fault of
the people.
There need not be an imper impersonality
sonality impersonality at the UF. .and there
isnt,'* Dr. Hale said. Too many

t jft HI I
fTPImR l 1 Bp I
j DONT
This is the place to get your new cycle. I
SYMBOL Os QUALITY I
For ease of travel to class and about Gainesville. I
Naturally, the money saved and extra time are
advantages for you. 'v^UJv'l
* COMPLETE SERVICE LOW DOWN PAYMENTS GUARANTEED since 1887 I
* PARTS AND ACCESSORIES BANK RATE FINANCING PRICES FROM $279 yAITIAhA I
Come In Or Call Ahead For Yours.
21 SOUTHEAST 2nd PLACE TEL. 378-2811_|

faculty and administrators are
working to prevent that very thing.
I dont care how big a school is,
the basic unit is the classroom,
the section in the residence hall,
the fraternity or sorority, the club,
the laboratory, the student-faculty
relationship.
We can't help being a large
school of many colleges. If it had
not been for careful planning, we
would have been even larger and
probably of poorer quality.*
Dr. Hale gave the students six
steps toward helping create satis satisfaction

mma

Page 7

faction satisfaction in gaining their goal.
Study hard so you will be
successful academically. Main Maintain
tain Maintain a positive attitude and a pride
in your school and its academic,
athletic and cultural achievements.
Contact professor and counselors,
advisors and deans.
Fourth, Dr. Hale went on, be
considerate of others and contri contribute
bute contribute to the academic atmosphere.
Appreciate the self-governing
opportunities provided you on this
campus and use them to express
your views and needs."

WERE FILLED UP!
BUT,
DESPAIR NOT!
University Gardens,
Gainesvilles Best
Rental Apartment Value,
Will Have More Space
Available Oct. 15th.
We have interim locations
on hand until then. i
For information, call 376-6720.
I 700 S.W. 16th Avenue I



Page 8

The Florida Alligator, Monday, Sept. 6, 1966

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
AUTOMATIC WASraNG Machine.
Almost new. Best model Norge.
Only $75. See at 604 N. Main
Street before 5:30 p.m. only. (A (A--1-ts-c).
-1-ts-c). (A--1-ts-c).
MAGNAVOX Portable stereo and
table-record stand SBO. Three
years old. Excellent condition.
Minimum use. 372-9730. (A-l (A-l-3t-p).
3t-p). (A-l-3t-p).
CRANE 40 Gal. electric hot water
heater. $35. Call FR 6-7187. (A (A-l-2t-c).
l-2t-c). (A-l-2t-c).
FOR SALE OR RENT Furnished
house trailer, $650 or rent $65.00.
Call 8-1132. (A-l-3t-c).
1964 HONDA 150, electric starter.
Excellent condition. Best offer
over S3OO. Phone Mrs. Kip, Ext.
2651 or 372-6241 after 6 p.m. for
appointment. (A-l-st-c).
MOTH CLASS Sailboat. Good con condition.
dition. condition. Like newSeidelmann dacron
window sail. Only S2BO complete.
Will be happy to demonstrate. Call
6-9786. (A-l-st-c).
MICROSCOPE. Spencer, monocu monocular,
lar, monocular, excellent condition. With
carrying case and sub-stage lamp.
$245. Phone 372-3572. (A-l-st-c).
MOTORBIKE, good condition, ideal
for local transportation. Call 376-
5525 after 6:00 p.m. (A-l-3t-c).
KNIGHT 18 watt hi-fi amplifier
(monaural) makes good guitar
amplifier; also VM record
changer. S2O each or best offer.
Phone 376-0108. (A-l-3t-c).
CUSHMAN HUSKIE Engine
completely rebuilt, excellent for
school transportation. S7O. Call
FR 6-7257 or FR 6-9361, ask for
Dave. (A-l-3t-c).
MUST SELL 1965 Suzuki Sports
80; 3900 miles, high compression
head, extra sprokets. $245. Call
376-8655. (A-l-3t-p).
lost & found
LOST: Pocketbook at Florida
Union Dance, August 31st. Belgium
burlap. Please return. Call Nancy
Gilreath 372-9273. (L-l-3t-c).

| 2nd ANNUAL FRESHMAN ROUNDUP
What we like to do is to get all new students started out in the correct and approved
manner (ask the old heads) by having them be able to tell their grandchildren like
this "Yessiree Bob, I seen the first flick of my college career at
I So, bring your I.D. to our box office and
I pick up a pass good for any show at the theatre
(ours, of course; you can't get in any other theatre with it), or if you wish, pick
it up at THE RECORD BAR, 923 W. Univ. Ave Anyway, get it before Saturday,
Sept. Nth. Our kind heart hardens thereafter, and that's the last day! Glad to
have you in town. Enjoy yourself and wax wise.

wanted
EXPERIENCED BASS player for
hire. Fender and Gibson equip equipment.
ment. equipment. Call 376-4882. (C-l-3t-c).
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Includes
all utilities (except electricity)
phone, refrigerator, television.
$122.50 per trimester. 1/2 block
from campus. Phone 378-3152 be between
tween between 2-5 p.m. weekdays. (C-l (C-l---lt-p).
--lt-p). (C-l---lt-p).
MALE ROOMMATE to share 10x52
mobile home in Hickory Hill. Big
kitchen Appliances. Private bed bedroom
room bedroom with half-bath. CaU Mike,
376-6696. (C-l-lt-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE. One bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment. $55.00 per month.
1824 N. W. 3rd Place, Apartment
11. (C-l-st-c).
MALE ROOMMATE share large
spacious apartment, near town, 13
blocks from campus. Private
bedroom, double bed. Upper Upperclassmen.
classmen. Upperclassmen. $52.50. Call Ext. 2161.
(C-l-st-c).
r-
services
RAME HAIR STYLING, 319 W.
University Ave. Four operators
specializing in every form of
beauty culture. We also sell and
service wigs. Free parking in
Longs Cafeteria parking lot. For
appointment call 372-5549. (M-l (M-l---ts-c).
--ts-c). (M-l---ts-c).
MOTHERS care and guidance in
private home for infants and pre preschoolers.
schoolers. preschoolers. If interested dial 6-7673
for appointment for interview.(M interview.(M--l-st-c).
-l-st-c). interview.(M--l-st-c).
GRADUATE STUDENTS Wife with
one child age four, will tend chil children
dren children 3 to 5 in home during day.
Very reasonable, flexible
schedule. 372-7707. 1532 1/2
N. W. Third Avenue, anytime.
(M-l-3t-c).
GERMAN TUTORING by German
lady. Contact 372-7627. (M (M---1-lt-c).
--1-lt-c). (M---1-lt-c). '/
SKY DIVING: Licensed instruction,
equipment rental, low rates, chute
automatic. For information call
Dave Henson 6-9221, Room 691.
(M-l-st-c).
LAUNDRY done in home. Well
experienced. Also will clean stu students
dents students apartments. Call FR6-7079
or 2-6016. (M-l-2t-c).

autos
KARMANN GHIA Convertible 1960.
New top, new tires, radio.
Excellent condition. 372-8735 after
6 p.m. (G-l-st-c).
'
1964 TR-4, immaculate condition,
low mileage, fully equipped. White
with blue interior. Will sacrifice.
Call 376-8714. (G-l-st-c).
1962 AUSTIN HEALEY 3,000 Mark
II SI6OO. Call 372-4113, after 5
p.m. (G-l-ts-c).
1959 SPRITE. SSOO. Inquire Apt.
35, Colonial Manor Apts. (G-l (G-l---st-c).
--st-c). (G-l---st-c).
1960 DODGE, actual miles 38,000
Second set of tires are brand new.
Four door, white, standard trans transmission,
mission, transmission, economy six cylinder,
excellent condition. Only $550. Call
2-9607 or 2-3251. (G-l-ts-c).
1961 RENAULT. Call Ext. 2651 or
after 5:30 p.m. 376-4878. (G-l (G-l---3t-c).
--3t-c). (G-l---3t-c).
1962 CORVAIR MONZA, Maroon
with black interior, four on the
floor, radio, heater, whitewalls.
Call 376-3261, Ext. 226. (G-l (G-l---3t-p).
--3t-p). (G-l---3t-p).
for rent
*>
ONE BEDROOM furnished lake
cottage. Lake Winnott, 23 miles
from Gainesville. Lake privileges.
Two trimester lease. S4O monthly.
Call Mr. Kaplan 372-0481. (B (B-l-3t-c).
l-3t-c). (B-l-3t-c).
FURNISHED lake cottage on Lake
Winnott. 23 miles from Gainesville
3 bedrooms, 2 bath. SBS per month.
Two trimester lease. Call Mr.
Kaplan 372-0481. (B-l-3t-c).
EFFICIENCY, Suitable for two. 320
N.W. 3rd Street. $65 monthly. All
utilities supplied except gas. Call
Mr. Kaplan 372-0481. (B-l-3t-c).
FURNISHED Bedroom, private en entrance,
trance, entrance, share bath. $35 per month.
320 N.W. 3rd Street. Call Mr.
Kaplan 372-0481. (B-l-3t-c).
TWO BEDROOM Furnished
apartment. 319 N.W. Ist Street.
Suitable for three. SBS monthly.
Two trimester lease. Call Mr.
Kaplan 372-0481. (B-l-3t-c).

*-
help wanted j
STUDENTS NEEDED to assist
manager. QUALIFICATIONS: (1)
U of F student in good academic,
standing. (2) Can work evenings.
(3) Can work 18-22 hours per
week. $35.00 per week salary (S9O
on full-time basis). Call Mr.
Malaghan at 8-2966 between 9:00
and 5:00. (E-l-ts-c).
WANTED: One Rock 'n Roll drum drummer
mer drummer to play in established band.
Jobs already booked through
October. Call Jim, 372-6225. (E (E--
-- (E--
personal
TENA FAFARD would like to
inform all her friends she is now
with Rame, 319 W. University
Ave., Phone 372-5549. Specializing
in hair coloring, cutting natural
curly hair, also specializes in
children's hair cuts. (J-l-ts-c).
FREE KITTENS 4 males, 2
females. Assorted colors. Call
2- after 5:30 p.m.(J-l-tf-nc).
PLAN A HULABALOO: Hampton
Beach, juke-box, coke stand, picnic
tables, swim in Hampton Lake.
Adults 35£. 20 miles; on State
Road 18, one mile off 301. Call
485-2702 or 485-3561. (J-l-2t-c).
St|lp
3 TOP FIRST AREA
uitc SHOWING
*IIIJ TONITE
I w
I
IkwApU
I RODTAYIOR in
II 56 HOURS

AIIIQAtOR Afts
Always
AttRACt
SUBURBIA I
Drive-In-Theatre
Nw 13 It. St, 372-9523
3 COLOR HITS
Tony Curtte Natalie Wood
| Henry Fonda
Lauren Bacall 1
? HoiFwm?
11 (andl^^gte]^l
Co Starring LESLIE PARRISH and EDWARD EVERETT HORTON
TECHNICOLOR' Prifntod byWARNER BROS. IB
|BL
BUT *|
THE BRAVE J
FRAOTSDUTRA
OCEAN S 11
Frank Sinatra
Dean Martin
I ELOQUENT |
t.r. rims I
I ONE OFTHEBESTi
-aunt rniin
I RATES WITH I
THE BEST
-tnu nms
I GREAT I
-(If UMCMII"
Hil if. #/ m Q /. f i
I INCREDIBLE" I 1
-vmt asstntf I
J 3
WJTmmM 5
I BEAUTIFUL I
-NNHH
A& Winner Bast
Performance
Cannes Film
J Festival 1962
luniuM
WITH HUMOR" TJ
Winner ef4 Brifek
AcaAeerr
kWVit A OtHrtMtlS J
PLUS GRADE A SHORT
n,, 'MOOHBIW



WONDERFUL WORLD
s> v OF WHEELS
- 2^
l| b?|L. i]|
&} t^.'j!SSS^^E^K3MHW^IWi vft / f \ lu \< s v<
worlds biggest seller!
' ;' :. '' . ; .'., .' % .., _' '_ ... .. o
Jjk |||. ||j| j Hfe ,;gl lj|
JBBH
bH|HHh BH^HK
F F PH
f V 3 '
Evidently nothing catches on like the fun
of owning a Honda. Join in. The first step
is a demonstration ride. Why not today ? FUN MACHINE HUNTING MACHINE SPORTS MACHINE
Honda Sales & Service Convenient to Campus
_ ^
m "' "' 11 '- ....
yfb 3-Speed Dunelt SPORTS and ~ jl\
INjgVra|\ $39.95 RACING BIKES
juvenile models r
SCHWINN BIKES ARE. BEST I \^/
.'' tf' ; '
fu# u Used Bikes Repairs Service
STRE,rs BICYCIE SHOP

Monday / Sept. 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator/

Page 9



Page 10

, Tfte Fior'ac Alfgotor, irtoncpy, Segr c c.,

Feme Golfman is an IS-yecr-oic
freshman.
She came to her Orientation
Group, rzurr.ber Sc. or. Sunday even evening
ing evening tn tree gym a little bewildered,
unsure, and lost, and left trvree hours
later a little bewildered, ur.-
sure, and lost.
But after ore week of time-con time-consuming,
suming, time-consuming, pre-school activities
geared to introduce fresrzrr-er. to trie
UF, Feme says she might survive.
"I lerje tt Viere the ivy cm tree
walls, the big trees, being away from
home its just a little too hot.
said trie 5 foot, smilzrg freshmen
from Miami.
Besides wisntrg that her shoes
were already broken tn, that it didn't
rain so much, and her classes were
closer to each other, Feme has ad adjusted
justed adjusted to the campus as well as any
cute freshmen girl who gets the
once crjer*' from the upper class
men, sorority girls, interested boys,
professors, res ident as s istants, and
roommates.
I must have filled out a hundred
cards this week. Print your name,
age, address, mailing address,
phone number .
And stood in lines at registra registration,
tion, registration, picture taking and counseling...
And listened to speeches Pre President
sident President Reitz*s welcome, and Bean
Hale's welcome, and Dean Brady's
welcome, and Bruce Culpepper and
the UJIJi.
She said she wants to meet a lot
of new people, make good grades
buy a spirit hat, go to fraternity
parties and football games, and join
the Florida Union committees.
I can't wait until classes start,
and I think Gainesville is a nice town,
and I like ....
Feme Golfman is an 18-year-old
freshman.

Wr £ A £ JPlwiO
Hr 4 S
STANDING IN LINE...
Or, Hurry Up And Wait

Orientation:

.
~ iot* mm wL* 1
W A BEWILDERED L00K...
_3j Orientation Starts For Feme

KiM
L* Kw
jK
I 4
A Loose As Albert
* # 6
(Photos by Nick Arroyo)
]
: \
r

jUreshman =7=
i. * v
Coeds Week
In Group 58

y
I J 11
fl
SL .v |ff* ,k^/
' 1
msss v '-' j / IK iBBHi 1
9 fl Brk 9
a# * !tV : C^v Y ?<*;..*,
p m *& |
Jf| 991* "*r I *v'J?^ V ''- \{ f '\* '"Y Y-Y. ~.*/
- ;v 99l
j
GETTING HER STUDENT NUMBER...
And Those Good OT I MM. Cards
-'- mSI M
?,, ||&i|nspp j -nj
l 9|>#
THE last DAF of ORIENTATION...
Group Leader Eunice Tall Gives Advice



Short freshman Has Tall Ambitions

By SUSAN FROEMKE
Alligator Staff Writer
* I
Through the crowds of regis registration

Gulf Hardware
Gainesville Shopping Center
IMMERSION HEATER
Great For Coffee Breaks
98c Zj
9 til 9 Weekdays
9 til 7 Saturdays
Fussells Grocery
and Market
1726 Waldo Rd. Ph. 378-1790
We are the only CITGO "jjT
dealer in Gainesville.
CITGO credit cards are
graciously accepted.
Regular customers get a fITGO
special discount. > *

,
l taw oit H sings row you IIHSP 9
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tration registration walked one freshman who
was unique aside from his winning
smile and wit. Standing only four
feet, six inches and being a

verified 18 years old, Roy
Brittingham Jr. from Pensacola
says he finds UF life quite com comfortable.
fortable. comfortable.
Due to a disorder in the pituitary
gland which controls the human
growth, Roy had the gland removed
when he was 12. But doctors pre predict
dict predict he will grow another foot in
the next two or three years, since
his gland is beginning to regener regenerate,
ate, regenerate, a rare occurence in body
chemistry.
Looking forward to college life,
Roy expects to major in electrical
engineering. So far his height
hasnt kept him out of anything
except the draft and football. While
in high school, Roy was the team's
football manager for three years
and president of his sophomore
class.
Besides football, Roy takes an
interest in most other sports,
fishing, and fraternities. While
here he plans to lead an active,
social life but he isn't searching
for the ideal four-foot tall girl
mainly as he explains, They
remind me of the sixth grade."
Currently most of his free time
is spent meeting people or walking
which he says he doesn't mind
except for the hot sun. His philos philosophy
ophy philosophy is to have faith, nbt just
courage in one's self and life
becomes better."
Os course Roy receives some
remarks from people, but then it's
a known fact that Napoleon was
short, too.
rm

Monday/ Sept. 6/ 196 5, The Florida Alligator/

|H fwm
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IMBg*?
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SMALLEST FRESHMAN: Roy Brittingham
UF Law Scholarship
Winners Announced

Clyde Douglas Brown of
McComb, Miss., and Stephen J.
Powell of Sanford have been named
winners of Crandall Memorial
Scholarships in the UF's College
of Law,
Attorneys Erwin A. Clayton of
Gainesville and Ernest J. Hewett
of Miami, trustees of the Crandall
Memorial Scholarship Fund, an announced
nounced announced winners of the junior
awards for the 1965-66 academic
year.
John G. Pierce of Winter Haven

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currently holds the senior award.
All three students possess
exceptional academic records.
The scholarships are provided
in the will of the late Kathleen
B. Crandall, wife of the late -Dr.
C. W. Crandall, a professor In
the College of Law here for many
years.
Pierce and Wade R. Byrd of
Palm Beach won the junior and
senior scholarships, respectively,
when the fund was activated In
1964.

Page 11



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Sept, 6, 1965

Page 12

600 Foreign
UF Students
Are Expected
More than 600 students from
foreign countries will be attending
the UF this year, according to
Col* Glenn A. Farris, advisor to
foreign students.
About 400 of the students attend
toe university on student visas,**
said Farris. Most erf these stu students
dents students are from India, Formosa,
C anada and Sooth £ ast Asia.**
Farris indicated that ahotr 10
per cent erf the foreign students
in the United States remain in this
country after graduation.
As advisor to the foreign
students, Farris maintains a close
watch on the progress made by
the visitors while at the UF.
We maintain a preliminary
correspondence with them before
they arrive here. While they are
on campus, I am available 24 hours
a day to help them with any problem
they may have,* said F arris.
The problems that the foreign
students have are similar to those
problems which all students share.
However, roost of the students Lave
few "problems which they cannot
cope with themselves,** he indi indicated.
cated. indicated.
Summer
(from page orve)
The School of Journalism and
Communications garnered first
place in the nation-wide William
Randolph Hearst Foundation Jour Journalism
nalism Journalism Contest. Director Rae O.
Weimer, UF President J. Wayne
Reitz and journalism professor
Hugh Cunningham accepted the a award
ward award at the White House in Wash Washington
ington Washington from President Lyndon
Johnson.
Vice-President Harry M. Phil Philpott
pott Philpott resigned to become president
of Auburn University in Alabama.
The search for his successor con continues.
tinues. continues.
The controversy over the tri trimester
mester trimester system In FloridasTstate
universities came under fire by
Secretary of State Tom Adams,
who supports the plan, and Gov.
Haydon Burns, who was to revert
to the old semester system.
Dr. Arthur Thompson, UF his history
tory history professor and noted historian,
died July 12.
UF Philosophy Department was
hit by resignations and the pro professors
fessors professors blasted Tigert Hall.
The Summer Frolics found the
New Christy Minstrels playing be before
fore before a packed audience in July.
A new university, Free Uni University
versity University of Florida,** was formed
here by one-time Humanities in instructor
structor instructor Edward Richer.
The rains came and they went.
Gainesville prepared for the fall
trimester and the September rush
of increased activity.
FUNLAND
AMUSEMENT
CENTER
WHERE STUDENTS
MEET FOR RECREATION
GAINESVILLE'S
LARGEST SELECTION
OF GAMES
i
lOnW^Jnjvjgty^

WHITEHEAD
Orientation
(From poge one)
Hume, technical coordinator, Tom
Bachmeyer, office manager,
George Blaha, director of group
control, and Mike Moooghan. di director
rector director o i traffic control.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz
addressed the group Wednesday
night at the Presidents welcome.
Dean of Mec Lester Hale, repre representatives
sentatives representatives from Student Govern Government
ment Government and the Honor Court addres addressed
sed addressed the students at the Students
Affairs Forum. They told the
group about the schools regula regulations
tions regulations ind about the extra curricu curricular
lar curricular activities offered for UF
students.
The groip leaders met for train training
ing training on August 28, and were instruc instructed
ted instructed on orientation procedures. The
office staff met the afterloon be before
fore before to prepare to handle the on onslaught
slaught onslaught of new students.
The first trimesters registra registration
tion registration and class scheduling is done
by the University College. Many
of the freshmen came to Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville during the summer for ad advanced
vanced advanced counseling. The remainder
of the group was counseled this
past week.

Hill Among the most useful and popular Credit
M services are loans for the purchase of auto automobiles.
mobiles. automobiles. Both the speed with which these loans
are na ndle tribute contribute to the popularity of this Credit Union serv serv
- serv ice.
Tuo reduced interest options are available for
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Members may submit to the Credit Com-
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Whitehead New Registrar

UF President J. Wayne Reitz has announced
the appointment of Richard H. Whitehead as director
of admissions and registrar.
Whitehead. 46. has filled the position in an acting
capacity since the death of Registrar Richard S.
Johnson last March. He has been associate registrar
since 1951 and a member of the UF staff since 193 <.
He served as president of the Florida Association
of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers
in 1963.
A native of Largo, Fla.. Whitehead received
his bachelor erf arts degree from the UF and com-

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pleted a year of graduate study at the California
Institute of Technology. He is a member of Pm
Kappa Phi honor society, Phi Gamma Delta fra fraternity,
ternity, fraternity, Alpha Phi Omega service organization
a past president of the Gainesville Optimist Club
Whitehead takes a prominent part in the activities
of the Church of Christ where he regularly teaches
an adult class and often fills the pulpit.
Mr. Whitehead has displayed an outstanding
record of service to the University over a long
period of time,** Vice President of Academic Affairs
Robert Mautz said.



'C-Courses Revamped For Current Trimester

By SUE KENNEDY
Alligator Staff Writer
C-courses, or the lower division
Comprehensive courses, almost a
tradition at the UF, have received
a facelifting this year.
Most noticeable to upperclassmen
is the changing of course numbers.
American Institutions, once C-ll
and C-12, has become CSS-111

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C-COURSE LECTURE: Only the numbers are changed
and CSS-112. Reading, Speaking has become CEH-131 and CEH- followed the same pattern.
and Writing, once C-31 and C-32, 132. Other C-courses have According to University College

Monday, Sept. 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Dean Byron S. Hollinshead, these
changes were made to make these
lower division courses more con consistent
sistent consistent with the other 100 and 200
level courses offered to freshmen
and sophomores.
Lecture credit In two of the
C-courses has been eliminated.
American Institutions and Reading,
Speaking and Writing have become
three hour courses instead of four
hour courses. Lectures in these
courses are being combined this
year.
Another important credit change
has made Effective Thinking, once
C-41 and now CLC-141 and CLC CLC-142,
-142, CLC-142, a two-trimester, three hour
course.
Fundamental Mathematics, once
C-42, is now C MS-171 and receives
three hours of credit.
While these changes may be
confusing to upperclassmen, the
freshmen, says Hollinshead, have
been oriented to them and under understand
stand understand them. The best policy for
upperclassmen, he continued,
would be not to try to advise the
freshmen about C-courses.
Hillel Readies
Fall Program
Happiness is a warm Hillel"
connotes the spirit of UF's B'nai
Blrith Hillel Foundation for Jewish
students throughout the year.
Hillel emphasizes the cultural
and social aspects of college life
as well as the religious. Its pur purpose,
pose, purpose, according to Rabbi Simeon
Kobrinetz, director, is to come to
grips with the challenges of our
faith and to find a meaningful
association with Judaism and to
have the opportunity to meet with
other students on campus."
Hillel began its fall agenda with
the orientation and registration
program of dancing, refreshments
and committee sign-ups during
Freshman Week.
Sabbath Services will be held
at 7:30 Friday evening September
10 followed by an Oneg Shabbath
reception honoring new students.
Sabbath morning services will
begin at 10 a.m. Saturday Septem September
ber September 11, conducted by Rabbi
Kobrinetz and student leaders.
The first brunch is on the agenda
for September 12 from 11-1 in
the afternoon. This will be followed
by a special Inaugural program.
Hlllel's first social function of
the year will be a fall dance,
scheduled for September 18 from
8-midnight at the center. Hillel
is located at 16 N. W. 18th Street.
Year-round activities feature:
the Institute for Judaic Studies
with courses in Jewish history,
Jewish philosophy and beginning
and intermediate Hebrew; guest
speakers; a kiddush seminar of
delicatessen sandwiches and a
short discussion following the Sab Sabbath
bath Sabbath morning services; Sunday
brunch bagels, lox, coffee
often together with speakers and
Hillel meetings.
Holiday observances are a func functional
tional functional part of Hlllel's organization,
beginning with the celebration of
the High Holy Days services. Rosh
Hash ana and Yom Klppur services
will be held in one of the UF's
main auditoriums. Throughout the
year, Sukkah-buildlng parties,
Chanukah latke dinners, Purlm
carnivals, and Passover seders
and meals form a composite part
of Hillel.
The Hillel building itself is open
for study until 10 p.m. on week weekdays.
days. weekdays. Rabbi Kobrinetz is available
for counseling upon appointment.
Tuesday and Thursday nights 4
students observing dietary laws
may participate in Hlllel's kosher
dinner plan. k i s

Page 13



, fce Flonoc AEigoaor, Vcro?f ( Sept, *9tc

Page 14

Wayne Reitz:
Bg 'be curious,
EE
President Reitz Calls Change
Greatest Freshman Challenge

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UF Doors Open Once Again

(From P. 1)
science, with particular emphasis
in the areas of physics, chemistry,
mathematics and engineering.
The NASA grant covers the com complete
plete complete cost of constructing a four fourstory
story fourstory building across from the
Universitys Student Service Cen Center
ter Center to carry out the space agencys
current and planned cooperative
effort on campus.
Curriculum changes affect the

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University College and College of
Law.
The day of the famed C
courses is over with revised des designations
ignations designations in seven basic subject
areas for freshmen and sopho sophomores.
mores. sophomores. Although most of the names
remain unchanged, the titles will
revert from C-11 for American In Institutions
stitutions Institutions to CSS 111, indicating a
comprehensive social science
course.

Physical Sciences will carry the
symbol CPS 121, Effective Think Thinki
i Thinki
ing CET 141, etc. Credit hours also
have been altered in most of the
basic courses, but the intent re remains
mains remains the same as the University
College begins its- 31st year
enable new students to develop a
strong background in general edu education
cation education to pave the way for a wise
choice in their field of advanced
study.
The College of Law will move
into its second trimester of offer offering
ing offering the JJD. (Juris Doctor) degree,
rather than the LL.B. (Bachelor of
Laws) degree. The admission
policy of the College now requires
an A.B. or equivalent degree for
all candidates so that theJ.D. pro program
gram program is consistent with current
trends.
The fall trimester continues
through Dec. 17, followed by the
winter trimester (Jan. 10 April
22) and the spring trimester (May
2 Aug. 12).

LONG or abort,
dilfg- WINDY
'iyj And His Staff
V/ Will Cut It To
jy/! Suit Your Taste.
Windys Barber Shop
1125 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Monday, Sept. 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

I n
- V f
JSijJf^, ij| Jssi
WHERE TO GO* She Tells People
Information Lady
Knows The Answers

By JANE STECHER
Alligator Staff Writer
Mrs. Richard Polk doesnt have
an office in Tigert Hall. But shes
the UFs unofficial Director of
Directions.

Mrs. Polk spends eight hours
per day directing people to all
portions of the UF campus from
her station at the Information Booth
at the main campus entrance near
Tigert. She says as many as 100
seek her assistance on a peak day.
Just north of Tigert, the booth
has been operated by the UF
Campus Police Dept, for the past
six years. Mrs. Polk has been
working there for about a year.
She says questions shes asked
most often are Where is Tigert
Hall? and Where is the Director
of Housing? Biggest problem in
the job, she says, is being asked
questions shes unable to answer.
Some students have asked her how
many hours they should take.
Her busiest time, naturally, is at
the beginning of school in Septem September
ber September when the large freshman class
pays its first visit to the UF
campus.
It took me about a month to get
to know the entire campus,
she said.

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florido Alligator, Monday, Sept. 6, 1965

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D m on n Q1 KITC MENS R,GHT GUARD MENS 100% COnON
S o? SPRAY DEODORANT PAJAMAS
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Preshrunk. Bartacked re **men FOR iittH, m
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y.v donl need cash .o ,a,e .. Z!'JLZ?~,XZIJirZ£Z N DAILY SUNDAYS:
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T I open on with us. No woiting. No VA MAAiJ | A *T
IfllMlllli delays. No lengthy soles slips to TO HUUn TO /

Monday / Sept. 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

> The Florido Alligator / Monday, Sept. 6, 1965

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G AINESVIULE



Freshmen Display Wares At Annual Talent Night

.-... hh| JB-. yap'^^g
|&Wpp|' S -. JS
W _>jBHV v .;b
H| flippy *J
NORABLE MENTION: THIRD PLACE
l UFs Traveling Forester

- 4
TJFers might be hard pressed
of paper, pencils and other wood
it werent for the ef effo|pte
fo|pte effo|pte of TEJiainas G. Herndon, ex ext^BM
t^BMi ext^BM jMester for the Agricul-
Service.
Iff spqP about 60 per cent of
mflHHpve ling around the state
from all walks of
their forestry problems,
jemton wears two hats. He is
an associate proses-
HMpHte university, although
classes, while the Fed-
Service lists him
HPjHb agent.
BMptHg to Herndon, the fed-
P;pn ment subsidizes the
of his salary as well
elses in the Agricul-
Service.
Herndon said county agents, in
a^fMV* 1 to being paid by the fed federally

LET GATOR CLASSIFIEDS WORK FOR YOU

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erally federally supported state funds, also
receive a pay check from their own
perspective county. The salaries of
these men can be quite good in some
of the larger counties.
It is the job of the extension
forester to aid local county agri agricultural
cultural agricultural agents with forestry prob problems
lems problems in their areas.
*We prepare publications for
distribution based on research
carried out by specialists in the
field, Herndon said. We attempt
to write technical material in a
layman's language.
Herndon showed a group of work
orders received from agents
throughout the state. Working with
his assistant, Anthony S. Jensen,
they work up possible solutions to
the problems.
Then they must come up with
a solution of how best to prevent
this material to the individuals in involved.

volved. involved. This may include group
demonstrations in the field, class classroom
room classroom movies and instruction, or
personal consultation.
You can't take a bunch of young
4-Hers into a classroom and expect
them to get anything out of a talk
on forest management, Herndon
said. Adjusting our presentation
to fit our audience is one of our
touchiest problems.
Although a specialist in his field,
Herndon said his biggest problem
was keeping up with the latest in information
formation information from the various re research
search research elements of federal, state
and private institutions.
My problem is finding time to
read and study information in order
to prepare and write publications
for foresters throughout the
state, Herndon said.
As if that wasn't enough to keep
busy, Herndon attends seminars
and shortcourses in forestry a around
round around the country. He will be at attending
tending attending a forestry seminar in
Arkansas later this summer.

Monday, Sept. 6, 1965, The Florida Alligotor,

if '''*
i
1
Bp
to^honors
Freshman Talent Might
Efj in Vn/varsity Aiulitori Aiulitorium
um Aiulitorium
, Placing second in the
L MM competition before a full
house of orientation stu students
dents students wen Kleeknerand
Tina
S ", £ VfssS>?l on a Scottish dance rou rou*.
*. rou*. : tine. Third-place fin fin-7T*
7T* fin-7T* is hers were the Midler
Tunns, who sang Sound
of Silence.
IMCm? A comedy folk song
I routine which took off
1 on /// (' S mot he r s
Brothers yarned anhon-
HHBHHHRRH orable mention for
SECOND: Shiely Holms and Iran
Kleekner, Tina Lindberg Fran Oster
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"Selling & Servicing Zenith Since 1933"

Page 19



Page 20

j The Florida Alligator/ Monday, Sept. 6/ 1965

for summer newspaper work mMmmmm
UFs School Os Journalism
Launches 'lntern Program

Science courses arent the only places where
experiments were carried out this summer, and the
Colleges of Education and Medicine arent the only
ones with interns.
The School of Journalism and Communications
ran an experimental internship program in operation
for the first time this year.
According to Professor John Paul Jones, who is
in charge of placement for the school, 20 students
participated in the program. They were employed
by various newspapers around the state, working
during the summer between their junior and senior
years at the UF.
The program was worked out between our
department and the Associated Press Association
of Florida, said Professor Jones. They come up
with the jobs, and we provide them with students
willing to work for the summer.
The purpose of the program, according to Jones,
is first, to give the students the experience of
working for a paper, and also to get these people
interested in newspaper work, as well as getting
newspapers interested in THEM.
This way, the students can find out if they
really like working for a paper, and the paper
can have a better chance of getting the colle 0^

Itll Get Cold Here
It isnt always this hot in Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville.
During these first weeks of UF
I classes, temperatures will soar
into the 90s. Native Florida
students will grumble about the
heat while out-of-state students
from the north will proclaim the
goodness of Florida weather.
But it gets cold here, too. 1
Daily temperatures will begin to f
drop into the high 70s by early HF V
October, and summer rain showers
will stop. Cold, dry weather *>> M
usually arrives in late November,
with temperatures dropping into X
the 20s in some instances. m fl
Snow rarely falls here. The last V B
full inch was recorded in February, B jS
Students on campuses of NYU,pBJ'-* w
The University of Chicago, and |TL* BB m
Denver U. will study in a mild \ II 1
mid-60 temperature as Florida \ /
students accept the heat and try
to tame a new co-ed blowing about
named Betsy. 'HR
STUDENT
INSURANCE
Did you forget
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Pick up enrollment
application at
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Low Cost-$17.25
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people after they are graduated, he said.
Some of the newspapers taking part in the program
include the Tampa Tribune, the Florida Times-
Union, Orlando Sentinel, and the United Press
International news bureau in Miami.
The students get jobs which arent just a copy-boy
type of thing, according to Jones, who is also
supervisor of this summer internship program.
They get a regular newspapermans salary, and
most of them are doing reporting or desk-work,
he said.
Each student sends back a weekly report on
what hes doing, said Jones. All of this which
you see in the corner is clippings and carbon copies
of work theyve written. He pointed to a pile of
printed matter about a foot high.
At the end of the summer, whoever has super supervised
vised supervised the student, sends back a letter of evaluation,
he said.
The schools staff is also making plans for similar
programs in the fields of broadcasting and
advertising.
We already have one Florida radio station which
takes broadcasting students on a similar basis as
the newspapers take those studying journalism,
said Jones, and were hoping for more.

a
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filpEOPit |V T
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oo.has the most complete assortment of school and
office machines and supplies in N. Central Florida.
For any of your needs, see or call Parker's at 372"
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typewriters, especially Underwood, Olivetti and
Smith-Corona. These include electric as well as
non-electric standards and portables. We repair all
makes. Rental and leasing plans are available. Do
you need a brief bag, art supplies or various engi engineering
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PARKERS
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THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FOOD SERVICE
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THE FOOD SERVICE IS UNIVERSITY-OWNED AND OPERATED TO PROVIDE FOR THE CONVENIENCE
OF THE STUDENTS, FACULTY, STAFF AND THEIR GUESTS. THE FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM IS
UNDER THE DIRECTION OF A PROFESSIONALLY TRAINED DIRECTOR AND STAFF WHO DESIRE TO
SERVE YOU TOP QUALITY FOOD WITH EXCELLENT SERVICE AT MODERATE PRICES.
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SERVED DAILY
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SNACK BARS IN ALL CAFETERIAS
BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER
Catering Service and Special Services Include:
SERVICES AT CAMP WAUBURG BOX LUNCHES
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FRIED CHICKEN POTATO SALAD
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BAKED BEANS SANDWICHES

Monday. Sept. 6. 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

Page 21



Page 22

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Sept. 6, 1965

* / 8
- I p
.flv I
I
f HP M
- mm / I
I V
w ; li
SIJb '. ~. 1
WMM
EXHIBITORS: from left, Hiram Williams, P. R. Mclntosh
and Jerry Uelsmann

Nouveau Display Continues Run

American Art Nouveau Posters,
an exhibit of 60 lithographs, will
continue through Sept. 30 at the
UFs Teaching Gallery of the
Department of Art.
The display was organized by the
Prints and Photographs Division
of the Librarv of Congress. Wash-

Ttte Florida Alligator is an official publication
of the University of Florida and is published
daily, Monday through Friday morning during reg regular
ular regular trimester and twice weekly during summer
trimester, except holidays and vacation periods.
Entered at U.S. Post Office as second class
matter.

a
NOW
| §pns(faror s(§l OPEN I
viy 0 w
V v_y I
I 3-, I
1227 W. Univ. Ave. WE OFFER I
I Between Royal Castle And Larrys CENTRAL CHARGE I
I Featuring The Finest Traditional Clothing And Ladies Sportswear I
FOR THE LADIES ... I
I R His For Her R Cos Cob o Horburt I
I Seaton Hall g Lady Sero g Adler I
Norman Davidson # College Town Rain Shedder I
Austin Hill Gay Gibson
| 0 Allison Ayres 0 John Romain I
I FOR THE MEN ... I
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-T

ington, D. C., from the Librarys
extensive collections and was
shown there initially. It is being
circulated throughout the United
States by the Smithsonian Institu Institution
tion Institution Traveling Exhibition Service.
Among artists represented in the
show are Americans Edward Pen PenfiVl
fiVl- PenfiVl .TnhnSloan. Frank Hnrsnnliw

University Art Gallery Opens
With Exhibition By Art Faculty

The University Gallery opened
for its fall exhibition yesterday
with exhibitions by the art faculty.
The exhibition featuring the
faculty members latest works will
include paintings, prints,
ceramics, sculpture and photo photography.
graphy. photography.
The faculty exhibition will run
through Sept. 30. There is a con continual
tinual continual program at the gallery with
a new show every month.
We try to give a variety of
art, so that no matter what your
personal taste is you will see it
sooner or later, said the
Director of the University
Gallery, Roy C. Craven Jr.
In this way we can show the
historical art, and something
unusual once in awhile, said
Craven.

Bertram Goodhue and Will H.
Bradley, as well as Europeans
Jules Cheret, Aubrey Beardsley,
Alfons Mucha and EugeneGrasset.
The term, art
designates an international move movement
ment movement in the arts in the latter part
of the 19th century, particularly
the last decade. It originated in
Paris and was the manifestation of
a desire to bring the fine arts
and crafts into aesthetic unity.
The Teaching Gallery is open
Monday through Friday from 9 a.m.
until noon and from 1:30 to 5 p.m.

The gallery is open daily, from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on Sunday
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. It is closed
on Mondays and holidays.
There is also a Teaching Gallery
where the students get a chance
to display their work.
The Teaching Gallery opens for
the fall Wednesday Sept. 1, with
an exhibition of American Art
Nouveau Posters from the Smith Smithsonian
sonian Smithsonian Institute.
These exhibitions are changed
monthly, and the gallery is open
on weekdays from 9 a.m. to sp.m.

LITTLE PIGS
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Monday / Sept. 6, 1965 / The Florida Alligator,

THIS WEEK
f -By SG President Bruce Culpepper

Im glad to announce, thanks to
the help that Ive received from
Student Governments summer
workers, that over eighty per cent
of our platform has been
completed. Os course there are
some responsibilities that are
never completely fulfilled, such as
improvement in the infirmary
structure and service or placing
additional emphasis on dormitory
social activities. But we will con continue
tinue continue to work in these areas. For
the sake of platform fulfillment,
we are making such sound
advancements that I am counting
these as done.
It is the projects we have com completed
pleted completed that have not been on a
platform in which Student
Government is most proud. This
summer, we changed the summer
frolics dance to Florida Frolics
and presented a top name enter entertainment
tainment entertainment the New Christy
Minstrels. This was a financial
risk because of the limited number
of students here but we felt such
a show would be appreciated and
was needed. Thanks to the leader leadership
ship leadership of Steve Gardner, Ed Koren,
and Randy Williams, Florida
Frolics set a precedent for years
to come.
Truman Scarborough, the
summer Secretary of Interior,
completed a project that was first
initiated by Mike Malaghan. He
led a drive for much needed litter
baskets to be placed around
campus. Our emphasis on keeping
the campus clean is now a year
round program.
Jean Maynard, summer
secretary for International
Affairs, instigated new emphasis
on meeting the needs of the inter international
national international students. Included in her
success was the attainment of a
combination range and
refrigerator for the International
Center.
Pepy Hicks was in charge
of circulating a questionnaire
concerning the infirmary service.
The results were helpful to Dr.
Hall, director of the infirmary,
who responded with many changes
and improvements. Student
Government has also made sub substantial
stantial substantial steps in the direction of
moving the infirmary so that it
would be under the control of the
medical center.

FOR THE FIRST TIMERS,
FOR THE MANY A TIMERS
Larrys Wonderhouse
FAMOUS
KC STRIP STEAK
SMALL LARGE EX-LARGE
$1 *SO $\ .85 $2.25
London Broil Steak
all served with choice of potato, t 4 4jT
tossed salad, hot rolls & butter | B \j
LARRY'S WONDERHOUSE
FR 2-2405 Larr Y A,, y 14 S.W. lit Sf.
SECOND COFFEE OR TEA ALWAYS FREE

Student Government was instru instrumental
mental instrumental in obtaining student opinion
concerning alternative proposals
for our higher educational system.
Dr. Doty, of the administration,
studied these carefully before
submitting the UFs proposal to
Governor Burns.
Betsy Sandstrom and Jane
Evexitt, both working on school
traditions, were responsible for
obtaining money to play the century
tower bells on special occasions,
such as pep rallies and Religion Religionin-Life
in-Life Religionin-Life Week. We are hopeful of
Jl M
1 Jfegl
' GARDNtK WILLIAMS
obtaining more money from Leg
Councillor the purpose. They also
made arrangements for flying our
school flag in the area of the new
student union. >
Alan Gaither is seeking a
revitalization of our campus civil
defense education. He will continue
to work in the area in conjunction
with the Leg Council.
The Leg Council, v with the
monetary direction of Tom Back Backmeyer,
meyer, Backmeyer, secretary of finance, and
the administrations Campus
Planning Committee, approved our
project of lighting the handball and
tennis courts at Murphree area.
Calvin Green of Plants and Grounds
is now purchasing a transformer.
All red tape has been met and the
lighting is now only a matter of
time.
I have exhausted neither the list
of our completed projects, nor
the list of the people who have been
instrumental in serving the
University this summer. The
Legislative Council has taken a
great deal of initiative and Interest
in the affairs of the University.
The cabinet has worked harder than
any group Ive ever seen. I try to
name these students as often as I
can but their true rewards come
through their service, not their
recognition.
We are all looking forward to a
productive fall.

Page 23



\, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Sept. 6, 1965

Page 24

Student Directories
Wont Be Distributed
Until October 20
Lost Year's Book 12 KQO BOOKS

RP? JMw sfIPMHMnE
niir
JPjBBBL \ Ifet ?
PP*kv f JK 1
I jl
K i i
L
Barber Shop
To Expand
A larger and better** barber
shop with space for 10 barber
chairs will be one of the features
of the new UF Student Union,
according to Judson T. Jaudon.
Jaudon is the manager of the
barber shop in the existing union,
which has four barber chairs.
The new barber shop, according
to Jaudon, will presumably** be
on the ground floor level, which
may attract more customers than
the current basement location
does.
Jaudon said he isnt sure whether
the new shop will have a new
vacuum system for cutting hair.
The new system, which keeps hair
from falling down a customers
back by means of a vacuum hose
attached to the electric clippers,
is in operation in at least one other
Gainesville barber shop. Jaudon,
however, said his business hasn't
been affected by it, and that it
isnt that popular yet.'*

WELCOME FRESHMEN
I | |S]wur
Push-button and
Windproof
Umbrellas
only >3
DZTOB SHOP
1710 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
ON THE "GOLD COAST"

r
TO BE PRINTED
By LESLIE MARKS
Alligator Staff Writer
The new 1965-66 Student
Directory will be ready Oct. 20
for UF students and faculty.
Tom Welles, director of the
UF Purchasing Office, has an announced
nounced announced that 8,000 directories will
be made available for general use.
These 8,000 will be distributed
to sororities, fraternities, and
dormitories under the direction of
Herb Langford. Another 4,500
books will be dispersed to the UF
staff and faculty and numerous
city and county agencies.
The directories, which are free,
have been paid for through the
advertisements of area merchants.
Names, locations, and classifi classifications
cations classifications of persons are among the
information made available in the
booklet. This years book, as those
of previous years, will contain a
departmental directory of the UF
staff, a student listing, and an
advertisement section. These
three sections v ill be printed on
blue, white and yellow paper
respectively.
The cover of the new directory
will be a campus scene involving
students. Changes inside the new
booklet include a slightly revised
campus map. The new map will not
contain a numbered key, or have
any red printing on it as did maps
of the past.
Holding the contract for the
directory is Plains Publications
of Lubock, Tex. The book is printed
in Florida.
GATOR I
ADS I
SELL!! I

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FASHIONS!!
Yes, you too can be a "GATOR GAL"
if you wear Fashions from the campus
fashion center, o 0 BLANCH'S
BLANCH'S features such well known
campus brand names as: Thermo-Jac fWik,
Mr. Thomson, Norman Davidson,
Koret of Cal if and Lady Manhattan.
jjpi ftp
\\ ii fc. ** 8116 Hie latest styles
VllH |from BLANCH'S.
The Little Specialty Shop Located Just North of the Campus
311 N.W. 13TH STREET PH. 372-1581
US£ YGUR CENTRAL CHARGE OR BLANCH'S CHANGE
Welcome Students
SPECIAL PRICES
ON APPROVED & REQUIRED GYM CLOTHES FOR MEN AND WOMEN
MEN
GYM SHORTS j\ I V AfN
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Monday, Sept. 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 25



Page 26

, The Florida Alligator/ Monday, Sept. 6, 1965

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LAKE WAUBURG: some changes made
Competition To Continue
For Publications Trophy

Competition will resume again
this year for the Student
Publications service trophy.
In the past, the competition has
been mostly among the UFs 13
sororities, but fraternities and
other organized groups are eligible
to compete.
The trophy is awarded to the
group which has contributed the
most to student publications during
the year. The award is based on
the number of hours that group
members have spent working for
the Alligator, Seminole or New
Orange Peel. Also counted are
the number of copies of Seminoles
and Orange Peels sold by the
members of the group.

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Last years winner was Delta
Phi Epsilon sorority.
Steve Conn, Student Publications
business manager is in charge of
the competition.

TV & FM ANTENNAES
V.
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ALL AT LOW PRICES
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Camp Wauburg Spruced Up

Returning students and freshmen
will find that Camp Wauberg has
* had some sprucing up over the
summer.
The Wauburg dock has been
almost completely rebuilt with
some pilings replaced and an entire
new floor and paint job. New safety
lines now mark off the approximate
one-acre swimming area. An area
three feet deep is marked off for
children.
And lifeguards are now armed
with a new motorboat to aid injured
skiers or neophyte canoers who
overturn their rigs.
f, We have always had a problem
with fishermen who row over on
the other side of the lake, said
V. Lavane Scott, grounds super supervisor
visor supervisor for Camp Wauburg. The
fish start biting and they lose
all track of time. Now we can
go around in the motorboat and
call them in.
Camp Wauburg is open week
days from noon until dark and from
9 a.m. until dark on Saturday and
Sunday.
A concession stand with vending
machines selling soft drinks,
sandwiches, potato chips,
cigarettes, candy and crackers is
open at all times.

DOCK REBUILT OVER SUMMER

In case of rain, the recreation
building has tables for picnicking
and playing ping pong. Although
there is a bath house now, a new
one is planned for the future.
Boat, ramps are provided for
those students who own their own
boats. Tuesday afternoons and
Saturdays from 9 until 2 p.m.
have been set aside for motor motorboats
boats motorboats and skiing. No canoes are
allowed to be checked out during
these times.
More improvements and
increased facilities are in the
planning stage.
Camp Wauburg has always had
its ups and downs. Retired Dean
of Students Robert C. Beaty told
how he once saved Wauberg from

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the auction block.
Then UF President, Albert A.
Murphree, wanted to sell it, Beaty
said. I offered to go out there
and live if they would keep it,
which is exactly what happened.
My wife and I lived out there for
two years in a big old farm house.
This was in 1926 and 27.*
After Beaty moved back into
town, Wauburg almost went to pot.
It was rebuilt by the National Youth
Administration in 1936 to 1938.
Wauburg didn't really come alive
until after the war and married
students the campus. Beaty
said that married students really
made Camp Wauburg what it is
today.



Auburn, LSU Head '65 Grid Card

By ANDY MOOR
Alligator Staff Writer
The 1965 UF football schedule
is a tough one, but somewhat less
demanding than the monster of
1964 which saw the Gators tackle
six bowl teams in addition to
three traditional rivalries.
For the most part the schedule
is strenuous however, with a three
week stretch early in the season
when Ray Graves charges must
tackle Mississippi State, LSU and
Ole Miss successively.
Scouting reports on all opponents
follow:
NORTHWESTERN The
Wildcats appear to be weaker than
ast seasons squad which finished
vith a 3-6 log. They lost 24
ettermen, 13 of which were
egulars. Included in the list is
ormer All-America quarterback
'om Myers, fullback Steve Murphy
nd punter Merlin Norenberg. The
ig Wildcat problem is replacing
Iyers with three sophomores and
i untested senior the only possi possilities.
lities. possilities. The Wildcat line is bigger
an the Gators, averaging about
15 per man, but lack of anyover anyoveriwe
iwe anyoveriwe ring runners will hurt Coach
lex Agases charges. Top candi candittes
ttes candittes for individual honors are end
Is Banazek, halfback Ron Rector
tackle Jim Burns.
m / -vi
ft
LSU'S MOREAU:
I, Threat to Gators
M MISSISSIPPI This is
ft game which should not be taken
ft>o lightly. The Bulldogs had only
I 4-6 record last year but played
Is rough a schedule as the Gators
lid. They return both halves of
heir inside-outside attack,
Bl arcus Rhoden and Hoyle
ft ranger. UF fans dont have to
fte told how dangerous Rhoden
Is since he broke loose on two
long touchdown runs against us
last year. Granger is as strong a
runner as anyone in the SEC.
Quarterback Ashby Cook, who
looked good while healthy as a
soph, is now ready for full time
duty. States coach, Paul Davis,
is a good one and his team should
command respect.
LSU Many observers look
Ito this game as the key to the
Gator season. Unquestionably, it
is a game of extreme importance.
The Tigers are listed by many
experts as the SECs best. The
entire Bengal backfield is back
including a healthy Pat Screen,
a strong Don Schwab and an
academically-eligible Danny
Lelanc. Screen has been tabbed
as a possible All-America since
he was a soph but injuries have
stood between him and greatness.
Schwab was the conferences
leading rusher last year with 683
yards. Lelanc, who sat out last
year with academic problems, is
ready to go again. He was a top
soph in 1962. Most vital to the

LSU attack is Doug Moreau who
scored 73 of the teams 115 points
in 64. Moreau is the best deep
pass receiver LSU has ever had
and has a deadly-accurate toe.
The Tigers have many other
standouts which are too numerous
to mention. Their strength is
beyond question.
MISSISSIPPI Many experts are
writing off the Rebels this year
because of last seasons flop. Ole
Miss might make these forecasts
look very silly by the end of the
campaign. Twenty-four lettermen
return including sure-fire All-
America Stan Hindman and All-
SEC back Mike Dennis. The Rebels
will be playing the roughest
schedule in memory which will
make things tough but Johnny
Vaught is not one to have two bad
seasons in a row. The fact which
puts this game in the Gators
rough category is where it is
played. Oxford, Mississippi is not
the easiest place in the world to
win a football game. Also, Ole
Miss is out for revenge after
the 30-14 drubbing it took in
Gainesville last October.
NORTH CAROLINA STATE
Homecoming should prove to be an
easy victory for the Gators, but
the Wolfpack has a history for
upsets. Take, for instance last
season, the Pack won the Atlantic
Coast championship when it was
listed as second-division material.
Earle Edwards is one of the better
coaches in the country. But it will
take more than a hex to get the
Pack past the Gators.
AUBURN This is the game
which scares Gator fans more
than any other on the schedule.
The main reason for this fear is
one simple fact: Florida has never
beaten Auburn in the loveliest
village on the plains. From first
appearances the Tigers look
weaker than last season's team
which finished at 6-4. They lost
Mr. Everything, Tucker Fred Frederickson,
erickson, Frederickson, and 1963 All-America
quarterback Jimmy Sidle along
with 12 other lettermen, most of
whom were regulars. However,
quarterback Tom Bryan returns
and he showed promise near the
end of last season while filling
in for the injured Sidle. The entire
forward wall of possibly the best
defense around is also back headed
by All-America prospect Bill
Cody. A slew of top sophomores
may make the Tigers one of the

1965 UF Schedule
Sept. 18 Northwestern at Evanston 1:30
Sept. 25 Mississippi State here 2:00
Oct. 2 LSU here 2:00
Qct. 9 Mississippi at Oxford 3:00
Oct. 16 N.C. State here (HC) 2:00
Oct. 30 Auburn at Auburn 2:30
Nov. 6 Georgia in Jacksonville 2:00
Nov. 13 Tulane here 2:00
Nov. 20 Miami at Miami 8:00
Nov. 27 FSU here 2:00
All Times EST
' ... __

The Florida Alligator SPORTS

Monday / Sept, 6/ 1965, The Florida Alligator/

best teams in the south. Toughest
thing for Coach Shug Jordan will
be to find replacements for the
entire defensive secondary. The
Gators look better than Auburn on
paper but the Cliff Hare jinx could
be an equalizer.
GEORGIA Last year's SEC
Cinderella may find midnight
drawing near as the season
approaches. The Bulldogs had two
things going for them in 1964:
(1) the element of surprise and
(2) the best pair of tackles in
the country. Now both these ele elements
ments elements are gone. Coach Vince
Dooley will do well to break even
with the problems hes facing. The
thing which could make the Georgia
game a tough one is the rivalry
involved. The Dogs often play
over their heads against Florida.
TULANE This should be the
Gators easiest game. Tulane still
has little material, although im improvement
provement improvement was evident at the end
of *64. The Green Wave leaves the
SEC after this season and it
appears that it made the right
decision.
MIAMI The Hurricanes return
more than half of last seasons
4-5-1 team. Coach Charlie Tate
is sure to get the most mileage
out of his material, which will be
spectacular when his 1965 recruits
join the varsity. He does have a
fine backfield headed by Bob
Biletnikoff, Russ Smith and Pete
Banazak. The line has holes to
fill with the graduation of Fred
(the Tree) Brown at end and Tony
Saladino at center. The Canes
may win more than they lose, but
will need a big effort to give the
Gators a battle.
FLORIDA STATE This is the
game the Gators want more than
any other on the schedule. Last
years Seminole loss was the
hardest thing in the world for them
to swallow. The great Tensi-Bilet Tensi-Biletnikoff
nikoff Tensi-Biletnikoff combination is now gone as
is tight end Don Floyd. This makes
the FSU offense look at best
mediocre. Without the strong
passing attack, halfback Phil
Spooner will find the goin,i much
tougher on his runs. Defensively,
the Semlnoles may be even better
than last season. They return intact
The Magnificent Seven which is
a threat to any opponent. With the
big offense gone, however, FSU
will have trouble repeating their
64 victory over Florida.

Page 27


_^Moor Kl
SPORTS £D/rOi?HlE|g
Many jinxes plague the success of Florida football teams.
For instance:
1. Never has a Florida team won a Southeastern Conference
football championship.
2. Not since 1928, has a Florida football team lost less than
two games in a given season.
3. Never has a Florida football team beaten Auburn in the
Tigers* home, Cliff Hare Stadium.
This year's Florida team is so good, however, that it could
eclipse each of the jinxes*.ln one season.
The 1965 Gator squad* is one of the most dedicated groups of
young men ever assembled. They know they have the potential
to be the best team In the schools history and they aim to be
just that.
Hustle Evident
Hustle is evident in even the most ordinary of practice exercises.
Most important, the seniors are taking a position of leadership
and are setting an example for the younger players to follow.
Coach Ray Graves pointed out, No one out here is pacing him himself.
self. himself. Each man is giving his all in every exercise. This is most
important in the seniors since they must be the team leaders. As
a result, I feel our conditioning is at least on schedule.
This years squad returns 75 per cent of the lettermen from last
years second place conference finishers. It loses only two starters
on offense and five on defense. In each of these positions, a returning
letterman has assumed the first-string berth.
On offense the Gators should be the best in the south. An abundance
of good running backs (eight returning lettermen) will make the
ground attack hard to stop. Yet, experts say the *65 Gators will be
a PASSING team.
Forecast Not Unreasonable
This forecast is not an unreasonable one. Quarterback Steve
Spurrier completed 65 of 114 passes for 943 yards and 6 touch touchdowns,
downs, touchdowns, enough to gain him SEC Sophomore of the Year recognition.
Behind him is Jacksonvilles Harmon Wages, the nations top high
school passer of two years ago. Wages has shown well in practice
and starred in the Orange-Blue game last spring.
On the receiving end of Spurrier and Wages passes will be the
best pass-catching corps in memory. Topping the list is lonesome
end Charles Casey, who caught 47 passes for 673 yards and 4
touchdowns last year. Behind Casey is Richard Trapp, a speedster
who amazed the crowd in the Orange-Blue clash with 7 catches
totaling 105 yards. Others counted on to catch passes are tight
end Barry Brown, split end Paul Ewaldsen and backs Jack Harper,
Jimmy Jordan, Alan Poe and Hal Seymour.
All this material has made Graves decide to use a flanker
offense most of the time. This formation was almost solely
responsible for last seasons final game bombardment of LSU.
Defense Built Around Gagner
UFs defense is built around a 6-3, 245-pound hulk who goes
by the name of Larry Gagner. Gagner was an AU-SEC offensive
guard in 1964 but has been moved to middle guard on defense,
replacing the graduated Bill Richbourg. Os all the 1965 Gator
All-America hopefuls, Gagner is probably most likely to make
the grade. With ;im anchoring the line, opponents will find yardage
up the middle hard to come by.
The defensive backfield could be the nations best. It loses
but one man of a group that was second nationally in pass defense,
allowing but 64 yards a game through the air. It is headed by
Captain Bruce Bennett, a 2nd team AP All-America on defense
last year. It includes experienced defenders in seniors Allen
Trammell and Dick Kirk and Junior George Grandy. Sophomores
Bobby Downs and Wayne McCall have shown so well that they may
see lots of action.
One could go on and on expounding the greatness of the 1965
Florida football team but more talk is unnecessary. The point
is this team has the makings of a conference and possible a
NATIONAL champion. All it needs is student support and a few
breaks to achieve the schools highest sports victory.
If the team gets this and can somehow get past an October 30
engagement at Auburn, Ala., 1965 could be the Year of the Gator.



Page 28

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Sept. 6, 1965

Varsity Whips Frosh But Defense Lags

**' UFs varsity drubbed the com combined
bined combined forces of the B-team and
freshmen in a full game scrim scrimmage
mage scrimmage Saturday afternoon by a score
of 630#
Quarterback Steve Spurrier led
the varsity attack throwing 21
times and completing 15 for 211
yards and three touchdowns. Paul
Ewaldsen, filling in for ailing
Charles Casey, caught two of the
TD strikes and was Spurriers
prime receiver of the afternoon.
On the ground game, a healthly
John Feiber was the leading car carrier
rier carrier with 56 yards in 11 attempts.
His understudy, Wayne Barfield,
was the no. 2 ground gainer with

Punter Seymour Will Be
Busiest Gator On Field

Barring injury Hal Seymour will
be the busiest man on the UFs
football team in 1965.
Many Gator fans know Seymour
as the barefoot punter from Starke
who has an aversion to being call called
ed called Hallie and high jumped 6-5
in high school.
He was also a high school end
on offense, although this fact was
well-hidden until last spring. His
emergence as a pass receiver in insures
sures insures him steady service in the
Florida corps of flankerback.
How much he can work depends
on other factors. He also had a
whale of spring in the defensive
backfield where his size (6-2,206)
agility and jumping ability is well
put to use.
Now fully recovered from an
attack of mono which decked him
for most of the 1964 season, Sey Seymour
mour Seymour will be a busy man this fall.
Seymours running mates at
flankerback should help make this
a strong position for the Gators.
Senior Alan Poeisatwo-letterman
with proven ability as a pass re receiver,
ceiver, receiver, blocker and runner.
Sophomore Richard Trapp of
Bradenton, who will also play some
at split end, is the kind of pass
receiver who wont be held down
for long and needs only experience
to become an outstanding football
player.
I think these three will get the
Morton Joins
Track Squad
John Morton, former star Miami
Edison athlete, has transferred
from Stanford University to UF.
Morton has signed a Florida
track scholarship, Gator head
track coach Jimmy Carnes has an announced.
nounced. announced.
Since Florida has started to
place such great emphasis on its
track program I decided to come
back close to home and participate
in my own state, said Morton.
Morton, an all-around athlete at
Edison, has compiled an outstand outstanding
ing outstanding record in track and field and
recently set a Jamaica national
discus record in the college discus
with a toss of 162-0.
Mortons top performances are
14-6 in the pole vault, 164-6 in the
college discus and 49-11 in the
16-lb. shot put.
John will concentrate on these
three events in so far as dual meet
competition is concerned, says
Carnes. He is a very outstanding
prospect in the decathlon, however,
and with work in this area is a
strong contender for the 1968
United States Olympic team.
Morton will be ineligible to com compete
pete compete next season but will have three
years of varsity eligibility remain remaining,
ing, remaining, starting with the 1966-67 track
season.

34 yards in 11 attempts. Allen
Trammell ran two punts back for
more than 100 yards and a touch touchdown.
down. touchdown.
The game was not as one-sided
as the score indicates, however.
The freshmen drove more than 70
yards the first time they got the
ball under the guidance of Larry
Rentz. The drive fizzled near the
goal and a fourth down field goal
attempt was wide. Several other
times the frosh moved the ball
well but couldnt cross the varsity
goal.
Coach Ray Graves said he view viewed
ed viewed the scrimmage with mixed
emotions.

job done at flankerback, says
Head Coach Ray Graves. We are
very confident that all of them can
catch the football and believe me
they will get a chance to do just
that this fall.
Seymour will likely start the fall
as the No. 1 man at flankerback,

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Our passing game was definite definitely
ly definitely improved but our defense was
not at all solid. Also, our running
game is not quite on schedule, but
having Graham McKee 1 back next
week may help a lot, Graves said.
Graves mentioned the injuries
to his defensive tackles and lack
of depth at defensive end as the
big problems.
Weve lost the services of Lee
Langley and Wally Colson, listed
as starting tackles, at least tem temporarily.
porarily. temporarily. We hope to have Colson
ready next week but Langleys sta status
tus status is indefinite, Graves com commented.
mented. commented.
According to Graves, the line-

this judgement being offered on a
reserved basis by Graves because
of the even battle between he and
Poe. Which ever boy starts at the
top or second spot had best keep
an eye on Trapp, however, because
the competition should be keen at
this position.

backers and defensive backs were
satisfactory in the scrimmage.
Our backs are very small and
this is a problem, said Graves.
If the line cant stop someone like
Granger (fullback Hoyle of Miss.
State), I just dont think the backs
can hold him to less than six to
seven yards.
Os all the afternoons happen happenings,
ings, happenings, Graves was most pleased
with the kicking of sophomore Bar Barfield.
field. Barfield.
Ive been worried about our

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kicking game all year but now
things look better since Wayne hit
7 for 7 extra points in the scrim scrimmage,
mage, scrimmage, Graves said.
There will be another scrim scrimmage
mage scrimmage either Tuesday or Wednesday
of this week. A full-game scrim scrimmage
mage scrimmage with SEC officials is on tap
for next Saturday. The scrimmage
will be secret and no one will be
admitted.
The team begins working toward
its opener with Northwestern Mon Monday.
day. Monday.



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Murals Program Activity
Open Up Next Week

By JOE HILLIARD
Alligator Staff Writer
Large universities offer many
advantages and one of UFs fore foremost
most foremost is its intramurals program.
The Gator program gives every
student the opportunity to parti participate
cipate participate in the sports he enjoys. It
is divided into the following two
categories: intramural clubs and
intramural competition between
dorms, fraternities, colleges, etc.
The competition among the Latter
is divided into three groups which
are fraternities and sororities,
residence halls, and independent
league. Over 140 teams participate
annually.
In the residence halls, each sec section
tion section may elect a manager, who can
organize the teams for each sport
and remain in contact with the in intramural
tramural intramural department, located in
Room 229 in Florida Gym. Man Managers
agers Managers must sign up their teams
there by next Monday. Games will
begin a week later with football
being the first sport. The sequence
of sports will be football, handball,
basketball, bowling, volleyball,
table tennis, softball, track and
tennis. Each team will play ap approximately
proximately approximately five to seven games.
For the fraternities, water bas basketball
ketball basketball will start the season. All
fraternity managers will have a
meeting on Sept. 15 in Room 309
at 4:00 p.m. in the Gym. The fra fraternity

Monday, Sept. 6, 1965, The Florido Alligator,

ternity fraternity schedule is as follows:
water basketball, volleyball, track,
bowling, basketball, golf, handball
and softball.
Independent competition begins
with bowling. Four people are re required
quired required for a team and no equipment
is needed. These teams must be
registered by September 15th. The
independent schedule is football,
handball, volleyball, basketball,
tennis and softball.
For the individual sports, there
are trophies for each participant
on winning teams. Team trophies
are awarded to winning fraternities
and sororities. There are also
large rotating trophies, which are
retired by three successive wins
of any one group, for the best over overall
all overall winner in each league.
There is a great selection of
equipment available for check out.
Equipment may be picked up either
in the Gym, Graham area, or Bro Broward
ward Broward area (girls only). Any student
may check out gear merely by
showing his ID card.

Clubs Search For Members
For Fall Trimester Murals
The Department of Intramural Athletics and Recreation sponsors a
wide variety of recreational activities and sports clubs. Membership in
these clubs is open to all students.
No experience is necessary and instruction for beginners is given by
the faculty club advisors and advanced club members. Competition is
based on wide levels of proficiency.
Any student interested in the following clubs should contact the Intra Intramural
mural Intramural Department at Room 229, Florida Gym or university extension
2912. Equipment and materials for all clubs are furnished by the Intra Intramural
mural Intramural Department.
A list of clubs and advisors follows:
Club Advisor Phone
Archery Club Miss Millar Ext. 2963
Barbell Club Mr. Eckdahl Ext. 2912
Cricket Club Dr. Gammage Ext. 2572
Fencing Club Dr. Reed Ext. 2512
Qymnasties Club Mr. Regna Ext. 2315
Judo Club Mr. Reisinger Ext. 2315
Karate Club Mr. Reisinger Ext. 2315
Orchesis Club (Modern Dance) Mrs. Lessard. Ext. 2963
Sailing Club Dr. Weaver Ext. 85418
Sigma Delta Psi Paul Varnes Ext. 2912
Soccer Club Mr. Moore Ext. 2315
Synchronized Swim Club Miss Shields Ext. 2963
Women's Tennis Club Miss Brusstar Ext. 2963
Water Ski Club Mr. Eckdahl Ext. 2912
Wrestling Club Mr. Reisinger Ext. 2315
Tor that feeling of insolence'
1 a,
/JT m
STYLES BY PHIL
k. ; i \
Carolyn Plaza
1620 W. University Ave. 378*2244

DORM GRID CLASH:
Murals Soon Take Over

Page 29



Page 30

, The Florida Alligatoiy Monday / Sept. 6, 1965

- - .
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LOCATED AT 110 S.W. 34th ST.
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Open Fri. 9 a.m. 9 p.m.

14 Sophomores Figure Big
In Graves Football Plans

By DICK DENNIS
Alligator Staff Writer
There is no substitute for ex experience.
perience. experience.
This is an old adage that the
sophomores on the 1965 football
Gators are doing their best to
disprove. There are about 14 new newcomers
comers newcomers numbered among Head
Coach Ray Graves first 57 men.
The biggest of the youngsters is
Paige Cutcliffe, 6-1, 237. Quick
and strong, Cutcliffe looked good
in spring practice. He was listed
by several magazines as one of
the top sophomore prospects in the
South. Cutcliffe will shore up the
defensive right tackle slot.
A standout on the frosh squad,
Harmon Wages, has been battling
Kay Stephenson for the No. 2 quar quarterback
terback quarterback job. Wages can run, throw
and punt expertly. A little season seasoning
ing seasoning should bring out his excellent
potential. At 6-2, 198, Wages has
the size and strength to overpower
would-be tackle rs.
Tough, determined Bobby
Downs* spring was slowed by in injuries.
juries. injuries. A high-school quarterback,
he has been switched to defensive
halfback. UF coaches predict his
to be a bright future. Hes 6-0,
180.
Gerald Bramlett, 6-1, 186, is
attempting to gain a berth on the
no. 2 defensive secondary against
passing in the nation. He also work worked
ed worked some at linebacker post in
spring.
Converted end Gene Peek, 6-2,
178, pleased fans at spring Orange

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Turf and Country Club
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Beginning Sept. Ist, 1965
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Boys &. Girls 2 Years &. Up
ALL DAY, % DAY,
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SATURDAY ONLY
PHYSICAL EDUCATIONAL jJJyfj,jJjj K
Swimming (Heated Pool), BETTER VET A 6-DAY-A-WEEK
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Tennis, Boating, 3-R's, OF ALL THOSE GREAT FOOT-
Conversational Spanish, BALL GAMES I COME ON OUT
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At Home Or School

Monday / Sept. 6, 1965. The Florida Alligator, F

GATOR SCRIMMAGE:
Promising Soph Tommy Glenn Carries Against Freshmen

and Blue game with a 37-yard run runback
back runback of a pass interception for a
TD.
The Gator secondary can also
rest easy while fast-improving
Tom Hungerbuhler, 6-0.187, takes
his turn. He has good football sense
to go with size and strength.
The linebacking corps, riddled
much of last season by injuries,

finds in Wayne McCall, 6-1, 197,
a capable reserve who loves con contact.
tact. contact. He's son of Dr, Wayne McCall,
a member of the State Board of
Regents.
The flankerback position, creat created
ed created this year in the new pro-style
offense, looks strong with swift
Richard Trapp, 6-1, 183, already
pushing the veterans for a possible
starting berth. Trapp scored the
winning TD in the spring game.
With less than three minutes to go
he made a one-handed grab of a
pass for a 56-yard score.
The fullback spot will be another
bitterly-fought for plum as soph
Wayne Barfield, 6-0,198, has
looked good this fall. Barfield
kicked 7 of 7 extra points in recent
pro-varsity scrimmage.
Another flankerback prospect is
Tommy Glenn, 6-2, 202. He's ex expected
pected expected to see lots of action In the
future. Glenn led Jacksonville's
prep scorers In his senior year.

Page 31



Page 32

/ The Florida Alligator, Monday, Sept. 6, 1965

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