Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The it iiip it tad
f/ or/( / a ilLLlUiilUn

PREVIEW OF UF LIFE
Jt. '
Welcome freshmen] This is your introduction to the University
of Florida its traditions, organizations, activities, leaders, events
the many moods that make up the UF personality.
The Florida Alligator has compiled this 72-page Freshman edition
to acquaint you with the university, to help you understand the scope
of its activities, and to give you a preview of the work, the fun, the
excitement and the opportunities that lie ahead for you in your college
career.
In this special edition you will find that J. Wayne Reitz, president
of the UF and Bruce Culpepper, student body president have been
Joined by many others in extending a cordial welcome to you.
You will see evidence of the fun and excitement of fraternity and
sorority activities along with the federal task of studying for those
exams.
Special thanks are due Eunice Tall, 2UC, freshman edition editor.
Keep Flexible
(AN EDITORIAL)
You, as incoming freshmen have chosen
the largest and the best university in Florida
to help you enrich your minds and lives.
No, It might not be the best university in
the nation, nor the most personal. But it can
be for you. Its up to you.
Many of your parents will sit at home and
say we are sending our kid to the university.
But sending and financing is about all they can
do.
Probably half of you are planning to become
lawyers, doctors or edfltUeors or teachers.
We feel it is certainly noble to have ambitions
as long as they are not inflexible.
Upon arriving at the UF you will receive
hundreds of little pieces of advice from
fellow students, faculty, and staff. Listen
to all of it, but when you seek aid in decision
lean heavily on those who are professionally
trained and qualified to aid you.
Therefore without attempting to give you
the true rule of the University, we will
simply wish you the customary good luck and
the advice given us upon our arrival: When
you study study hard and enjoy yourself
when youre not.
new U F VICTORY HAT is sported by Student
Body President Bruce Culpepper with coed
Diane Hoehne. The smart-looking straw hats
with orange and blue bands will oe promoted
by Student Government at athletic events
beginning in September.

WELCOME FRESHMEN!

Vol. 57. No. 160

HOMECOMING SLOGAN ANNOUNCED
f Gators Cheer
Floridas 400th Year

Gators Cheer
Floridas 400th Year
will be the slogan
theme for the UFs
1965 Homecoming
weekend celebration
October 15-16.
Homecoming Chairman Wilson
Atkinson, SLW, of Hollywood an announced
nounced announced the winning slogan
Thursday. It was submitted by Ron
Fick of Westbrook, Maine and was
judged first by Florida Gov. Haydon
Burns and the State Cabinet during
a recent special meeting in Talla Tallahassee.
hassee. Tallahassee.
Fick*s catchy phrase earns him
a five-part prize that includes
separate weekend vacation jaunts
to Nassau and Hollywood-by-the-
Sea, Homecoming weekend accom accomodations
odations accomodations for two at Gainesville's
Holiday Inn, as well as two tickets
for the Florida-North Carolina
game and SSO in
gift certificates from local mer merchants.
chants. merchants.
Atkinson said more than 1,400
slogan entries were submitted
an increase of 700 in the contest
participation of 1964. Twenty-five
states were in the final tally,
Including Alaska, California,
Washington, Oregon and Maine
among the more distant locales.
Second prize went to UF coed
Claudia Daly of Ft. Lauderdale.
She will receive vacation journeys
to Cape Coral Estates and Miami
Beach's Balmoral Hotel each
for three days a SSO Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville shopping spree and two Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming football tickets.
Mrs. Hazel Ritch of Starke took
third place to earn an AM-FM
radio from Couch's of Gainesville
and $25 in gift certificates. Fourth
spot went to Mrs. R. C. Blaloch
of Abbeville, Ala., who will get
SIOO in Gainesville merchandise.
Atkinson said plans already are
being made to incorporate
Florida's quadricentennial cele celebration
bration celebration as part of the gala Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming parade October 15. Special
invitations will be extended to St.
Augustine groups and marching
units to participate in the parade
because of the commemoration of
the 400th anniversary already
under way in that city.
Next job for Florida Blue Key,
which annually sponsors Home Homecoming,
coming, Homecoming, will be selection of a guest
speaker for the October 15 banquet
at Florida Gymnasium and a
roaster of ceremonies for Gator
Growl, the mammoth, student-pro student-produced
duced student-produced pep rally that will follow
the banquet at Florida Field.
Hundreds of UF students have
been working since April on var various
ious various phases of Homecoming *65,
including the paraded alumni
breakfast andbarbeoie, Gator
Growl, and other events.

Friday, July 30, 1965

i!ember^o^th!^flohid^cabii!et
recently selected Gators Cheer Floridas
400th Year as the winning slogan for 1965
Homecoming. Gov. Haydon Burns, center, is
shown with Homecoming Chairman Wilson
Atkinson of Hollywood, fourth from left, and
Stewart Parsons of Tallahassee, fourth from
right, president of Florida Blue Key, after
the entry from Ron Fick of Westbrook, Maine,
was named for first prize. Others, left to
right, include Agriculture Commissioner Doyle
Conner, State Treasurer Broward Williams,
Attorney General Earl Faircloth, Atkinson,
Gov. Burns, Parsons, Public Instruction Sup Superintendent
erintendent Superintendent Thomas D. Bailey, Comptroller
Ray Green and Secretary of State Tom Adams.
$1.19 Million Granted UF
For NASA Building

The National Aeronautics and
Space Administration (NASA)
awarded the UF a $1,190,000 fa facilities
cilities facilities grant Wednesday for
construction of a four-story space
sciences research building on the
campus.
The announcement by UF Presi President
dent President J. Wayne Reitz followed con confirmatlon
firmatlon confirmatlon from NASA
Administrator James E. Webb in
Washington, D. C.
Dr. Reitz said architectural
planning would begin Immediately,
aiming toward groundbreaking in
early 1966.
The building will be located
across from the university's
Service Center, southwest of New Newell
ell Newell Hall.
Completion of the structure will
enable various space-oriented
programs already under way at the
University to be housed in one
area, rather than spread
throughout campus.
Dr. Reitz pointed out almost
all colleges of the University can
be expected, at some time lnlhe
future, to make a contribution to
knowledge needed for space
exploration. He cited a dozen de departments
partments departments in the College of Arts
and Sciences, along with
engineering, medicine, physical
education and architecture as
specific examples.

Section A

"The new grant will permit the
expansion of theoretical and
experimental research in aero aeronautical
nautical aeronautical and space sciences and
will enable the UF to train an
increased number of highly
qualified young researchers,"
Webb said.
The University is in its second
year of a three-year, $670,000
grant from NASA for multi-dis multi-disciplinary
ciplinary multi-disciplinary research with 18
separate projects dealing in such
varied fields as radio astronomy,
nuclear propulsion and aeronomy.
Eight individual research grants
from NASA totaling another $260,
000 also are being utilized this
year, along with a SIIB,OOO train training
ing training grant supporting 32 graduate
students in space-related work.
One wing of the new building
will house the University's com computer
puter computer facilities. Dr. Reitz said
plans have been made to convert
from the current 709 computer
to an IBM 360 model with approx approximately
imately approximately 10 times greater speed
and capability.
The four floors will contain
offices and laboratories for re researchers
searchers researchers from the areas of
psychology, psychiatry,
physiology, electrical engineering,
physics, chemistry, engineering
(See NASA Grant, P. 2)



Page 2-A

I The Florida * p
* ALLIGATOR S
| DAVID A. WEST Editor-In-Chief $
ij: AL LEONARD. . . Executive Editor fe
:: EUNICE TALL. . .Freshman Ed. Editor I?
|j:j LOU FERRIS .Asst. Freshman Ed. Editor &
$ ANDY MOOR. .Sports Editor #
y.
NASA Grant (Cont'd. from P. I)

mechanics, metallurgy, optical and
radio astronomy, aeronomy and
astrophysics.
Dr. Reitz praised the work of
Dr. L. E. Grinter, dean of the
University's Graduate School, in
coordinating the building proposal
that was presented to NASA offi officials.
cials. officials.
"The University's contribution

Womens Honorary To Form

A new women's honorary
sorority to be formed next fall
will recognize achievements in
leadership and service, according
to Andy Hall, 4AS, secretary of
organizations.
, "The purpose of this organi organization
zation organization is to fill die vacuum that
ftosts by having only one women's
leadership sorority on campus,"
HaU said.
_ Mortar Board, the national wo women's

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, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 3Q, 1945

to the national program of space
research through its graduates, its
effort and desire to stimulate the
nation's economy through cooper cooperation
ation cooperation with industry and its en encouragement
couragement encouragement of the facilities of
all disciplines to contribute to
the nation's space-related
research are significant," Dr.
Reitz concluded.

men's women's leadership honorary has a
limited membership and requires
its members to maintain an overall
2.7 average.
The only academic requirement
for membership in the new organi organization
zation organization will be a 2.0 average,
according to Hall.
The charter membership will be
formed In September if the organi organization
zation organization is approved then by the
Student-Faculty Committee on
Social and Academic Affairs.

Noted Medical Profs Named

New UF Prof Os Pediatrics

Dr. Charles U. Lowe, one of
the world's authorities on the
understanding of developmental
aspects of metabolic disease, hi.
been appointed professor of pedi pediatrics
atrics pediatrics at the UF's College o
Medicine.
The appointment, announced
Thursday by Dr. Emanuel Suter,
dean of the College, is effective
August 1.
Dr. Lowe, 44, is research
professor of pediatrics at the Uni University
versity University of Buffalo and attending
physician and director of research
at Children's Hospital in Buffalo.
He described, for the first time,
a hereditary disease which has
become known as Lowe's Syn Syndrome,
drome, Syndrome, a metabolic defect
involving the kidney and associated
with mental retardation and blind blindness.
ness. blindness. Ibis discovery has been
credited as a significant lead to
the understanding of biochemical,
anatomical and genetic inter interrelations
relations interrelations in human development.
He has developed therapeutic
techniques for certain forms of
glycogen storage diseases In
children and conducted extensive
research Into nutritional problems
in children.

Dr. Lowe is a member of the
National Research Council's Com Committee
mittee Committee on Infant Nutrition, a post
e has held since 1959. He also
erved the Council as a member
of its Division of Medical Sciences
from 1958 to 1961. He served the
American Academy of Pediatrics
as a founding member of its
Committee on Nutrition as its
chairman from 1957 1960 and
again from 1963 to the present.
In announcing the appointment,
Dean Suter said: "Dr. Lowe's
abilities as a physician and med medical
ical medical investigator whose authority
is respected internationally in the
field of metabolism will bring
added strength to our teaching and
clinical programs. The UF College
of Medicine welcomes his talents."
Dr. Lowe received aBS degree
from Harvard College cum laude
in 1942, and the MD degree cum
laude from Yale University's
School of Medicine in 1945.
Born In Pelham, N.Y., Dr. Lowe
is married to the former Eileen
Josten of Northampton, Mass., and
has four children.

Foundation
Backs Program

The UF College o t Medicine
and the Nemours Foundation 0 f
Wilmington, Esl. f Monday announ announced
ced announced appointment of Dr. William B
Weil Jr. as the Alfred T. duPont
Professor of Pediatrics for the
Handicapped Child. The announce announcement
ment announcement followed approval by the
Board of R£ents at St. Peters Petersburg.
burg. Petersburg.
Dr. Weil is a nationally recog recognized
nized recognized pediatrician and specialist
in chronic diseases of childhood.
The appointment, made possible
by the Alfred I. duPont Institute
of the Nemours Foundation, ini initiates
tiates initiates a long range program imed
at prevention of handicapping con
ditions in children and improving
the care of the handicapped
particularly in the South. The grant
was approved one year ago by the
Board of Control.
Dr. Weil, 40, currently associate
professor of pediatrics in the
College of Medicine, is director
of the National Foundation- March
of Dimes Birth Defects Center at
the University's J. HiUis Miller
Health Center and is secretary secretarytreasurer
treasurer secretarytreasurer of the Society for
Pediatric Research.
He is also director of the
graduate training program for
academic pediatrics in the College
of Medicine and a member of the
Advisory Committee for the
University Hospital's Clinical
Research Center which concerns
itself with treating patients suf suffering
fering suffering from diseases of unknown
causes.



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Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3-A



Page 4-A

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RESEARCHERS in the UFs College of
Medicine probe the mind of the gator in
order to give science a better understanding
of the human brain. Dr. Donald C. Goodman,
professor of anatomy and neurology, studies
the cerebellum in the brain to determine its
role in controlling posture, equilibrium and
locomotion.
'*Wp^SL
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.xtg&A
r
NUCLEAR engineers work on aVandeGraaf
accelerator in conducting neutron studies.

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PROJECT STROL is in action here as Dr. Harry F. Hollien
center, associate director of the UF Communications Science Labor Laboratory,
atory, Laboratory, prepares to start a series of tests from Tom Freijo. Dr.
John F. Michel, left, research associate in the lab with Dr. Hollien
and Mrs. Carol Hazouri, X-ray technician, stand by to assist in the
experiments. The National Institutes of Health sponsor the $200,000
project that is giving greater background data on the workings ot the
larynx.

/ The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 30 # 1965

Research A Continuous UF Activity

By TOVA LEVINE
Feature Editor
Through time and space, the UF world of
research spins on -- constantly enlarging its
orbit to encompass new and varied challenges
of science and the arts.
Every department of the university is
involved in research of some kind, Dr.
E. R. Hendrickson, UF director of research
said, although some departments are doing
more than others. Some are working on local
projects and others, national.

A great deal of UF research
Is of national importance, accord according
ing according to Hendrickson, as evidenced
by the support of national organi organizations
zations organizations and federal agencies.
Over sl2 million in grants, con contracts
tracts contracts and donations mostly
from national sources were in
effect at UF as of December 1964.
The bulk of research funds for
these various projects are invested
in engineering and medicine, fol followed
lowed followed by the Agriculture and Arts
and Sciences Colleges.
Space occupies a big place in
UF research and scientists in
different departments are studying
various aspects of it."
Ibis is the word from Larry
Woods of the office of sponsored
research. Woods s editor of a
biannual publication of the office
entitled, Dimensions in Re Research.
search. Research.
UF engineers are working on a
wide range of projects in regard
to NASA's Saturn program. One
type involves a study of liquid
propellants for the fuel of the
rocket.
Other disciplines involved in
space study are biology and
physics, as evidenced by the work
of two brothers, Drs. Archie and
Thomas D. Carr.
Dr. Archie Carr, professor of
biology, is studying the migration
of green turtles, some of which
weigh over 300 pounds. By attach attaching
ing attaching a transmitter to the back of
the turtles (who swim on the sur surface
face surface of the water) and by sending
up a receiver system in one of
NASA's scientific satellites,'*
Carr hopes to trace the direction
and position of the turtles as the
satellite relays the information
back to him whenever it passes
over the turtle.
Dr. Thomas D. Carr, associate
professor of physics and
astronomy, has been granted NASA
support for a radio-telescope to
be carried on another type of
satellite to assist in the radio
observation of planets, Woods said.
In the College of Medicine, re research
search research and discovery of a virus viruskilling
killing viruskilling drug known as IDU used
for a cure of a blinding virus
caused by a corneal ulcer on the

eye, has brought national recog recognition
nition recognition to Dr. Herbert E. Kaufman,
associate professor of
opthalmology.
Dr. Kaufman was named one of
America's Ten Outstanding Young
Men of 1964 for his discovery of
IDU.
But there's still more to the
story of UF's research.
Last year, 444 projects were
underway, Dr. Hendrickson said,
and this number is always in increasing.
creasing. increasing.
UF research on the point of
view of quality is as good as any
I've seen in the country, he added.
Here's a sample of what other
departments are doing:
Anatomy: a study of what
changes take place in the brain,
after an injury or cerebral hem hemorrhage
orrhage hemorrhage damages it, that permit
the functioning of certain cells and
the return of bodily movements.
Anesthesiology: a study of
the effect of different strengths of
a common anesthesia, cyclo-pro cyclo-propane,
pane, cyclo-propane, on chicken embryos.
Metallurgy: experiments
with gold as a protective coating
device, such as was used in Astro Astronaut
naut Astronaut Ed White's lifeline and sun
visor (which were both overlaid in
gold).
Agriculture: 12 new crops
for state growers were developed
this year, including a new type of
blackberry, two new types of tom tomatoes,
atoes, tomatoes, and a new watermelon; also,
experimentations with j
the grapefruit.
Geography: migration stu studies
dies studies of certain South American
natives.
Zoology: studies on the
South African ostrich, to see how
it adapts itself to the extreme
arid conditions in which it lives.

y ;
of^iJS£ Y E. GODDARD, associate professor
fihiSl S f t i y st dle length and density of
lbers from the heart of the Dine i trees.

DR. HERBERT E.l
KAUFMAN, professor 1
and chief of ophthalm- if
ology in the UFs
medical school, is f
credited with the dis- 1
covery of the first I
known cure for a virus 1
disease, a disease of 1
the eye which often j
leads to blindness. M
iq 'lflvl
HPH||hl i B f JB|B
m
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TjSEi^Tinrdri
rection of Dr. Albert I
G. Guy, graduate I
student Terrence B. I
Lindemer built this I
special apparatus for p
three-fola metallic di- gj
ffusion studies. The I
work is sponsored by
Mi u- s- ah



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Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

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JOY RELAXES at home in Gainesville in
the outfit she wore for the Miss 1-75
contest.
Union Staff Artist Wins
' :s£ -1*: .V : .-'<-. T :, - v '. '-*.. J 'i'.-fe; .(X 1 1
_
Beauty Opportunity

Entering the Miss Interstate Interstate-75"
-75" Interstate-75" contest in Wildwood this
summer began what seems to be
a promising career for pretty
Florida Union staff artist Joy
Priem.
But Joy isn't sure whether she
will be actress, model or set
designer.
After the 1-75 contest, Joy re received
ceived received a call from a Los Angeles,
Calif, photographer-agent who had
covered the contest.
He said she was photogenic,"
and asked her to accept an all allexpense
expense allexpense trip to St. Louis to be
in a documentary film produced
by the National Association of
Truckers, and to be Miss August"
for Overdrive trucking magazine.
Joy accepted, and had a great
time" in St. Louis.
The petite dark-eyed brunette
lives in Gainesville, and was a
UF student in 1961-62. Now,
besides her full time Union Job,
she paints and draws as a hobby,
surfs (yes, in the Atlantic!), does
some Little Theater acting and
plays pool. She has also modeled
fashions.
She says she would rather be a
professional set designer than act actress
ress actress or model, but that it is a
hard field to break into."
Joy was in a photo-feature of
the Charlatan, 1965 Mardi Gras
issue, early this year.
Future plans include another
film for the trucking association,
possibly work in California but
right now, she says she enjoys
her Job drawing and designing
for Florida Union projects.

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/ FLORIDA UNION
STAFFER Joy Priem
embarks for St. Louis
from Gainesville Air Airport.
port. Airport.

Page 5-A



Page 6-A

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 30/ 1965

Henry Mancini Heads Fall
Lyceum Counci I Attractions

Henry Mancini, the Chicago
Symphony Orchestra, and an Irish
folk singer related to the poet
William Butler Yeats are a few
of the attractions to be offered
this year by the UF Lyceum
Council.
Henry Mancini will conduct a
40-piece orchestra in concert,
Saturday, September 25, accord according
ing according to Reid Poole, head of the UF
Department of Music. Poole said
admission to the concert for UF
students will be $1.50, while the
price to the general public will be
$3.00.
On October 26, the classical
20-piece Esterhazy Orchestra will
perform as a regular Lyceum
Council attraction. Named for the
Count Esterhazy who employed
JMBA Names
New Officers
Jack B. Nichols, 4LW, of Tampa,
was elected the new president of
the John Marshal Bar Association
last week.
Other newly elected officers in include
clude include Charles O. Mitchell, 3LW,
vice president from Jacksonville;
James L. Harrison, 3LW, sec secretary
retary secretary from Jacksonville; and
Harry W. Meshaw, 3LW, treasur treasurer-elect
er-elect treasurer-elect from Jacksonville Beach.
The elections were held at the
Law School last week with 350
people voting.

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composer Franz Josef Haydn
during the 18th century, the or orchestra
chestra orchestra specializes in the music
of Haydn's era.
Like all other regular Lyceum
Council attractions, students will
be admitted to this one free upon
showing their identification cards.
Miss Gralnne Yeats will be on
campus October 23. Miss Yeats,
a distant relative of poet William
Butler Yeats, will perform a
program of mainly Irish folksongs.
Poole said the Lyceum Council
is also tentatively scheduling a
singer named Subbulakshmi for
September 28. Subbulakshmi, ac accompanied
companied accompanied by a group of native
instrumentalists, will perform
songs of India. The performance
is being arranged through the
Indian Embassy at Washington,
D. C.
The winter trimester will be
a fuller one as far as musical
attractions on the campus are
concerned, Poole said.
The National Ballet Company
of Washington, D. C., is slated
to appear January 23, while the
New York Pro Musica Society,
under the direction of Noah Green Greenberg,
berg, Greenberg, will perform February 9.
The New York group, according
to Poole, is the world's greatest
group of performers of Baroque
and Renaissance works, as well
as music from the Middle Ages.
The New York Pro Musica has
toured throughout the world and
has an exclusive recording
contract with Decca Records.
February will bring the Vienna
Octet, a chamber music group

which Poole said covers the field
as far as music for the octet
is concerned." The octet will per perform
form perform February 15.
The Chicago Symphony Orches Orchestra,
tra, Orchestra, under the direction of Jean
Martinon, will be featured in a
February 27 concert. This or orchestra
chestra orchestra was recently rated as one
of the five best symphony orches orchestras
tras orchestras in America by Time magazine.
The "popular" attraction for the
winter trimester comparable to
the Mancini concert in the fall
has not been decided yet, Poole
said.
"Mancini is die biggest popular
attraction the Lyceum Council has
ever had," said Poole. "If the
students show enough interest in
this calibre of entertainment, it
probably will continue."
Bands Practice
Members and directors of high
school bands from throughout
Florida arrived on the UF campus
Tuesday for the eighth annual mar marching
ching marching band clinic.
The five-day program attracts
150 students and directors and will
be capped by the All-Star Marching
Band's appearance in pre-game
and halftime performances at
Saturday's North-South high school
football game on Florida Field.
The Universitys Department of
Music and the Florida Bandmas Bandmasters*
ters* Bandmasters* Association co-sponsor the
clinic with William F. Swor,
director of bands, at Louisiana
State University, serving as
overall director.

Y ff vyiff aaj
LIKE ATTENDING CLASS?

Freshmen and other students
have the opportunity to spend three
extra hours a week in class for
no grades ami no credit. The
Reading Clinic, Room 310 Ander Anderson
son Anderson Hall, offers this opportunity
to any student who wishes to im improve
prove improve his reading and study skills.
The clinic, which is part of the
C-3 department, is open five days
a week from 8:30 a.m. to noon and
from 1 to 5 p^n.
About 75 students are partici participating
pating participating this summer, but during the
school year volunteers number
nearly 1,000. Freshmen com comprize
prize comprize the greatest number of those

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Y. Melton, assistant director of
the clinic, but law students and
faculty members have also bent,
flted from the program.
The aim of the clinic is not
just to make a student a faster
reader, but to work with him in all
phases of his college development.
Preliminary testing and counseliig
help the student determine hi*
weak points.
Attendance is not required, an!
the student can continue comlig
as long as he feels it is necessary.
Most students will attend for six
to eight weeks, according to Dr
Melton.



Alumni Film Featured at 'TV Reception

'Road to The Moon Shown
For Incoming UF Freshman
Faculty representatives and students from
the University of Florida will attend 35 special
receptions throughout the state during August
in conjunction with preview showings of the
Alumni Associations 1965 film, Road to the
Moon.
Television stations in Miami, Panama City,
Tampa, Orlando, Jacksonville, Tallahassee,
Palm Beach, Pensacola and Ft. Myers have
scheduled the 30-minute documentary film,
August 3-11.
All receptions with the exception of those
in Perry and Jacksonville are timed to begin
at least 30 minutes in advance of the telecast.
Audiences will include alumni, students who
will be entering the University next September
and their parents. Faculty members and Uni University
versity University students will conduct a question-and question-andanswer
answer question-andanswer session after the film.
Road to the Moon spotlights students,
faculty and staff members with an emphasis
on academic and personal assistance avail available
able available to the student as he pursues his profession
at the University.

TUESDAY. AUG. 3, 7:30 P.M. (CST)
STATION WJHG-TV (CH. 7), PANAMA CITY
PANAMA CITY Panama City Country
Club, 7 p*m. (CST) William E. Rion,
director, Florida union; Robert Crowley,
Panama City.
MARIANNA Chipola Hotel, 7 p.m. (CST)
Dr. Kenneth Christiansen, director of edu educational
cational educational television; Brenda Joyce Braxton,
Cotton dale.
TUESDAY, AUG. 3, 8:30 P.M.
STATION WCKT-TV (CH.7), MIAMI
MIAMI DuPont Plaza Hotel, 8 p.m.
Dr. Kimball Wiles, dean, College of Education;
Ronald LaFace, Miami.
FT. LAUDERDALE Galt Ocean Mile
Hotel, 7:30 p.m. Dr. Ralph Page, dean,
College of Arts and Sciences; Jane Edity Shelly,
Ft. Lauderdale.
WEDNESDAY. AUG. 4, 8 P.M.
STATION WTVT-Tv (CH. 13), TAMPA
TAMPA Floridan Hotel, 7:30 p.m. --
Robert Lynch, acting director. Division of
Informational Services; Charlotte Jean Mira Mirabella,
bella, Mirabella, Tampa. A __
BARTOW Johns Restaurant, 7:30 p.m.--
Louis V. Voyles, assistant University
examiner; Frederick G. McKeel, Lakeland.
BRADENTON Bradenton Cabana Motel,
7:30 p.m. Lt. Col. Milton B. Christian,
assistant professor of military science; Sam
C. Hershfield, Bradenton.
CLEARWATER Jack Tar Harrison Hotel,
7:30 p.m. Dr. Knox T. Millsaps, professor
of aerospace engineering; Judith Annette
Moore, Clearwater. oil
PLANT CITY Johnsons Restaurant, 7:3U
p.m. Spurgeon Cherry, assistant dean,
College of Physical Education and Health;
James S. Gardner, GainesviUe.
SARASOTA Sarasota Terrace Motor
Hotel, 7:30 o.m. Dr. Roy Tew. associate
Srofessor, Department of Speech; Patrick
[. Scanlon, Gainesville. _ OA
SEBRING First National Bank, 7:30
p.m. Dr. H. T. Martin Jr., director of
University Counseling Center; Jack Roy Seims,
V ST Social Arts Building,
St. Petersburg Junior College, 7:30 p.m*
Dr. E. R. Hendrickson, director, Division of
Sponsored Research; Elizabeth Douglas, Safety
Harb r THURSDAY. AUG. 5. 8:30 P.M.
STATION WFTV-+V (CH.9). ORLANDO
ORLANDO Cherry Plaza Hotel, 8 P.m.--
Alan Robertson, dean of University relations
and development; Richard' L. Fletcher Jr.,
OI COCOA Brevard Hotel, 8 p.m. -- Dr.
Herbert E. Kaufman, chairman, Department
S&JBS
'ary departments; John S. Hager, Ormond
B *LBMBORQ Leesburg BtltaClub.Sp.m.--
B 'oCALA* Feder.l SaTlnge li F-daii
45SSSKS: Constance Colwell, Ocala.

SCHEDULE
!v !v
| "Rood to |
i Moon"will be
seen on film/
| not telecast,
in these cities. $
| &
WiVV*yVVAVAViVVV%Vo
:k
:k

Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

MnaaditllMHaiMl MnaaditllMHaiMl*
* MnaaditllMHaiMl* J ||2 |H Pj B
J I-J A- KJ MQH H H
/ /-V k H l^Mj/
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-*- Sfe I &3SB N
UF STUDENTS Tommy Tart, Diane Kelley
and Bill Holt (1-r) help map out plans for
student participation in statewide TV reception
project for incoming frosh and their parents.

SANFORD Sanford Civic Center, 8 p.m.
Bill A. Fleming, director, Division of Alumni
Services; Carol Oxford, Sanford,
TITUSVILLE Citizens Bank, 8 p.m.
D. K. Stanley, dean, College of Physical
Education and Health; Truman Scarborough
Jr., Titusville.
FRIDAY, AUG. 6, 9:30 P.M.
STATION WJXT-TV (CH. 4), JACKSONVILLE
** JACKSONVILLE Wilmington Room,
Atlantic Coast Line Building, 7:30 p.m., Aug.
5 Robert B. Mautz, vice president for
academic affairs; Lois Linwick, Jacksonville.
GAINESVILLE University of Florida
Faculty Club, 8 p.m. Louis V. Voyles,
assistant University examiner; Richard J.
Anderson, professor of psychology; Dr. Daniel
O. Spinks, professor of soils ana soil chemist;
Dr. Harold C. Riker, director of housing;
William E. Rion, director, Florida Union.
LAKE CITY Womans Club, 8 p.m.
Dr. Donald J. Hart, dean, College of Business
Administration; A. W. Isom Jr., Lake City.
LIVE OAK Suwannee Hotel, 8 p.m.
Kenneth F. Small, director of Radio Station
WRUF; Sheryl Folsom, Live Oak.
PALATKA Jamels Restaurant, 8 p.m.
Lois Knowles, assistant dean, College of
Nursing; Larry E. Mailhos, Palatka.
SATURDAY, AUG. 7, 5 P.M.
STATION WCTV-TV (CH. 6), TALLAHASSEE
TALLAHASSEE Residence of Frank Worth,
310 Saratoga Drive, 4:30 p.m. Alanobert Alanobertson,
son, Alanobertson, dean of University relations and develop development;
ment; development; Zollie Maynard Jr., Tallahassee.
** PERRY Starlight Cafeteria, 7:30
p.m., Aug. 13 Dr. Ernest H. Cox, assistant
dean, College of Arts and Sciences; Frank
Faircloth, Perry. . OA
QUINCY Kittrells Restaurant, 4:30
p.m. Dr. Joe N. Busby, assistant director,
Agriculture Extension Service; Stewart Par Parsons,
sons, Parsons, Gainesville.
MONDAY, AUG. 9, 7:30 P.M.
STATION WPTV-TV (CH. SV PALM BEACH
PALM BEACH Palm Beach Towers. 7
p.m. George Corrick, director, Division
of Development Services; Thomas W. Sans Sansbury,
bury, Sansbury, West Palm Beadh.
BELLE GLADE Belle Glade Civic Cen Center,
ter, Center, 7 p.m. Dr. Earl G. Rogers, professor
of agronomy; Mike Berryhill, Belle Glade.
FT. PIERCE Simonsens Restaurant,
7 p.m. Dr. Harold C. Riker, director
of housing; John F. Prindible 111, Ft. Pierce.
VERO BEACH Youth Center, 7 p.m.
Dr. Marna V. Brady, dean of women; Sierra
Sue Kennedy, Vero Beach.
TUESDAY, AUG. 10, 8 P.M. (MTV
STATION WEAR-TV (CH. 3). PENSACOLA
PENSACOLA Mutual Federal Savings &
Loan Association, 7:30 p.m. (CST) -- Dr.
Lester L. Hale, dean of student affairs; Susan
Skinner, Pensacola. i *on
VALPARAISO Valparaiso State Bank, 7:30
p.m. (CST) Reid Poole, chairman, Depart Department
ment Department of Music; Judith Pritchard, Eglin Air
Force Base. w
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 11. 8 P.M.
STATION WINK-TV (CH. 11), FT. MYERS
FT. MYERS First National Bank, 7:30
p.m. William Cross, assistant dean of
men; Constance Lee Hickson, Bokeelia.
NAPLES Womans Club, 7:30 p.m.
Dr. Ernest H. Cox, assistant dean, College
of Arts and Sciences; Peter M. Winokur,
Naples.

Page 7-A



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 30, 1965

Page 8-A

ROTC Not
All Drudgery
The opportunity to serve their
country and fulfill their military
obligation as a commissioned
officer awaits those who success successfully
fully successfully complete the Army or Air
Force ROTC program.
During their first two years of
ROTC training, which is man mandatory,
datory, mandatory, cadets are familiarized
with the service of their choice.
Movies, maps, weapons and close
order drill are utilized to demon demonst
st demonst ra t e what the commissioned
officer is expected to know.
The first two years of drill dont
have to be all drudgery. Qualified
cadets can play in the ROTC band.
The Army and Air Force have
precision drill teams and rifle
teams.
Both teams travel extensively.
The drill teams have gone to
Mardi Gras, Cherry Blossom
Festival and the Presidential
Inauguration Parade as well as
parades around the state. Rifle
teams attend meets at various
colleges, universities and military
installations around the South.
Rigorous mental and physical
examinations are given to those
desiring to enter the advanced
program. Qualified cadets will
attend summer camp between their
junior and senior year.
Scholarships are offered by both
services and are of two or four
year duration. These include free
tuition, textbooks and laboratory
fees in addition to paying a retainer
fee of SSO per month for the period
that the scholarship is in effect.
Advanced cadets not on scholar scholarship
ship scholarship receive S4O per month during
their junior and senior year. Stu Students
dents Students desiring graduate work are
deferred from active duty until
they have completed their advanced
degree.
After graduation, cadets com commissioned
missioned commissioned in the Army must serve
two years active duty while Air
Force officers on ground status
serve four years active duty. Army
officers selected for the Army
Aviation training must serve three
years active duty, and Air Force
aviators serve five years active
duty.

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July 30, 1965,

Union A
Community
Center
By TOVA LEVINE
- Feature Editor
The Florida Union is the com community
munity community center of the UF for its
students, faculty, alumni and
guests. The Union is an organi organization
zation organization and a program as well as
a building.
The first event sponsored by
the Union in the fall will be the
Orientation Open House program.
All campus organizations and
Union committees have been
invited to plan a display and demon demonstration
stration demonstration for this night. All parts
of the Florida Union will be open
to incoming freshmen and new stu students,
dents, students, including the Student
Government offices, publications
and Florida Blue Key offices.
The second event sponsored by
the Florida Union will be the
Freshman Talent show,
culminating the week-long orien orientation
tation orientation period. According to Dick
Thompson, acting president of the'
Union Board, all freshmen with
talent of any sort dancing,
singing, instrumental or comedy
acts are encouraged to try out.
Those who wish to participate
should plan to bring with them the
necessary accessories for the skit
or act.
The Florida Union encompasses
many of the activities of the UF
and offers functions and events
throughout the year to appeal to
many different interests.
According to Thompson, there
are openings in committee work
for those students who wish to
participate, and opportunities for
advancement on the Board.
"The Union Board covers
different areas of student life and
tries to have something for all
segments of the student body,** he
added.
The Forums Committee keeps
the campus up to date on contem contemporary
porary contemporary affairs through book
reviews and discussions. In the
past Erskine Caldwell, Roy
Wilkins, Medford Evans and
notable UF professors have spoken
at one of the forum discussion
presentations. Receptions and
group discussions follow the
speeches! Similar programs are
slated for this year.
The Fine Arts Committee, in
presenting displays, art works,
drama and music performances
helps to promote the cultural
interests on campus. Programs
of "Macbeth** by the National
Shakespeare Co., "The Miser**
wirtten by Moliere and the operetta
"Naughty Marietta** will be pre presented,
sented, presented, as well as others in
conjunction with the campus-wide f
Fine Arts Festival.
Within the building itself are
the billiard room, craft shop,
photographic darkroom, music
listening rooms, browsing library,
guest rooms, barber shop, game
rooms and meeting rooms.
Plans are underway for the new
Florida Union which is scheduled
to open in the fall of 1966.
FU officers for the coming term
are: Ira (Bill) McCollum,
president; Doug Lynn, vice presi president;
dent; president; Dick Thompson, treasurer;
Jane Klmbrell, director. There
will be three positions open for
interested students: two director directorships
ships directorships and secretary of the Board
of Union Activities.
4.
Thompson said students who
would like to work for the Union
should apply in Room 315 FU for
the committee of their choice.

Page 9-A



Page 10-A

All freshmen, except those who
live with their parents in Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, will be living on the UF
campus this fall.
These incoming freshmen will
not be assigned rooms in any one
dorm or to any particular floors
of the dorms, said H. C. Riker,
Director of Housing. Room
assignments are made indeterm indeterminant
inant indeterminant of the year of school the
student is in.
Applications for mens housing
accommodations for the fall will be
accepted until space runs out,
said Riker, but womens housing,
was filled some time ago.
The UF campus can house 5,800
single students in the dormitories
on campus 2,200 women and
3,600 men. There are also apart apartments
ments apartments for 900 married students on

The illegal sale and use of
narcotics, ranging from marijuana
cigarettes to dexedrine and other
goof balls, though not wide widespread,
spread, widespread, poses a law enforcement
and detection problem on the UF
campus.
According to campus police
records, there have been nine
cases of students involved in the
illegal use or theft of drugs since
1959.
It is difficult to find out exactly
where students get narcotics,
said Gainesville Chief of Police
William D. Joiner.
They can get them from various
places. In the past we have had
two or three pushers that would
get marijuana cigarettes from
Miami, Tampa and Jacksonville
and sell them here, Joiner said.
Dean of Men Frank T. Adams
cited the most serious narcotics
problem as that concerning
dexedrine and other pep pills.
Gasoline stations which are
known truck stems have been known
as sources for dexedrine, Adams
said. While I dont know of any
around here that do sell them, if
theyll sell the pills to truck
drivers, theyll probably sell to
anybody.

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, The Florida Alligator, Friday/ July 30, 1965

UF To House 5,800 This hall
+ +

Narcotics.. Not in Much Demand Here

campus. Housing for another 1,300
students is available in the various
sorority and fraternity houses.
The remaining 8,000 students
have to find accommodations in
Gainesville. It is not too difficult
to find suitable housing there,
according, to Riker, because so
many hew apartment houses are
being built during the summer near
the campus.
Some students will be living on
campus in temporary facilities
until regular space becomes
available. Riker said these
temporary facilities range from
upper floor dorm study lounges,
which have been temporarily con converted
verted converted to rooms, to temporary
mens dorms, which are located
near the Fine Arts and
Architecture Building.

Also, students with prescrip prescriptions
tions prescriptions for dexedrine have been
known to sell pills to other stu students,
dents, students, Adams said. They can buy
50 or 100 pills for a dollar and
sell them at fifty cents each.
According to Adams, dexedrine
is chiefly a problem around
examination time, as students try
to keep awake to study.
Dexedrine may have no effect
on some people, Adams said, but
there are others who simply
shouldn't be taking it. It works on
the central nervous system and can
really have some bad effects.
Penalties differ for students
caught selling or using dexedrine
or similar drugs. In some cases,
the offender may simply be talked
with. In more serious cases, he
may be sent before a faculty
discipline committee, and subse subsequently
quently subsequently suspended or expelled.
In addition, in any case involving
the illegal use or sale of narcotics,
the state narcotics board is
notified.
I believe the dexedrine problem
is not as serious now as it has

Applications for housing have
considerably exceeded the space
available, said Riker, especially
applications from women stu students.
dents. students.
Incoming freshmen women will
be greeted in the lobbies of the
dorms by approximately 150 coeds
who will return to the campus early
to welcome them. In the mens
halls section advisors will greet
the incoming freshmen men; these
section advisors will be assisted
by officers and representatives
from the Student Area Councils.
These welcome weekers will
assist the new students in getting
settled in their dorms, answer any
questions the new student might
have, and show the new freshman
around campus.

been in the past. People all over
the state are cracking down on its
sale, doctors arent issuing pre prescriptions
scriptions prescriptions for it as readily as
they once did, and the use of the
drug in general is being reevalu reevaluated,
ated, reevaluated, Adams said.
At one time some years ago,
the campus police collected enough
dexedrine on campus to stock
several drugstores.
Other than dexedrine, Adams
said there was no serious narcotics
problem.
In the past year, we have had
several cases of students caught
with marijuana cigarettes, he
said. They were caught when they
left some of the cigarettes in
laundry that they sent out to be
cleaned. The laundry notified us.
Police Lt. Vernon K. Holliman
of the campus police said that it
was hard to pinpoint any big
sources for drugs on campus,
particularly dexedrine.
We know of no distributors as
such, Holliman said. It seems
to be just a lot of individuals who

(Off Campus Touch & Go 1
i Th e off-campus housing situatton will be touch and go |
*j in September, according to Carl B. Opp, Director of Off-Campus ?:
vl Housing.
?i men in one room units, for graduate women in private homes, i|:
:|:j and f or double occupancy in apartments with rent above SIOO S
ij: per month, said Opp. $
*: The outlook for women is grim. We have already had to 5:
suggest to women transfer students to find enrollment else- 0
I where. |
:*3 $ will not alleviate the immediate problem since many units will $
[:: not be completed until October, said Opp. |
H Although there is a great demand tor quality apartments, :
g rents generally have not increased. However, there are exceptions, g
g The Gainesville tax re-evaluation may tend to raise rent in £
>:j the future depending on local homestead exemptions, said Opp. :
£i B
r%* * v.v.V.V.VV*%VAVVV%V/%V*VVV*V*VVVAVfVVVVVVVV.V.V.v

probably have extra pills they got
on prescription which they sell
to other students.
Holliman, like Adams, cited
examination time as the peak
period for dexedrine traffic.
I think, though, that most stu students
dents students are smart enough not to
want to use such narcotics or to
have a need of them, Holliman
added. ;

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I ~Cy TO THE NEW FRESHMEN COMING TO THE UF THIS FALL, W I
WE ESPECIALLY WELCOME YOU... 1
Ktf'' AND WISH YOU ALL GOOD LUCK IN THE FUTURE. I
I LET US HELP YOU TO I
IfEEL AT HOME AWAY FROM HOME I
fljHk Belk-Lindsey is a familiar name throughout Florida,
jf And, at Belk-Lindsey in Gainesville, you'll find |
H familiar famous brand-name merchandise, as well 3
as man y ex clusive fashions not found elsewhere... 1
ome n us mee y u anc 9 e,> to know you. I
F a ll Does Mean Football I
I .. .And to the College Student it also means many I
VHT other campus activities and a new social season...
1 fISraHK Start off with the wonderful confidence that stems 1
from habits of good taste, fit and style in clothing.
§ MmEm At Belk-Lindsey youll find styles for any activity,
BBBpI. an y hour, rom classes to formal events.
I (Lounging and sleepwear, too.)
I Plan Now To Visit Belks I
I f'J ll "^ ie Store With More" in Men and Women's Famous Wear I
I WE'LL BE LOOKING FOR YOU I
1. H
|H m ? |HE
*" m* jpj
* jflr *"*
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER I
I N STREE.T g s I
I STORE HOURS: 10 A.M. -9 P.M. (CLOSED SUNDAYS) FREE PARKING |

UF Dental School Here Soon

The future UF college of denlstry
will soon have a dean, according
to the Provost of the J. Hillls
Miller Health Center.
Over 40 applicants are under
consideration for the new post.
The present task is to reduce
this number to the best qualified
applicants.
We have started the process
of selecting the dean/* stated Dr.

Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator/

Samuel P. Martin. Our target
date is set for this fall."*
Upon selection of the dean, plan planning
ning planning will begin on the physical
layout of the college. This year the
legislature appropriated $112,000
for the planning staff which will
draft the form of the dental college.
Working with the dean will be an
architect selected by the Board of
Regents.
We expect the next legislature
to appropriate the actual building
funds/* stated Dr. Martin.
The next legislative funds will
not be available until the Spring
of 1967. Thus, actual construction
is not expected to begin before
Fall, 1967.
Federal funds will be sought to
aid in construction of the college.
This money would be provided
on a matching basis with state
appropriations. The exact ratio of
federal-state funds is unknown at
present.
No action has yet been taken on
a dental college faculty. Dr. Martin

Bi-Racial Pushing:
Will It Be Here?

If a UF fraternity meets oppo opposition
sition opposition from its national
organization about the
acceptability of a pledge, the right
of each chapter to choose its own
members should be supported by
the UF administration, according
to William Bryan, advisor to fra fraternities.
ternities. fraternities.
Each fraternity at the UF has
the right to pledge any man they
wish as long as he meets the
academic requirements es established
tablished established by the IFC/* Bryan said.
Speculation about UF policy
arose last week after the
publication in Look Magazine of
an article concerning a fraternity
at Stanford University that had
been suspended by its national
organization shortly after the
chapter pledged a Negro.
Bryan stressed that selection of
members is entirely an individual
matter of each chapter.
I am a strong believer in the
right of all men to associate with
those whom they wish. This is the
foundation of the fraternity
system/* Bryan said.
No racial problems involving the
fraternity system were foreseen by
other UF administrators.
Dean of Men Frank Adams anti anticipated
cipated anticipated no incidents on the campus.
Matters involving race, color
or creed have not presented pro problems
blems problems here/* Adams said. Racial

' ***\
Ip.
TUE f aSL PATRONIZE OUR
ADVERTISERS ...
FLORIDA they 1 re
AU.I6ATOR GREAT GUNS!

stated that this would be a
responsibility of the future dean.
However, he expected the future
staff to number between 80 to 100
members, not all of whom would
be dental educators.
The entrance date of the first
class is not expected before 4969
or 1970.
"We hope to start with about 30
students, remarked Provost
Martin. Ultimately there will be
between 50 to 64 students in each
class.
This number will not take care
of the number of dentists needed
in Florida, continued Dr. Martin.
Each year more than 50 dentists
die in the state. Therefore we won't
overtake the number of deaths.
Over 400 Fla. residents now
attend out-of-state dental schools.
The state aids a number of these
students under a program of the
Southern Regional Education
Board. This program allows Fla.
denistry students to attend school
in other states and receive assist assistance
ance assistance from the state.

conflicts can be avoided by mature
attitudes.
Negro men interested in
fraternal organizations have the
option of participating in rush
week or colonizing a chapter of a
Negro fraternity at the UF.
Several national Negro frater fraternities
nities fraternities exist. These include Alpha
Phi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, which
has a membership of 13,000 and
Phi Beta Sigma which has 48
chapters.
Assistant Dean of Men William
Cross said he was approached last
year by several Negro students who
sought information about
colonizing a Negro fraternity on
campus.
I told them that if they could
meet the requirements for a colony
they could start one, Cross said.
No further action was taken by
the group at that time.
In order for a fraternity to come
to the campus, the IFC usually
gives informal approval to the
group seeking colonization.
To be recognized by the uni university,
versity, university, the organization must have
15 members and a constitution and
must be established on campus for
one year before petitioning
a national fraternity for a charter.
Several fraternities reported
that those Negroes that
participated in rush week activities
last year were well received by
the group.

Page 11-A



Page 12-A

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 30, 1965

WELCOME TO PLUSH L^
(At Rates Students Can Afford)
Planned With YOU In Mind
BALCONY I I BALCONY
I | I s '" n '" I Living
i very gi
I .majwu. iviNA BEDROOM BEDROOM VBTy fa
BEDROOM LIVING LIVING #2
13'0"x 11'6" ROOM ROOM 11 / 4"xl0 / 0 // li'O" lO'O"
1 15'8"x13'8" 15'8"x 14'0" ha xnrw 13 8 x 109
l
t 9
' mm p J
i Six rprr -n HALL IMF
iJL in WNIMG I 100 l | _LkJJ B -r II _JL >
1 n BATH nn KITCHEN KITCHEN ROOM BATH /fl
vvxvv ra-xro tv*vv | j pj[_
One Bedroom Two Bedroom
NOW RENTING FOR OCCUPANCY SEPT. 1
BP( V i'XMflr *ww: L*rM a.. P JjSM
|g_
Twlr Book Private Patios Aad Balcoales
" -V- : j%. ', V C. V.v. : "f ''' : V "TV/
ALL-ELECTRIC I I O Ixi OULt KITCHENS
1 GAINESVILLE'S
11 I
1- Apts. From sllO I I 1 I I I I mM | W U
2- Apts. From $l3O I I 1 I I iJ f mr i 1
Call 376-6720



an be very pleasant, 4ElLjflk^|MHlPiPr
e of worries. 1 -#' v w;, -;-":
\ tubes' HMl^HH^k^.^
)R YOUR j|H|'' .'
HHHHHHHHHHH|| .IBr
r,T, ",\ 360 ULTRA MODERN APARTMENTS
* Large Recreation Room \ I 1 /rt ! J*
* Four-Acre Lake \ ...only 1/2 mile from the Ur campus
* Twin Swimming Pools \ %/ / X
* Tennis, Handball Courts \ at 700 SW 16th Avenue,
* Picnic Area, Barbecue Facilities \
* More Than 18 Beautiful Acres \
* Beautiful Preserved Native Trees \
* Inviting Paths Through Gardens, Groves \
* Laundry Facilities, Conveniently Located \ I I f
* Separate Storage Area, Each Apartment \ I Ig
* Individual Central Air Conditioning, Heating \ I |2
* Fireproof Construction, Sound-Conditioned I 1$
* Inside Corridors for Complete Privacy I university I^
* Spacious Apartments I FLORIDA I
700 Square-Footers & 900 Square-Footers
* Hotpoint Range, Oven, Hooded Exhaust Fan
* Hotpoint Refrigerator-Freezer I
* Abundant Kitchen Cabinet Space I JT
* Step-Saving Work Surfaces |g w\
* Hotpoint Garbage Disposal Unit Im f I $
* Colorful Ceramic Tile Baths I I *
* Oversized Walk-In Closets I I 3
* Sliding Glass Doors to Patio, Balcony I * wS^SSiSmmm
* Formica Cabinets in Kitchens, Baths II
* Wall-to-Wall Carpeting I |
Living Rooms, Bedrooms, Hallways I
* Parquet Oak Flooring in Dining Rooms f I 1
* Central Television Antenna, All Apartments I j|
* Limousine Service TTie Half-Mile to UF Campus V OJ |3 [I
* Near Elementary, Secondary Schools J Iff
* Walking Distance From Shopping Center f
* Close to Business, Industrial Complexes, Churches
Only 500 Yards From U.S. 441, Quick Access to Others y* 1 |
apartment value
The Note
I m]^R3S^PjPHVH H studious
I I H V/flflfjf/Ml STYLISH
SOCIABLE

|Friday, July 30/ 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13-A



Page 14-A

Students Assemble Daily Newspaper

BR'
...... F'?
iitlllif 1 ih ih l I '' tWIIIIIBIHBPW ii if
IT WON'T be empty for long.
i
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JJSN/ Jk
'Sf*
* Aagk ~ i '.. ... :;
k iSHrak. ; :
fl I jfll HHijte
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EXTRA PAIR of hands needed
f- i
fHHHBPMneaMBm
1 M :s - i mi!^Mtmm l Bi:||P&
BBikv
jMmmn
\\ vs
[ !-#*?& j
V\> ?
|^K> :
HBpp-f'
TOUCHING UP the negative
a. '

r The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 30, 1965

Unique learning Experience

It really doesnt matter if U cant
spel very good or if U have never
ritten for a paper befor -- U can
learn!
And UF provides a real life
experience in journalism through
its daily newspaper, the Alligator,
and its yearbook, the Seminole.
Both publications are now in the
planning stage for the coming year
with new ideas, news features and
new policies. There are paying
staff positions available and
several openings. Experience is
not a requirement, the editors
claim.
The Alligator, will be edited by
Steve Vaughn, 4JM. Managing
editor will be Benny Cason, grad graduate
uate graduate student in journalism. The
annual Seminole will be under the
direction ofethKraselsky,4EDF,
and managing editor will be Nel
Laughon, 2UC.
The policies of the student pub publications
lications publications are set down by a
three-student ami three-faculty
member board, the Board of
Student Publications. The group
also chooses the editors for all
publications.
Fall discussion of the board
will deal with resuming publication
of the campus humor magazine,
the Orange Peel, and the proposed
faculty-advisor plan.
Student members of the board
are: A1 Leonard, Peggy Blanchard,
and Ron Spencer. John V. Webb,
associate professor of journalism,
is chairman of the board.
The Alligator is free to students
as it is paid for in part by student
fees and by advertising revenues
(about 60 per cent). The cost of
the Seminole is $3. It is issued
at the end of the spring trimester.
Student publications are located
ih the basement of the Florida
Union. Interested students are
invited to take a trip down, look
around and join the staff. Publi Publications
cations Publications will move to the new
Florida Union building upon its
completion in fall of 1906.

jfl Hfc jK|B^|9R^^R
is*. 'x mmkk
*sP&sfr' ***

wmrnm
Hfl
a
Sr r > v "\
n
jhl
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iH >: w J r,\, ' l i*~ Z'V-' r J* X ';''*" *,"
I A $: w |s* ji|l|
'^*l->" ''ifiSS*'
.... j Hp JHB
** * *~; -iijir'^ 1 '^filSilPP
*** vw
i
|
THE COPY mounts while editor wonders where his
~ k
staff has gone.
>-. s'' w, ~ . .' :.. V ,-



Enrollment Hits 16,650

11 The UF campus will be teeming
Bth an estimated 16,650 students
Be fall/* said Richard H. White-
Bad, Registrar. This is an
Bcrease of about 950 students
Ber last years fall enrollment
B 15,701.
B This year, as it has been each
Bar since September, 1962, the
Bze of the incoming freshman
Bass is limited to 2,800. Accord Accordjig
jig Accordjig to H. C. Riker, Director of
B>using, the ratio of the freshman

KISER'S OFFICE EQUIPMENT
I 640 N. MAIN STREET
bbb
I Typewriter
I Headquarters
IfES, we are
klio
Brie exclusive typewriters
1/1 r f/I MThT A IN STOCK AT ALL
\UL IMJr I A TIMES for your
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Hi
Dealer, too!

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mm if
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j^'- :^S; ft^#CS3SSS , 4 x s v* 'Y 'jit s t v^gfl
MU | iHBHbB|.
£' j| 1
LaffiMt i
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IB I BHH I

This is the place to get your new cycle. I
,B3 BX SYMBOL OF QUALITY I
For ease of travel to class and about Gainesville. I
| Naturally, the money saved and extra time are /^MaNI
advantages for you. \z||iy|
* COMPLETE SERVICE LOW DOWN PAYMENTS GUARANTEED I
* PARTS AND ACCESSORIES BANK RATE FINANCING PRICES FROM $279 YAIUAhA I
Come In Or Call Ahead For Yours. I
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men to freshman women is ex expected
pected expected to be 1750 to 1150. This
means there will be about 50 per
cent more freshman men than
women.
No limit has been placed on
the number of transfer students
that can be accpeted. Whitehead
said that he expects the majority
of these transfer students to come
to the UF from the junior colleges
scattered throughout the state.

According to Whitehead, the UF
expects its enrollment to be around
20,000 by 1970. These sky skyrocketing
rocketing skyrocketing enrollment figures are
the reason for the large amount
of construction started on campus
this summer, commented White Whitehead.
head. Whitehead.
It is expected that most of these
classroom facilities will be avail available
able available by the fall of 1967.
/$]
rd
M
ft]
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS
REACH EVERYWHERE

Friday, July 30/ 1965, The Florida Alligator, I

|| 4,500 Get To Register EaHy %
if n
1 m
£:>: Approximately 4,500 students will receive privileged:^::
gigi registration appointments this week enabling them to complete ivig
registration on August 27, 28 or 29. -gig
In order to be able to register early, a student roust have anjjjg!;
ggi: overall average of 2.6 on all work attempted at the UF. Students gigi
igig graduating in December 1965 and graduate students also receive gig:
igig privileged appointments. gig;
igig Over 25 per cent of the students enrolled last year are eligible gigi
igig for early registration. This percentage is consistent with the gig:
figures for previous years, according to Richard H. Whitehead, gig
gig Associate Registrar.
gigi The purpose of privileged registration is to recognize academic :$::
gig: excellence. It should be a goal, not a handicap to the poorer £§s
gig- student, Whitehead said. jigg
gigi Regular registration is scheduled for Sept. 1, 2 and 3. Fees gigi
igig may be paid at that time by students who register early.
isis Sg;
m H

Campus Pac Bigger

A new and larger version of the
traditional campus pac will be
available to students at the begin beginning
ning beginning of the fall trimester, Student
Body President Bruce Culpepper
announced this week.
The new campus pac has more
things, and in a greater variety
than the original version, Cul Culpepper
pepper Culpepper said, These are things
that all men or women can use.
Campus pacs come in two ver versions,
sions, versions, one for men and one for
women. The contain an assortment
of toiletries ranging from such
things as razors and after-shave
lotion to sun tan lotion and lip lipstick.
stick. lipstick.
These pacs contain more $9.00

worth of articles,'* Culpepper said,
and they will be available to
students at only $3.00.
So far, 3,000 pacs have been
ordered.
We feel that these will sell*
If they do, then we can order as
many more as we need," Culpepper
said. The same company in New
York that handled the original
campus pacs has offered us these
to see how they go over.
Proceeds from the sale of
campus pacs go to Dollars tor
Scholars.
Culpepper has appointed Steve
Gardner as the new chairman for
the Dollars tor Scholars program.

Page 15-A



Page 16-A

> The Florida Alligator, Friday/ July 30, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIERS

for rent
"* 11 1 l. 11 1 1 1
AVAILABLE NOW UNTIL
SEPTEMBER Ist with reduction
in rent. Small 1 bedroom furn furnished
ished furnished apartment. Water furnished.
Near campus. FR 6-8819. (B-160-
lt-c).
1231 SW 3RD AVENUE. 3rd house
east from Tigert Hall. Furnished
duplex for male graduate students
or couples. Apartment A, S4O per
student (4) students; SIOO for
couple. Apartment B, (3) students
S4O per Student or SIOO for couple.
First and last months rent in
advance. FR 2-8823 daytime or
FR 6-4968 after 6 p.m. (B-160-
lt-c).
LARGE DOUBLE ROOM for boys.
Air-conditioned, private bath. Also
single room, share bath. Vacant
August 20th. Quiet place for grad graduate
uate graduate student. 105 NW 7th Terrace.
Telephone 376-0809.(B-160-lt-p)
FOR AUGUST ONLY. Efficiency
and corner room by day, week or
month. Apply 321 SW 13th Street.
(B-160-lt-c).
AVAILABLE AUGUST 15th. Con Convenient
venient Convenient efficiency apartment for
couple. Also comfortable suite of
rooms for 2 gentlemen for Sept.
Ist. Apply 321 SW 13th St., across
from campus. (B-160-lt-c).
LARGE, QUIET comfortable room
in private home available to mature
male students or businessmen. All
modern conveniences, semi semiprivate
private semiprivate bath. See at 202 NW 21st
Terr, or call FR 6-5368 or FR 6-
2100. (B-160-lt-c).
UNFURNISHED, NEW modern, 3
bedroom CCB home. Large yard.
Couple preferred. 3851 NW 19th
Street. 376-8543 after 5:30 p.m.
(B-160-lt-c).
NEED TEMPORARY QUARTERS
in August? Luxury air-conditioned
house trailer available, preferably
to couple, from August Bth to
August 31st. S3O week, includes
all utilities. Call UF Ext. 2832,
ask for Moorhead. (B-160-lt-nc).
1 BEDROOM lake cottage. Lake
privileges. Lake Winnott 22 miles
from Gainesville. S4O per month.
372-0481, Mr. Kaplan after 9 p.m.
(B-159-2t-c).
2 ROOM SUITES, motel type, furn furnished.
ished. furnished. 1 block from campus. Re Refrigerator,
frigerator, Refrigerator, no kitchen. 2 semester
lease. 6-6494. (B-158-3t-c).
wanted
CHEAP MOTORSCOOTER. Will
buy now or at end of trimester.
Call FR 6-1872. (C-160-lt-p).
BOYS ENGLISH bike 26 or 28.
Girls English or American bike
28. WANTED TO RENT, canoe
or row boat tor 1 week river trip
in August. 6-8565. (C-160-lt-c).
I AMUSEMENT CENTER I
lion w. Univ., 2 blocks from I
campus where students meet I
If OR recreation!

for rent
KIRKLANDS Double rooms
available for male students. 1 block
from campus. slls per trimester.
Contact Jim Hodge on Tuesday or
Thursday afternoons or weekends
1602 NW Ist Ave. 376-9345. (B (B---159-ts-c).
--159-ts-c). (B---159-ts-c).
EFFICIENCIES, BEDROOMS. Off Offstreet
street Offstreet parking. All utilities furn furnished
ished furnished except gas. 320 NW 3rd St.
2 trimester lease. Haunted house.
Phone 372-0481 after 9 p.m. (B (B---159-2t-c).
--159-2t-c). (B---159-2t-c).
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath Lake Cottage,
air-conditioned. 2 trimester lease,
SBS/month. 372-0481, Mr. Kaplan,
after 9 p.m. (B-158-3t-c).
AIR CONDITIONED HOUSES
LEASING NOW FOR SEPTEMBER
3 or 4 males or females. Call
Charlie Mayo, FR 6-4471, Mary
Moeller Realty. (B-156-6t-c).
FURNISHED Apartment, 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, 1 bath. Downtown location.
Ideal for 3 or 4 students. SIOO
per month year round. 372-0481,
Mr. Kaplan. Please phone after
9 p.m. (B-156-st-c).
SMALL Furnished house with 2
bedrooms and bath. Green alum,
siding, 1954 NW 34th Ave. $75 per
month. Call FR 2-3251 after 6
p.m. (B-155-ts-c).
3 BEDROOM HOUSE, 2 bedroom
duplex, furnished. Large rooms,
air-conditioners. Close in, quiet
neighborhood. 12 months lease.
References. 6-6494. (B-158-3t-c).
SMALL FURNISHED CCB cottage.
Bedroom, electric kitchen, tile
shower. Linda Ann Court, south
on Ocala Road. 376-5826. (B (B-158
158 (B-158 3t-nc).
'FURNISHED Apartment, 4 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, 1 bath. Air-conditioned. 220
SE 7th St. $l5O per month. Ideal
for 5 students. 372-0481, Mr.
Kaplan. Please phone after 9 p.m.
(B-156-st-c).
autos
1960 SIMCA. Good Condition.
Phone 376-8130. (G-158-3t-c).
STATION WAGON, White Volks Volkswagen,
wagen, Volkswagen, 1965. 30 miles per gal.
Excellent model, not yet available
in U. S. Only 3600 miles. 372-
8082. (G-159-2t-c).
jjiF JbWJB
MMgjL \ i JHhI
Synanon

autos
1961 BMW ISETTA 300. Not
running, but has sentimental value
Make offer. 376-0607. (G-16 lt-p).
1960 VOLVO PV544. 2 door sedan,
good condition, priced to sell. Call
owner 376-0607. (G-160-lt-p).
1960 FALCON 2 door hardtop.
Standard shift. In top condition.
Contact Gutta, Phone FR 6-1456
University Ext. 2026. (G-159-
2t-c).
BEAUTIFUL 1961 PONTIAC
CATALINA CONVERTIBLE .Radio,
white walls, new nylon top. Per Perfect
fect Perfect condition. S4OO down and take
over my low monthly payments
or $1225 cash. Call 376-8863. (G (G---159-ts-c).
--159-ts-c). (G---159-ts-c).
*6O CORVAIR. 4 door, automatic
transmission. Heater. A real buy
at $475. Call FR 2-5625 after 5
p.m. (G-158-tf-nc).

I STARTS COIOH I
I EXCLUSIVE FIRST I
I AREA SHOWING! I
I |L I
I y j>A;rfoai-) jt\aiii-iJ'M fpl, I
l I
I SHOW... JUDfir BEQWft I

autos
1964 VW 1500, 6,600 miles.
Brought .in from Spain, $1875.1961
T-Bird, fully equipped, $1450.376-
0906. (G-158-3t-c).
1957 BUICK Centruy, 2-door, S3OO.
*56 Olds, radio and beater, $350.
376-0906. (G-158-3t-c).
1963 ENGLISH FORD CONSUL.;
Low miles. Sharp condition. Must:
sell. SBSO. Call FR 2-3251 after
6 p.m. (G-155-ts-c).
FIRE ENGINE RED "bug-eyed
Austin-Healey Sprite. Clean. $675.
FR 6-2966. (G-160-lt-c).
>
for sale
...
2 AIR-CONDITIONERS: 116 volts,
6000 BTU, SSO and 220 volts, 14,500
BTU with heat pump, $125. 12*
SAILBOAT, SIOO. Call 376-3684
after 6 p.m. (A-160-lt-c),

for sale
*65 HONDA SUPER 90.1500 miles,
4 speed, 60 mpL, 100 mpg. Under
warranty. Must see. Make offer.
376-0809, anytime. (A-160-lt-c).
i ii i
FRIGID AIRE REFRIGERATOR. In
excellent working condition. S3O.
Call 8-1586 after 5:00 p.m. (A*
160-lt-p).
1965 HONDA 150 cc. Less than
1760 miles. Includes fiberglass,
saddlebags, rain suit, helmet
white wall tires, electric starter.
Call Frank 376-9150. (A-159-
2t-p).

BUY AN ADDIS BY ADDIS. Wit,
satire and plain old belly-laughs
are now available to you,
"Playboy** cartoonist Don Addis
(or £) can now be found in a bound
volume. Buy one for 50 cents and
let him out. Come to Room 9 of
* the Florida Union. (A-158-tf-nc).



for sale
FURNITURE* PractlQjdly new
desks, tables and HI-FI. Call
pgfozu 8 p.m. 3765310. (Al6o (Al6o-10
-10 z 60 MARLETTE, 3 bedroom
mobile home. Colonial style. 3530
SW 24th Ave., Lot 75 Pinehurst
Park er call after 5 p.m. 276-
4290. (A-159-2t-c).
PURE-BRED Chocolate-seal point
Siamese Kittens. Females, sls|
Males, S2O. 6 weeks old before
they can leave mother. 376-5826.
;A-158-2t-nc).
personal
CONGRATULATIONS to Frank and
Luetta. Have a whole lot of happi happiness.
ness. happiness. A.P. m. (J-160-lt-p).
In memory of AD LAI E.
STEVENSON, Collegiate Council
for the United Nations. (J-159-
2t-c).
TENA FAFARD would like
to inform all her friends she is
now with Rame*, 319 W. Univ.
Avenue, Phone 372-5549. Special Specializing
izing Specializing in hair coloring, cutting
natural curly hair, also specializes
in children's hair cuts. (J-157-
ts-c).
STUDENT SPECIALS me and
night, 7 days a week, 99?. Meal
tickets available at 10% discount,
Long's Cafeteria downtown
between the theatres. (J-153-ts-p).
services
. ... -J
GERMAN TUTORING by German
lady. Contact 372-7627. (M-160-
lt-c).
PROFESSIONAL TYPING done in
my home. 12 years experience.
Medical Terminology passed. On
approved Graduate List. Students,
graduate students, offices on
campus call Mrs. Lyons any anytime
time anytime 6-7160. (M-159-2t-c).
IRONING DONE IN MY HOME.
Call FR 6-4086. (M-149-lt-c).
IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios. 372-0300. (M (M---153-ts-c).
--153-ts-c). (M---153-ts-c).
thelp wanted
i
LARRY'S WONDERHOUSE, is
recruiting waiters for the Septem September
ber September trimester. Hours will be 4
till 8 p.m., 6 days. Apply in
person, Larrys Wonderhouse, 14
SW Ist Street, behind Sears. (E (E---160-lt-c).
--160-lt-c). (E---160-lt-c).
BOYS 12 to 16 years old for
established paper routes on and
adjacent to University grounds.
Contact the Gainesville Sun, 378-
1411. (E-160-lt-c).
CLERK-TYPIST or Transcribing
Secretary n to begin work August
2, 1966. For interview appoint appointment,
ment, appointment, call ext. 2230 or 2239. (E-*
159-2 t-c).
SECRETARY WANTED. Due to
graduation, one of our better
secretaries will be leaving and we
will need a replacement around
August 7th. Replacement must be
well-founded in shorthand and
typing and willing to apply self
to job. Above average salary for
experienced secretary. Will fill
position with first qualified appli applicant.
cant. applicant. Write or phone for interview.
Scruggs A Carmichael, 3 SE Ist
Ave. 376-8242. (E-152-10t-c).

A
Complete!
Intact!
Every
Spectacular
scene!
Direct
from its
record
roadshow
engagements!
npn
Jim
bkemhwwW'l
precMcuuJ
I "Peter O'Toole 1 I
is fascinating!"
-N. Y. Herald Tribune
A Film by RICHARD BROOKS
A Columbia Picture
FRmIIi SUPER PANAYISKM 70*
TECHMCOLOR* B
p i.
1:00 3:42 6:24 9:06
AUGUST 5 Thru 11
Two Carefree Americans
turn Paris on its Ear/
JAM6S DiCk.
Oapeii; VAn w
EUffi V Am
piwn
Kpcacto* n mvaUjU
EmMeMaNfe-^
AUGUST 12 Thru 18

nododylovesi
A FRESHMAN I
bat bis motbar 11
. .Like Superman!
and Under Dog we
are champions of the
oppressed and down-11
trodden. .a F r e s h-B
man to us is still aB
human being and
grades willing he
may be at U.F. for aB
number of years fl
SO TO GET I
YOU HOOKED I
when you come toB
U.F. stumble up toB
asmas I
THEATRE I
Bring this ad and!
your I. D. car dB
(unbent) and we will
bestow upon you
A PASS I
. . .a what Roy?B
A PASS, I
I SAY! I
Good for any show
at the 1
g ma&
in hopes that you will!
think it is so fine!
you will never go to I
another theatre and*
will bring all your 1
money to us thru your I
entire college!
career!
It*s sneaky, but it I
works. I

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

-- -
real estate
FOR SALE BY OWNER: 3 bed bedroom*
room* bedroom* Excellent condition. Wood Woodland
land Woodland Terrace. 7th Avenue near
NW 36th Street. Near Littlewood
and Westwood Schools, and NW
34th Street Shopping Center. Call
372-1352. (I-160-lt-c).
CAROL ESTATES Air Airconditioned,
conditioned, Airconditioned, 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
screened porch, central heat. S4OO
cash, $93/month. 1942 NE 16th
Terr. Phone 372-5893. (1-157-
ts-c).
BUILT-IN Kitchen, 3 bedroom,
1 1/2 bath, CCB, terazzo floors.
Corner lot. Best offer and assume
FHA mortgage. 1446 NE 21st Ave.
376-1435. (I-157-4t-c).
WHY PAY RENT? Own your own
duplex. Live in one side and rent
from other side pays mortgage
payment. Perfect for college
couple who will be here 2 years
or more. We have several with
flexible terms. Call Wayne Mason
c/o Ernest Tew Realty, 376-6461.
(I-155-6t-c).
feSSpS Z3 ,3 ,;v/
FOR SALE by owner: Country
home and 4 acres. 3 bedroom,
2 bath, living room, and living livingkitchen,
kitchen, livingkitchen, 34x14 screened porch.
Wall to wall carpet. Central heat.
Call 372-0253. (1-159- 2t-p).
W 9

Friday/ July 30/ 1965, The Florida Alligator/

ffX JByf jfn mgdm J%
xx
fkl, *mnov
Vl' MB .<*&% fjm - ht jfyft|| Bp
Gators Face Toughest
SEC Schedule Ever

After the toughest schedule in
the SEC in 1964 and ending up
with a respectable 7-3 season,
with a 4-2 conference record, the
Fighting Gators prepare to do
battle with some of the nations
finest.
The Gators, predicted runner-up
in SEC play, by a poll of coaches
and sports writers, should have
their hands full with perennial
powerhouses Mississippi, Auburn,
LSU, Georgia and arch- rival FSU.
Northwestern, ending up in ninth
place last season, in the Big Ten
Conference, is expected to be im improved
proved improved enough this season to be one
of only three teams predicted to
beat UF, according to Street and
Smith's football preview.
UF opens Its home season
against Mississippi State: the
team the Gators beat last season
16-13 in the closing seconds with
the pro-type, clock-killing, side sideline-jaassingcoiiibinationof
line-jaassingcoiiibinationof sideline-jaassingcoiiibinationof

p
real estate
4 BEDROOM, 2 bath, double car carport,
port, carport, built-in range and oven.
Seller to pay all closing cost. Only
$450 down, only $96.98 per month.
Price S9OO less than FHA
appraisal. 1806 NW 38th Terr.
372-0481, Mr. Kaplan for appoint appointment
ment appointment to show. Please phone after
9 p.m. (I-159-4t-c).
HOUSE FOR SALE OR RENT.
124 SE 39th Street. No down
payment. FR 6-3668. (1-154-tf-cV
wanted
LEAVING FOR OHIO (Akron area)
Rider wanted. Air-conditioned car.
Leaving around August 25th. Call
372-0915. (C-160-lt-p).
- -
TWO students need ride to Atlanta,
Georgia. Share expenses. Call Bill,
8-1804. (C-160-lt-c).
RESPONSIBLE White woman com companion
panion companion for refined lady. Room,
board and salary included. Apply
in person; 230 NW 2nd Ave. (C (C---160-lt-c).
--160-lt-c). (C---160-lt-c).
NEED RIDE HOME to PENSACOLA
AREA? Call Gypsy at 6-6042.
Leaving August Bth, share
expenses. (C-160-lt-nc).
LADIES* BICYCLE, English type,
good condition. Please call 376-
3716. (C-160-lt-p).

Spurrier to Casey for the winning
TD.
Homecoming, on Oct. 16, finds
the Gators matched with the 1964
Atlantic Coast Conference champs
North Carolina State.
Mississippi and Auburn, both
defeated by the Gators last year
by the scores 30-14 and 14-0
respectively, have made UF their
homecoming foes for the 1965
season.
Top veterans Include, according
to UF coaching staff, AU-SEC
sophomore of the year in 1964,
quarterback Steve Spurrier; All-
SEC second team, split end Charles.
Casey; pre-season All-America
(by Street and Smith), guard Larry
Gagner; All-SEC and APs All-
America defensive back, safety safetyman
man safetyman Bruce Bennett; all-the-way
threat, tailback Jack Harper; and
top offensive lineman last season,
guard Larry Beckman.
(Continued on P.22-A)

wanted
y 'j.i" 11111 j" '
WASHINGTON, D. C. bound. Need
one rider, one way, sls. Leaving
evening of August 7th. Call Moor Moorhead,
head, Moorhead, UF Ext. 2832. (C-160-lt-nc).
2 STUDENTS NEEDED to share
furnished, air-conditioned apart apartment
ment apartment for fall and winter
trimesters. 2 blocks from campus.
Call Ernie, 2-0854 after 1 p.m.
(C-160-lt-c).
RIDERS TO CHICAGO. Leaving
the weekend of August 6th. Call
Marten Kernis 6-3211, Ext. 5444
or 8-1379. (C-160-lt-c).
M.n In i i*.
WANTED TO RENT, Ovfer-the Ovfer-thecab-type
cab-type Ovfer-thecab-type camper (without truck)
from August 13th to September sth.
Nancy at 6-8821 from 8 to 5.
(C-159-2t-c).
RIDE WANTED to Pensacola
(Myrtle Grove) August 12th. Please
call Marsha, Room 126, Rawlings
Hall after 5 p.m. (C-159-2t-p).
RIDERS to South Indiana, Cincin Cincinnati
nati Cincinnati or enroute. sls one way or
round trip. 1964 Tempest. Leave
August 14th. FR 6-0693. (C-159-
2t-c).
WANTED STUDIOUS coed to share
apartment in September; contact
soon CLAIRE GOLDHAGEN, 3131
SW 7th Street, Miami, Florida.
(C-159-2t-c).

Page 17-A



Page 18-A

, The Florida Alligator, Friday July 30, 1965

Men Have Mixed Views
On Short Shorts

The regulation permitting girls
to wear shorts at all times on
campus during the third trimester
has been in effect since the spring
of 1959 when it was passed by the
Women Students* Association, A
faculty member may request that
women students do not wear
Bermudas in his class, however.
From a male viewpoint, it seems
to be O.K. for girls to wear shorts
to class, but many UF students
would rather see girls in dresses.
Jan Ruble, 3EG, says, It's fine
with me. Some of them might look
better if they didnt, though.
Jeff Williams, 2UC, says, I
dont think its too bad, but girls
look better in dresses.
John Henry Smith, 3BA, feels
that some of them seem to be a

Monkeys Keep Eyes Closed

How can you teach a monkey to
blink? Dr. Henry S. Pennypacker,
assistant professor of psychology
is trying to find that out.
Under a grant from the U. S.
Public Health Service, he is corn cornducting
ducting cornducting comparative eyelid con conditioning
ditioning conditioning research which aims to
differentiate between two types of
learning.
Basic physiological reflexive
learning is that which the animal
has little to do with. The other
kind, instrumental learning, is that
in which the animal performs an
act voluntarily for a reward.
Blasts of air and electrical
shocks are used to make the mon monkeys
keys monkeys blink, but so far, Dr.
Pennypacker and his assistants
have not been able to train the

Planetarium in Benton Doomed

Star gazers and astrologers may
have some difficulty setting up shop
this summer.
The planetarium on top of Benton
Hall is doomed, along with the
condemned building.
No plans have been made for a
new home for the planetarium or
VET COLLEGE
ON ITS WAY
The first College of Veterinary
Medicine in the state of Florida
will be established at the UF
during the next four to six years,
according to G. T. Edds, head
of the veterinary science de department.
partment. department.
The location of the college at
the UF was approved by the 1965
Florida legislature.
Tbe College of Veterinary
Medicine will be a separate col college
lege college under the Provost of the
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences,** said Edds.
Ibe expected enrollment for the
UF veterinary college is not
definite yet. Edds said, however,
that most schools consider 65
students a reasonable number with
which to start.
ALLIANCE
TV SERVICE
Fast, Expert Service
on all makes
TELEVISION
RADIO
STEREO
10% DISCOUNT
on parts to all
U of F students
817 W. Univ Ave
Phone 376-9955

little indecent when they're too
tight.
But Mike Borden, lUC, thinks
theyre better than ankle length
dresses!
Some girls, however, have a
more lenient attitude in the matter.
Sandy Young, 2UC, says, I
think shorts are fine if theyre
not too tight and the shirts axe
tucked in.
Judy Watts, 2UC, thinks theyre
a little too informal for 'all year
round, but theyre fine for
summer.
A quick survey of the campus
reveals that the majority of girls
have not abandoned tbeir
traditional dress for cooler sum summer
mer summer wear. The hot days of July
and August may change some of
that, though.

monkeys to close their eyes to
avoid a stimulus.
He hopes to find out if dif differences
ferences differences exist between the two
types of learning and whether
different parts of the nervous
system are involved, as a basis
for further research.
The experiment is similar to
Pavlovs experiments with sali salivating
vating salivating dogs.
Dr. Pennypacker received the
grant one year ago from the U. S.
Public Health Service. The project
is to last for 3 years.
At first, squirrel monkeys were
used for the research, but Dr.
Pennypacker explained that he is
now using cebus monkeys because
they are larger, more intelligent
and less vicious.

the deposed C-2 department.
The planetarium was originally
built several years ago to serve
as a study aid for C-2 and astrono astronomy
my astronomy students. Dr. Leonidas Roberts
crumble under Dr. Roberts and his
planetarium, and he was moved to
the Physics Building.
Not so for the planetarium.
It stands padlocked and quiet,
waiting for the demolishment of
the building.
was the man in charge of the
planetarium. His office was in
Benton Hall, right next to the
planetarium.

Extracurricular 1
of (are you iri this picture?) I
hjf 2035 NW 13fh St. I
378-2304 I

UF Coed Picked To
Help Edit Magazine

11 1
m. m
. -v jF r
mmr \^lf!P
ANN BRESLAUER
. .cover girl
ftftftftftftrftftftftftftftiftftiftiftftft^ftftftftftx-ft.;
I UF Miss Trying
iFor College Queen!
ft: ft
Miss Jo Ann Notaris, a ft:
x senior at the UF, was one ft
£: of the most outstanding col- $:
ft lege girls in the State of £;
Florida. She earned a trip to ft
:£ New York City, where she $
:£ competed for the title of i-i;
National College Queen.
ft Based on her scholastic ft
ft accomplishments and her ft
ft leadership in campus ft
ft activities, Miss Notaris was
ft chosen as State Winner from ft:
among thousands of college ft;
jx students. She will represent :ft
ft Florida during the 11th Annual *
ft National College Queen ft
ft Pageant. The City of New ft
ft York plays host to this event ft
each year, honoring collegiate .ft
ift women from across America. :ft
ft _...Jft
S&ATpI
ss ads nr s
1 REACH I J
{people WT
I uhiv. Est 2832 i g

Ann Breslauer, a UF sophomore
of Boynton Beach, has been
selected by Mademoiselle
magazine from 1500 contestants
to be one of its 1965 Guest Editors.
Miss Breslauer, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Charles S. Breslauer,
of 2835 S. W. sth Street, Boynton
Beach, was brought to New York
by the magazine to spend the month
of June with 19 other winners to
help edit the August, 1965 college
issue.
She will be the cover girl for
the August issue.
In small groups, they inter interviewed
viewed interviewed noted artists, actors,
writers, designers, and politically
prominent personages of their
choosing. Collectively, visited ad advertising
vertising advertising agencies, publishing
houses, and manufacturer show showrooms
rooms showrooms in the fashion market to
learn first-hand how some of the
important businesses of New York
operate.
A special assignment for the
Guest Editors was a trip to Madrid,
by Iberia Airlines. After five days
of sight-seeing in Spain, they
returned to their editorial duties
in New York.

MUSIC AT ITS BEST
WHEN PIAYED ON A NEW
phono
NOW AS LOW AS C4£95 BUY
6 WAYS
Gainesvilles Largest Selection
Os Zenith StereosPhonos
COUCHS 608 N. MAIN ST. I
"SELLING & SERVICING ZENITH SINCE 1933"

They were also among the pro professional
fessional professional models showing fall
fashions in Mademoiselle's
annual back-to-coliege fashion
show June 2, before 2,000 store
buyers and executives, in the Grand
Ballroom of New York's As tor
Hotel.
Miss Breslauer, 19, majors in
advertising design at Florida.
She was layout editor of the
"Seminole," the University's
yearbook, and a captain in Angel
Flight, honorary women's mili military,
tary, military, and a graduate of a summer's
work at the New York World's
Fair.
When asked why she entered the
Guest Editor competition, Miss
Breslauer replied, "I had read
about the competition many times
in high school, and I always wished
I was in college so 1 could /be
eligible. My first year I was so
busy that I didn't feel I could do
the assignment justice. This year
was the year! More than anything!
I want to work on a magazine when
I graduate, and I felt that this
would be a good way to test my
ability and potential."
In commenting on what she ex expected
pected expected to do as a Guest Editor,
Miss Breslauer said, "To watch,
listen, and learn. .and to have
a chance to show what I can do."
. : . *



> OH
1 I J f | l I
I I
I WHERE YOUR FLORAL I
GIFT & BRIDE SHOP
NEEDS BECOME
WELCOME STUDENTS
CREATIONS
WE INVITE __
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Wiffiso.- ' /iV'* '' w' '* > W:
mm* s nfIHHHHBHHHi B BmmK -. i 9 m| S| /* '

July 30/ 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19-A



Page 20-A

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 30, 1965

Basketball Team
Schedule Set

Floridas basketball schedule
for 1965-66 is the most demanding
and exciting one in the schools
history, Gator Athletic Director
Ray Graves announced today.
In addition to rugged Southeast Southeastern
ern Southeastern Conference competition, the
men of Coach Norm Sloan take on
national powers North Carolina
and Washington on the road and
defend a Gator Bowl crown against
a tough field.
The 26-game schedule includes
home and home meetings with FSU,
Miami, Kentucky, Tennessee, Au Auburn,
burn, Auburn, Mississippi State, Ole Miss
and Georgia.
The Gators open the season Dec.
1 in Gainesville against Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville University.
Complete 1965-66 Basketball
schedule:
Dec. 1 Jacksonville here, 4

z' O
HI \ Ik JSr:'
v m
g(j| V' ; J
IpK i ify
-
UF CAGERS face tough season.
Save with Budget* Rent-A-Car:
$ C
a full 24-hour day mile*
only
the gat you
i The cars are the same! The price is the difference!
/' (Same Insurance Coverage)
gSf'
Corvair Monza J&tf MIMUIMV^h
Businessmen and Students know Xf CL AOWK
the importance ot keeping expenses *KV R§NT A CAR /JS 1
down. So does Budget. Thats why SVS7MV 9
our rates are less. You can save up
to 40*1 by calling Budget!
-CALL 378-1010 *-
r. Pick-Up nd Delivery 527 W. UniV Ave
Budget* Rent-A Car of (Trailways Bus Terminal) I
Gainesville sim buooct r*jp|
M. - "- J

at Miami, 8 FSU here, 18
North Carolina (Chapel Hill, N.C.),
21 and 22 Washington (Seattle,
Wash.), 29 Gator Bowl Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville (first round, Penn State
vs. Alabama, DePaul vs. Florida),
30 Gator Bowl consolation and
finals.
Jan. 3 -- Alabama here, 8
Kentucky here, 12 Miami here,
15 Mississippi here, 18 at
FSU, 22 Georgia (Athens, Ga.),
24 At Auburn, 29 Mississippi
(Oxford, Miss.), 31 Mississippi
State (State College, Miss.).
Feb. 5 Tennessee (Knoxville,
Tenn.), 7 Kentucky (Lexington,
Ky.), 9 Auburn here, 14
Mississippi State here, 19 Van Vanderbilt
derbilt Vanderbilt here, 21 Tennessee here,
26 Tulane (New Orleans, La.),
28 LSU (Baton Rouge, La.).
March 4 Georgia here.

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Second cup of coffee op
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glass of Ice tea free
to LARRYS
LrAlxlx I *J EXTRA SERVICE:
PERSONAL CHECK CASHED ,0"
WITHOUT CHARGE
% £ XJst Gators
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LARRY'S / JjA
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Open 24 Hours a Day /
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Friday, July 30/ 1965/ The Florida Alligator,

Page 21-A



Page 22-A

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 3Q, 1965

P
. M
!
* Il|| xi'v>x
]HK ||*~ |
* "ipii H 'lilf
HgW: rM
s, ijk
...JEFF RAMSEY
rd
J
* M-' i -
n
I
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS
REACH EVERYWHERE

Size and strength will be a characteristic of 1965-66
Florida basketball, but Gator head coach Norm Sloan
will be seeking some folks to get the ball to his
big men.
Sloan returns 6-9 Gary Keller and 6-11 Jeff
Ramsey from last year's 18-7 team, one which
was the most successful in Gator history and finished
the season tied for third in the Southeastern
Conference.
We know both Gary and Jeff will be improved
with the experience they gained as being sophomore
starters in a tough league," says Sloan. We have
other experienced big boys like Bob Hoffmann and
Paul Morton and are real pleased with the outlook
up front."
Sloan's big problem will be finding guards to
replace departed captain and all-SEC star Brooks
Henderson and his running mate of the past three
years, Tom Baxley.
This was one of the finest pair of guards

New Stands
After Season
Construction of permanent
student stands on the east side
of Florida Field will begin after
the last home football game of
the 1965 fall season, according to
Percy Beard, assistant athletic
director.
The stands are expected to be
completed for the first football
game of the 1966 season.
Architects have already taken
foundation samples this spring,"
said Beard.
The east stands will raise the
seating capacity to a total of 56,000
an addition of 8,000 seats. The
plans include an entrance to the
stadium from the walkway in front
of the Engineering College.
Beard said that the new seating
will be similar to the West Stands.
A 100 room air-conditioned
dormitory will be included in the
construction to house UF athletes
and other students.
FOOTBALL
(Continued from P. 17-A)
Last year's top defensive back backfield
field backfield in the nation, for most of
the season, consisting of Bruce
Bennett, Allan Trammell, Dick
Kirk and Jerry Newcomer, will
remain virtually the same, except
for graduating Newcomer.
Top sophomores to watch should
be offensive end Richard Trapp,
quarterback Harmon Wages,
offensive guard David Hiss, defen defensive
sive defensive tackle Paige Cutcliffe and
monster, roaming linebacker,
Wayne McCall.
If two potential football teams
like Miami and Tulane can be
called easy teams, they would
have to be deemed the pre-season
pick as the easiest of the ten
teams UF will play this season.

RAME HAIR STYLIST
319 W. University Ave. Tel. 372-5549
Welcome Students
We are proud to an announce
nounce announce that we have 4
competent hair stylists,
specializing in every,
form of beauty culture,
in order to give you
better service.
Our prices compare
with other salons in
this vicinity.
AMPLE PARKING IN REAR

Cagers Reaching Up

FINAL STATISTICS
OVERALL RECORD: 18-7
SEC RECORD: 11-5
Name G Pet. Reb. PF Total AVG.
Brooks Henderson 25 .473 112 79 350 14.0
Dick Tomlinson 25 .474 178 73 321 12.9
Gary Keller 25 .500 247 84 312 12.5
Jeff Ramsey 25 .630 196 74 249 9.9
Tom Baxley 25 .369 51 64 200 8.0
Paul Morton 25 .370 90 59 112 4.5
Bob Hoffmann 25 .525 87 34 104 4.2
Skip Higley 25 .493 34 31 95 3.8
Bill Koss 10 .500 16 6 31 3.1
Edd Poore 12 .462 21 13 28 2.4
Ed Mahoney 10 .350 9 2 24 2.4
Team Rebounds 190
UNIV. OF FLORIDA 25 .475 1041 585 1826 73.0
OPPONENTS 25 .393 708 537 1568 62.7

Graduated
Gator Record
FLORIDA OPPONENT
68 VMI 59
90 Stetson 57
50 FSU 51
58 Miami 67
73 North Carolina 54
82 Wake Forest 65
62 Texas 49
85 Tulane 63
102 LSU 62
63 Auburn 74
74 Miss. State 59
60 Mississippi 39
86 Miami 69
84 Kentucky 68
67 Alabama 51
61 Kentucky 78
43 Tennessee 75
79 Auburn 83
68 Miss. State 51
85 Mississippi 53
78 Vanderbilt 80
77 FSU 65
83 Georgia 74
58 Tennessee 56
90 Georgia 66

Florida has had,'* Sloan notes. Skip Higley played
quite a bit last year and we have confidence in him.
The other spot is wide open with several boys in
the running."
Sloan plans to open the practice sessions with
6-4 Morton at guard but the versatile senior will
also see front line duty at forward,
Listed in no particular order is a list of candi candidates
dates candidates for the other guard spot are, in addition to
Morton, juniors Spunk Bryant and Ed Mahoney and
sophomores Harry Winkler and Mike Rollyson.
Bryant is a transfer student from Gulf Coast JC,
Mahoney a returning veteran, Winkler a holdout
sophomore and Rollyson was the leading scorer
(18.3) on last year's freshman team.
Sloan believes the SEC race will be another very
tight one with the best basketball teams belonging
to Tennessee, Vanderbilt, Kentucky and Auburn,
For those who have forgotten, here is a rundown
on last year's outstanding Gator basketball record:

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THE ART OF RAPID READING Pitkin
GOOD INTENTIONS Ogden Nosh
THE TOWN AND THE CITY Kerooac
50 POEMS E.E. Cummings
ANIMAL ECOLOGY Dowdeswill
FREEDOM'S FERMENT Tyler
MATHEMATICS INACTION Sutton
TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
CHROMATOGRAPHY Heftmann
THEORY OF AUTOMOTIVE CONTROL.. .Aizerman
BASIC MATRIX THEORY Fuller
Compos Shop & Bookstore

1 Welcome From Bull Gatorii
i m
i m
I Dear Freshman: sjxj
Members of the Division of Intercollegiate Athletics sincerely ;s£
welcome you to the student body of the University of Florida and, g:*:
we hope, to the ranks of loyal Gator fans.
Your participation in support of Florida athletic teams will have
a strong effect on whatever success these teams manage over the s*:
I coming years. The spirit of the student body has increased year
by year and I personally want to point this out for due credit as
one reason our athletic program and record has also improved. M
I There's just nothing like playing before the home folks and it :*x
has always been my contention that a football team, or any other
I intercollegiate team, belongs to the faculty and student body first,
I These boys are students, just as you are, and they have main- s%v
I tained the same rigid entrance requirements you have maintained. m
I It's your athletic program and we want you to be a part of it as II
I a loyal fan. S:*:-
* Don't ever underestimate the power you have as supporters
I of Gator teams. Like the famous 12th man the Corps of Cadets
form for Naval Academy teams, the student body of the University K
of Florida is a major asset when we are playing at home. jxxj
Anybody who has ever had to walk into Baton Rouge, La. on
a Saturday night to face LSU knows what power a spirited, vocal
student body provides.
:$x So, welcome to the campus and to becoming part of our athletic s:s:
ft:::; tradition. Good luck to each one of you. SSs
x*>
x£ £ ft:*.
m RAY GRAVES :;**
£* Athletic Director :^x|
ft£*x*x*xvx*x*xx*:v:*x:*:*xx-x*x*x*:*x*x*x*x*x*x*:*x*x*x-:*x*: : : : : : : : :
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July 30, 1965,

Team
Looks
Good
While most of the best known
judges of Southeastern Conference
football believe Florida lacks the
depth to take away championship
honors this year they appear to be
just as convinced that several
Gator stars are* heeded for a
banner year.
Pre-season publications have
already rated defensive captain
Bruce Bennett and offensive end
Charles Casey as first-team all-
America choices.
Other Florida players expected
to bask in the limelight are quar quarterback
terback quarterback Steve Spurrier, and Barry
Brown, tailback Jack Harper, de defensive
fensive defensive guard Larry Gagner and
defensive halfback Allen
Trammell*
In a poll of league coaches,
while ranked no higher than third,
Florida came up with five pre preseason
season preseason choices as all-conference
men. Gagner, Bennett and Tram Trammell
mell Trammell made the defensive team and
Casey and Spurrier were chosen
on the offensive unit by the Birm Birmingham
ingham Birmingham Post-Herald.
Gagner was the coaches* choice
as the leagues best defensive
lineman, Bennett was picked as
the best, safetyman in the SEC.
I have said all along that we
will have some of the finest
Individuals in the SEC," says head
coach Ray Graves. "How far we
can go depends on how many big
plays we can get and the breaks
of the game. We will be severely
handicapped by a lack of depth if
we get many injuries. If injuries
at key spots are slight we can com compete
pete compete with any te \m in this league."
SEC coaches i inked the league
in this fashlonforthePost-Herald:
IAlabama, 2LSU, 3 Florida,
4Auburn, sMississippi, 6
Kentucky, 7Miss. State, 8
Tennessee, 9Georgia, 10Van 10Vanderbilt,
derbilt, 10Vanderbilt, 11Tulane.
"I think this is a good pre preseason
season preseason evaluation of the
conference," says Graves. "My
own personal choice as the pro probable
bable probable champion would have to be
LSU. Auburn should be one of the
real strong contenders and Ole
Miss will be a tremendous football
team."
Graves* opinions about the
Gators* needs for "big plays" and
lack of injuries to key boys were
echoed by Post-Herald Sports
Editor Bill Lumpkin.
"How far the Gators can travel
on the title path will be decided
by the amount of mileage Coach
Graves gets out of Spurrier, Casey
and a few other very talented
individuals," Lumpkin wrote.
"The Gators dont have the depth
of Alabama, LSU, Ole Miss or
Auburn, but if the top boys stay
healthy Florida is capable of
beating any team in the league,
or the country for that matter."
Florida finished the 1964 season
with a 7-3 record and a tie for
second in the SEC. They were
picked, in that years version of
the coaches* poll, to finish sixth
with a 5-5 record.
lots of Racket
...with
QAtOR AdS

Page 23



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<, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 30, 1965

JOIN THE
THOUSANDS



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TIGERT HALL THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA'S ADMINISTRATIVE HEADQUARTERS
.
I
- > -SN | -S*A t .- '.- v r g&m&M
1 W { ~ ?1 V .', ',
Portrait of A Leader

FARM BOY
On April 1, 1955, this former
Kansas farm boy, who worked his
way through Colorado A & M,
became the fifth president of the
University of Florida. He was
46 years old, said he had sand in
his shoes, frustrated the press by
quoting the old saw, Blessed is
he who has nothing to say and
cannot be persuaded to say it,
and then began getting reacquainted
with the 1,800 acre campus which
had been his home for most of
die past 21 years*
But who Is this roan that has
dedicated his life to serving the
people of Florida? And what makes
him tick? The purpose of this
publication is to provide insight
Into the life of J. Wayne Reitz
a man who is respected on every
front and loved by his students
and faculty.
FIRST PRESIDENCY
As a student, Dr. Reitz was
active in campus activities. He
was editor of the yearbook, presi president
dent president of the student body and won
the Rocky Mountain Oratory
Award* A Sigma Chi since 1927,
he was the first winner of the
Balfour Province Award for out outstanding
standing outstanding work in die Rocky

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Section B,

Page 1

Mountain Area*
As his undergraduate record
indicates, he has a tremendous
capacity for hard work* After
serving as assistant extension
economist at Colorado State Uni University
versity University and the University of
Illinois he earned his masters
degree at Illinois. He then joined
the University of Florida faculty in
1934 as an assistant professor of
agricultural economics and was
promoted to full professor before
leaving the University faculty in
1944. In the meantime he earned
his Ph. D. degree from the
University of Wisconsin.
AGRICULTURALIST
Dr* Reitz was absent from the
University of Florida campus for
five years while serving as eco economic
nomic economic counsel to the United
Growers and Shippers Association
in Orlando and later as Chief of
the Citrus Fruit Division, Fruit
and Marketing Administration of
the U* S. Department of Agricul Agriculture
ture Agriculture in Washington. In 1949 Univer University
sity University of Florida President appointed
him Provost for Agriculture, a
position he occupied urtil assuming
the presidency on April 1, 1955.
He has been honored with
honorary degrees by Tusculum

IHa m
UF PRESIDENT J. WAYNE REITZ

College, University of Miami,
Jacksonville University and
Colorado State University. Other
awards Include selection by his
social fraternity for the Significant
Sig Award in 1956, the Elroy Alfaro
Foundation Award, Jewish
Chautauqua Society Citation,
Progressive Farmer's "Man of
the Year Award in 1958 and Canon
City, Colorado's "Distinguished
Citizen Award" in 1960.

A BUSY MAM
Although the duties of the presi presidency
dency presidency of an Institution as large
and complex as the University of
Florida leave little time for outside
activities, President Reitz has
found time to serve a number of
organizations and federal agencies
in advisory capacities. Among
them are: Board of Consultants
for Agricultural Sciences, The

Friday, July 30, 1965

Rockefeller Foundation; White
House Public Advisory Committee
on Trade Negotiations; Board of
Directors of Escuela Agricola
Pan-americana in Honduras;
Board of Directors, and Chairman
in 1957 of the Jacksonville Branch
of the Federal Reserve Bank of
Atlanta; Board of Directors of the
Southern Regional Education
Board; Board of Trustees of
Florida Presbyterian College; and
many others.
THE FAMILY
There is an element in a uni university
versity university presidents life which is
seldom considered by the public
as it evaluates his leadership of
the educational institution the
family.
A look into Dr. Reitz private
world reveals an environment of
mutual trust and love; success as
a family man; as a firm and just
father; a a a good neighbor.
One of the heartwarming things
about the Reitz family is that
they have remained very close to
each other even though public life
has given them so little time
together. The President is away a
great deal, either at his desk or
out of town on official business.
The girls are miles away.
(Continued on P. U-B)



Page 2-B

v The Florida Alligator/ Friday, July 30, 1965

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aal n
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to be like. Whether it's to be a formal or informal fall season for you, do your col collegiate
legiate collegiate clothing collecting where the campus connoisseur*do; where the service,
advice and variety of selection are just as great (and well known) as the quality
brand names. As any collector can tell you, the value of your collection is meas measured
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. i- ''<**'< % -l f v:.'
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Friday, July 30, 1965/ The Florida Alligator,

Orientation Begins
To Initiate

Orientation is a week of new
experiences. From Sunday, Aug.
29, until Friday, Sept. 3, the enter entering
ing entering freshman or transferee will
get acquainted with the personali personalities,
ties, personalities, the colleges, the rules and
the campus of the University of
Florida.
Here is a rundown of the plan planned
ned planned activities of orientation and
the purposes of the activities.
The first day, some 2800 fresh freshmen
men freshmen and 650 University College

£ ** .* M
** 1
"Take me to my leader, Daddy-o!"

transfer students will have arrived
and assembled at the Florida Gym Gymnasium.
nasium. Gymnasium. They will be put into
groups with assigned leaders to
show them the campus, fill out
informational forms, and learn a about
bout about housing regulations.
Monday and Tuesday will be de devoted
voted devoted to academic and psychologi psychological
cal psychological testing. This is for the purpose
of future counseling and advice.
Tuesday night is student affairs
night when Dean Lester Hale, dean

Night Walking
Is Safe, Girls
Should a UF coed be alraid to
walk alone at night on campus?
She shouldn't be nervous at
all/' says Lt. Vernon Holliman of
the campus police. A coed is
probably safer on campus than she
is in her own home town."
Lt. Holliman suggests that coeds
who do walk alone at night always
take a lighted path and avoid short shortcuts
cuts shortcuts through wooded areas. This
holds true whether she's walking
on campus or downtown or at
home/' he continued.
Lt. Holliman cites that there
has been no confirmed case of a
girl being physically harmed from
assault since the university be became
came became coeducational. In addition to
regular watchmen, a foot patrol patrolman
man patrolman is on duty near the dorms and
libraries from 9 p.m. to early
morning every day.
There's nothing to fear, he as assures
sures assures incoming freshmen.
ff&ATpa
I ad* i s
REtfH t J.
(PEOPLE Wjf
M uwiy, Bfc 2832 rw

of student affairs, will speak. Stu Student
dent Student government officers will also,
be introduced.
Wednesday night, University of
Florida President J. Wayne Reitz
will traditionally welcome all the
new students to the campus. The
deans of each campus college will
also be introduced.
Thursday and Friday mornings
will then be devoted to the presen presentation
tation presentation of the first college lecture.
As a new feature of orientation,'

the' Institutions and English de departments
partments departments are presenting prelimi preliminary
nary preliminary class lectures in order to
help the incoming freshman begin
his academic life on solid footing.
According to Dr. John Dunkle,
assistant dean of men In the Uni University
versity University College, "The purpose of
the ope hour lectures which will be
held on Thursday and Friday morn morning
ing morning of orientation is to give students
a chance to begin their studies be before
fore before tqeir actual classes start.**


m iB X
mm m
w S
A TIRED ORIEN ORIENTATION
TATION ORIENTATION group leader
takes a lew minutes
break.

Page 3-B



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 30, 1965

Page 4-B

Registration
j g? i & i a
SCHEDULING YOUR COURSES
Between 2,800 and 3,000 fresh- this 150 group of professors, there
men are expected to register on were a number of professors who
or before the set registration date teach in upper division who also
at UF this fall. teach in the University College.
Dr. David Stryker of University Besides this corps of proses-
College said that the exact figures sors on hand to assist the fall
have not been received yet, but that freshmen the university also has,
not more than 3,000 will be enrolled in several areas of the campus,
because of the enrollment policies counselors whose specific func funcset
set funcset down by the Florida State tion is to see that the students
Board of Regents in Tallahassee, transition from home to the uni-
Dr. Stryker, besides being a full- versity occurs with as little
time counselor at University Col- confusion as possible. Whenever
lege, is also encharge of early fall any special problems arise, the
registration this summer. **Regis- student should feel free to come
tration for the fall will be going and talk to one of these people,
on all summer long. We expect The University College, where
to register about 80 per cent of the incoming freshmen will spend
the freshmen before September, the first two years of their college
Last year, for example, we were career, is designed for two pur purable
able purable to pre-register 79 per cent poses:
of the freshmen beforeSeptem- (1) To give the new student
ber. the basic elements of a
It is sometimes taken for granted liberal education, and
that in a large university, such as (2) To provide favorable
the University of Florida, relations circumstances for him
between student and university are to select a favorable
on an impersonal basis. Dr. John vocation.
Dunkle feels that this will not be This is because about three threetrue
true threetrue here at UF. fourths of the entering freshmen
Dr. Dunkle said that there will are not certain of their vocational
be about 150 professors teaching objectives. The University Col Colin
in Colin University College this fall, lege gives these students certain
This will put the student to teacher opportunities to become familiar
ratio at about 20 to 1. with the borad fields of human
Dr. Dunkle also said that besides knowledge.
jBT oi H
jHf $ W jj
tU

A Letter From The President

Dear Freshmen Students:
You are about to embark into what can be the most
valuable learning experience of your life as well as
a period when many of your lasting and most enriching
associations will be made.
The University affords numerous opportunities for
your personal and professional upbuilding. I hope
you will enter actively into those enterprises which
will enrich your life, for that is the purpose of this
institution and for your being here.
Perhaps the most sobering challenge you face is
the fact that the record you make here as a student
will largely determine your future opportunities. The
faculty is always ready to assist you. Talk with your
professors frequently about your work, your interests,
and your plans.
We are concerned about each of you individually
and cherish for you the opportunity to make the most
of your lives while here and after you leave this
campus as more mature and educated citizens.

iSf-'v <
an opportunity to meet you personally.
Sincerely,
J. Wayne Reitz
President

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Silverman's extends a cordial welcome to the freshman,
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hi every .college town the students have a special store they
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Traditional apparel for the college man and woman has been
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Our student charge plan ( a Silverman's first on campus
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Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Xxx'^TX^xXi:iYivxx'x*xV* x\-*** x- -yi'tXiVxx^^xxxXj>>XrXXTX-x-XBX-x xctX x-X
(From Th^Dean:
x Welcome: ?
to the Uni- :(:
'£ versity, you have been told you
the to degree (:(
:': of your choice and in due time be
£ a university graduate -- one of a ;;
Whether or not you £
the you (:(
are capable will depend one hun- JjHf
on the type decisions £
£ YOU make. 1 | |v | $
Will you dash off to the beach the week-end ::
£ in the library? Will you decide to take a crip*' course or one more £
£ challenging to your intellectural capacity? Will you interrupt the £
£ job at hand to join in the card game across the hall? £
Make right decisions, keep life activity in proper perspective and ::
£ you, as well as the University, will be proud of your accomplish- £
£ ments, :£
£ Sincerely, *£
Frank T. Adams, Jr.
Dean of Men £
. ;*
1.4* # Ml t * I ,*
Readiness Is All
By G. S. CORSERI
Columnist
Out of high school, spellbound, wide-eyed and bushy-tailed, the
main sweat, I figure, is not to let on Im a fresh, not to divulge the
old identity, so to speak, to rise above myself, putting it philosophically.
You just play the part, Charley,* I tell myself confidently even
though my name isn't Charley, and its no hairs!"
The first thing I figure I've got to do is get muself a girl. She
shouldn't be just any old girl that happens to be hanging around. She
has to be different cool and lofty.
During Orientation Week, I run into just the sort of girl I've got
in mind. We're running in opposite directions, and neither of us is
watching the sights in front, so we smack right into one another,
nose to nose, and the both of us accomplish backward somersaults,
which makes a lot of passers-by laugh and throw pennies.

I run over to see if she's all
right. Her nose is a little crooked,
three front teeth are missing, and
she's staring kind of vacantly. I'm
enthralled by the sight. You're
beautiful, and I love you," I tell
her with great emotion. /
She takes a long look at me and
begins to cry. I figure she's over-V
come by my sincerity, so I tell her i
it's all right, being manly and
considerate about it all, I don't
mind if she cries, even if she
doesn't look so good that way.
You clod!" she says.
You care," I exclaim,
delighted. I offer her my hand
to pick her up, and suddenly theres
a sharp pain. I look at my hand
and it's covered with teeth marks
that weren't there before, and
it's kind of bedraggled looking,
so I put it in my pocket.
Darling?" I say, confounded
to the core.
She gets up and starts to run
away. She's too shy," I tell
myself. How sweet touching,
even. She's shy!
After the girl ran away from
me I figure the next thing I'd
better concentrate on would be
my studies, because the Fresh,
as a rule, are none too glowing
when it comes to studies. I buy
myself a book called How To
Study," written by Professor
Salvadore Antonio Snodgraves.
To study," writes Snodgraves
in his accent you furst uv all
make sure de head is attached
firmly to de shoulders. Dis is
fundamentable." The next 300
pages are filled with various
exercises and philosophical proofs
aimed at determing whether
one's head is, indeed, upon de
shoulders. Snodgraves concludes
his masterpiece with the monu monumental
mental monumental dictum: To study without
de head upon de shoulders is, while

ABC ELEMENTARY I
The Most Student-Minded Businessmen

[i n
u 1
1J
---
not, perhaps, impossibleble, quite
difficult, to be sure." I'm very
much enlightened by it all, and 1
send the book to a friend of mine
who's in the Peace Corp 6in
Mozambique.
I decide that I've had about
enough of this, and that it isn't
studying, anyway, that makes the
college man, but what it is is
whether or not you can handle
the brews, guzzle, so to speak.
I walk into the first shabby
bar I come to and order a tall
one.
A tall what?" the barman says.
You know, I say, kind of
stealthy, winking my eye a bit.
A B-E-E-R! A beer, baby!"
Baby, who's about 300 pounds,
takes me by the ear, lifts me off
the ground, belches, and throws me
out into the street where a Volks Volkswagon,
wagon, Volkswagon, driven by the girl with
the crooked nose, runs me over.
She's passionate, I tell
myself. And, ascertaining that my
head is still upon the old shoulder
blades, I limp after the Volks,
my C-3 Syllabus clutched firmly
in my bedraggled hand, thinking
how fine life is, how wonderful
it is to belong and to be a college
roan.

Page 5-B



Page 6-B

Law Students Available
To Represent You

By SID STUBBS
Honor Court Chancellor
We are very fortunate to be
attending a university that chooses
to treat its students as persons of
honor. Only so long as students
choose to support the Honor Code
can it be effective. One of your
first decisions as a student at the
University of Florida should be that
you will adhere to the provisions of
the Honor Code.
Many of you as freshmen will find
classes under an honor system a
new experience. Most of the
professors do not remain in the
room while exams are being given.
This places the burden on the
honesty and integrity of each stu student.
dent. student.
The Honor System asks each
student to be honorable but
it asks more. It asks each student
to be responsible to a certain ex extent
tent extent for the honor of other students.
Without this, an honor system can
never be effective. Many of you
will have no trouble at all accepting
the Honor Code and applying it in
your own actions. However, you
may find it distasteful to be con concerned
cerned concerned with violations of others.
Unfortunately, this is where the
Honor System most needs your
support to stay alive. A moment's
reflection will surely convince you
that this is the backbone of an
honor system.* Those of you
who accept the Honor Code as
applied to your own actions would
in all probability live by the same
code under a proctor system. But
under a proctor system, you would
not be required to concern your yourselves
selves yourselves with the actions of others.
Life as a student under the Honor
Code is not really so very differ different
ent different from the life you will be ex expected
pected expected to lead as citizens of a
community after you leave the
University of Florida. Many of the
violations of the laws in any com community
munity community are reported to the police
by citizens. Certainly there are
not enough policemen for them to
be present at the commission of
every crime.

I & 4 1
jHk mBEBBm
CHANCELLOR OF THE HONOR COURT
SID STUBBS
'

, The Florida Alligator, Fridays July 30, 1965

The System: On Your Honor

Here, when the Honor Code is
broken, you are expected to report
the violation to the Honor Court
or the professor, or to talk to
another student about the viola violation
tion violation and then, together, report the
offense. If the violator is a friend,
you may first want to speak to the
friend but if your friend re refuses
fuses refuses to heed your advice you will
be doing him a favor if you report
the violation. The very least that
is expected of you is that you
exert all the influence of your
friendship to stop the violation.
Concededly, this is the hardest
choice to make under the Honor
System.
You will probably never see an
Honor Code violation but if you
do, remember that the choice you
make may well set a pattern of
of action for your life. It will
certainly have an impact on your
self-respect.
The following section of this
article describes the operation
of the Honor Court and explains
the offenses under the Honor Code.
CHE ATING: the GIVING or TAK TAKING
ING TAKING of any information or material
with the intent of wrongfully aid aiding
ing aiding yourself on any academic work
which is considered in any way in
the determination of the final
grade.
STEALING: the taking of the pro property
perty property of another and with the intent
of depriving the owner of the use
of the property.
BAD CHECKS: knowlingly ne negotiating
gotiating negotiating a worthless check of your
own or another, or failure to make
good a returned check within a
reasonable period of time.
All of the above provisions have
very practical applications in stu student
dent student life. For example, the ef effectiveness
fectiveness effectiveness of the "bad check
provision is largely responsible
for the ease with which students
can cash personal checks through throughout
out throughout Gainesville. Each time a student
chashes a bad check, the mer merchants'
chants' merchants' trust of the "Florida Man
is proportionally lessened and it
becomes more difficult for other

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A student defense counsel argues a motion before the past Chancellor
of the Honor Court

students to cash checks. In re regard
gard regard to stealing, trust and con conficence
ficence conficence among students is directly
injured by such acts. For example,
even temporarily taking the bicycle
of another without permission is
within the definition of stealing.
Consider the problems resulting
from students "borrowing bi bicycles
cycles bicycles after each class and
abandoning them on other parts
of campus, despite a lack of any
intent to permanently steal them.
Finally, and probably most im importantly
portantly importantly in an academic context:
cheating. Every student who cheats
not only lessens his own self selfrespect,
respect, selfrespect, but at the same time
breaches the trust to his fellow
students that has been placed upon
him under the Honor System. The
System itself is not a faculty im imposed
posed imposed means of discipline. It is
instead fully a student institution
that is entirely dependent upon
student operation and cooperation
for its success. Herein lies the
hardest concept for most new stu students
dents students to understand: the responsi responsibility
bility responsibility to report violations of the
Honor Code does not involve "tattl "tattling
ing "tattling on a fellow student, any more
than it is "tattling to tell a
policeman that you just saw one
person shoot another, or mali maliciously
ciously maliciously slash another's tires, etc.
Any student that has violated the
Code has breached your trust and
that of every other student.
In the context of cheating, his
violation and consequently un unearned
earned unearned grade will, in the long run,
affect you and every other student,
if it goes unreported because of an
unwarranted "mind your own bus business
iness business attitude. In fact, where a
student violates the Honor Code,
it is your business. In high schcol
perhaps a lack of maturity might
view acceptance of this responsi responsibility
bility responsibility as "tattling, and thus re reliance
liance reliance is placed upon proctors. At
the University of Florida, reliance
is placed completely upon you.
In effect, the entire system rests
upon the principle of academic
honesty. A diploma from the Uni University
versity University of Florida is as much a

stamp of approval of the character
of the graduate as It is a certifi certificate
cate certificate of courses completed. The
student who cheats his way through
school and proves after gradua graduation
tion graduation that he has not earned his
diploma, serves only to reflect
adversely upon the standards of the
University of Florida and thus
upon all other Florida graduates.
In addition, since many courses are
graded on a curve or sliding scale,
your grades and the grades of your
fellow classmates are adversely
affected by a student who cheats
and whose violation goes unre unreported.
ported. unreported.
THE HONOR COURT
The present Honor Code pro provisions
visions provisions mentioned cheating,
stealing and the issuance of worth worthless
less worthless checks are administered
by a completely student operated
Honor Court. The Honor Court, a
branch of Student Government, is
invested with full authority to in investigate
vestigate investigate and try all reported vio violations.
lations. violations. During orientation you will
hear more about the Court and its
operations. Briefly, it consists of
an elected Chancellor, who is the
presiding judge over all trials as
well as the chief administrator of
the Honor System, a clerk, and
sixteen justices elected from the
various colleges. The Court has
a courtroom and offices located
in Rooms 304 and 306 of the Florida
Union, as well as a full-time sec secretary.
retary. secretary. A thorough investigation of
all reported violations is made
by advanced law students who serve
as counsel for the Court. Every
student is afforded every opportu opportunity
nity opportunity to maintain his innocence. A
student who pleads guilty is tried
summarily before the Chancellor
and two Vice-Chancellors to deter determine
mine determine the penalty.
If a student pleads not guilty,
he is tried by a court of six jurors
chosen at random from the Student
Body, similar to the procedure
used in regular jury trials. Every
effort is made to see that every
student has a fair trial; the possi possibility
bility possibility of an arbitrary conviction or
a summary dismissal from school

based on the possibly erroneous
belief of a professor, an inherent
defect of the proctor system, is
successfully eliminated.
The defendant is afforded the
same basic rights he would have
under state law, with trials con conducted
ducted conducted by qualified law students,
who voluntarily devote their time
to the implementation of the prin principles
ciples principles of the Honor System. In
addition, the proceedings them themselves
selves themselves are kept secret to protect
the innocent. Verdicts and penal penalties
ties penalties are posted by number in order
to afford a first offender the op opportunity
portunity opportunity to rehabilitate himself
without public disgrace. The penal
power of the Honor Court itself
can include any or all of the
following: a severe reprimand, a
failing grade in a course, penalty
hours, suspension for up to one
year, permanent expulsion.
The real value of the System,
however, lies not in its penal
authority or efficiency, but rather
in its educative purpose. Without
student enforcement and coopera cooperation
tion cooperation the System is meaningless, and
'honor** becomes a hollow word.
The Honor Court does not initiate
action; it relies upon you to accept
your responsibility under the Sys System
tem System and report violations. The
future of the System is thus com completely
pletely completely in your hands.
I urge you to give your active
support to the Honor System and
to have the courage to report a
violation if you become aware of
one. If you have any questions, I
will be happy to try to answer
them. Call university extension
2374, or come by the Honor Court
Office on the third floor of the
Florida Union.
Always remember that any dis dissatisfaction
satisfaction dissatisfaction with the Honor System
that you see reflected in professors
and administrators is the respon responsibility
sibility responsibility of students who have chosen
not to live by the Honor Code.
The strength of the Honor Sys System
tem System lies in your hands. Will you
merit the trust of the Honor
System?



WSA Works To Represent Women

Women Students* Association
better known as WSA is the
organization for the UF coed: be
she freshman or senior, indepen independent
dent independent or sorority member, dorm
resident or part of the off-campus
crowd.
All women students are auto automatically
matically automatically members of WSA when
they come to campus. There are
no dues. WSA is a subsidiary or organization
ganization organization of Student Government,
representing all single undergra undergraduate
duate undergraduate women.
The first contact the freshman
has with WSA is in the Honor and
Hall Councils of the dormitory.
The councils help the freshman to
establish herself in the dorm and
adjust to college life through
Welcome Week activities and the
Big Sister program.
, Honor Councils serve as the
judiciary bodies helping coeds
understand the regulations of WSA.
Hall Councils serve as planning
groups for various programs and
festivities within the dorm such as
speakers, parties, socials with
other dorms, movies and dorm
improvement.
Each floor in the dorm has re representatives
presentatives representatives who serve as the

r~
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COSMETICS LAMPS CHILDREN S WEAR lower. Here are just a few of the excitfng values to
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Pay No Money Down... Take 30 Days, Months To Pay!
HARDWARE DOMESTICS MEN S WEAR
Monday thru
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GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER NORTH MAIN STREET

go-tjtween for the coed and Hall
Council. An Interhall Council is
the transmittal agency to the WSA
Council.
WSA sets regulations for curfew,
dress, dorm activities and
sponsors the publication of the
Coedikette sent to all freshman
women.
Dean Marna V. Brady, advisor
to WSA, urged that any coed who
wants a chance to work with WSA
should do so by contacting one of
her half representatives or the
Dean of Women's office.
WSA offers the coed a chance
to serve UF, get involved in acti activities,
vities, activities, extend herself and go up
the ladder of organization work
here, Dean Brady said.
WSA has a proud history be beginning
ginning beginning in spring of 1948, with
each succeeding class helping to
build and improve upon the struc structure
ture structure of the group, she continued.
WSA cooperates in Religion-in-
Llfe Week, Dollars for Scholars,
Homecoming and several other UF
projects.
Officers for the 1965 year term

m 11?
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wPN ~ %
DEAN OF* WOMEN Marna V. Brady works on a Womens Students As Association
sociation Association project with four interested coeds. Any interested freshmen
girls may participate in this organization merely by volunteering for
one of the many committees or WSA sub-organizations.

are Kay Lundquist, president; Jane
Kimbrell, vice president; Penny
Port, recording secretary; Karen
Read, corresponding secretary;

Friday, July 30, 1965/ The Florida Alligator,

Nancy Calhoun, treasurer.
Jennifer McKinnon, Senior class
representative; MarilynShinbaum,
Junior class representative; Cindy

Cohen and Kay Melton, Freshman-
Sophomore class representatives
and Janet Stoddard, secretary of
women's affairs.

Page 7-B



Page 8-B

WSA President Still To Be Installedi

y govern governjfc
jfc governjfc .*#: Jf for UF women,
Kay Lundquist, 3AS, explained
that she battled the flu in the in infirmary
firmary infirmary the night of the WSA

hereisthe
Psi jN s i f news of the day
! FOOD FOR LESS"
ply Those in the know
fiooll W,IHS CRO D
(iMtrial
Complete
tunth on Sp tia,,
l\ l\ \\ Dinner Specials Every Evening I /W
I ' \jl
BNpMpMw
I
I 4 Minutes from Campus 1212 North Main Street, in the Gainesville Shopping Center

1/ The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 30, 1965

installation banquet which she had
planned for March 15.
Nevertheless, this 20 year old
pre-med major has taken over
her rightful reign as the top
representative of women students
and their organization.
Previously she had been elected
junior and sophomore WSA repre representatives.
sentatives. representatives.
Miss Lundquist expressed her
opinion on:

WOMEN IN MENS APART APARTMENTS:
MENTS: APARTMENTS: The new housing rule
states that women are allowed in
mens apartments, and vice versa,
as long as it is permitted by the
landlord and no question of pro propriety
priety propriety is raised. As the rule stood
before, girls were penalized by
Honor Council. The purpose of
signing-out was defeated when
coeds were not truthful about their
destination.

CURFEW: We have the most
liberal curfew hours of any uni university
versity university in the South. With a late
permit, a senior girl may come
into the dorm at 12:30 p.m., and
a junior, at 11:30 p.m.
CURFEW OFF CAMPUS:
There is no way to enforce off offcampus
campus offcampus women to observe curfew,
however, they are on their honor
to obey the same rules as women

living on campus or in sornil
houses.* W
A member of Mortar
Honorary and Chi Omega soror
Miss Lundquist participate
Legislative Council, Little Sist
of the Laurel, and cheerleade
Organizing plans for next ye
she urged any women studej
interested in participating in
and its related sub-division
dormitories to contact her at
2-3434. I
So far, we need girls to h
in the freshmen orientation p
gram in the dorm, sorority al
dorm leadership workshops, M
various homecoming activities
Coed/keftJ
Tells Rulel
What kind of clothes to bring t|
school? What are the curfew hours!
What to do about dormitory life!
Women Students* AssociatioJ
(WSA) suggests that incomiiJ
coeds refer to their Coedikettl
Magazine. 1
As the name may imply, thil
publication is designed to intro!
duce all incoming women to th!
traditions, customs, and regulal
tions of the UF. 1
The first official welcome ol
WSA to new students, Coedikettel
was mailed out in early Mayundeil
the direction of Miss Becky Bear Bearden,
den, Bearden, editor.
Originating in 1950, Coedikette
has been written and illustrated
by a student staff each year,
Beethoven
To Jazz
Whether it*s a Beethoven sym symphony
phony symphony by Leonard Bernstein, the
jazz music of Duke Ellington, or
a print of a painting by Rembrandt
or Picasso, students can find the
art and music they want at the
University of Florida Library.
The library maintains a collec collection
tion collection of over 2,000 LP phonograph
records, according to Mr. Alli Allison
son Allison Carson, director of audio audiovisual
visual audiovisual services for the library.
The records are divided into
two types, non- circulating and
circulating.** Students may rent
the circulating records at a fee
of five cents per day. The non noncirculating
circulating noncirculating records, according to
Carson, may not be checked out
of the library because of the rare
quality of most of the per performances.
formances. performances.
Students may listen to all rec records,
ords, records, however, in the five listen listening
ing listening rooms maintained free of
charge by the library. The listen listening
ing listening rooms and record collection
are on the fourth floor of the main
library and are open from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.ro. Monday through Friday,
and at other times on weekends.
Carson says the library receives
about 600 new records, including
replacements, every year. Rec Records
ords Records in the collection are mostly
classical in nature, but there are
also special sections for Broad Broadway
way Broadway shows, movie soundtracks,
jazz, and mood music.
Students looking for paintings to
decorate their rooms can take ad advantage
vantage advantage of a rather library service.
A collection of approximately 16
prints of well-known paintings is
available for rental from the Hu Humanities
manities Humanities Room of the library.
The prints are rented each tri trimester,
mester, trimester, at afee ranging from SI.OO
to $1.75 per painting, depending on
the age and original cost of the
print.



What A Way, To Spend The Day

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Approximately 1,000 girls will participate as
rushees in Fall Panhellenic Rush. Os that num number,
ber, number, more than 700 will be in-comingfreshmen.
Often confusing for the freshman girl is the
traditional Silence Period observed during the
first few weeks of school. Panhellenic Hush
Chairman Carolyn Wilkes explains that this
period between the rushees and sorority girls
is an attempt to protect the rushee from feeling
obligations toward a sorority because of a

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THEY HAVE FUN
at Sigma Chi Derby

WELCOME TO THE UNIVER UNIVERSITY
SITY UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA:
At the time this letter had
to go to press Dr. Mama V.
Brady, > Dean of Women, was
en route to Washington, D. C.
to attend the Conference of the
Governors* Commissions on
the Status of Women.
In her absence we, her
assistants, wish to extend to
you her warmest welcome,
express her pride in
University of Florida women,
and offer the assistance of her
office and staff.
Dean Brady is a builder.
She arrived on campus in 1948
and in the fall of that year
established the Women Stu Students
dents Students Association asan
affiliated organization of
Student Government. Since

Rush Hits UF Early

A Letter from the Dean:

that time she and your pre predecessors
decessors predecessors have worked toward
the realization of their ideals
for you.
Dean Brady has said that
the future is built on the
foundations of the past, and
you, the new students, will
be its architects.*'
For months our university
has been preparing for your
arrival. There have been
pre registration programs,
orientation committees,
Welcome Week* planning,
housing assignments, and
resident assistant workshops.
We have lived with the
building of new classrooms,
streets now open and now
closed, seas of mud, and tons
of printed communications.
The University was preparing

Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

,_ v' ~.. Ac

previous friendship.
A new element was added to the rushing
program last year, added Miss Wilkes. A
group of 13 sorority girls, one from each
ouse, are chosen by Panhellenic Council to
advise rushees on problems and questions con concerning
cerning concerning rush.
Essentially these 13 girls will not actively
participate in the fall program but will repre represent
sent represent sororities as a unit, thereby facilitating
a fair rush for the rushees and Panhellenic.

m*** & : vU
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for the class of 1969,
improving its structure,
making ready to welcome you!
When you arrive, your Uni University
versity University will have completed
its arrangements and
exchanged its work clothes
for academic dress.
It is with open arms that it
welcomes you, not in anony anonymous
mous anonymous caravans but each one
personally, as one receives a
good friend whom one holds
dear and wishes to keep.
We are pleased that you have
chosen to belong to the
University of Florida.
For Dr. Marna V. Brady
Dean of Women
by Dr. Marjorie Jackson
Assistant Dean of Women

JUST LIKE OLD TIMES
anywhere

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AT GATOR GROWL

Page 9-B



Page 10-B

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Saturday Morning...Zowee

... We Are The Girls of Old Florida
- ..

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 30, 1965

Sorority Life Fills Their Days

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.. .And Here's John and Me At The Fiji Picnic

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We re Very Casual Friends
"



MS' Ml

ABOUT DR. REITZ

(Continued from P. 1-B)
Margaret Ann is now Mrs. Baxter
Cochran, the wife of a Presby Presbyterian
terian Presbyterian minister in Cornelia, Ga.,
and Marjorie works for the United
Nations in New York. Mrs. Reitz
and her mother, Mrs. S. H.
Millikan, now make up the family
in Gainesville.
In spite of the miles between,
love for each other, regard for
good scholarship, music, and a
mutual concern for their fellow
man binds them into a strong
family unit.
Early risers who pass the
Presidents residence on the way
to work each morning usually note
that the big state automobile is
already gone. Some who come
early enough, spot Dr. Reitz as
he is driving into campus. More
often than not, however, his car
is already in its reserved space in
the Tigert Hall parking lot. And,
on Saturday mornings when the
other parking spaces in the lot
are empty, the Presidents black
sedan is usually there.
At the same time, at home, it's
a good guess the wheels are already
beginning to turn. More often than
not, there is an official function
about to take place. It could be
a dinner for a small group of
visiting dignitaries; for a visiting
lecturer; for Homecoming
celebrities; a houseguest like
British Prime Minister Atlee or
the late John Kennedy; or a
reception for 2,000 graduating
seniors, their families and
friends.
The lady behind these social
activities and the hundred of details
inherent in such ventures is Mrs.
Reitz. As the Universitys first
lady, she shares the presidents
heavy social responsibilities with
charm, grace and an unusual sensi sensitivity.
tivity. sensitivity.
And, while the number of
functions range from one a week
to ten at Christmas, there is
always welcome time for functions
which involve students: Mortar
Board breakfasts and meetings;
special teas; Blue Key and Student
Government dinners; Dames
receptions.
NEW SERVICES
The University of Floridas
record of service to Florida and
its citizens was long and disting distinguished
uished distinguished in 1955 when Dr. J. Wayne
Reitz assumed the presidency.
These basic services to the state
have been continued and
strengthened even while others
were being added.
Among the major new services
offered by the University during
the decade were educational-pro educational-programming
gramming educational-programming through WUFT-TV, the
Universitys educational television
station. For Encyclopedia
Britannica Films, the University

produced on film a complete
course in high school chemistry
which is now in use throughout the
world.
At the request of the Ford
Foundation, the University of
Florida dispatched a team of
faculty members to strengthen
science programs and agricultural
education at the University of
Mandalay, Burma.
In the University of Florida
Hospital and Clinics was
established the primary health
service facility in Florida. While
providing complex medical,
surgical and diagnostic services to
both private patients and patients
sponsored by county and state
health and welfare agencies, the
professional medical staff of the
Hospital and Clinics is also
teaching the members of the
medical and health teams of
tomorrow for Florida
communities.
Through the University of
Florida Library, which reached
the one million volume mark during
the decade, an inter-library loan
service was established to provide
books, articles and microfilm
reproductions to other uni universities,
versities, universities, junior colleges and
Florida industry. The University
also established and operated off offcampus
campus offcampus programs for work leading
to the Master of Engineering
degree in St. Petersburg, West
Palm Beach and Orlando. And, in
1964 GENESYS (Graduate
Engineering Education System)
was established to provide
graduate engineering and science
courses throughout the state, via
closed circuit television, for the
scientists and engineers employed
by Florida space age industry.
ADMINISTRATION
The decade saw many adminis administrative
trative administrative and organizational changes
made within the University.
Among the highlights were:
With the support of the Ford
Foundation, a Science and Engi Engineering
neering Engineering Study was completed as assessing
sessing assessing the future demand for
trained manpower in these fields,
determining administrative and
staffing arrangements, determin determining
ing determining the roost feasible arrangements
for the utilization of existing staff
and outlining the necessary physi physical
cal physical plant requirements.
The Nuclear Science Center was
established and a director appoint appointed
ed appointed to coordinate the Universitys
diversified nuclear program.
Floridas first nuclear reactor was
completed and placed in operation
on the University of Florida cam campus
pus campus and in 1964 the Nuclear Sci Sciences
ences Sciences Building was completed and
occigried.
The 1963 Florida Legislature

Welcome From
The Student
Body President

Dear Freshmen:
As you now join the student body
of the University of Florida, I would
like to confront you not only with
a welcome but also a challenge.
You are starting out on an adven adventure
ture adventure in higher education from which
you will reap inexhaustible know knowledge
ledge knowledge and lasting friendships. If
you take advantage of the facilities
that are now available to you as a
Florida student, both academic and
extra-curricular, then you are in insured
sured insured an exciting college life.
The University hopes that you
will make an all-out effort to ob obtain
tain obtain a broad exposure or well
roundedness. To have an exciting

Lighter Moments of The Fifth President

Humorous situations have occurred during
the past ten years, many of them as a result
of the basic friendliness of the man who serves
as president on a campus the size of a small
city.
In an interview with a reporter for one of the
student publications Dr. Reitz related the
remarks of a boy who came down the receiving
line during the reception formerly held following
the President's traditional address to the fresh freshman
man freshman class. "I surely enjoyed your talk tonight,
the freshman told Dr. Reitz, "particularly the
quotations.
** *
Another incident surrounding a reception line
was the time one student shook his hand and
paused, shook it again, and then said "I'd
like to shake your hand again because I've
waited in line an hour and a half to do this.
** *
During her first week on the Florida campus
a coed from New York was sitting on the bench
in front of Building X when President Reitz
walked by. "Good Morning, how are you?* he
asked. The girl only glared back at him. She
had been taught when a stranger speaks to
you to move away or call the police. "I never

authorized the establishment of a
Division of Sponsored Research,
which, because of certain freedom
and flexibility, it provides.in the
administration of grant and con contract
tract contract research, stimulates and
promotes the Universitys rapidly
growing research program.
The University Computing Cen Center
ter Center was also established and an
IBM 709 computer was purchased
to provide high speed computing
facilities for the first time on the
University of Florida campus.
In other areas the Florida Leg Legislature
islature Legislature authorized funds for in increasing
creasing increasing faculty salaries to levels
comparable with the national
average for institutions of over
10,000 students and lump sum ad adjustments
justments adjustments on non-academic salary
levels to provide funds, to make
these levels more competitive.
The most comprehensive study
of the University and its future
role was completed in 1962 as a
part of a system-wide Role and
Scope study. Also during the dec decade
ade decade a comprehensive study of space
utilization, designed to permit
closer supervision and control
over the assignment of rooms for
class purposes, was completed and
implemented.
Along with major curriculum re revisions
visions revisions in agriculture, architec architecture
ture architecture and fine arts, business ad administration,
ministration, administration, journalism and
communications, engineering, law
and pharmacy, and Office of Uni University
versity University Relations and Development
was established to organize and
coordinate an overall program of
institutional advancement.

Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

campus life grasp at every oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to broaden your background;
swing at every type of action that
makes your life richer, more
meaningful and more fruitful.
It is said that success for each
man is what hes willing to settle
for. Make the best contribution at
the level that youve set for your yourself.
self. yourself. Whatever you do, dont settle
for common place.
The great strides of human pro progress
gress progress have come from uncommon
men and women. When we get sick
we want an uncommon doctor. When
we go to war we yearn for an un uncommon
common uncommon general or admiral. The
imperative need of this campus,

For the first time an outside
management consulting firm was
retained to recommend changes in
the Universitys administrative
structure for more efficient and
economical operation.
And, in 1964 a new University
Constitution was adopted, clarify clarifying
ing clarifying and updating University poli policies
cies policies and procedures.
NEW FACILITIES
The pressure for new and
additional faculties in the 1955-65
decade was Intense. Rising
enrollments account for much of
this pressure but the changing
composition of the student body
a larger percentage of upper
division and graduate students
intensified it. The rapidly growing
status of the University faculty's
research capabiUty also placed
an additional strain on University
faculties.
Although the list of new faculties
is long, many University pro programs
grams programs are still quartered in
"temporary buildings which are
now 20 years old. Sufficient funds
have not been available to meet
the building needs necessary to
cope with expansion of the
University.
Briefly, among the new faculties
established and placed in operation
during the decade were:
An educational television station
offering courses by television for
die pubUc and closed circuit for
classroom purposes. Many
courses were produced in coop cooperation

v dreamed that the President would speak to me
and I nearly fainted when 1 met him formally
later that week. Suppose I had called the
poUce, she wondered.
* *
Wrapped in towels and clouded in the steamy
mist of the athletic training room two men
were working kinks out of their tired muscles.
"I'm Wayne Reitz, the taller man said extending
his hand. "Im , a
tackle on the freshman team, said the other,
giving a firm handshake, "Whats your
position?
** *
When Candid Camera was filming on the
campus Dr. Reitz was hidden behind a screen
only a few feet from the students he was
talking with on the telephone. After inviting them
to play golf or have dinner with him he would
walk around the screen and greet them
personally. The reactions were varied. "Pardon
me. Sir, said one brand new freshman, "but
I dont believe I know you. Another, a senior
who had met with Dr. Reitz many times, thought
the man on the phone was kidding him and played
along saying, "Yes Sir, Dr. Reitz, Ill be glad
to play golf with you if you will arrange to get
me out of class, preferably in the morning.

state, and nation at all times is the
leadership of the uncommon man
and woman. We need men and wo women
men women who cannot be intimidated,
who are not concerned with ap applause
plause applause meters, who will not sell
tomorrow for cheers today. We
need men and women who have
developed an insatiable desire for
hard work, and who constantly dis display
play display great drive, constant energy,
and faith in themselves and what
they are trying to accomplish.
We wish you the best of luck in
your college years.
Sincerely,
Bruce Culpepper
Student Body President

eration cooperation with public schools and
junior colleges.
The worlds largest Cobalt
irradiator was completed and
placed in service for food
preservation research.
All units of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center Medical Sciences
Building, University Hospital and
Clinics and the Pharmacy-
Research wing were completed
and placed in operation.
In addition to the 10 kw nuclear
training reactor, the power of
which was subsequently increased
in 1964 to 100 kw, a new home
for the Department of Physics was
completed and occupied by the
faculty and research staff of the
department. Dan McCarty Hall,
home of the CoUege of Agricul Agriculture,
ture, Agriculture, was completed and occupied
and a new physical plant for P.K.
Yonge, the University Laboratory
School, was placed in operation.
With the help of the National
Science Foundation, the IBM 709
in the Computing Center was
purchased and made available to
the Universitys scientific edu educational
cational educational and research programs.
Other new faciUStes during the
decade include# two permanent
brick apartment villages for
married students, providing 296
apartments; an addition to the law
school building; seven residence
halls which provide housing for
2,326 students; and the
architecture and fine arts complex
which was occupied early in 1965.

Page 11-B



Page 12-B

PRESI
THE 1965 FIGH
Grave things go
IHHK: better,! m / f
ij v (
18 NORIHWCSTERN
WI*T I 111W#0SRBSr Sept.' 25 MISS^STATE
" 1 (Gainesville)
Oct. 12 L. S. U.
\ (Gainesville)
Oct. 1 MISSISSIPPI
Y (Oxford)
Oct. 16 N. CAR. STATE
\ (Gainesville-Homec
taste! | 1 Oct. 30 \ AUBURN
I ini |! VAoburn)
Nov 6 Georgia
. THE COCACOU COMPANY N n c^" viMe)
KEPT THE FUVOR IN Nv. 13 /£LANE
fGainesville)
H "*" how can N v 20 jn; f\\ /
...1 Nov. 27 F. S. U. \Vy
I|Jq£ (GomesvilMJ^J
1 calorie /
tasteso / \
good? §
Beckman
Bottled under authority of Coca-Cola Bottling Co. by
GAINESVILLE COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.
* * *.*
.
'

, The Fforida Alligator, Friday, July 30, 1965



TING GATORS
llsli Cotoe WM
[1 swim H
fz M Nataliy '
:m'
; y)v.y;.y *% jf MI
I P jy a
§* H ww fur m w
M j&r iwr ,4;-
Adult T w
V V Tastes -mj^
Bennett
929 East University Ave. Gainesville, Florida 32601
Phone 376-3701 or 376-6506

Friday, July 30, 1965, TK& Florida Alligator,

Page 13-B



Page 14-B

, TVie Florido Alligotor, Fridoy, July 30, 1965

Time Ouf for Fraternity Pranks
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FROLICS

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SOCIALIZING
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% ,svy^-(TS^7/ *?ffr >^S?T ty&k'- ' .'_
...LOYALTIES



AT RELIGIOUS CENTER
erv/ce, Social, Cultural Needs Filled

freshman's first contact
college religious life is with
rganized religious centers
d campus.
eral religious groups have
itions buildings a short
ice off campus. The centers
or services, socials, dis dison
on dison groups and brunches for
members.
lominations that have foun founis
is founis located near campus are:
ist, Catholic, Episcopal,
is h, Lutheran, Methodist,
jyterian and Mormon.
e Unitarian Fellowship,
;tian Science Organization,
Ini ted Church and Congrega-
Christian churches hold
meetings in the Florida
. Society of Friends attend
ces in downtown Gainesville.
hodist, Episcopalian, Lu Luan,
an, Luan, Baptist, Presbyterian,
lie and Jewish centers pro proworship
worship proworship services, social and
tional programs.
i centers seek to help the
nt grow in understanding
faith through discussion,
eat ion and worship ex exnces.
nces. exnces. They form the
;ual basis for the college
nt.
e University Religious Asso Assoion
ion Assoion (URA) is a student
lized group designed to
nulate the discussion of
Lous issues." The URA helps

welcome, gals!
welcome to gainesville
welcome to the u. of f.
| welcome to tWIQ
dress in good taste with that Twig look, wear the^
coat by "misty harbor" coat by "debutogs" ..- |
and carry a bag by "john romain" or 1 letisse
and on .and on. .
I look for my stable door, and look for me in the
wV I window.. .come in.. .browse around... and en en-7
-7 en-7 \ J joy my rustic decor.. .i'm a touch of americana
mP?U | ...and i'm sumptuously situate at one-one-
jl Jr I three-one,yvest university avenue.. .one block
WVJI from campus.. .see ya 500 n....
m

coordinate the events between
various religious groups, in
addition to publishing a semi semiweekly
weekly semiweekly bulletin of religious
activities available to the student.
w B
I I
The URA encourages and stimu stimulates
lates stimulates discussion of religious issues
within the educational and intellec intellectual
tual intellectual context of the university
community, to further inter interreligious
religious interreligious understanding and to gain
cooperation between the religious
organizations at UF.
The URA is connected with the
Department of Religion. Regular
academic professors in the de department
partment department direct and advise the
activities of the association.

One of the main features spon sponsored
sored sponsored by the URA is Religion-
In-Life Week, which brings to
campus each year guest speakers
who discuss the questions and
problems of religion in modern
life.
Last year the distinguished
author, lecturer and commentator
on cultural problems, Barbara
Ward (Lady Jackson) was the guest
speaker at the Religion-In-l ife
Convocation in January.

MAKE BETTER GRADES
STUDY WITH
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Zenith Quality FM Service Technicians
SELLING & SERVICING ZENITH SINCE 1933

Friday/ July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator/

Mrs. Ward is again scheduled
to speak during the 1965-66 Re Religion
ligion Religion In Life Week activities
during the coming Winter
Trimester. She will address the
university wide Convocation
during the week of Jan. 23-28.
In the week-long series of
forums, speeches and discussions
the college community is given
the opportunity to consider and
evaluate the application of
religious belief to the decisions of
life.

The URA also features other
special events throughout the
academic year including the
traditional campus -wide
Christmas observance at which the
President of the University pre presents
sents presents his Christmas message to
the students. The event is
scheduled for December 5 this
year.
I NJUNuity,
jUp Originality,
r | Neatness,
Exactness...
Are the words used time
after time to describe
Gator advertising. To
take advantage of these
qualities, call Univ. Ex
ZB3Z
The Florida Alligator

Page 15-B



Page 16-B

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 30, 1965

THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FOOD SERVICE
.
THE FOOD SERVICE IS UNIVERSITY-OWNED AND OPERATED TO PROVIDE FOR THE CONVENIENCE
OF THE STUDENTS, FACULTY, STAFF AND THEIR GUESTS. THE FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM IS
UNDER THE DIRECTION OF A PROFESSIONALLY TRAINED DIRECTOR AND STAFF WHO DESIRE TO
SERVE YOU TOP QUALITY FOOD WITH EXCELLENT SERVICE AT MODERATE PRICES.
WELCOME, FRESHMEN, AND ALL (.. \
..cull.
For Your Convenience
I* AIL THESE PLACES TO SERVE YOU = A
SERVED DAILY MBX
m MAIN CAFETERIA FLORIDA ROOM cafeteria pHM \
O/c W)
M M CAMPUS CLUB snack bar RAWLINGS HALL CAFETERIA J
SPECIAL!! CO-ED CLUB cafeteria SERVICE CENTER CAFETERIA
JENNINGS CAFETERIA MEDICAL CENTER SNACK BAR
. i
i
i
i
HUME HALL CAFETERIA GRAHAM AREA SNACK BAR /
g||
_ TOLBERT SNACK BAR
"Gator Room .*
For operational schedules, see doimitory bulletin boards or cafeteria and snack bar posted bulletins.
SNACK BARS IN ALL CAFETERIAS
BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER
Catering Service and Special Services Include:
SERVICES at camp wauburg box lunches
BARBECUES PICNICS
BANQUETS COFFEES
LUAUS TEAS RIDTUnAV
All Kinds of Food Prepared To Take Out: nrrnDATPn
ERIEE. CHICKEN POTATO salad DECORATED CAKES
PASTRIES COLE SLAW
BAKED BEANS SANDWICHES
The Food Service Division is self-supporting. Any money left after expenses is used
to improve facilities for students. Keep your money on campus, and working for y6u!
V/



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EiL mu* I Diamond Needles $4.50 s^r f s £
RIZ ORTOLANI 11
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pi Special At All Times

Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

How To Study Right?
Student Explains
Alan Brunswick, 18, 2UC, from St. Peters Petersburg,
burg, Petersburg, is president of the freshman honor so society
ciety society for outstanding scholars, Phi Eta Sigma.
A major in political science, he has main maintained
tained maintained a 3.5 average for his freshman year
in addition to serving as the director of com communications
munications communications in the Student Government office
of Interior and a member of the Tau Epsilon
Phi fraternity executive council.
In the following column he offers new students
his ideas on the age-old question:How to Study
Successfully in College. **

As incoming freshmen at the
U niversity of Florida, you will pro probably
bably probably hear the complaint that at
such a big school, Everyone is
just a number in the big IBM ma machine.
chine. machine. In many cases this maybe
true, but with a little bit of extra
effort on your part, it doesnt
necessarily have to be the case.
Newcomers at any institution
need some patter to guide them,
and for freshmen at a large uni university
versity university such as tha UF, this is
especially so. For as you will
soon learn, college is much dif different
ferent different than high school ever was.
Here, academics is the prime con concern,
cern, concern, but with so many competing
interests it can easily be ignored.
To avoid such a situation and its
consequences, it might be best to
set up a pattern of rules as a
guideline to your study habits:
1) Set yourself an academic
goal and work towards it.
The higher you set the goal,
the higher the results will
be.
2) Set aside a definite time
for study and find a place
where you can most ef effectively
fectively effectively concentrate on
your work.
3) Dont procrastinate and
dont get behind in your
work at college they play
for keeps: one day lost is
extremely hard to make up.
4) Dont spend all of your free
time at study; make sure
your schedule includes ade adequate
quate adequate time for leisure and
extracurricular activities,
for as you will learn, they
will almost be as big a part
of your liberal education as
your- scholastic activities.
5) In class, pay attention ana
get the important points into
your notes, dont waste time

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with unneeded trivia. If class
notes are essential in a par particular
ticular particular class, set aside a
weekend time for a review,
reorgnization, and re recopying
copying recopying of these notes, to
get them into the best con condition
dition condition for later study and to
insure familiarization of the
material.
6) Using a text, underline ma material
terial material you think is essential,
making note of especially
important matter. Review
this underlined material as
often as is necessary for
proper retention. Often an
outline of the material based
.K
M tik
mSSm
Hi v pr
BRUNSWICK
on the underlining is an
invaluable study aid.
These are just a few hints for
better -study which should be of
aid to you during your stay at the
university. Os course, the list is
not complete; it meant only as a
start to stimulate your own per personal
sonal personal good study habits.
Heres wishing you a success successful
ful successful year!
Alan Brunswick

Page 17-B



, The Florida Alligator/ Friday, July 30/ 1965

Page 18-B

Heres Where Your Money Goes
h
FRACTIONAL BREAKDOWN OF *65-66
STUDENT GOVERNMENT BUDGET
1 This Years Budget
/ I \ Ter* I Tera II Tera 111 Total
/ I \ Athlotlea 64,600 58,225 23,587 146,412
/ Stydent Activities I Athletics \ nuumjiwii*
/ $134,172.50 $146,412.00 \ SSiVg!W../.n M,oo
/ 27 % 29.2% \
I I \ Hoaecoaing 1,650 950 2,600
I Speakers 1 Bureau 800 -BOO
I Gator Band 2,215 3,075 690 5,980
Cheerleader. 1 037.40 *
1 Debate 1,760 2,540 600 4,900
Florida Players 4,221.67 3,944.67 3,894.66 SJ|OW
/Alien's Glee Club 1,455 3,745 500 5*122
/ \ Woaen's Glee Club 1,200 3,150 545 4,895
1 / l\ / Board of Int. Activities 615 1,235 300 2,150
1 I nimm. in .|, / / \ /CV / Lyceua 9,755 12,675 4,725 27,155
\ IntramuralS / I \ Of.* / Livestock Judging 314 100 414
\ fee o/ r aa / I \ P n VaL / Moot Court 306.32 299 ------ 605.32
\ $66/866*00 / I 1 0t Special Fund 10,550 7,900 *2 75
\ 11 oa/ / I \ /s' /o / Syaphony Orchestra 983 4,252 745 5??2
\ II .2% A5? / \ / University Religious 655 3,775 352 o, ,2*422 *<>
\ / \ * \ /'P / \ U / University Choir 1,129.40 3,584 -1,190 5,903.40
\ //S O / \ / Mayors' Council 1,110 1,110 590 2,810
\ //, a,' / l / Women's Student Assoc. 393 1,362 90 1,845
\ /< -sP Af> I A \ / Publications 24,718 24,717 6,430 55,865
\ /0* <0 I A l / Intraaurals 29,125 13,088 9,000 31,213
X /S' ? J I \ X Student Salaries 10,270 10,545 4,925 25,740
/ \ y/ Mens Interhall W
I t GRAND TOTAL Tern I Tara II Tera 111
- 1220.400.00 5198.650.00 580.474,50 >499,524,50
Student Salaries attendance estimates i 5,200 13,700 5,550 34,450
$25,740.00
5.2%
TOTAL: $499,527.50
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I With This Coupon | CoL Sanders Says: P I
I iONLY ONE COUPON PER person! lifKimilE TO rAiuceviiicl
I | NOT GOOD AFTER SEPT. 15th | WtICOMI TO GAINESVILLE |
iN^V.VAV^VeVeVViViVeViVWeViViViVeVeSViVeViVeViVeNVe'e'iVeSWeSV WW 'eW.VeViVeViH
I DISCOUNT PRICES ON QUANTITY ORDERS I
I Colonel Sanders Recipe I
Ilk Kentucky fried
I it's finger-lickin' good I
I Cor. NW 13th St. & 3rd Ave. Phone 376-6472 I



(G Treasurer Budgets Money, Money

By STEVE CHEESE MAN
Student Body Treasure
ongratulations on your choice
he University of Florida. As
probably already expect, your
at this university will be a full
-one in which there is never
4g h time to do everything you
t to do in the way of activities,
ire are numerous activities
jaded for students by Student
ternment and the various organ organions
ions organions which it supports. The
key required for these activities
te responsibility of the Student
y Treasurer in conjunction with
Legislative Council and its
get and Finance Committee.

SOME CHICKS I
Y ft k
M 'IMBH ii- j§f|
Be Mean Scheme Dream I
, v--' J *-' \ - 1 "' j _;* ..H B s' .' B- *' --. i' /:B

Sfe'-fl Ip# g*' v- fpp ,r ,v 4 / ... *v ,;; .*
m I
Scream Steam Beam I
. s. For Dinner At I
Comer of NW 13th St. & 16th Ave.
1A C\A/ lO L Ca H

Briefly, I will explain how this
money is budgeted, the Trea Treasurers
surers Treasurers connection with the budget budgeting
ing budgeting process, and other activities of
the Treasurers office in general.
There are 186 student organiza organizations
tions organizations on the University of Florida
campus. Twenty -two of these
organizations receive funds from
student government. These funds
are derived from student activity
fees which are included in the
tuition each student pays at the
beginning of every trimester. In
the past, this fee has been $14.50,
but with the raise in tuition from
sll3 to $l3O per trimester, the
student fee will be $25.50. Last
March, $499,525 was budgeted to

the Athletic Department, the
Florida Union, and to twenty stu student
dent student organizations which repre represent
sent represent and serve the student body
both on and off campus. Next year,
approximately $900,000 will be
budgeted by Student Government.
Your Student Government has
direct control over more money
than does any other university
student government in the entire
nation. Below you will see a
specific rundown of how your
money will be spent during the next
fiscal year: September, 1965,
through August, 1966.
The Treasurers office is res responsible
ponsible responsible for maintaining financial
control over the students money

Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator/

and to assure that the budget as
passed by the legislative council
is followed closely and that no
unauthorized purchases are made
by the organizations which receive
student government funds.
There is a schematic drawing
showing the process by which the
students money is budgeted each
year. First, each of the twenty
two organizations submits a pro proposed
posed proposed budget to the Treasurers
Office. The Treasurer then
reviews these proposed budgets
personally and submits them to the
budget and finance committee with
any comments he feels are
necessary. Tbe Budget and Finance
Committee consists of Six

J| Ik
JBp
jm
Egj&> H I
CHEESEMAN
members of the legislative council
and the Secretary of Finance. Af After
ter After the members of the Budget and
Finance Committee have reviewed
the proposed budgets, making any
changes which they feel necessary,
they submit these budgets to the
Legislative Council as amended.
The Council must review these
budgets at two seperate meetings
before they can be formally and
finally passed. It would be inter interesting
esting interesting to know that during this
entire budgeting process, there is
only one non-student who has final
authority over SG money and that is
Dr. Reitz, President of the Univer University
sity University of Florida. We have a
STUDENT government at this uni university.
versity. university.
Other responsibilities and acti activities
vities activities of the Treasurer's office
Include all types of planning which
will require some type of financial
assistance from SG, such as: the
development of the new Camp Wau Wauburg
burg Wauburg property, planning the new
Florida Union to be finished in
July of 1966. in addition to help helping
ing helping to make arrangements for
lighting all the handball and tennis
courts on campus. The Secretary
of Finance, Tom Backmeyer, is
running an Inventory on all SG
property in addition to making the
necessary financial arrangements
for graduation invitations. The
Treasurer's office, in conjunction
with the Secretary of Public Re Relations,
lations, Relations, 'just recently conducted a
poll on the New Orange Peel, the
controversial campus magazine
published by the Student Publica Publications
tions Publications Department. Preparations
are also being made to acquire
Insurance for those students who go
on trips in representation of the
student body.
If you are at all Interested in
working in student government and
possibly in the Treasurer's office,
or if you are just interested in
what's going on, feel tree to drop
by Room 307 in the Florida Union.
I would be pleased to have the
opportunity to help you in any way
possible. Remember, it is your
Student Government.
PATRONIZE
GATOR
ADVERTISERS
v IB
M |[ij 11 Hlyi Vs
THEYRE A
GOOD GROUP

Page 19-B



Page 20-B

The Florida Alligator,
Friday, July 30, 1965
Insurance
Rates
Down
By EUNICE I. TALL
Legislative Council this sum summer
mer summer accepted a bid for next years
student insurance which offers a
reduction in rates and an increase
in coverage.
The contract was awarded to
Insurance City Life Co. of Hart Hartford,
ford, Hartford, Conn.
The individual single student fee
will remain at the current $17.25;
however, student and spouse com combination
bination combination costs have been reduced
from $46 to S3B; student, spouse
and children, S6O to $53; student
and child (no spouse), $36 to
$30.50. Maternity coverage will
also remain at $42.
In coverage, students will be
allowed $5 a day maximum costs
for the Infirmary, an increase of
$2 over this years plan.
As far as I now know, the
coverage costs for hospital and
medical expenses will remain the
same, said SG Vice President
Dick Thompson.
According to Thompson, ap approximately
proximately approximately 40 per cent of the
student body, 6,400 students, par participated
ticipated participated in the program this year
under the Guarantee Reserve Life
Insurance Co., Hammond, Indiana, j
The program is offered to all full
time students attending the UF and
their dependents. Eligible depen dependents
dents dependents shall be the student's spouse
and all unmarried children over
two weeks but under 19 years of
age.
UF Infirmary: |
What It Offers
The Family
The UF Infirmary offers phy physical
sical physical and mental health services
to the student as a part of his
registration fee.
Fourteen dollars of the $l3O reg registration
istration registration fee goes for Infirmary
services. This entitles him to out outpatient
patient outpatient services and some medi medication.
cation. medication. There is a charge of $5
a day if the student is confined to
the Infirmary.
No surgery is performed at the
Infirmary, but x-rays are avail available
able available for a charge of about 25 per
cent of the normal cost. Prescrip Prescriptions
tions Prescriptions may be filled at the Infirmary
pharmacy at a price of cost plus
25 per cent.
Student insurance pays for
x-rays and prescriptions, as well
as the inpatient charge. The in insurance,
surance, insurance, now carried by about 50
per cent of the students, is strongly
recommended by Dr. William Hall,
director of the Infirmary. We
wish 100 per cent of the students
had it. Its really a bargain, he
said.
For more serious illnesses than
can be handled at the Infirmary,
the students are referred to the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center,
where excellent facilities are
available.
Psychiatric help and evaluation
is available to any student who
feels he would like or need it.
Dr. Hall expects services next
year to be more rapid and more
comprehensive. There are pre presently
sently presently eight physicians and three
psychiatrists on the staff.

AMONG 'MUST' PLACES
For Every UF'er
IS 7
Kv * s? :#&H
liiijw j
B w&cjftb ::
*']
"*%£. SB : : % k I f I .. %^^tmgm,
niiiirl tw#Bwk?:3r'^_ vn '. }fcjjjj^iliMfejfc3^^ ~^S?^^y^iilK:
3MB|JJ|^^P^^iiiM^^^^lgigliW-l.itiiiWli ; BMWj^BHWPMI'II I W^ii 1 111 'lll I 'ill II^HHBBH^MmI^W
* ..'-' . *
Now At New Location
919 W. University Ave.
NEXT TO RECORD BAR
Certain spots rate as Regular Stops. There's your r00m...
the library.. .your favorite hash house....
And then there's Smith's.
-. -V-T: f %
? ;
|b9 I .<* [lnN|; at 'faFfi v**TPff^k=
N : 1/ BBH
"* "Florida's oldest traditional shop" jpBMB,
ED GEORGE
' '
'
'* r
SMITHS MENS SHOP




By TOVA LEVINE
Feature Editor
The plays the thing for any
student that wants to join in
t, crew or committee work in
K> of the dramatic productions
HuFs Florida Players.
Iviorida Players, a student or orlization,
lization, orlization, helps to produce the
>ws, yet does not require its
ors or crew workers to be
rnbers of the organization itself.
Players put on two shows each
mester, selected and directed
H staff members of the Speech
partment. The variety of shows
great. Plays performed in past

I.

EPEE for COtLEGI STUDENTS ONLY I
| 1% DRAWING SEPT. 30 I
§£>i wL - I
mm - Bk jm
Mr AM b I
* vv" ; i jfll
I, MT "m i I fffl
OAtE TO THE BIG STORE ON THE SQUARE AND REGISTER
URLS: WIN THIS AMERICAN TOURISTER FIBRE GLASS
RAIN CASE THAT KATHY CROW IS HOLDING
OYS: WIN THIS AMERICAN TOURISTER FIBRE GLASS
:OURIER (ATTACHE) CASE SHOWN BY DOUG MOLITAR
REGISTER SEPT. 1-30
YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BE PRESENT TO WIN
mikd^
The Store Thats More Than Just A Hardware Store
SE Ist St. THE HOME OF NAME BRAND QUALITY 372-85311 |

SHOW BIZ
Florida Players Act It Out

years have included Oedipus, Tar Tartuffe,
tuffe, Tartuffe, Pygmalion, Our Town, You
Cant Take it with You, Death of
a Salesman, Rain, Bell, Book and
Candle, Picnic, Teahouse of the
August Moon, and Bus Stop.
Participation in plays requires
no previous experience and com committee
mittee committee work is always there for
the interested student. The first
step in joining the cast of the play
is the tryout period.
Try-outs are. held for three
nights and are open to all UF stu students.
dents. students. Students are chosen on a ability,
bility, ability, voice, and appearance in
ensemble.
According to one play director,
often students who didnt think they

had the ability were cast in a show
as the director felt they had poten potential.
tial. potential. More work is needed with
those who are new to show busi business
ness business but individual work and some
basic training helps to overcome
this.
Rehearsing for the play takes
a minimum of 40-50 hours for ac actors
tors actors having major roles.
As the actors rehearse, much
back-stage action is taking place
to produce the effects which com complement
plement complement the acting. Student and
graduate assistant committees,
aided by speech instructors, work
on the lighting, set construction,
costuming, publicity and tickets,
house management and sound ef effects.
fects. effects. The scenery for the plays
are under the supervision of Dr.
Henry D. Swanson, who does most
of the art work of the set.
One member of Florida Players
explained that theater at UF
means experience for both be beginner
ginner beginner and veteran since produc production
tion production crew and casts are made up
exclusively of students. In addition
there is an experienced and ac accredited
credited accredited theater staff to provide
the professional touch to their ef efforts
forts efforts and insure that audiences get
theater at its best.
This student-actor continued,
Remember, we are offering op opportunities
portunities opportunities for experience, not
requiring experience. You dont
have to have been born in a thea theatrical
trical theatrical trunk to join the Players.

Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

%|gps
**jk w o' £%

H| I#.
BP ;|
f S' ft* I''
. 111 I
iJIHc
B BS % Ifl'
*./ T J ' V r I V l '.*-' I I w r

Dont hesitate because you havent
played a role or diiqmed a spot spotlight;
light; spotlight; in only weeks youll be doing
it like a veteran.
It takes a lot of time to be in
a play, but if put in the proper
perspective knowing studies
roust be done first, then it wont
harm grades, he added.
The purpose of the Florida Play Players
ers Players is to study the theater and
its allied arts, to produce plays
and to foster an interest in and an
appreciation of the theater and
drama of UF.
Membership in the Players is
determined by a point system
based on time and effort of stu students
dents students working in productions.
Three levels of proficiency are
available: Player, Journeyman,
and Master.
During orientation week pro programs,
grams, programs, Florida Players will pre present
sent present an open, house to meet the
staff and members of the group,
view slides of past productions,
and get a preview of whats-to whats-tocome.
come. whats-tocome.
Tryouts for the first play of the
season will begin September 8-9.
The play will be directed by Dr.
Leland L. Zimmerman.

LATE TO CLASS?
Be on time with a dependable
ZENITH Clock Radio
, r-from...
ggLJ COUCHS
L nj Radio
" Department
SEE AND HEAR THE COMPLETE
SELECTION OF ZENITH
CLOCK RADIOS 4 u
AM OR AM-FM RADIOS **
rr\l irUX 608 N MAIN STREET

The second play of the season,
under the direction of Dr. Donald
R. Henry, will be Knight of the
Burning Pestle,** written by Fran Francis
cis Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher.
Productions are held in Norman
Hall Auditorium. The*new theater,
capable of many variations in thea theater
ter theater production, will open in the new
Florida Union in fall of 1966.
r
Br B
i.
jl 9 rH

Page 21-B



Page 22-B

>/ The Florida Alligator, Friday / July 30/ 1965

15 T( TiME % VK Vfy SEMINOLE!
' J ~
- ,; ; iju V
II -~~~~'~~^~~ I, __
y ei, yi 4 yn out f/tve# semmou fe/r /emir ve^yow* 1
Be me Fnisr cum oh Yovk block to Sum ano
Baton*e peLietyor /tecumaimoaiy look m
one f*Bi£ or Kecft **. r; ~'i BM v iifll ill w
r ** w
JM
(Vo ur./fiooD oL' YcARBooK)
:^3j|---C?:- !;'- .'-' .\> - ,'' ,; .V: _v7 >' .frl -. ... : 4 *-1 . -V . .... .* ../.,,. \. \ ... "' .. V' - ,-' <%. 1 . ,,- /-^-v4 ; v V.^
.i&liuffisir&iv) *&?£.. -j-. *. : r /-. -> '?. KL - ti, J*- w !:v.. ;.. / v... '. .to*. ' v. .- ':. '%*. v- V ' -'" >£ . ?'.''' * .' '.'''. * . v



We think it only fair to let you
now something of what to expect
When you get to the University of
Wlorida. This article has been
Written, therefore, as a sort of
Windly counsel; a guide, as it were,
W> help you make the right deci decilions.
lions. decilions. Now, soon after you arrive,
Wou will likely be approached by a
omewhat seedy-looking individual
With a furtive air,, who will clutch
lour arm and whisper into your
Bar

! wanna in

What does he mean, Do you
want to work in Student Publicat Publications?
ions? Publications? What ARE Student Pub Pubic
ic Pubic ations, anyway? These and other
notty problems will continue to
>lague you throughout your college
career UNLESS YOU CONTINUE
IX) READ THIS ARTICLE!
Just a few minutes daily may
king unimagined rewards. Student
publications are The Alligator
newspaper), The Seminole (year (yearbook),
book), (yearbook), and The New Orange Peel
hagazine). They are adminis adminisbred
bred adminisbred by the Board of Student
publications (a student-faculty
lommittee) and supported by ads,
Jales, and student fees (The Alli Allijator,
jator, Allijator, for example, costs each
ludent a Uttle less than 2 1/2
puts per day).
[HE ALLIGATOR
p the voice of more than 14,000
Itudents. It talks FOR them
Iditorials, letters to the editor),
j talks TO them (news stories
f every phase of campus life),
lid it talks ABOUT them (fea (fea|res
|res (fea|res and pictures about person personifies
ifies personifies well-known and obscure)*
f e Alligator is VITAL to the
piiversity; everyone needs to know
I all times WHATS GOING ON;
ludent, professor and adminis adminislator
lator adminislator alike.
[HE SEMINOLE
I nothing more or less than
BEMORIES, bound in hardcovers,
i years after graduation, youll
Bill pull out your old Seminole
| m time to time and remem-
B r when. So will your class classics.
ics. classics. Every EVENT, every
tGANIZATION will be there
mewhere in the yearbooks
Wges, plus the FACES that were
Wch an important part of this
WnQUE period in your life.
(range PEEL
O
I an unusual sort of publication.
P ce national magazines, it carries

Our Resplendent
Headquarters
Reflects
UF Publications
Lofty Status

articles and stories on EVERY EVERYTHING
THING EVERYTHING from nuclear war to sex.
Unlike them, however, its all
written for YOU. The HUMOR is
the type college students like;
satirical, irreverent, biting. The
NON-FICTION is fast-paced and
stimulating. The FICTION is ex experimental
perimental experimental in nature; you may not
always like it, but you wont be
able to ignore it. The Peel is
meant to be read and REREAD REREADand
and REREADand it is.
AND YOU?
None of the publications we just
mentioned could exist without
STUDENTS to produce them. At
most colleges, the school of
journalism puts out the
publications; not so here. That
means students from every field
are WELCOME. Sure, experience
is a nice quality to bring with you,
but it isnt a prerequisite. In UF
publications you have a chance to
LEARN. And not only about journ journalism;
alism; journalism; about meeting responsibili responsibility,
ty, responsibility, about getting along with the
Public, about fairness and
accuracy and a host of other
abstract words that boiled down,
mean INTEGRITY.
HOW TO JOIN
Publications are located in the
basement of the Florida Union,
near the pool hall and coke
machine, coincidentally. Go there.
Track down an EDITOR and tell
him (or her) that youre interested
in working. Then stand back,
because the editor will probably
LEAP INTO THE AIR, crying
hosanahs and generally menacing
everyone in the immediate area.
FORGET 1T...
if hard work scares you, if your
grades are below average, or if
youre chronically late and UN UNDEPENDABLE
DEPENDABLE UNDEPENDABLE (actually, we know
this section doesnt apply to YOU;
we only included it in case some
Unauthorized Person should get
hold of this article).

11 I it!/**-**-- **

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:'. Hr^|fl(PP*f ; %Sh jj
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^ >>tf *' i(^impJfgpjP^ '/Hr JP
Alligator Staffers At Work
,
, I>t , tVt y tV^yyA^^// y// / .^yy^ yy y // yy < y^^^V^j^^VjV /^^^^^^/^V.y^V^^^^^^^<^
->>y?^XW;§l^3K v vfr>Kyli'^SK/!*AK%Sy : *^>*^w*K%w%iw^wX*>><>! :y/X/;'^<^v^//AW/v/^ ivi'^..

Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Thousands Scream
lor The
Florida Alligator

Page 23-B



-IMPORTANT-
KEEP YOUR 'EDUCATION
versity For Tuition Must Be
For The Exact Amount.
A A A|mm WW #% a mm mm Large Checks Will Not Be
J J Mmm mm jF mm Cashed By The University.
m mm Personal Checks On Out-Of-
Gainesville Banks Are Diffi-
In A Checking Accountl r*££
Os Cash With You.
Records Make It Easier To Budget Your Cash I You Important Time From I
The Press Os Orientation And
Getting Moved In.
AN INNOVATION 11
For Uliverslty of Florida Your Own SPECIAL Check
SNiMS 0,l
H wt
JO"'* 0000
' TV hrp

lot Y
f -* e: --~----i Eliminate One Vital
j i
/ clip cut fill in mail early j Activity Now Before Your
j TO: university city bank Arrival in The University City
| DRAWER U GAINESVILLE 32601 j
I"*-- 1 P en Your Checking
j ADDRESS: j Account By Mail Pay
| (if now known or advise on arrival) / m
| HOME TOWN x# - ~
i Tour Tuition And Other
! STUDENT OPENING I
j NUMBER: DEPOSIT $ m __
enclosed I Expenses By Your Own
j I Will Pick Up My Checkbook On My Arrival In i I
| Gainesville. ClieCK!
! SIGNATURE: EACH CHECKBOOK (WITH 20 CHECKS) COSTS
(as you will sign your checks) $2.50 IN ADVANCE PAYS ALL MONTHLY
L j SERVICE CHARGES
gpa ONL v 2 BLOCKS FROM THE CAMPUS
PliLO ALWAYS WELCOME
IUBR|
FEDERAL I S
DEPOSIT m
INSURANCE Cyy :fl
CORPORATION
A FULL GAINESVILLE, FLA.
SERVICE BANK 1116 W. UNIVERSITY AVENUE ***
PHONE 372-3415 AREA CODE 904



*. .
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The Campus Its Plans And Moods

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

USection C,

Page 1

||Friday, July 30, 1965|



Page 2-C

Dont Let The Size Scare You

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f The Florida Alligator/ Friday/ July 30, 1965

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
AND CAMPUS SHOPS
37 MAIN BOOKSTORE k CAMPUS SHOP
38 BROWARD BRANCH
39 JENNINGS SHOP
40 MEDICAL BOOKSTORE
41 TRI SHOP

FOOD SERVICE UNITS
27 CAMPUS CLUB k MAIN CAFETERIA
28 COED CLUB CAFETERIA k SNACK BAR
29 FLORIDA ROOM CATETERIA k SNACK BAR
30 GRAHAM HALL SNACK BAR
31 HEALTH CENTER SNACK BAR
32 HUME HALL CAFETERIA k SNACK BAR
33 JENNINGS HALL CAFETERIA k SNACK BAR
34 RAWLINGS HALL CAFETERIA k SNACK BAR
35 STUDENT SERVICE CENTER CAFETERIA
k SNACK RAN. DANCING, PARTIES
36 TOLBERT HALL. SNACK BAP

SOO ENGINEERING BLDG
SOS ROLFS HALL
107 MEDICAL SCIENCES
234 STADIUM
102 LAW BUILDING
102 MEDICAL SCIENCES
101 TEACHING HOSPITAL
1 OS PHARMACY
203 FLORIDA GYM
2 OS MILITARY BLOG
r
204 TISIRT HALL

16 ENGINEERING
17 FORESTRY
18 HEA LTH RELATED PROFESSIONS
19 JOURNALISM fc COMMUNICATIONS
20 LAW
21 MEDICINE
22 NURSING
23 PHARMACY
24 PHYSICAL EDUCATION A HEALTH
25 R.O.T.C. COORDINATOR
26 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

7 FLORIDA UNION A STUDENT
GOVERNMENT OFFICES FLORIDA UNION BLDG
8 CASHIER A STUDENT DEPOSITORY THE HUB
8 MAIN LIBRARY LIBRARY
10 FOREIGN STUOENT ADVISER INTERNATIONAL CENTER
BLDG AE
OFFICES OF ACADEMIC DEANS AND DIRECTORS
11 AGRICULTURE 126 MCCARTY HALL
12 ARCHITECTURE A FINE ARTS ARCH A FINE ARTS BLDG.
13 ARTS A SCIENCES 1 OS ANDERSON HALL
14 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SI4 MATHERLY HALL
18 EDUCATION lit NORMAN HAUL.

KCY STUDENT SERVICE OFFICES
1 RE6IITRAHI ADMISSIONS 111 TIOIRT HfLU
CURRENT RECORD* .14 TIOIRT HALL
2 STUDENT AFFAIR*, DEAN OF MEN,
DEAN OP WOMEN, LOAN*, SCHOLAR.
hips a employment 124 tisert haul
3 UNIVERSITY COLLEOE
COUNSELING 204 TIOERT MALL
4 COUNSELING CENTER 12S BUILDING E
5 STUOENT HEALTH (|J4FIRMARV> INFIRMARY
6 ROClSlko GROUND FLOOR, SOUTH.
WEST WING BROWARD HALL



Welcome

...And An Invitation From
L&L Mens Shop

nml \ \'\ iri f'** unit
Jr 11 Ji i if 14 . j ,fc
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mJM
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ft Jr fUPilll k4?lr ill 1* IM Imh l,if
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Featuring These Famous Name Brands:
Natural shoulder suits by HASPEL, GRIFFON and SOUTHWICK
CTAr Shirts by CREIGHTON and SERO Slacks by HIGGINS and
O I MU jeffersoN Socks by GOLD CUP Toiletries by CANOE and
ENGLISH LEATHER Rainwear by ALLIGATOR Sportcoats by
STANLEY BLACKER and LI NETT Belts by G REE NHALL BROS.
Shoes by FLORSHEIM and FRANK BROS.
COUNTRY SHIRT YANKEE PEDLAR DAVID FERGUSON
DRAG GLEN of MICHIGAN JEUNE LEIGUE by CHERBURG Mc-
MULLEN NORMAN DAVIDSON GORDON FORD Bags
by SUZANNE Sweaters by TWEEDSBURY HARBURT

#tag *tt Brag
'TRADITIONALLY YOURS'
13 W. Univ. Ave.

ASK ABOUT OUR STUDENT CHARGE
The proprietor of this emporium takes great pleasure in welcoming
all students-new and oldto the Stag 'N Drag sportswear estab establishment
lishment establishment of the L&L Men's Shop.
The informality of this shop constitutes pleasure for the lady in love
with casual fashions or the gentleman who likes to indulge an extra flair
for tradition.
It's the desire of the proprietor to derive frequent pleasure seeing how
well-dressed his patrons look in fashions from Stag 'N Drag. You'll love
it, and we in turn will be flattered to see you. Do come in and browse.

First Federal Lot

Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator

Mur-x JL
rffu

Page 3-C



, The Florida Alligator Friday/ July 30/ 1965

Page 4-C

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Coeds Adorn Campus Life

I 1

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WELCOME, FRESHMEN
FROM IHF6MOR SHOP
m
I I B wcr
OSTOB
SHOP
1710 W. UNIVtRSITY AVE.
ON THE "GOLD COAST" I
Headquarters for your collegiate needs
PANTS ATHLETIC SUPPORTERS
SHIRTS T-SHIRTS (U of FLA)
TIES LEVIS (White & Blue, Corduroy)
iKj ~ I t vlHj
belts fraternity lavaliers
UNDERWEAR by HANES FRATERNITY LAPEL PINS
SOX by GOLD CUP HANDBALLS
SWEAT SHIRTS (U of FLA) TENNIS BALLS
JAMAICA SHORTS COWBOY HATS
JACKETS (U of FLA) HANDBALL GLOVES
TENNIS SHOES (CONVERSE, U.S. KEDS) Uof FLA DECALS
* *
. _ - / --. . 9
GYM SHORTS FRATERNITY DECALS
WE HAVE THE REGULATION GYM CLOTHES
FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION NEEDS
Shop at The Gator Shop directly across University Avenue from the men's dorms,
on The Gold Coast near The College Inn. We cater to all your needs, whether for
gym or dress. (We also re-string tennis racquets.) Why fight downtown when we
are so convenient?
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT
1
% V SPORT APPAREL
7T 1710 W. University Avenue
Open 9 t.i 6 GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
PHONE PR 6-5191

Friday, July 30, 1965/ The Florida Alligator

Beauty Winners
fff -r L 2 ..... , :
*~w f W t MISSUF JINNY JASPER
m Ik
|& Yl A
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imo

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HOMECOMING QUEEN MARY ARUSKAS
4§ii 1 I jtfasa
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MILITARY BALL QUEEN SUZANNE HULL
...
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IK&ijl,
|H| Hl'jJ" EffirUl
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'-- ; 'olllifP '!?^'?^- A '. >;:; '..4-4, ....! ~
< i.fj; f -,jf / 1 j'7'' ."* r
SIGMA CHI DERBY QUEEN
JEANNIE MAYNARD

Page 5-C



Page 6-C

, The Florida Alligator, Friday July 30/ 1965

WEL
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||i;,
BmE
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MISS WAUBURG
DONNA BERGER
ap. j
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MISS SEMINOLE
PAULA MERET
v: :V '' v /.'

ATTEHTION PARENTS
- '.f rSsrv _, ~-' r ~: - !
K :r. sv r j ./.. u
y,: a^A^oBUlWllJPWaMiKiCfiMpM^fJ^tgl!i^ r y x //Ik/iBWHB .. :, ';:;v : : ; '^:..> ; ::-

HERES A SPECIAL SUBSCRIPTION
OFFER DESIGNED JUST FOR YOU
With your son or daughter enrolled at the University of Florida, you'll take a special interest in
the news and activities of the university community. Ihere's no better way to keep abreast of the
doings at your youngster's new Alma Mater than to read the Florida Alligator, so we've arranged
this Special Offer to parents and relatives of new Gators. Clip and mail this coupon now. This
offer will be void after SEPT. 1, 1965.
miW. v- ; i; te :- i V- ; S ; -
-.-. .* ..
Daily Mail Subscription SIO.OO
5 Days a week, September thru April (First Two Trimesters)
Special Twice-a-week Subscription S4JO
Tuesdays 4 Fridays, September thru April
ll - 1 "' '""* l 11 "" 1 " '" 1 *ll.l I .1...- I .... -
I
I NAME i
I V lr *f f Vie |
j ADDRESS j Mail To:
CITY STATE | FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
ZIP CODE j jf CIRCULATION DEPT.
j Please enter my subscription for DailyQslo;Twice-a-WeelQs4.so. i / \ Room 9, Florida Union
(Make checks & money orders payable to The Florida Alligator. Do I / I University of Florida
j not send ca* or stamps.) j\J Gainesville, Florida



Graduate Research Library

PjfPPPPlMpil! ; iJijjj 'R' ; 1
Â¥ l^lHr,^Bl ,IMI li[ if ** H|lil*|i i|%t 1-1 If :f
jdw/fcsji, .M l dyBMBBMIg waSBISf Blgsgl|iHss& III j are all *****la f? f H iu*4 \ > I'4 jU&SB I || lijgjl 1 <\Jf' 5>
'££# \ ,^^ v : ~ *p jBHKBjL.IMBBf jMMfilfc^Bjjgifti

WELCOME, NEW STUDENTS

"dBBv fl I I MB333£
rl MbbbHMBMBB
Wfl 1 111 i| i|||||| IBBW^^WHIiBIH' SmS **' *& : m$ mm 4
YOUR FRIENDLY BANK FOR ALL YOUR BANKING NEEDS v
Gainesville hospitality is personified in the service you get at Florida National. Our service is not just
friendly; it is fast, efficient and complete as well -a happy combination of genuine courtesy and highly
businesslike professionalism. You are invited to come in and check for yourself the many modern conven conveniences
iences conveniences of the Florida National Bank, where every banking need can be met. It's located in the heart of
our downtown shopping district, smack in the middle of University Avenue's most frequented block. Free
Parking, Drive-In and Walk-Up Tellers are just a few of the many courtesies extended to all Florida Nat National
ional National Bank visitors. The Florida National Bank is a favorite with all Gainesville citizens both the local
population and the university community because we like you, and like to show it.
Drive-In & Walk-Up Windows Open til 4:00 p.m. Week Days Entire Bank Open til 6:00 p.m. Fridays
1 %£/&?? r 'y ' ' ' '. y V f> 0 >/l'- J- : V..
V ' >
WALK-UP TELLER AUTO LOANS
DRIVE-IN WINDOWS HOME IMPROVEMENT LOANS M <
CHECKING ACCOUNTS SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES HHHHH|HHppH||H
. SAVING ACCOUNTS MANY OTHER SERVICES |Mll|bdtUSiUl|||Hll^|NllljlMleifl
MEMBER: FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 120 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE 378-2621 I
FLORIDA NATIONAL GROUPOFBANKS ; |

Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

New Building
To Be Open
To Undergrads
One million volumes
will be moved to the
new $2.3 million Gra Graduate
duate Graduate Research Li Library
brary Library from the UF
Main Library when the
new buildings com completed.
pleted. completed.
4 in i
Undergraduate stu students
dents students win have access
to the stacks and re reference
ference reference materials in
the new library, al although
though although it is planned
primarily for faculty
and graduate student
research.
The six-story build building
ing building is being con constructed
structed constructed on the Plaza
of the Americas fac facing
ing facing University Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium. It will also be
home for the UF*s rare
book collection and the
P.K. Yonge Library of
Florida History.

Page 7-C



, The Florida Alligator/ Friday, July 30/ 1965

Page 8-C

: ; -^i&apMg... he 1 : ,'* 's >
1-, />* imWIWtI '% wiPHUKS^ jilfTiraiMii ihir" !f > -S
- ksj£MMfc£Sw&f& wpp wHhHU|
New Engineering Complex

Five new College of Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering buildings at the UF that will
be under construction later this
year are shown in an artist's con conception
ception conception of the campus complex*
The view looks southward and
illustrates the area southeast of
the University's sewage treatment
plant as it will appear when the
structures, valued at $4,438,000,
are completed in early 1967. At

A WELCOMES YOU
lenneuf TO OUR TOWN gA
ALWAYS FIRST J^^Si
Compare The Quality
\ Os Penneys Shirts, A|l§m|B
1# Slacks Parkas Canvas hJmi
slliwmlmli Shoes, Sox, Sports Wear '^Xlni
ilmlr Dorm Wear. ifiH| j
Department Has A |B^/
L >MMllllfrjjM Complete Line Os Hw
X. >N^j Sheets, Spreads, Drapes, BT
Other Dorm Needs. /fll
Use Your Hometown Penneys Charge T]
Card Here Too!
Penneys Is DowntownW. University Ave. Walking Distance From The Uof F

the top of the photograph is the
bio environmental research
laboratory ($1,062,000)*
The chemical engineering build building
ing building ($1,190,000) is in the appro approximate
ximate approximate middle of the construction
site with two electrical engineer engineering
ing engineering buildings ($1,400,000) at the
lower left and an aerospace en engineering
gineering engineering facility ($786,000) at the

lower right. McElvy and Jenne Jennewein
wein Jennewein Architects, Inc. of Tampa
designed the complex. The Allen
Campbell Company of Tyler, Tex.,
and Clearwater was the apparent
low bidder with a base proposal
of $5,354,000 that includes two
coastal engineering buildings and
a $786,000 mechanical engineer engineering
ing engineering addition as well as the complex.

/rl
V rml
fe.VvW'fl
% 1 1 FREE PARKING I
OUT oa \.p* GIFT WRAPPING
. tVe - OUt* GREETING CARDS I
.CflL-Vj Cft "GOLDIE-OLDIES"
k Ikw *. ACCESSORIES
c Iks TAPES
CENTRAL CHARGE
O NEW POP HITS
mtrrtiim 1,19 wUN,VAVE
UIjLUU NIJ < NEXT TO KONIOANS)
RECORD shop
For Over 7 Years The Favorite
Os The Campus
Come By- See Why
-



Buildings You Will See Finished

' 1 9 KhAv *4ki '1 B i ik..
j* ,' 4 v '|s*f f ytfpfr,*?:.' r . ?, sm? "ll 9 B I Ml. i mmdwiisf?*
*-. Ml.gra i il te #JSm£' ...l mmmmsm: s MM.I::-. ..*BI
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' Ms ffuNf v lipiS I $* M .mml '' m '
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|yftgra ||p9|g|||lH pf'aflraqijg m&BLJ2Bmt ~ j- i .l -
New General Classrooms Building

Modern
room apartments for
S7O per month make
up the 104-unit new
married housing com comfilex
filex comfilex south of Yulee
iving area.
The apartments now
being finished will be
occupied this Septem September.
ber. September.
An air conditioned
library and study
lounge with a seating
capacity of 60 students
and coin operated
laundry facilities are
also in the new mar married
ried married village.

% Hkki <^k Hb w/xS/MB^* nn^iUlHV
!£' fK > v v< 'K |ffH ,*BP w ****>< '/T' 4 **%
* Jujiik & k 4p '** I.m-
v vi a a** tr s& ,4 mm
BIHWF*tB*SI 31 p IX-nflWHi for '** <* .
New Florida Union

-Y'- : .- .-
mt;' BliBU BMNMBBp
i pw IBjiMfew jB M jdHBB Bh9^^mlb9Bb9 i^' >< '' ; ''*''
,.y iJIjL BpS^
Jy p- C.b %Lm |MBg|| # I
New Married Housing

Friday, July 30/ 1965, The Florida Alligator/

*
University College
students will enjoy
air-conditioned com comfort
fort comfort for most of their
classes when the four
story general class classroom
room classroom building is com comgleted
gleted comgleted next 10 Tigert
all.
The $1.4 million
building i s set for
completion in Decem December,
ber, December, 1965 in time
for use the second tri trimester
mester trimester of the 1965-66
school year.

1
Construction which
began in May 1964 on
the new $5 million
Florida Union will be
completed in time for
1965 freshmen to
realize use of its many
student facilities for at
least three years at the
UF before graduation.
The six story
structure is located
south of the Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering Building near
Hume, Tolbert and
Graham living areas.
The focus of student
activities on campus,
the Union is headquar headquarters
ters headquarters for Student Pub Publications,
lications, Publications, Student Go Government,
vernment, Government, Florida
Blue Key and the
Florida Union Board of
Student Activities. Of Offices
fices Offices for these bodies
will move from the
present Florida Union
in the center of campus
to the new set
for completion i n
March 1966.

Page 9-C



Page 10-C

c^ _.. o. w | |l '
Health Center Complex
&IJ%iJ Ik
11 h '',P^M|iMriid|^^y|^B| .Milffl >
>JS . H .'-KJH ''./K H|Ljl|
SB B|||L lH| Bjj£:
;Mil
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a y** j -jif(|:
MR, 'RRT .-.^'/^v-y^^-^a&v.'*^_p " y*SK^/' /l > CO&T' , '^k:'--%- :
Florida Field

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I
IMil K
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- - '*-'' KjteM Ife JS '" IJSi *:
f\ mm rn |
Drill Field at Sunset

/ The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 30, 1965

Birds Eye View of UF Campus

*. *j %/
l|p'- Wj-^
'%? v r, v "'';
Sin. v
-A v
S | lEik, Sir W
SH r
% '* x-
fr'
h m i iffbkj j 1 w 'i. ij>- SSShREhIIwII
Century Tower



New, Old Gathering Places
....< ***&*.* ml V v' ?\* W'> f4l^%V v '^'M:^Kl ,
j* ijn!.r L ~?.
* > aMUR- m
-Jfe r H edit. M JSf BfiWfJiMk
IPBiHBjL mm i iN :\ M Jr jfl iff
^ Vv V x .. / ? 4 '^- ? .'
v Vjfc. 'j&t ' ffc\c W. s | ||to |-rtn-ir.||inT'~rfr w '-|rliri--Ilriliiini -iriitin- '' v^^' ,ir
I -v ~4~ -^B
New Florida Union A
Old Florida Union
HUHHwHj
t, Ho, I doat play football. -JES~I I
Tib studs lor First Natbaair' I
Every Florida Man or Woman just like every other / \
Gainesville citizen has good reason to be proud I y I Lfl / I j v\ 1
of banking with The First National Bank of Gaines- 1 'I I f
ville. It marks you as a wise person, with the sense \'| f II / ... i* J I
to deal with an old, established firm whose good A I 1 L 1/ / *' Jl j 4
reputation is part of Gainesville's history. Jg l I
Look for the First National Bank in the heart of j I
town, where our big clock has become a valued J
landmark to all who pass by. l
ESTABLISHED 1888 I
COMPLETE BANKING y J*^ I
73 YEA s R E S R^g TINUOUS OF GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA PARKING I
MEMBER OF FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION I
MEMBER OF FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM I

Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator/

Page 11-C



Page 12-C

, The Florida Alligator, Friday # July 30, 1965

CAMPU
featuring the
BROWSE SHOP and b<
THE OFFICIAL UNIVERSII
FOR OVER 1700 DIFFERENT TITLES OF PAPERBACK ADJOIHIH
BOOKS & OVER 500 TECHNICAL & REFERENCE H
BOOKS IN MANY FIELDS
L 1 Mv Hk
" 1 i jmM
~' t L ~iiin_ -'JH
OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY TEXTBOOKS & SUPPLIES %
T< v fe' --V- ' '''\ '' hs '/'' '*
GET YOUR
AND SAVE
TEXTBOOK I
B USED BOOKS SOLD AT 25% DISCOUNT
B WE PAY 50% OF NEW BOOK PRICE FOR
AUTHORIZED TO BE USED AGAIN AT
j
WE OFFER TOP MARKET PRICE FOR A^-



5 SHOP
ff
Branch Stores
uL.- "
' 7? 'f
okstore Medical Center Broward,
Y OF FLORIDA BOOKSTORE #
the hub n Sho P Jennings
:; V Check Our List For Your Needs
m HkPGSKB Hmm
Iffil* rs '^cteTrlM
I Mr #1 w qfBBBSi*
ft pk 1 Mr. ivti Nik^SRBH
yUMga ft* jrT rlw iilii || Iff 1 textbooks NEW and used
92 S i 1 ffTlKl
RStfl E I J K£ I ILT IliTpyi ARCHITECTURAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES
w ~ %l Mai jHCk .. X KWSwk
ART SUPPLIES
I- I jJipfok.,
.I- Kl. 1%, ''
1 CRAFT SUPPLIES
r
GYM UTF|TS
* SWEATSHIRTS
li|Pl| COLLEGE PETS
Ifcfcil COLLEGE SEAL
I-- I^/
k M MASCOT STATIONERY
r : # FLORIDA RECORD ALBUMS

. H .:.. :/ .
HALLMARK GREETING CARDS
'Wf COLLEGE JEWELRY AND CLASS RINGS
WRITING EQUIPMENT BY SCHAEFFER, PARKER, ESTERBROOK,
NORMA, SCRIPTO AND PAPERMATE
PENNANTS AND DECALS
COMPLETE LINE OF GENERAL SUPPLIES
DRUGS AND SUNDRIES
RICE POLICYI
.
FROM NEW BOOK PRICE. I
USED BOOKS IN GOOD CONDITIONIF I
end of term.
TEXTBOOK THAT HAS BEEN DISCONTINUED.

Friday, July 30/ 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13-C



Page 14-C

f ah-Rahs They're With Us Yet
BgkgffggWJ i ijh |p
I ; - # *- ** ~ \> *** *-'
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A -.y# Hi
a? Br yi j
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t k jjfci
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|B U.VnBIHHI .nfg < nWilMilT' i fWllr
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Stockings, Os Course, Are Always Optional...

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..JVnd So Are Rah-Rahs

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w ~ A fIA 1 i i I ill *T .fiii BTI #* \ /.I w V
l* j Ii ii ii1 1 Tf 1 7*1 1 I#(I IB

, The Florida Alligator/ Friday, July 30, 1965

/V Fagans Bootery
Mmmm



'- t j tLMBEh^u
i, ; V';,':y.;; : ;.. . mtki h
9 It
I
§ * I lip *i|r A- H m
I t% uv k
Ms : 3BR .#3p W x
yX\r ^,HnH : # :v; i,.. SB* jm
HH I W' % §§| HP JmjgP fifes w
Hr S
v}> V ? 'ps* } 1?> V''/*'BB jS *mg. x v
L jjpf jB f / If
If
ix, w^jH^MPif.
i TYPICALLY DRESSED Florida students pause to talk between
es in front of the UF's Business School Motherly Hall TTzey are
z Berger and Scott Hager
Welcome Students
SPECIAL PRICES ON APPROVED & REQUIRED GYM CLOTHES I
SHORTS
:S, by Converse, Keds, Beacon Falls
\J SHIRTS, Gator Stencilled l\f'l \
a SHIRTS, Plain j l, | PL ORtfrjd X
VIEN _jjjy j
udas (J \Vn \
its r-il hi f i; __._
:S, by Converse, Keds, Beacon Falls y
J SHIRTS, Gator Stencilled i I | --_' \
.T SHIRTS, Plain L, ft JA Jd.
I Perry TENNIS SHORTS for Men TENNIS RACKET RE-STRINGING
I Perry TENNIS SHORTS for Ladies FAST SERVICE
vite You to Visit North Central Florida's Most Complete Sporting Goods Store
JIMMIE HUGHES SPORTING GOODS
|fey One Block East of Campus 1113 W Univ. Ave.

FHday- July 30, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

Easy Going Sport
Clothes Always
r ln 9 For Coeds
By JO FRANKLIN
Selecting a wardrobe for college could easily
become a traumatic experience for a new coed
without the aid of a few tips. A little planning
can eliminate mounds of never-to-be-worn
clothes and the expense behind it.
The whole key to selection is a practical look
at campus life. The Florida coed is a girl on
the move and is attracted to the non-restricting
swing skirt, A-line, or gentle flare topped by
the traditional, yet feminine shirt.
The new colors for the fall are predicted as
Peat Brown, Corn Flower Blue, Scone (a mix mixture
ture mixture of yellow and beige), Pine Heather, and
any of the new tweed and heather shades. The
easy-going shift and shirtwaist, with their many
variations are still favorites. The latest rendi rendition
tion rendition of these are the dark cotton and dacron
A-line Villager dresses with tucks in the front,
sleeves long or cap, in either prints or solid
colors.
The many steps of walking in between classes
allows comfort to dictate footwear fashion as
loafers, sneakers, rah-rahs and sandals.
Purses to compliment in leathers,Belgian
\ tweeds, and tailored combinations are popular
now.
Fall weekends bring football games, fraternity
parties, and other fun all calling for different
attire. Suits or dresses for football games are
selected in cool cottons, blends, and knits appro appropriate
priate appropriate for the warm Fall sun.
| For partying in the evening the switch is
to long pants. Dark cottons are always in style
but the cool weather brings out a new breed
of wools this year. Hounds tooth, Glen plaids, and
Diamond plaids are the rage for both slacks
and skirts, completed by a matching sweater.
The ever-attractive plain cardigan is receiving a
good deal of competition from the new cable
stitch sweater.
I As a rule, the only events that will call for
an afternoon dress are certain Lyceum Council
presentations and Homecoming Weekend
activities. The London touch in the after-five
apparel has proved to be a big hit.
If washing and ironing arent your favorite
pastimes then plan your wardrobe accordingly
with an eye to the drip-dry, no-iron fabrics
and knits. Most frills and fluffs are junked in
favor of the easy-to-care-for tailored and village
look. If it is at all possible, hang on to some of
your clothes money until you reach Gainesville,
so you can check out some of the local stores
for other new campus styles. Even though the
college edition of some magazines are a good
place to start, there is no better barometer
for a specific campus than the stores that cater
to it.
At any rate, use your good taste, begin with
your present outfits, and balance the rest of the
new buys between practicallitv and individuality.
After all, a Florida coed needs no introduction.
Libbye s nvites you all to I
come in and browse. We feature
sport clothes for all-blouses,
slacks, bermudas, skirts, and
2 & 3 pc. suits. Select from
newest of fashions by:
JAYSON CLASSICS QUEEN CASUAL
MACSHORE MISS PAT OF CALIFORNIA
JANE COLBY FRITZI OF CALIFORNIA
HIS FOLTER PERSONAL SPORTSWEAR
FOREVER YOUNG MARIE PHILLIPS
BBYE'S
Next to Fla. Theater Central Chg. & Layaway 235 W. Unlv. Ave.

Page 15-C



# The Florida Alligator, Friday July 30, 1965

Page 16-C

A Time To Live, A Time To Study...

I 1
I 1
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p. - ;
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...On The Grass

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' ~ tlffiflW9i9l^^9n99i' rn fVru^ys & wy ;v'
js iy- - - r -'-
JP i.^l
'* '"
...By Yourself

aBP';,. n, fi fill: ; V&
jjfjfl I Hk. H I 3 jfl vv-.'. |Ht Mj / 'MKHm 1 job.
lit ? Jfl
*, %t s,; 1 F f v*j -
t
# ..\A/ itn Your Dei to

...While Yov Sh*p

Jj
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K !SsS i&st *, ** £ x |H
* 9
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m ~ i
' s£s> .1 mr : ~ : -¥; : 99 % t v
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1981 : >
>Â¥'' 1 .9 ;:: t ~
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...While You Shave



I IMALONES^lfiin
I I BOOK and SUPPLY '' I
l I IfxWo I
I Be Sure to See Us CHECKS CASHED I I
lli/' ISKI J||
I £ ENGINEERING I ARCHITECTURAL supplies I
8 CIIPPI ICC 9 I Uof F GLASSES A MUGS
I | aurruiJ Iu of F sweatshirts I I
IJ K& E Posf Dietz 9 en I S GREETING CARDS 2 I
I CDACU FOUNTA,N PENS I I
iKvjn'i n NOTEBOOK paper
THINK AHEAD I | I
I Order Yoer Textbooks Now I
I And Avoid The Fall Rush I
I | Just give us your NAMb I
I | and list (by abbreviation) the COURSES you begin in September: 2
Clip and mail this to us; we'll mail your books C.O.D. raj&
I MALONE'S Book & Sapply 1 I
I I Textbooks School Supplies Novelties X I
I 1712 WUniv.Ave-Ph I

Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

IN AN ACADEMIC
COMMUNITY...
' mam - j M| mmmm i
1 :i;|
i
H
B ijfj:
H
Wr
pjp p s

... THE PURSUITS
rwVKM Britt f toyf**
& ? jhbHk _fxniL
r£*l4r HK#HI
\ 4*-* f Bflv m'-
*j it ML r^r
a

REACH TO
THE PEAKS
i.- ,v' : V if S v*
wiHBMHBBBBBfci | ,* JHMMHBMBia&..
I
1 il : v ~1
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3J KT
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-* dtSfflawffi .£* '/ IIOm? '*
TjKfgUKjHMBgaBXM iffSinTy wX4^-..vflfjffr.i. y...-. %&&! \MBS'
Rwii I

Page 17-C



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 30/ 1965

Page 18-C

HAPPINESS IS BEING IN POLITICS
SKr s < HP& jnk a *' s JUG
ftdpfc* m' ,; S 3
id His < ~*~- < ^ > ?
SB§A #: _BHf
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,
I
NATIONALLY ..L. to R. Senators Ful I bright (D-Ark.)and Smothers (DFla )

IB BPI Kyuggi fBBBPB :.-'
JBMIIiBBSIHrP I << k i :
: -fe : ??: HE.
;' f '-. ' '' "V> .-^gSWjSt'
BBL'^^iH'' IBS jak.. BBB^'
t&" 1 Ik "Vy'
kHHHH Blb V'' . mm :
xmr 888 .BP te >- * . ' diw vj,
?18. ~ v£ tPv-'
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STATE Goy. Haydon Burns

AND VERY LOCAL...
Student Body Pres.
Bruce Culpepper

WORLD
K I U ) ))) TRAVEL
SERVICE
CALL 376-4641
OR VISIT OUR OFFICE AT
808 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE
A COMPLETE ONE-STOP TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS FOR:
AIR AND STEAMSHIP TICKETS AIR AND SEA CRUISES
HOTEL & RESORT RESERVATIONS TRAVEL INSURANCE
DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN AUTO RENTALS FOREIGN CAR PURCHASES
ESCORTED TOURS INDEPENDENT PLANNED TOURS TO YOUR PREFERENCE.
SjHfflg; YOUR ASSURANCE OF QUALITY SERVICE IN THE TRAVEL PROFESSION.

1
r NEW gyromatic
So astonishingly thin, this Gyromatic feels like a
soft glove on your wrist Yet its wondrous mech mech.
. mech. Hr anism performs with brilliance. Its the peak of
SMh|| Girard Perregauxs 172 years of watchmaking
perfection. Self-winding, shock-resistant. In 14-
il||yi||j /
Other Girard Perregaux watches from $47.50
''" Bkv. -'' life
BH|K
tfoforffiOQ
§£s£&
v,< 211 W. University Av.
372-8658



the only car under SIO,OOO
Twin Weber Carburetors
Four cylinder aluminum engine
Disc Brakes, all around -, j
5 forward speed synchromesh gear shift ~ J ; "
Double overhead cam shafts 7
1 illVJhliV\ 1 -4#^^
Imp -smJHL-- - a

Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19-C



Page 20-C

l, The Florida Alligator, Friday / July 30 / 1965

HOMECOMING WEEKEND

MMf jtfMf
. 'j aa


...AND SHE
REIGNED
.;.... ;;:x,.
Hk
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V
Br . I§l |: : il I
'\v '";, \' < ,<*% \\>V<- s

at g ...weare
'lifils-C >RMD NAMES 81,01161
\\ yJ/ I /M JBT f ALL THESE FAMOUS BRAND NAMES 4 DOZENS MORE ARE |1
>V' V if I BOTANY 500 ..FARAH..MONET JEWELRY..SUPERBA... II
. i i SwT X j antzen...bau bras...don loper...faberge...casuai il
\\< f m W / V maker...smE-MART...Hollywood vassarette...hancs.. V
r Jf V burlington-bonnie bellj>atty remE-VAN heusen_SA
\f ARTEMIS...VANITY FAIR...KUPPENHEIMER...FIELDCREST... O
* >tfV fH I health-tex..jrow...charies of THE RITZ...GOSSARD... I
| RWREGOR. REIIE-SKARMEER. WARNERS j
We elieve in brand names because
1 I who labels his merchandise is proud
j E .Eiat h. n.Ret. You suie
. I them own
v 1 by purchasing again and again and again, This gives you a double guarantee
youand only youhave made these brand f quality, fashion, comfort and value.
names great. Over a period of years you have M #
tested their quality and found it good, judged the wjfjLQftf"
style and found it pleasing, compared the prices and Wf University Avenue

THEY CAME
IN BUSLOADS
TO SEE

.
* *.£; st&s H 1 V*£ '. ' 3

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STUDENT-FACULTY RELATIONS
: r HpNRMH I ;||§y &,. At Atmr
mr Atmr 1
. : x *wK3MSmr
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attention 1
students: I
MURPHYS I
the vital
I I
| ingredients... j
I f A AD I I
design I
effort 1
to make a house
8 (or an apartment...or a room) I
a HOME! K
fHI >. I
The friendly folks at Murphy's know exactly what it takes to make a college I
student's quarters livable.. .and homelike! Everything must be bright and
cheerful.. .well-made, too.. .but not expensive! This is what you II find at
Murphy's! Whether its curtains and draperies; throw rugs or room size rugs;
dishes, pots and pans, tableware or table covers; towels or bedding; every- \
thing from knick-knacks to tables and comfortable chairs! Whatever you
need... LOOK FIRST AT MURPHY'S!
jp - I

Friday, July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

...GET BETTER
IP
£ 4, v
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:.-t.* A *Mk
L S
\ -|vE -|vEf
f -|vEf % V

1 |^
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...AND BETTER
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Page 21-C



Page 22-C

# The Florida Allrgator, Friday, July 30, 1965

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/% AT I F CF
Gators Are Tough in SEC
BBP'^BBB^
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Mt t i. RR,

1 |
/nwafkfx /4
HV lWiWl\//^
( WgWV/ |
I anxious to make you feel X j
V at home. Come in and get X
/ acquainted the next time you |
I find yourself downtown. You*re 1
\ welcome to just browse around. We
1 think you'll want to get to know us bet- /
J ter after you've enjoyed the informal atmos- v
1 phere of our shop, and seen our complete line /
I of nationally advertised quality dresses, sportswear
I and lingerie--all bearing brand names you know and \
I respect. Ask the girls who have been here awhile A 1
l visit to the Personality Shop is not only wise; it's fun I And i
5 while you're visiting, why not let us open your very own stu- X
I dent charge account to make shopping easier and more convenient? J
\
/ | The Personality j |
/ 8 E. University Avenue \
[OPEN A STUDENT CHARGE OPEN 'TIL 9 FRIDAY NIGHTS /



Ml I
A-E widths 1 &,
To Size 13
your favorite slip-on in
BRAWNY SCOTCH GRAIN
FOR THE COED & COLLEGIAN J\
BROWN I \
HARVEST GRAIN IJf/ / I
AAAA to B widths J /jfjJjC*M I I
To Size 11 II I I
i 2
I
\ NOW AVAILABLE
IN GAINESVILLE
_
Tnr.Tditchelli
Phone: 376-0444 1127 West University Avenue

K&
IL I
jj# wK ~ \\'£
. M ;
i n ||II 5
1 mWWBBBBMWI HW 11 ] wl
v j
\ CHANDLERS W)ff
\ HAMBURGERS V^
U.S. GOVT. INSPECTED BEEF USED EXCLUSIVELY
HAMBURGER .15 COCA COLA .104.15

DOUBLE HAMBURGER .25 ROOT BEER .10 (.15
CHEESEBURGER .20 ORANGE .10 (.15
DOUBLE CHEESEBURGER.3S COFFEE .10
FRENCH FRIES .15 GRAPE .108.15
MILK .12 LEMONADE .10 (.15
MILKSHAKES Clmolate Strawberry Voiilla .20
\
.
'
720 N.W. 13th Street
CHANDLER'S HAMBURGERS

Friday July 30, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 23-C



Page 24-C

ottoP WONDERFUL WORLD
y OF WHEELS
HOII D 3
is a demonstration ride. Why not today? FUN MACHINE HUNTING MACHINE SPORTS MACHINE

Honda Sales A Service Convenient to Campus

Coaster $36*95
fj|| Dunelt
'_ '" ''l i 'l

We Used Bikes Repairs Service
JTREIT'SNCYCLE SHOP
Phone ahead to have cycle or bike ready by Sept. I. Save Time and Money!

__ r-;L#qrW' ff
SPORTS and
RACING BIKES ySir^SL
JUVENILE MODELS WWtemSy ff
SCHWINN BIKES ARE BESTI Ns I Wy\AW^sM
' *i i i

. I
The Florida Alligator, Friday July 30, 1965