Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
-
h.-Jc-. lirannn'fr ..: , mgntf s^H^K
Jj Wp&foM P jM lit 1 t
t
K

Minstrels
Will Perform
Here Tonight
Tonight is the highlight of the
summer social season as the New
Christy Minstrels come to Florida
Frolics. The nine member group
will start the show at 8:30 p.m.
in the Florida Gym.,
The New Christy Minstrels,
formed four years ago by Randy
Sparks, are currently on a yearly
tour performing on college cam campuses,
puses, campuses, in concert halls and in audi auditoriums
toriums auditoriums across the United States.
The group, named for Edwin P.
Christy and his original Christy
Minstrels, has released seven al albums
bums albums through Columbia Records.
Their latest album, Chim Chim
Cher-ee is from the Walt Disney
movie, Mary Poppins.
Other recent hits for the New
Christy Minstrels include Down Downtown,
town, Downtown, Well Sing in the Sun Sunshine,
shine, Sunshine, Cottonflelds, and Hes
a Loser,
This summers Frolics is a
great accomplishment in summer
campus entertainment, according
to Steve Gardner, Frolics chair chairman.
man. chairman. Over 3,000 tickets have been
sold. This success is attributed to
the fact that a big-name, popular
group comparable to those pre presented
sented presented during regular trimesters
will perform.
Tickets for tonights perform performance
ance performance will be on sale today at the
Information Booth across from the
Hub from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.;
at the CJ. and Campus Club from
11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m.; and
at the Main Library from 9 a.m.
until 3 p.m.
Tickets may also be purchased
at the door as long as they last.
Cost is $1.50 per person.

UF Gets Large Grant
For Fall Work-Study Plan

by DIANE DAWSON
Stall Writer
The federal government** war on
poverty** program is being fought
at the UF. A federal work-study
grant of $100,168 will be used to
provide part-time jobs to low
income students for the fall
trimester.
The grant is part of a $300,000
request for the full year made
under the Economic Opportunity
Act of 1964.
Jobs will be available for as
many as 1,000 students next year,
according to Daniel B. Wilder,
student financial aid officer.
Hourly wages vary from the mini minimum
mum minimum of $1 to a maximum $3 for
graduate students. The jobs will
not affect existing part-time jobs

Florida ALLIGATOR

Trimester System May Go

by BUNNIE ROMAN
Staff Writer
A new academic calendar for
Florida state supported universi universities
ties universities will be decided Monday by the
Board of Regents in St. Peters Petersburg,
burg, Petersburg, according to Robert B.
Mautz, U.F. vice president in
charge of academic affairs.
According to Mautz, it has been
decided by those concerned that a
new system is needed.
The Council of University
Presidents will recommend to the
Board that a modified semester
system be instituted, said Dean
Mautz.
The approximate schedule for a
modified semester as recommend recommended
ed recommended by the UF would be as follows:
Classes for the first semester
would begin on Sept. 5 and would
end on Jan. 13.
Classes for the second semes semester
ter semester would begin on Feb. 6 and end
on June 2.
Classes for the summer session
would begin on June 14 and end on
Aug. 8.
Each of the five state supported
universities will also recommend
a university calendar.
All five state universities, ac according
cording according to Dean Mautz, will rec recommend
ommend recommend about the same calendar,
a modified semester of some kind.
The Council of Presidents will
also recommend that the modified
semester plan not be put into effect
until at least two years from now,

on campus or civil service po positions.
sitions. positions.
In order for a single student to
be eligible, his parents must earn
less than $3,000 per year plus
S6OO for each dependent. In the
case of a married student, these
financial conditions must be met
separately by his parents, his
spouse*s parents and his
unenrolled spouse.
A student may work up to 15
hours per week during the first
two trimesters. If he is not en enrolled
rolled enrolled in the university during
the third trimester, he may work
up to 40 hours per week.
The financial aid officer and
the student work together to find
(See 'GRANT', Pbge 2)

Vol. 57. No. 157

said Assistant to President J.
Wayne Reitz, Melvin L. Sharpe.
The Council of Presidents, ac according
cording according to Sharpe, would recom recommend
mend recommend this because they do not have
the funds to cover the changes that
would have to be made to accomo accomodate
date accomodate the new calendar.
After the Board of Regents

Dr. Arthur Thompson Dies

Dr. Arthur W. Thompson, an
authority on American history and
culture who earned international
recognition for significant writings
on the subject, died Monday at
Alachua General Hospital. He was
44.
His untimely death after a long
Illness ended a distinguished
career as professor of American
history at the UF. He joined the
University as an instructor in 1946,
and at the time of his death was
professor of history, chairman of
the Board of Editors of the Social
Science Monograph Series
published by the University of
Florida Press, and a member of
the Board of the University Press.
He was campus coordinator of the
American studies aspects for the
present contingent of Peace Corps
trainees for Brazil.
Dr. Thompson was best known
to graduate and undergraduate
students as an outstanding teacher,
receiving citations for this ability.
He was known to professional his historians
torians historians as a scholar and author
of widely accepted books used in
colleges of the nation and abroad.
He was selected by the U. S.
Department of State as a specialist
for the American Studies Seminar
at Kyoto University in Japan in
the summer of 1961. He was a
Fulbright scholar at the University
at Tbkyo in 1959.
Dr. Thompson was cited by
Florida Blue Key, mens leader leadership
ship leadership honorary fraternity, last
spring for outstanding service
to the University of Florida** and
by student government for
excellence in teaching.** He was
an honorary member of Blue Key.
Notable among his works are the
editing of *Gateway to the Social
Sciences; two volumes on
Sources for American Civiliza Civilization,
tion, Civilization, 1800-1900 (in New York

makes its decision on Monday as
to the calendar change, the State
Board of Education will review this
change, said Hendri R. Chandler,
corporate secretary of the Board
of Regents. Generally the State
Board of Education goes along with
the Board of Regents decisions,
added Chandler.

HISTORY PROF

City)/' published in 1960 and 1962
by Columbia University Press and
co-authored by the late Harry
Carman, a noted authority on
American history; a 1961 account
of "Jacksonian Democracy on the
Florida Frontier;" a 1964 work on
"The Gilded Age," published in
"Main Problems in American
jjUstory/^rolum^H^>yDorsey
n
DR. ARTHUR THOMPSON

History Shows Students
Subject to Crisis Call-up

In the event of a reservist call callup,
up, callup, UF students belonging to armed
services reserve units will not be
left behind.
The last reserve call- 14) during
the Berlin Crisis in 1961 found
many UF'ers leaving their books
to pick up arms.
At press time, local military
units in Gainesville had received
no official word of their
called into active duty.

Friday, July 16, 1965

Whatever change is decided
upon, according to Chandler, will
not go into effect before 1966.
A modified semester calendar
was recently accepted by the UF
chapter of the American Associa Association
tion Association of University Professors exe executive
cutive executive committee, said Fletcher
N. Baldwin, president of AAUP.

Press, and numerous articles in
professional Journals.
Dr. John K. Mahon, acting head
of the University's Department
of History, said "His works as a
teacher and scholar were well
known and respected by all
informed American historians.
The UF has never known a better
teacher."
Dr. Thompson was founder of
the University faculty seminar of
American civilization which for
10 years has drawn together a
distinguished group of scholar scholarteachers
teachers scholarteachers from a wide range of
disciplines on campus for dis discussions
cussions discussions and professional
exchange.
He earned the A. B. degree
from Brooklyn College in 1940,
a masters from Columbia Uni University
versity University in 1942, and the PluD.
from Columbia in 1954. He has
served as visiting professor and
lecturer at the College of the
City of New York, New York
University, Columbia University,
Tokyo University, Rlkkyo Univer University
sity University and University of Massachu Massachusetts.
setts. Massachusetts. He was recipient of a
graduate research appointment by
the UF for the summer of 1962.

Yesterday, military leaders in
Washington recommended that the
strength of UJS. forces in South
Viet Nam be booted to 179,000 men
by the end of the year. If this pro proposal
posal proposal is given the green light by
the White House it would mean an
increase of 100,000 men in the
troubled area.
A tentative estimate by the Joint
Chiefs of Staff calls for 206,000
citizen servicemen to be affected.



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 16/ 1965

Hi j ijj m
IHV HHHH
UF PRESIDENT J. Wayne Reitz welcomed
officers of the Florida Youth Workshop Asso Association
ciation Association Board to his office Wednesday during a
brief tour of Tigert. Charlie Moorer of
Milton, center, is chairman of the FYWA
Board and is helping coordinate workshop
activities on campus during the groups six-day
meeting this weeK. Steve Richey of Leesburg,
left, is vice president. The session has
attracted 174 students from high schools,
community teen centers and youth service
clubs throughout Florida for a series of
discussions keyed to the central topic of
decision-making.

Workshop Ends Today

Decision-making the scientific
vay is being tackled by 200 Florida
ligh school juniors who are
GRANT
(Continued From Page I)
a job which he is qualified for and
interested in. Requests for em employment
ployment employment under this program can
be made anytime. Jobs are still
available for this summer,
according to Wilder.
The UF's grant is part of
$703,840 to be distributed among
35 Florida colleges and univer universities
sities universities this fall. It is the largest
amount to be received by any of
the schools.
The request for funds was
based on an estimate made by a
study of the financial history of
all the students enrolled and a
determination of the approximate
number of potential freshmen in
the areas from which the UF
draws its students.
Federal allocation of funds to
states for the work-study program
is made on the basis of the number
of families in that state who are
earning $3,000 or less per year.
Federal funds finance 90 per cent
of the program, the states
providing the remaining 10 per
cent.
The program began at the UF
this summer with $36,000 Federal
and $4,000 state funds. About 20
students have found jobs through
the program.
Any funds left over at the end
of the summer will be sent back
to the Federal government for
redistribution next June.
Do your laundry
you shop
* Every 10th LoaaF lH:
KOIN KLEEN
704 W. Univ. Avc.
hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmT

attending the Florida Youth
Workshop, which ends today.
The UF-sponsored program is
holding its 13th annual session
this week July 12-17 under the
direction of G. Manuel Turner,
the coordinator of the workshop.
Dean Donald J. Hart of the
College of Business Admin Administration
istration Administration gave the keynote address
at the first meeting of the Work Workshop
shop Workshop Monday evening.
In addition to attending lectures
on how to cope with the different
types of problems they will en encounter
counter encounter throughout life, the
students are getting practice in
actually making decisions.

See Whats New *"
The Browse Shop
A JAMES STEPHENS READER Frankenberg
ESCAPE FROM AUTHORITY Schaar
THE CHARACTER OF THE EXECUTIVE Stryker
POVERTY: SOCIAL CONSCIENCE IN THE PRO PROGRESSIVE
GRESSIVE PROGRESSIVE ERA.. Jones
CARIBBEAN ON $5 AND $lO A DAY
INORGANIC CHEMISTRY OF NITROGEN Jolly
!
STATISTICAL CONCEPTS McCollough
TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
MODERN SYNTHETIC REACTIONS House
COMPLEX VARIABLES & APPLICATIONS...ChurchiII
THEORY OF RANDOM FUNCTIONS Rugachev
Campus Shop & Bookstore


Social Security-Student Numbers l
! Considered by Administration I

by DIANE HOEHNE
Staff Writer

oiau wiiwjj
Social security numbers may re replace
place replace the present five digit student
numbers by September 1966, ac according
cording according to R. H. Whitehead, as assistant
sistant assistant registrar.
We are definitely considering
the use of social security numbers
just as soon as it is possible to
make the necessary arrangements
that go beyond this office, said
j Whitehead.
Preliminary arrangements
must be made before this plan can
go into effect, said Whitehead,
since the registrar's office is not
the only one that will be affected
by the change.
Each college on the campus will
have the revise forms to accom accommodate
modate accommodate the change from a five
digit to a nine digit number. Ac Accordingly
cordingly Accordingly the computers must be
reprogrammed to handle the longer
number.
Students entering college who do
not have a social security number
will have to obtain one. Whitehead
said foreign students may be as assigned
signed assigned a nine digit number begin beginning
ning beginning with three zeros or some other
combination which is not used by
the government as a social security
number.
This accommodation for foreign
student numbers will have to have
final approval also, according to
Whitehead.
One advantage of using social
security numbers as student num numbers,
bers, numbers, said Whitehead, would be
to provide a common number in
exchanging information about stu-
Dean Maloney
Heads Committee
UF Law Dean Frank E. Maloney
has been named to head a
committee of The Florida Bar
according to an announcement
today by Bar president Robert M.
Ervin, Tallahassee.
Maloney was named chairman
of the Bar's committee on liaison
with the American Law Student
Association.

dents between universities.
The UF faculty replaced faculty

Newest Christy Minstrel
Album available at
p iecord Bar.
SSZ&L
tonight,
m Come see
1.7" us or
' tickets.
&4p
W. UNIV. kfir*
Free Parking, Rear I YES SIR!
I WE PUT I
I THE "SIR" I
I SERVICE
I family restaurant I
I home of the I
I Boy I
I ** or/ 9 ina / double-deck I
I mW HAMBURGER I
I 2035 NW 13th St. I

numbers with social security num numbers
bers numbers In the spring of 1963,



t &tag n Irag
Within the next few day*, we will begin on extensive remodeling program lit the Lfir L Men's
Shop ond Shoe Dept. The contractors will need more "ROOM TO WORK". In order to re reduce
duce reduce our stock to the lowest possible level/ we hove further reduced prices on mony items
throughout the store .
THE QUALITY REMAINS HIGH ONLY THE PRICES HAVE BEEN
LOWERED. EXTRA SAVINGS ARE YOURS NOW!
Mik %£) LARGE GROUP FAMOUS NAME
mw, BUTTON DOWN coILAR
\ K NATIONALLY ADVERTISED
dacron & wool ?o L . 2 9 for 5
mm DACRON & COTTON M w to
AAENQ BOHB regular collar QQc
,f,fc,lW SPORT SHIRTS
tol'l su,ts =' £
B FORMERLY b 55.00 PLEATED G FRONT
CHECK FOR YOUR SIZE I/* PRICE
3 I}.1-| REG. 9.95 | REG. 12.95
Wwm Rfulor 2 311 j 1 | 2 ] 3 A O O f Cft
|j jyj [j | NOW *f J NOW Q
t CABANA a,
swim sets St aci v* tao,
'ALUES AOO I II V I
\ T 0
group of DRESSES
BEACH JACKETS values to 25.00
VALUES 100 NOw6 00 -10 00
TO 6.95 *
SALE O SHOES NOW V.Yi 'STH, V/ffi
11 PLASTIC RAINCOATS 99* SWIM WEAR
GROUP OF ROBES & PAJAMAS 'A PRICE | 5 00 1/ 2 nKt
WHITE * EES S IRTS WHITE BOXER UNDER 1 SHORTS dEF BIoUSOS v.l , 119* 3
W 1.99 rs_2 1.50 ; .s |R SHORTS 5
GROUP OP 2 PIECE
ncc I g oup Summer Suits. 10
RCC V TZa ik /k 1 SUMMER T
PARKING > ~J &J mp 3 < TIE assorted
9{g Serai" >[ **** CAS now 39* SPORTS WEAR it ea.]
Parking Lot uw UNIV AVt USE YOUR CENTRAL CHARGE <
: - \ ' '>

July 16, 1965/

Wolff Will
Leave UF
This Fall
Dr. George E. Wolff, director
of honors studies at the University,
will leave the UF this August to
be the regional director of the
College Entrance Examination
Board in Sewanee, Tennessee.
"Dr. Wolff was the prime
organizer of the University honors
program," said Dr. David Stryker,
professor of English who will
replace Dr. Wolff as the director
of honors studies.
Dr. Wolff, who came here in
1948 and was an undergraduate
here 26 years ago, helped start
the honors program in 1961. Every
year fifty students are selected,
on the basis of high school grades,
a score of 485 or over on the
FJorida high school senior place placement
ment placement tests, and the result of a
personal interview, to participate
in this accelerated program.
Dr. Wolff received his B.A. and
M.A. in political science at the
UF and his Ph.D. in political sci science
ence science at the University of North
Carolina. He is an associate pro professor
fessor professor of social science.
campus
briefs
COUNCIL MEETS
There will be a meeting of the
Legislative Council on Tuesday,
July 20, 1965. It will be held in
the Law School Auditorium
Room 120. This will be the last
scheduled meeting of the Council
during the trimester. The
Caucuses will begin at 7:15 p.ro.
The meeting will begin at 7:45.
EDUCATION DAMES
The Education Dames will hold
its regular monthly meeting on
Wednesday, July 21, 1965 at 8
p.ro at the home of Mrs. A. W.
Strickland, 2720 S. W. Archer
Rd. Plans for the fall welcoming
tea will be discussed.
PARTY
The European Club is having a
party and meeting tonight, 8 p.m.
at the International Student Center.
Everyone is invited, also after
frolics.
COURSE SCHEDUI F
The Schedule of Courses for the
1965 fair and 1966 spring trimes trimesters
ters trimesters is now available to students
from the Registrar's Office, Room
33, Tigert.
I OUR
Ase FI T
FoK A Kirffr
Car mane lias
7 days a week, 11 to 9
706 W. University Ave.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 16, 1965

ALLIGATOR

One Mans Prayer
One quails at the duty of saying something
fitting upon the passing of Adlai Stevenson.
Possibly the most articulate American political
figure of our time, Stevenson was a far more
able man with words than those now seeking
to appropriately eulogize him in editorial
offices throughout the country.
No one could state a case better than he,
and it is for this outstanding trait that he will
longest be remembered. He was witty, wise,
perceptive, able and eloquent, and these
qualities rewarded him with the dubious honor
of twice carrying his partys standard against
a man who had the political vulnerability of
George Washington.
But carry the banner he did, and he carried
it well.
His speeches and writings brilliantly
summed up the difficult times America was
groping through during the fifties, and many
persons who had never heard of Adlai Stevenson
suddenly became captivated with this artful
orator who was so gamely pitting his weapons
of knowledge, intellect and expression against
an arsenal of popularity, ballyhoo and plain
sentiment.
He went down to crushing defeats both times,
but his dignity and bearing emerged unscathed.
In losing, he succeeded in making America a
little more aware of herself, and reflective
Americans have since come to develop that
higher faith in themselves which Adlai
Stevenson always insisted was there. His was
a great gift, in drawing that faith to the surface.
Adlai Stevenson will be grievously missed
around the world for he was an exceptional
man, an outstanding statesman and a great
humanitarian.
And he was an exemplary person, so perhaps
the most fitting and valuable thing to pvt down
for such a man is not something about him,
but something of him. Adlai Stevenson always
carried with him the following words a
prayer written by an anonymous Confederate
soldier and he must have tried to live by
them as well
I asked God for strength, that I might achieve,
I was made weak, that I might learn humbly to obey...
I asked for health, that I might do greater things,
I was given infirmity, that I might do better things...
I asked for riches, that I might be happy,
I was given poverty, that I might be wise...
I asked for power, that I might have the praise of men,
I was given weakness, that I might feel the need of God...
I asked for all things, that I might enjoy life,
I was given life, that I might enjoy ell things...
I got nothing that I asked for but everything I had hoped for;
Almost despite myself, my unspoken prayers were answered;
| am, among all men, most richly blessed.

THIS WEEK
Bruce Eyes Frolics Infirmary

By BRUCE CULPEPPER
Student Body President
FROLICS. Don't forget the
CHRISTY MINSTRELS tonight.
Steve Gardner and his staff have
spent a great deal of time in
promoting this event and we are
holding our breath in hopes that it
will be a success financially.
Bringing high priced entertainment
to campus in the summer is an
economic risk but we feel that
summer students activities are
minimal and that such entertain entertainment
ment entertainment should be available. If Florida
Frolics is successful then it will
open the door to similar
productions in the future sum mers.
I think well be proud of the
results of this experiment.
INFIRMARY. One of my primary
concerns this summer has been
student health facilities, particu particularly
larly particularly the infirmary. The Alligator
has run a series of editorials
concerning the infirm ary facilities
and has taken a stand for moving
the infirmary so that it will be
under the auspices of the Medical
Center. With this I sincerely agree.
I have expressed our concern to

LETTER
In Defense of Cross Column

EDITOR:
Two sterling representatives of
the adult culture of the South -7
at once liberal, finky, and ineffec ineffectual
tual ineffectual copped out on their pet in
Tuesdays Alligator. Sad and
hapless Bent Card got it worse
from their sponsors than it ever
did from lighthearted Lucien
Cross.
Buddy Davis, I suspect, can be
brought as low as he was in his
letter because, tactically speaking,
the defense of the Bent Card can
be only as lucid as its objectives.
One must work ones way through
Mrs. Gaddums mystification of
the ends of the Bent Card before
the personal lashing out of Davis
becomes explicable.
Neither letter would make
Reverend Charles McCoy of
Berkeley very happy; the Bent
Card was inspired by him, as
everybody knows. His idea was
quite sound: students, like Negroes
and other abused and exploited
groups in our culture, are
agitated about their status-denials;
hence, they will organize, com complain,
plain, complain, perhaps protest, and where
really ignored by a basically
hostile and neurotic adult culture,
eventually demonstrate and em embarrass
barrass embarrass the establishment that
manipulates youth for the systems
own short-run interests. Given
this ugly state of affairs, Reverend
McCoy has advocated radical
university reform, his Christianity
being of the authentic, rare variety
and the ministry has a role to
play in this drama as serious as
its role ought to be in the Negro
revolt.
Well, the concept was filtered
through the Gainesville branch of
aroused university-related Chris Christians,
tians, Christians, and the Bent Card was born.
A visit to the place is a testimonial
to the wisdom of Max Weber's
observation that Protestantism had
a minimal awareness of what it
takes to make community. Sad,

OPINOIN

many people and have found support
from a majority of students and
many members of the adminis administration.
tration. administration. Certainly the Alligators
stand has helped those of us who
are interested in an infirmary
change and I am hopeful that they
will continue.
Presently, our infirmary is not
the worst in the country, nor is it
the best. When Dean Stanley and
the College of Physical Education
took control of it, its situation
was deplorable. Since that time it
has improved. They have air-con air-conditioned
ditioned air-conditioned it, refurnished it, supplied
an emergency electrical system,
and tried to maintain an alert
staff. With the coming of Dr. Hall
the infirmary personnel has con continued
tinued continued to progress. Yet, I am
convinced that the only reason
that the infirmary has been able
to maintain operation is because
thousands of students refuse to
seek infirmary treatment in
preference to high priced local
physicians at home. If all the
students on campus began using
the infirmary, instead of going
elsewhere, I would predict chaos.

solitary, atomistic souls drift into
the Bent Card to be processed
into a group** or community,**
and sit around listening to dated,
funky folk songs, or drinking
over-priced (very uncoffee-house uncoffee-houselike)
like) uncoffee-houselike) coffee, tea or milk, please.
The joker in the deck dealt by
the Bent Card is that the only
Community in the place is created
off the premises, outside the
influence of Christianity Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville style, and arrives there
intact, after being gawked at by
types who brood about the premises
with wide, zombie eyes that do
indeed appeal for help.
Cross* column merely tries to
account for the palpable nothing nothingness
ness nothingness of the experiment. Student
identities are not likely to be
healed by the charity of uncon unconsciously
sciously unconsciously hostile and patronizing
adults. President Reitz* meager
contribution was Lucien*s way of
reading the ironic symptoms of
the Bent Cards general malaise.
Buddy Davis and Maxine Gaddum
want to help as does the
Faculty Christian Fellowship
without authentic risk to
themselves or to the way the local
academic shop is really run.
Since what McCoy had in mind
was a place where concerned stu students
dents students could freely and responsibly
clear their heads about what the
goofy adult culture was doing to
them, having that in mind for
Gainesville is bound to stimulate
the use of the word subversion.**
Davis is quite right: the Bent
Card IS as subversive as Trinity
Episcopal Church: (which is the
whole problem, right?). In a totali totalitarian
tarian totalitarian society welcome to the
University of Floridaassembling
concerned students is either
subversion or slim-slam
pretending; Cross concluded that
the Bent Card was a phony since,
from a radical point of view (which
used to circulate as a point of
view amongst Christians), dol-

DAVID A. WEST
Editor-in-chief

AL LEONARD
Executive Editor

ANDY MOOR
Sports Editor

Why be just average? It seems
only natural for us to use the
resources that the medical center
offers. If our infirmary were
under the Medical Center manage management
ment management then it could be a drawing
force for young, enthusiastic
interns and residents who come to
Gainesville medical school. It
could easily maintain an around
the clock availability of doctors.
And, finally, it would have ready
access to the more modern
equipment of the Center.
I feel that this problem is ex extremely
tremely extremely critical. The faults of
our infirmary do not lay on the
persons in charge but on the
system.
There is not a more capable
man than Dr. Hall, but his hands
ard tied because of lack of space,
resources and administration
support
I hope we can make some
concrete steps towards a change
in our present system. If this
University is to be our home
away from home** then we must
fill our half-stocked medicine
cabinet.

lision with a totalitarian power
structure is inevitable if you are
concerned in an unphony way.
Amusingly, many people are
complaining about Cross' column
because they are pretending that
the fient Card is just what its
least honest supporters want it to
be: a coffee, tea or milk dispen dispensary,
sary, dispensary, with spectator sports in the
shape of sing- alongs. But are all
obliged to see the Bent Card in
this way? Why not see it functioning
as a gimmick that merely distracts
conscience from its cases? But
in a totalitarian society seeing
everything the same way is cus customary;
tomary; customary; the kid who comes along
to spot the nudity of an emperor
is alleged not to know what a
University is all about.
Cross knows what this
University is all about, which might
account for a trace of bitterness:
he knows, for example, that not a
single Christian student foundation
will permit Freedom Forum to
hold meetings in their buildings.
The same people who pressured
Freedom Forum out of these
Christian centers are the ones who
underwrite the Bent Card. Some
cynicism, I think, is forgivable.
Os course only a mental brat"
would dare poke fun at a dismal
irrelevancy supported by Buddy
Davis; what Cross should do is
join the mental snots" in
Journalism 301 and learn how to
libel in a polished, All-American
way. Does name-calling help? In
away, Mr. Davis, it does help to
get ad hominem: about you, your
trainees, Harry and Wayne and
Lester and Bob and Holly and the
whole sorry lot.
Reverend McCoy: please come
back and reclaim your brain child.
He'sJ wearing skirts and falling
asleep in the pulpit and he's
supposed to be a big, strong,
evangelical boy by now!
RONALD ARONS, 4AS



Alachua Headstart Program Halted

by JANE YOUNG
Academic Affairs Editor
The federal Headstart pro program
gram program in Alachua County has been
suspended pending a hearing
by the Office of Economic Oppor Opportunity
tunity Opportunity (OEO).
The hearing originally scheduled
for 10 sum. today, in Washington
has been postponed until next week,
said Alachua County School Board

yy.'.'iHlV* 111 j f m - --- tviv,y,y,Y,y,y t y
Be it hereby enacted by the University of Florida Legislative
Council that the Election Law of the Student Body shall be amended
as follows:
Section 11. Scheduling of Debates.
11.1 .a. In order to insure that any future agreements
pertaining to debates between candidates for President of
the Student Body shall become general knowledge at an
early point in the campaign, ap advisory committee shall
hereby be created to assist the political parties in scheduling
said debates.
b. This section shall not be interpreted to mean that
X; debates are required of the presidential candidates.
11.2. The committee shall be known as the Student Body
Presidential Debates Advisory Committee.
b. It shall be composed of the following individuals: the
President of the Student Body who shall serve as Chairman,
the President of Women's Inter-Hall Council, the President
of Mens Inter-Hall Council, and one representative from
each political party, who shall be certified in writing by
the chairmen of the respective political parties. The
Secretary of Interior shaH serve as Non-voting secretary
to the Committee.
11.3. The advisory committee shall meet no sooner than
16 days before the election; the exact time and place shaH
be determined by the chairman and published in the Florida
Alligator at least three days prior to the meeting.
11.4. The duly authorized representatives of the political
parties shall have the power to determine the number of
debates to be held during the campaign while in the presence
of the other members of the committee. M
b. The full committee shall not have the power to force
any party to participate in any minimum number of debates.
c. The full committee shall have the power to designate
the sponsorships of the various debates after the
representatives of the political parties have decided on the
number of debates to be held, if any.
11.5. The candidates shall not be limited to the debates
arranged for by this committee, nor shall they be obligated M
to participate in any additional debates after the original
arrangements are agreed to by their representatives in the
committee meeting.
b. Should the political parties or their candidates agree
to additional formal, prearranged, publicized debates aside
from those scheduled in the com mittee meeting, the chairman
of each party shall notify the Editor of the Florida Alligator
and the Secretary of Interior at least two (2) days prior
to said debate.
c. The notification shall take the form of a written state statement
ment statement of the time, place, and sponsorship of said additional
debate, and shall be signed by each party chairman. If
the statement does not contain the signatures of all the
party chairmen, an explanation must be attached, and the
Secretary of Interior shall immediately notify the party
chairman or chairmen who have not signed the statement
that said statement has been received. x|
d. No public prearranged debate between the candidates
which is publicized through the news media may be held
without compliance with one of the above procedures.
e. Failure to comply with this or any section of this X:
law shall be considered an election violation and may be
dealt with by the Board of Elections. £:
11.6. Organizations wishing to sponsor debates must
make this known to the Secretary of Interior in writing
or by the personal appearance of representatives of the
various organizations at the meeting of the full committee.
This procedure shall be followed in the original scheduling.
b. Should there be additional debates other than those
set up by the committee, there shall be no restrictions on
sponsorship, except that all sponsors must be bona fide X;
university organizations. :*:
c. In case of an emergency which would prevent a candi candidates
dates candidates attendance at a debate, the candidate must immediately &
notify the advisory committee that he cannot attend the X;
debate and the committee will then decide whether to cancel
or go or reschedule the debate and a spokesman
from the committee will attend the scheduled debate and
announce the decision.
11.7. A representative of the Alligator may be present
and report the pertinent information and shall print the
scheduled debates as determined by the committee. ;X
10 r>T *** **"> wy QOVT which It coaaMara ot>)*eUofuble.
Memo* B GUARANTEED, Mnd portion win b. ci**o wb.orrer P* > I*'
Florida Alligator will m* consider adjustments of paymw* tor aay adfarttooasant tarotrli* typ typocrapfalcal
ocrapfalcal typocrapfalcal .rrora or .rrereous insertion unless nottca Is tlren to th. Advarttsing Mana*ar within
(1) ooe day after advertisement appears.
Th. Florida iniptor .u] ut b. responsible tor more than owe Incorrect Insertion of an adr.rtis.ment
rea awmral ttmto. Nottceo lor correction mtmt ba fireo batore aeat laaarUoo.
T FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is tbs official student newspaper of the Uateereity <* Florida and Is
Published flat times waokly except daring May, Job. aad July whan It is published semi-weekly. Oely
editorials -preset the tyM of thetr anthers. The Alligator is entered as second class

Chairman Willard Williams.
The School Board, Williams
said, asked for a hearing before
final determination of the closure
of the program. Unknown to us,
the OEO had set up an informal
hearing, we had requested a hear hearing.
ing. hearing. The informal hearing would
have only been chit chat accord according
ing according to Williams, and we must
have a determination as soon as
possible.

Friday, July 16/ 1965/ The Florida Alligator

Headstart is a program to pre prepare
pare prepare pre-school children for the
first grade. There were 525 stu students
dents students in the program in Alachua
County under the direction of the
County School Board and operated
under a grant from the OEO.
Willard Williams, School Board
chairman, said the OEO notified
the board Tuesday that the pro program
gram program was to be suspended because
of discrimination.

ARTICLE IV
Suffrage, Elections, and
Qualifications for Office
Section 2. Time of Elections.
Two general elections will be
held each year: Fall elections
shall be held on the fourth
Thursday after first term
classes commence. Spring
elections shall be held on the
fifth Thursday after classes
commence for the first term
beginning after January 1.
Proposed change:
Section 2. Time of Elections.
Two general elections will be
held each year: Fall elections
shall be held on the fourth
Thursday after first term
classes commence. Spring
elections shall be held on the
fourth Thursday after classes
commence for the first term
beginning after January 1.

< Council
1 Approval
t
Pending
The Legislative Council will
consider passage of a
proposed constitutional
C amendment changing time of
( student government elections
in the spring trimester on
Tuesday, July 20. If the
proposed amendment is
approved on this second
reading it will be submitted
to the student body for refer refert
t Pending final approval also
at the meeting is the second
1 reading of an election law
( governing presidential
debates. The election law Is
enacted upon approval at the
upcoming meeting.

ABpt
Night
Humpty
Dmam pty
FRIDAY All pish
You Can Eat,
OLD-FASHIONED Hush Puppies,
FISH NIGHT Cole Slaw 97 s
5 PM 9 PM
Fresh Cedar Key Fish
HUM PTY DUMPTY
. V " ' ,
DRIVE-IN l RBAURAHT
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEALS
FR2-5387 310 N.W. 13th St.
I^_________-L.

Seven classrooms at Duval Ele Elementary
mentary Elementary School were not included
in the suspension.
The staff at Duval includes white
teachers, but no white students.
However, the School Board also
closed the program at Duval Ele Elementary
mentary Elementary because, according to
Williams, it was not feasible to
operate that segment separately.
Dr. Jack C. Evans, medical
director of the Childrens Clinic
at the UF Hospital and head doc doctor
tor doctor in the Headstart program said
he hopes to be able to finish the
program with those children that
have already been examined. The
program allocated S2O per child
for medical care. If the OEO will
release this amount the medical
program can continue, Evans said.
Williams said, The United
States government has yet to tell
us who objected to the running of
our project.
Rev. T. A. Wright, president of
the Gainesville chapter of the
NAACP said his group, CORE and
Voters for Equal Rights had pre presented
sented presented the complaints to the OEO.
Wright said that the Superinten Superintendent
dent Superintendent of the Alachua County School
Board had previously stated that
about 200 Negro teachers would be
eliminated and replaced by white
teachers over a Deriod of time.
Wright also said he hopes the
school board and the OEO will be
able to arrive at a compromise in
the hearing today. If not, however,
he said a- Gainesville group will
apply for the program and will use
churches for classrooms.
Williams said he believed this
group would be able to meet the
requirements of the OEO. I dont
think that it takes very much to
meet the requirements, the main
one is forced integration.
ALLIAMCE
TV SERVICE
Fast, Expert Service
on all makes
TELEVISION
RADIO
STEREO
10% DISCOUNT
on parts to all
U of F students
817 W. Univ Ave
Phone 376-9955

Page 5

WHY? I
Whi
University
Gardens?
HERE'S WHY
* Private patio, balcony
* Large recreation room
* Twin pools, sun decks
* Tennis, handball courts I
* Cabana club
* Bar-B-Q, picnic area
* Over 18 beautiful acres!
* Four-acre lake
* Preserved natural setting!
* Laundry facilities
* Separate apt. storage I
* Central air conditioning I
* Individual central heat
* Central TV antenna
* Sound-proofed walls
* Spacious-plus rooms
* Hotpoint appliances
* Ceramic tile baths
* Oversized walk-in closet!
* Sliding glass doors
* Formica cabinets
* Wall-to-wall carpeting I
* Oak dining room floors
* Limousine service to UF I
ONE-BEDROOM APTS. I
FROM sllO MONTHLY I
TWO-BEDROOM APTS.
FROM $l3O MONTHLY I
EACH APARTMENT HAS I
HOTPOINT
ELECTRIC APPLIANCES I
IN MODERN KITCHENS!
Opening Sept. 1
Gainesvilles
BEST
and
NEWEST
Rental
Apartment
Value
700
S.W. 16th Ave.
1/2 Mi. From UF Campus I
For Further Information, 1
Col 376-4720



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 16, 1965

Page 6

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for rent r
NEW Air-conditioned furnlshec
apartment. 3 blocks from campus.
Available August Ist. Call 2-0208
at noon or after 5 p.m. (B-157-
3t-c).
AVAILABLE NOW UNTIL
SEPTEMBER Ist with reduction
In rent. Small 1 bedroom
furnished apartment. Water
furnished. Near campus. FR 6-
8819. (B-157-2t-c).
NEW MODERN, 1 bedroom apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Fully furnished, central air
and heat. Private enclosed patio.
Paved parking. 427 SE Bth St.
Call 372-2864. (B-157-lt-c).
SEVEN-ROOM, 3 bedroom house.
1 block from campus. Fully furn furnished.
ished. furnished. Fireplace. Attic playroom.
1226 SW 3rd Ave. $l5O month.
372-2864. (B-157-lt-c).
LARGE ROOM, Air-conditioned,
private bath. Other room double or
single, share bath. Quiet home for
graduate students. 105 NW 7th
Terrace. 372-0809. (B-157-3t-p).
KIRKLAND APARTMENTS.
Rooms for male students. See
Tuesday or Thursday afternoons
or weekends at 1602 NW Ist Ave.
Contact Jim Hodge, FR 6-9345.
(B-157-ts-c).
APARTMENT Completely furn furnished.
ished. furnished. One bedroom, swimming
pool, all electric kitchen, central
heat, air-conditioning. S9O per
month. Available immediately.
Couple preferred. 372-3826. (B (B---127-ts-c).
--127-ts-c). (B---127-ts-c).
1 BEDROOM LAKE Cottage. Lake
privileges. Lake Wlnnot 22 miles
from Gainesville. S4O per month.
372-0481, Mr. Kaplan (B-155-
3t-c).
SMALL FURNISHED CCB cottage.
Bedroom, electric kitchen, tile
shower. Linda Ann Court, south
on Ocala Road. 376-5826. (B (B---155-3t-nc).
--155-3t-nc). (B---155-3t-nc).
f -1 ----- - - -
FURNISHED Apartment, 4 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, 1 bath. Air-conditioned. 220
SE 7th St. $l5O per month. Ideal
for 5 students. 372-0481, Mr.
Kaplan. Please phone after 9 p.m.
(B-156-st-c).
FURNISHED Apartment, 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, 1 bath. Downtown location.
Ideal for 3 or 4 students. SIOO
per month for 2 trimesters $75
per month year round. 372-0481,
Mr. Kaplan. Please phone after
9 p.m. (B-156-st-
VISITING FRESHMEN
After you determine your courses (CEH 131, CPS 121,
etc.)/ you can avoid the September textbook rush if you
ORDER YOUR BOOKS NOW
Just mail the blank below. We'll send your books
to your home, C.O.D.
NAME
ADDRESS
COURSES
Malones Book & Sopply
1712 W. University Ave. Ph. 372-0368

for rent
JNFURNISHED 3 bedroom, 2 bath.
Built-in oven and range, carport,
screened porch. Air-conditioned.
$135 per month. 1 year lease.
1804 NW 38th Terr., 372-0481,
Mr. Kaplan. Please phone after
9 p.m. (B-156-st-c).
SMALL Furnished house with 2
bedrooms and bath. Green alum,
siding, 1954 NW 34th Ave. $75 per
month. Call FR 2-3251 after 6
p.m. (B-155-ts-c).
AIR CONDITIONED HOUSES
LEASING NOW FOR SEPTEMBER
3 or 4 males or females. Call
Charlie Mayo, FR 6-4471, Mary
- Moeller Realty. (B-156-6t-c).
help wanted
SECRETARY WANTED. Due to
graduation, one of our better
secretaries will be leaving and we
will need a replacement around
- August 7th. Replacement must be
well-founded in shorthand and
typing and willing to apply self
to Job. Above average salary for
experienced secretary. Will fill
position with first qualified appli applicant.
cant. applicant. Write or phone for interview.
Scruggs & Carmichael, 3 SE Ist
Ave. 376-5242. (E-152-10t-c).
CASHIERS: If you have had
experience as a cashier and in interested
terested interested in part-time or full-time
work. Contact FLORIDA BOOK
STORE, W. University Avenue.
Phone 376-6066. (E-156-3t-c).
Pride And Power
Award-Winning §
Performance In
"The Bridge On JKL
The River Kwai^^HMH|
ALEC GUINNESS
JOHN MILLS.
- TUNES OF
GLORY ~
7~echn/colqr if Mm
Sun.-Tues. HrtU7
1,3,5,7,9

services
wanted
MDERS NORTH to Boston (via
New York City) about August 13.
Contact: Jim Bryant, 359 Thomas,
2-9167. (C-157-ts-c).
A FEW HUNDRED more hungry
budget minded students to enjoy
SPUDNUTS DONUT SHOP, 1017
W. Univ. Open every night till
midnight. (C-140-ts-c).
DESPERATELY Need ride to
Philadelphia or South Jersey in
August. Call Don after 9 p.m. at
8-2193. (C-150-tf-nc).
PERSON to drive car to Chicago
on August 1. Expenses paid. FR
2-5832. (C-156-3t-c).

I Tonile |
I EXCITING I
I | 2400 Hawthorn* Hoad 'RK2O- Hoot FR 6*oll \ |y| ew Hits! I
I I
m
I BlfuiEiKvr |
I H TU P TD A IKI" -IT WILL CARRY YOU TO I
I IIIE I H,A4IIIW THE PEAK OF ADVENTURE! I
I HIT *2 BRING THE LITTLE WOMAN..I
I BHWI SHE'LUXE LAUGHING I
I MURDER I
| YOUR WIFE' |
I JMUfIJgW I
I nusi fm tie no; U- flj I

IN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios. 372-0300. (M (M---153-ts-c).
--153-ts-c). (M---153-ts-c).

Save with Budget* Rent-A-Car:
c
a full 24-hoar day ^Handle*
only
the gas you use.
The cars are the same! The price is the difference!
/ (Same Insurance Coverage)
Corvair Monza jSEf
Businessmen and Students know jmf WWEf. 'vf:
the importance of keeping expenses HI /'S'
down. So does Budget. Thats why EVEITM -nhw
our rates are less. You can save up
to by calling Budget!
CALI 378-1010
f ' k -p d Deliv r 527 W. Univ. Ave.
Badge!* Rent-A-Car of (Trailways Bus Terminal) I
Cj dinOSVillO OlW .UO.IT MNT-.-C*.

NEED TYPING DONE? ierm (
papers, letters, and application'
forms. Call Reba Stone, 2-1397
after 5 p.m. (M-154-3t-


services
PROFESSIONAL TYPING In my
home. Call Carol Parker anytime,
2-6353. (M-157-2t-c).
IRONING DONE IN MY HOME.
Call FR 6-4086. (M-149-Bt-c).
real estate
4 BEDROOM, 2 bath, double car carport,
port, carport, built-in range and oven.
Seller to pay all closing cost.
Only $450 down, only $96.98 per
month.lo6 -NW 38th Terr. 372-
0481, Mr. Kaplan for appointment
to show. Please phone after 9
p.m. (I-156-st-c).
CAROL ESTATES Air
conditioned, 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
screened porch, central heat % s4oo
cash, $93/month. 1942 NE 16th
Terr. Phone 372-5893. (1-157-
ts-c).

"Full of intense emotional feeling. Doubt that
the average person would enjoy the picture."
STUDENT 4BA
LAST TIMES SATURDAY a scene I
thats bizarre, to say the least, the hero heroines
ines heroines scream is a scream of horror but
also a scream of ecstasy." time magazine
for sales
Sfipwe/i JCmKs
. A TAANe-LUK
Winner of 3 Onrush Film Feilnud Anerdi
Beit Dnmih Film of the Year
Beil Female Performer Beit Abide Performer
I*3*s*7*9
From the beginning,
they knew it was wrong....
nothing could
J>/ I jp jjp
ELIZABETH TAYLOR
RICHARD BURTON
EVA MARIE SAINT
[COLOR] %e.£cmd/upo /
1:00, 3:11, 5:22,
7:33, 9:44

real estate
L
BUILT-IN Kitchen, 3 bedroom,
1 1/2 bath, CCB, terazzo floors.
Corner lot. Best offer and assume
FHA mortgage. 1446 NE 21st Ave.
376-1435. (I-157-4t-c).
WHY PAY RENT? Own your own
duplex. Live in one side and rent
from other side pays mortgage
payment. Perfect for college
couple who will be here 2 years
or more. We have several with
flexible terms. Call Wayne Mason
c/o Ernest Tew Realty, 376-6461.
(I-155-6t-c).
BY OWNER in NW section. 3 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, built-in kitchen
with walk-in pantry, family room
with fireplace, separate dining
room, laundry room. Central heat
and air-conditioning. Littlewood-
Westwood area. $21,500. 3706 NW
22nd Place. Phone 372-5344. (I (I---1
--1- (I---1 st-c).

real estate
HOUSE FOR SALE OR RENT.
124 SE 39th Street. No down
payment. FR 6-3668. (I-154-ts-c).
autos
BEAUTIFUL 1961 PONTIAC
CATALINA CONVERTIBLE.
Radio, white walls, new nylon top.
Perfect condition. S4OO down and
take over my low monthly pay payments
ments payments or $1225 cash. Call 376-
8863. (G-157-ts-c).
1962 CORVAIR MONZA sport
coupe, automatic transmission,
bucket seats, radio. LOW
MILEAGE. Will trade for older
car or motorcycle. Call 376-8863.
(G-157-lt-c).
1958 IMPALA V-8. Automatic,
radio & heater. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Call 372-0450, after 5 p.m.
(G-157-lt-c).
GETTING MARRIED, must sell
1960 MORRIS MINOR. 51,500
miles. Extras. Super clean. One
owner. $350. 1835 NW sth Ave.
376-0522. (G-157-3t-c).
LEAVING COUNTRY, Selling
classic XK-140 Jaguar roadster.
White with red interior. C Head,
wire wheels, radio and heater.
Excellent condition. 378-1119. (G (G---157-3t-c).
--157-3t-c). (G---157-3t-c).
1962 MG MIDGET. Red. Radio,
heater, new white wall tires. MUST
SELL NOW! Good condition. S9OO.
FR 8-2105 after 2 p.m. (G-157-
3t-c).
MUST SELL, leaving country. *64
F-85 Olds deluxe station wagon.
Factory air-conditioning, ps, r & h.
Excellent condition. 412 NW 17th
St. 6-1994. (G-157-lt-c).
1963 ENGLISH FORD COUNSUL.
Low miles. Sharp condition. Must
seU. SBSO. Call FR 2-3251 after
6 p.m. (G-155-ts-c).
-tm- --
1960 AUSHN-HEALY Sprite. New
paint, new tires. Reduced for quick
sale. Call Wayne, 2-5374 after 7
p.m. (G-155-3t-c).
1954 CHEVY. Good transportation.
SIOO. Call 372-5396 between 12
and 2 or after 7 p.ro/G-156-3t-c).
I FUNLAND I
I AMUSEMENT CENTER I
lOll W. Univ., 2 blocks from I
campus where students meet I
|FO^^CREAT^QIj|
I MOTORCYCLES I
I For The Discriminating I
I CYCLERAMA I
l37B^Bl^lSyn^lJ|
SUBURBIA
DRIVE-IN
iBJIfcMDI
H |in COLUMBIA COLOB | /It
"Bye Bye BlriBe
Sun-Mon-Tues 7/18,19,2C
[ "Cinderella
ALSO
"Roustabout"
Elvis Presley-in Color
Starts Wed., July 21
"Mary Poppins
-

Friday, July 16, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

personal
I.Q. 98 or 99 percentile? Meet
Mensa at Wauburg, Sunday 3 p.m.
Information and screening there.
(J-157-lt-c).
WILL THE GUY with the *64
Pontiac please call Don again at
8-2193. I lost your name and
number. (J-155-tf-nc).
TEN A FAFARD would like to
inform all her friends she is now
with Rame*, 319 W. Univ. Avenue,
Phone 372-5549. Specializing in
hair coloring, cutting natural curly
hair, also specializes in childrens
hair cuts. (J-157-ts-c).
RIDER WANTED to Boca Raton
area at end of trimester. Contact:
Arnold M. Kramer, P. O. Box
#541, East Palatka, Florida 32031.
(J-157-3t-c).
Is the Bent Card REALLY an
Administration Front Activity?
Are we REALLY a Safe Free Freedom
dom Freedom Forum?** Who Knows? Who
cares? For the answers to these
burning issues, dont miss the
next exciting installment THIS
WEEKEND 9 p.m. 1826 West
University Avenue. (J-157-lt-c).
STUDENT SPECIALS noon and
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The World of Cinema
A Stranger Knocks 9
Sexual Controversy
%

By DON FEDERMAN
Movie Reviewer
Amidst all the plaudits the
States current flic, the Danish
A Stranger Knocks, received, I
beg to disagree most vociferously.
And what I intend to say is more
a comment on lady-fingered New
York reviewers and their public
than on this film which is pretty
obviously a classic exemplum
(perhaps parody is a better word
for those with a lighter frame of
mind) of third-rate art films.
As some of you may know, the
current film had to be cleared by
the U. S. Supreme Court. The
film contained two scenes which
were more awkward than shocking,
and which suggested rather than
revealed (as if anything startingly
different can be revealed to
Americans, so starved for
sensationalism they are). In this
case, this movie had the nerve
to demonstrate (and please no
blushing from the purients) that
women CAN have orgasm (nat (naturally,
urally, (naturally, then, this movie could
ONLY surprise Americans with its
daring). Actually, assuming
one musters the proper sexual
attitude, the movie, rather than
being the sex shocker of the
year (Time), becomes in these
two scenes the sex disappoint disappointment
ment disappointment of the year much in the
manner of middle class
dutemesence since they are so
poorly executed, what with a
womans bath robe flying open
revealing (gasp) a naked thigh
(but then thighs are naked in their
natural state, arent they?). One,
thus, is tempted to think this
Supreme Court battle was a
publicity scheme to promote a
tired art film.
As for the rest of the movie,
one wonders whether director
Jacobsen ever learned how to make
a movie. Hie plot is somewhat
interesting (granted) a woman
falls in love with a stranger and
then discovers he (now her lover)
killed her husband. The movie
thus becomes (or intends to) a

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study of the effects of love and
hate on a personality and how the
struggle produces morally
regrettable acts (the plot is
paralleled with the development
of a free-will-determinism argu argument,
ment, argument, an irony being introduced in
that the woman, in finally seeking
retribution, gives credence to the
deterministic arguments of her
lover these the best scenes
of the movie, by the way).
Nevertheless, so much of the
drama, the lines, the movements,
the photography, even the humor,
is just so much cliche with little
continuity (a movie of scenes
rather than something organic).
Chief objection is the
melodramatic music score which
needlessly underscores the action
proper (it reminds me of a 1930s
orchestral arrangement of an
organ soap opera score). The
second objection refers to photo photography
graphy photography (not an imm aginative bone
in the directors body). Time and
again, the camera is improperly
positioned and creates the most
painful effects (e.g. the scenes
of the radio broadcast, the
ridiculous close-up recognition of
the wedding ring, or the sudden
shift to a waist shot to record
for posterity he holding her hand
for the first time). UGHIt! Then
take the comic scene how
contrived and how out-of-mood. In
fact, nothing seems to work in
this movie.
So, in short, where lies the
appeal? This is only speculation,
but best bet lies in the fact that
our American critics are always
being completely snowed by the
slightest mention of sex (oh my
God, theres that word again!).
As for the public, this drama of
passion offers hope for end endlessly
lessly endlessly patient husbands and
timid, somewhat frightened, and
thoroughly ambivalent women
that they need no longer pine away
for orgasm. Also, it gives some
theologians a stay of execution.
And thus the moral of this
review? Stop pining!

Page 7



The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 16, 1965

Page 8

UF Cagers Win 3; Sophs Pace Swimmers

Before the start of the roundball
season, prospects looked bright for
the best Gator basketball season
in a long time.
As head UF hoop coach Norman
Sloan said, Well just have to
wait until the season begins to see
who has improved the most
Florida or the rest of the South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference.
The Gators were scheduled to
open the season with a starting
lineup blessed with a smooth blend
of experience and youth.
Three outstanding Gator
veterans, Tom Baxley, Brooks
Henderson, and Dick Tomlinson
joined Paul Morton and Bob
Hoffman as the major returnees.
Two sophomores were slated to
start for the Gators home opener,
against Virginia Military Institute?
Jeff Ramsey and Gary Keller, both
from Dixie Hollins High in St.
Petersburg. Ramsey, center, stood
6-10, while Keller, a forward,
towered at 6-9.
Hoffman 6-8 and Morton 6-4,
both juniors, could be counted on
to help shore up the forward wall.
Despite a field goal shooting
percentage of only 32%, UF puUed
away from a 44-44 tie with VMI
to win, 68-59, in Florida Gym.
Henderson and Baxley salvaged the
game with some last-minute clutch
shooting. Each scored 17 points to
lead the Gators. Ramsey led the
rebounders with eight.
A coming of age for our
sophomores, was what Sloan
termed the Gator cagers 90- 57 rout
of the Stetson Hatters, Saturday
December 5, at Florida Gym.
Keller and Ramsey both scored
17 points. Keller grabbed 13 re rebounds
bounds rebounds and Ramsey collected 10.
The Gators next faced their first
road tilt of the year Wednesday,
December 9, at Tallahassee.
Florida State threw a slowdown
offense against the high-scoring
Gators, and barely eked out a
victory, 51-50, furthercom furthercompoundlng
poundlng furthercompoundlng UF's miserable year
against the Seminoles.
UF turned South, toward Miami,
and Rick Barry. The All-America

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THIRD OF A SERIES

ace proved too much for Keller
or the shorter Tomlinson to
handle, and Miami scrapped their
way to a 67-58 victory.
Hie Gators returned home to
duel North Carolina and its All-
America, Bill Cunningham, on
December 21. A vacation-depleted
crowd saw UF pull an impressive
upset, walloping the Tar Heels, 73-
54. Keller led all scorers with 24
points.
The Gator roundbaUers had
compiled a spotty 3-2 mark, but
had shown flashes of brilliance.
Sophomores Keller and Ramsey
had shown they could be counted
on for the tough grind of SEC
play.
The Gator swim team, seeking
its 10th consecutive SEC swim
crown, opened its meet season with
a host of proven returnees and
numerous promising sophomores.
On January 8, the Gators copped
the years first meet, 51-43 over
Tulane. Sophomore Tom Dioguardi
was the big gun for UF, winning
the 50-yard freestyle (22.3) and
the 100-yard free (50.8), estab establishing
lishing establishing pool records in both
events.
The aqualads continued their
winning ways the following Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, giving Georgia a53 to 40
dunking. In all but one event a
pool, varsity or meet record was
broken. The team of Blanchard
Tual, Scott Edgett, captain Ray
Whitehouse and Tom Dioguardi set
a new meet and pool mark in the
400-yard Medley Relay.
Tual also broke the pool, varsity
and meet record in the 200-yard
backstroke. Charlie King tied the
meet record in the 200-yard indi individual
vidual individual medley and broke the meet
record in the 200-yard breast breaststroke.
stroke. breaststroke.
Dioguardi again paced the
record-breakers. He shattered the
pool, varsity, and meet marks in
the 100-yard freestyle, turning a
time of 48.2 seconds. This qualified
him for NCAA swim cham championships.
pionships. championships.
In Tuesdays Alligator: Success
in basketball.

GATOR YEAR IN REVIEW

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Senior guard Tom Baxley drives against North Carolina. The Gators
upset the Tarheels in mid-December to emerge as one of the better
teams in the south. N.C. was a pre-season top twenty pick.

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