Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Turlington: Man-of-The-Year

Reitz to Get Faculty Petition

A petition with seventy faculty signers will be
presented to UF Pres. J. Wayne Reitz Tuesday
morning. The petition seeks change in tenure
granting procedures.

Circulated throughout the fa faculty
culty faculty during the past year, the
petition requests individual col colleges
leges colleges or departments have the
the primary responsibility for
tenure granting.
The petition will be presented
by the recently formed Faculty*
Study Group. The group will act
as a midwife* 1 in the presenta presentation.
tion. presentation. The petition was brought to
their attention at their initial meet meeting
ing meeting Wednesday night and they
agreed to present it, not as its
sponsors but merely as a con conveying
veying conveying body.
According to Robert C. Berry,
assistant professor of law, who
is acting as temporary chair chairman
man chairman of the agenda committee, the
Group** is very interested in
the proposal and will study the
matter and take action at a later
date.
The petition mentions boradly
the questions of tenure granting
as brought to light in recent events
and seeks change in order that the
individual departments have a
greater responsibility for the
granting of tenure.
Currently tenure is usually given
to faculty members following the
recommendation of the depart department
ment department head, the dean of the college
and the UF personnel board to
the university president. The pre president
sident president then recommends the indi individual
vidual individual to the Board of Regents who
does the actual granting of tenure.
Under the petitions plan some of
the middle steps are Imped to be
eliminated.
The committee had originally
hoped to present the petition
Thursday but Dr. Reitz was re reported
ported reported out of town. They have made
an appointment for Tuesday after afternoon
noon afternoon to present the petition and an
accompaning letter.

New Christy Minstrels
r,
Will Star at Florida Frolics

Florida Frolics, an improved
and enlarged Summer Frolics, will
bring the New Christy Minstrels
to the Florida Gym Friday, July
16. The program will begin at
8:30 p.ro. and last approximately
two hours.
Admission is $1.50 per person.
Students from the UF will receive
privileged seating in the center
section of the gym floor. Anyone
else may attend for the same
admission price.
Tickets may be purchased at die
campus informational booth across
from the Hub. The booth will be
open July 5-9 from 2 to 4 p.m.
During the week of July 12-16,
the booth will be open from 1 to
5 p.m.
Tickets will also be available
at the Campus Club, the library,
and the College Inn.

Florida i

Vol. 57, No. 153.

SEVENTY SIGNERS SEEK CHANGES

Federal Govt.
Gives College
Large Grant
The U.S. Office of Education
has awarded three grants total totaling
ing totaling $1,130,312 to the UF College
of Engineering to finance cam campus
pus campus construction and help defray
costs of television instruction at
three off-campus graduate edu educators
cators educators sites.
The grants were announced by
Senators Spessard Holland, George
Smathers and Representative D.R.
Billy** Matthews. They are sub subjected
jected subjected to approval by the Board of
Regents at its July 19 meeting in
St. Petersburg.
The largest of the three grants
for $458,227wi1l be used to
finalize work on the television
link between the main campus
here and graduate engineering
classrooms in Cape Kennedy, Day Daytona
tona Daytona Beach and Orlando. The lat latter
ter latter three are part of the new
GENESYS (Graduate Engineering
Education System) program that
started last fall on a closed cir circuit
cuit circuit basis throughout the state.
Remaining grants Include $357,-
145 for coastal and materials en engineering
gineering engineering structures and a hydrau hydraulic
lic hydraulic research laboratory and $314,-
940 to go toward the cost at eight
additional buildings, shop equip equipment,
ment, equipment, housing offices, supplies and
teaching laboratories.
The awards were created by
Title II of the 1963 Higher Edu Education
cation Education Facilities Act. Another
grant request for $350,000 under
Title I of the same measure also
has been made to the U.S. Office
of Education.

The New Christy Minstrels are
known for their recording of the
song *' Today. Their latest album
contains songs from the movie
41 Mary Popplns. The group con consists
sists consists of 8 boys and 2 girls. Their
versatile arrangements make use
of mandolins, banjos, and guitars.
The event will receive publicity
throughout North Florida, from
Jacksonville to Orlando. Local
radio stations will be giving away
tickets beginning Sunday, and re representatives
presentatives representatives will be selling
tickets at high school dances in the
area.
The Legislative Council will vote
Tuesday night on a request for
SISOO to pay for part of the ex expense
pense expense of the program.
The measure has been passed
unanimously by the Budget and Fi Finance
nance Finance Committee.

MAN OF THE YEAR RALPH TURLINGTON

JbHb o' y & ' : -*&**'
THOMAS MARTIN

.Sjj
.SHRIHBA
WILLIAM CONWAY

Runners-Up

Honorable Mentions

Friday, July 2, 1965

Be m * Om ;
Km w
1
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E.T. YffRK

RAE O. WEIMER

Alligator
Picks Local
Representative

State Rep. Ralph Turlington of
Alachua County today was named
The Florida Alligators man-of man-ofthe-year.
the-year. man-ofthe-year.
Turlington was selected as the
person in Florida who has made
the greatest contribution to higher
education and the University of
Florida during the past fiscal
year.
The award is made annually by
the University's student newspaper
from nominations received
throughout the state.
The eight-term representative,
who was recently selected by his
legislative Collegues as the most
effective Florida House of Re Representatives
presentatives Representatives member during the
past consistent term, was elected
for the award as a result of his
effort to inform Florida's legis legislature
lature legislature of the pressing needs in
higher education/' Editor David
West said.
Runner-up awards went to Uni University
versity University of Florida Dean of
Engineering Thomas L. Martin for
his work in establishing the
GENESYS program for continuing
education for graduate students in
engineering via television in
Florida and to Provost of Agri Agriculture
culture Agriculture E.T. York for his work in
the DARE (Developing Agricultural
Resources Effectively) program.
Honorable mention went to Rae
O. Weimer, director of the school
of journalism and communication,
whose journalism department was
recognized as the top in the nation
in the Hearst Writing Contest this
year; and to William Conway for
his work as past president of the
UF Alumni Association.
Sam Mase of the St. Peters Petersburg
burg Petersburg Times received an honorable
mention in the newspaper cata catagory
gory catagory for his recent series of arti articles
cles articles probing the complexities fac facing
ing facing a large university and its
students.
Turlington, graduated with
honors from the University of
Florida and received his Masters
Degree from Harvard. While at
UF in 1940, he won the Intramural
Debate Trophy. A leader in student
government, he was on the Exe Executive
cutive Executive Council and the Florida
Union Board of Managers.
Turlington was a member of the
University of Florida faculty for
2-1/2 years before pursuing his
political interests. In the house of
Representatives he has received
many honors and leadership
awards.
In 1963 he was given the Allen
Morris Award for being a member
of the most effective three man
delegation. He was named as one
of the ten most valuable members
of the House in that year also.
The editors of the daily news newspapers
papers newspapers of Florida voted him as the
Runner-up for the roost valuable
member.
Dr. York not only began DARE
he also established the first re research
search research and training center for
tropical agriculture in the UJ3.
He has also found and attracted
outstanding faculty members and
has educated and persuaded legis legislative
lative legislative bodies as to foe unfulfilled
needs of foe Agricultural Sciences
Departments. He has unified and
improved the quality of UF edu education
cation education and Agricultural research
programs.
At the request of the Peace
(See 'Turlington' P. 2)



l, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 2, 1965

Page 2

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MAN OF THE YEAR
Ralph Turlington receives plaque and congra congratulations
tulations congratulations from Alligator Editor David West,

For
BUSINESS MANAGER
FLORIDA W FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR I^WaLLIBATOR
RALPH TURLINGTON
WMUCATUMI
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Gator Party
THE POSTERS DONT CHANGE
An old campaign poster of Turlington when
he sought the position of business manager of
The Florida Alligator. He was successful In his
bid,
Soo Whats ** #w ,B
The Browse Shop
WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATURE Roberts
EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHICAL RESEARCH Thouless
UNPOPULAR ESSAYS Bertrand Russell
THE PUBLIC ARTS 7. Gilbert Selden
SHAKESPEARE'S SONGS AND POEMS
EDUCATION AND LIBERTY James Conant
%
TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
SOLID STATE THEORY... Sachs
ELEMENTS OF NUMERICAL ANALYSIS Henrici
MATHEMATICS MA NUAL Merritt
Campus Shop & Bookstore

Turlington

. (Continued From P. I)
Corps, the University of Florida Floridawith
with Floridawith Dr. York as coordinator coordinatortrained
trained coordinatortrained a group of volunteers in
agriculture and community deve development.
lopment. development.
Thru Dean Martins leadership
and guidance of the GENESYS pro program
gram program six new buildings and fac facilities
ilities facilities were completed at Cape
Kennedy, Daytona Beach and
Orlando and a television studio
and classrooms were installed at
Gainesville. Dean Martin also thru
a faculty improvement program,
obtained 36 new faculty members
for the UF College of Engineering
in 1964, All of these men hold a
PhJ) degree.
Also because of Dean Martins
efforts the College of Engineering
has received -$700,000 in match matching
ing matching funds from the National Science
Foundation; four Health, Education,
and Welfare facilities proposals
have been favorably received and
are awaiting action next fall; and
a $6.2 million building program
has been started with the award
of $5,354,000 construction con contract
tract contract for six new buildings.
William Conway has devoted
many houffe of his time during the
past twenty years toward the
betterment of the University of
Florida and higher education within
the State of Florida,
He served as the President of
the University of Florida Alumni
Association in Orange County in
1948 subsequent to serving all
other offices in the Orange County
Club. He organized the Gator Boos Boosters
ters Boosters Club of Orange County and
directed its activities for five
years. He also organized the Uni University
versity University of Florida Alumni Associa Association
tion Association of Volusia County and the Gator
Boosters dubs of Daytona Beach
and Volusia County.
Weimer, who has headed the
CJF's School of Journalism
ind Communications was cited for
lis department and his concepts in
raining undergraduates in jour journalism.
nalism. journalism. The nomination said Wei Weimers
mers Weimers emphasis on the under undergraduate
graduate undergraduate program was an example
which was paid off for the UF.

PIZZA PALACE SPECIAL
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25$ off on Small PIZZA Cheese Pizza 10$ off on Small
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OVEN FRESH DELIVERY
PHONES 372-1655 372-1546
OPEN AT 4 PM
608 N.W. 13th Street
The None that Made Pizza miff

Dr. Martin Appointed
To Advisory Group

Dr. Thomas L. Martin Jr*, dean
of the College of Engineering, has
been appointed to serve on the
National Academy of Sciences ad advisory
visory advisory committee to the Office of
Emergency Planning.
Academy President Frederick
Seitz announced Dean Martin's ap appointment
pointment appointment yesterday.
The committee was formed re recently
cently recently t o discharge respon responsibilities
sibilities responsibilities that the Academy has
accepted at the request of the di director
rector director of the Office of Emergency
Planning. Dr. Carl F. Prutton,
chemical engineer from Ocala, is
committee chairman.
The OEP plays a critical role in

Richer Case Extended

An extension in the Edward J.
Richer case has been granted b>
the UF Senate Committee on Aca Academic
demic Academic Tenure and Freedom.
Fletcher N. Baldwin and Stanley
K. Laughlin, representing Richer,
will submit their brief in the case
on July 9. The original deadline
was June 28.
The committee in its hearing
on June 8 ruled that the com complaint
plaint complaint was not sufficient for com committee
mittee committee action. Richer was given an
opportunity to amend the com complaint.
plaint. complaint.

rn
LAST (very important prices) I
DAY! v>^|
cotton rOp Fashion Event]
LINENS T / VJ /
IMPORTED laces 9 AM-5:30 PM J
RE EMBRO 100% Irish Linen /(
\ / GoilGuynn's
HffiSSa PrtrtS i POt POURRI
100% silk prints y 2407 SW 13th St.
Dacron,. Cotton prints Register for Drawing!
RHODIA Yarn (Silk) Prints CDCC
At Special FREE Course in
Low Prices Sewing and Knitting!
SPECIAL "Sari" Lengths We have hired TWO MORE DRESS DRESSMODE
MODE DRESSMODE LGARMEN lb On Display MAKERS to serve you better! Now
COFFEE, TEA served at the shop FULL TIME

UJS. Planning for recovery intht
event of a major national disaster
resulting from an attack or from
natural causes. The committee will
undertake critical study and*
careful preparation in the areas of
construction, materials, com communications,
munications, communications, physics, manufact manufacting,
ing, manufacting, power and fuels, food, trans transportation,
portation, transportation, automation and be behavioral
havioral behavioral psychology.
The National Academy of
Sciences is the nation's highest
ranking professional society whose
membership is restructed to a
select group of men chosen for
their achievements in original
scientific and engineering
research.

Robert J. Farley, representing
the UF, is not teaching B-term
and will have to be called back to
Gainesville for the presentation.
Ernest M. Jones, Academic Ten Tenure
ure Tenure and Freedom committee chair chairman,
man, chairman, said a committee meeting
will be called the week of July 12,
Teaches Here
Dr* Dudley E. South, professor
of mathematics at Florida Presby Presbyterian
terian Presbyterian College In St* Petersburg,
is serving as visiting professor
of mathematics at the University of
Florida tills summer*



Fun Slated at July 4 Playday

The guy with the golden legs
will be chosen midst the palm and
pine by the edge of UF*s Camp
Wauburg Sunday during July 4

has just completed supervision of a senior semi seminar
nar seminar session researching the life and works of
American painter Balcomb Greene. Twenty
of Greens canvases go on display at the Uni University
versity University Gallery Saturday through Aug. 1. Students
in the seminar include (left to right) Erik
Speyer, Joyce Bleidner(seaied), and Amy Mahar.

1/4 1/2
...on a large group of
Suits
Sportcoats
Trousers
Shirts
Swim Wear
All items arc from our
seasonal selection of fine
apparel for men
and young men.
ffiHHsraa dDBB
number 6 main street south

FIREWORKS AT EVENING PROGRAM

Playday, sponsored by the Florida
Union Board for Student Activities.
Swimming, boating, picnicking
and canoe jousting will be among

the planned recreational activities.
Pony rides for the children will
also be offered.
Another feature of tne afternoon
will be a new-style beauty con contest
test contest in which a panel of all-girl
judges will chose the Florida Man
with the shapeliest legs.
Fireworks will explode during
the evening festivities in the
Stadium, beginning at 7:30. State
Attorney General Earl Faircloth
will speak at the evening program.
We expect more than 1,500
people to attend this Playday. It
is especially oriented to the fam family,
ily, family, but there will be activities for
everyone,** Ed Koren, 2UC, chair chairman
man chairman of the Union Board recreation
committee, said.
This is the fifth July 4th Play Playday
day Playday and, although the previous ones
were highly successful, we are
hoping for an even bigger turn-out
this year,** Koren said.
Union Board activities chairman
Ken Levine said, This years
Playday is aimed not only as a
spectator event, but primarily a
participant event.**
Smithsonian
Exhibit
On Display
A display of commemorative
Japanese postage stamps and the
Smithsonian Institutions exhibit
of Pakistan stone rubbings is being
shown at the Florida Union through
July 30.
The stamps were placed in the
Unions north wing gallery by the
Japan Society, Inc. The stone rub rubbings
bings rubbings are in Bryan Lounge.
Most of the 49 rubbings are the
work of Mrs. E.J.W. Bunting and
the remainder were done by Mrs.
Martha P. Caldwell from 1959
until 1962.
Tim decorations are divided into
three categories of subject matter:
jewelry, arms, people and ani animals;
mals; animals; geometric designs and cali caligraphy.
graphy. caligraphy. Rubbings were taken from
carvings on Muslim tombs, dating
from about 1400-1800 AJ}., located
in the lower Sind Valley and along
the Makran coast of West Pakistan.

PATRONIZE
GATOR
ADVERTISERS

fr that Ive got
yoer undivided attention...
Face it, baby. University Gardens offers
the coolest pads in G'ville: All new apart apartments
ments apartments with spacious rooms, walk-in closets;
individual central air conditioning and heat;
Hotpoint appliances; wall-to-wall carpeting;
tile baths, patios and balconies; twin pools;
handball and tennis courts; limousine service
the half-mile to campus; barbecue pits and a
picnic area; 18 beautiful landscaped acres to
call home...and all within walking distance
of shopping centers, schools, churches. They
open Sept. 1, and guys and dolls who like to
live in style economically are calling up
376-6720 for reservations NOW I
1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS FROM sllO
2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS FROM £] JQ
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ITT!TIj9 .ill I iISBUI 16th AVE

Friday, July 2, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

PLAYDAY BUS SCHEDULE
Tolbert 12:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00
Murphree 12:05 1:05 2:05 3:05 4:05 5:05
Corry Village 12:10 1:10 2:10 3:10 4:10 5:10
Jennings 12:15 1:15 2:15 3:15 4:15 5:15
Wauburg 12:30 1:30 2:30 3:30 4:30 5:30

-- /V : wg?
V\ Jy 4
/ ggi i i* a j
1,,,- B
L. K.
BMy& .jf"
1
kfl
I
Bruce
Culpepper, left foreground, and helpers dis distribute
tribute distribute watermelon slices to the crowd at the
Summer Gator Bands pre-Independence Day
Twilight Concert Wednesday night in front of
University Auditorium.

Bids Opened For New
Human Development Center

Bids for construction of Phase I
of the University of Floridas Cen Center
ter Center for Human Development were
opened Wednesday with Stobe Con Construction
struction Construction Company of Miami the
apparent low bidder at $898,400.
The new construction at the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center will
consist of a Childrens Mental
Health Unit which will concentrate
on in-patient and out-patient care
of children with psychiatric prob problems;
lems; problems; a developmental clinic, a
perinatal (cq) clinical research
unit and pertinent laboratories.
The state has appropriated
$500,000, matched by $502,000 in
federal funds, for construction of
the first phase.
A contract is expected to be let

NOTICE

Succession Law
Be it hereby enacted by the
Legislative Council that the
Secretary of Finance shall
succeed to the office of Trea Treasurer
surer Treasurer of the Student Body
should that office become va vacant.
cant. vacant.

within 30 days and construction of
the addition to University Hospital
should begin by mid-August.
Bid opening brings the Univers University
ity University Hospital a step closer to meet meeting
ing meeting the pressing need for an in inpatient
patient inpatient psychiatric service for
emotionally distrubed children in
Florida.
The Center for Human Develop Development
ment Development is based on an Increasing
belief among doctors and re researchers
searchers researchers that many diseases are
the result of a series of events,
often dating from birth or even
sooner. In attempting to trace
the gradual development of
diseases, the Center will bring
together all the basic sciences con concerned
cerned concerned with human development developmentincluding
including developmentincluding such fields as the social
sciences and education.
Phases II and in, now in plan planning
ning planning stages, will provide additional
space for investigating the whole of
human development process from
pre-natal stages to old age, includ including
ing including such problems as birth defects,
mental retardation and behavioral
development.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 2, 1965

EDITORIAL
Confidential
The Alligator has been critical of the UF*s
infirmary We have stated there is a lack of
confidence in the infirmary by the student
Recently Florida State University*s student
newspaper carried a story of a seven-month
fetus that was found in the trash chute of a
girVs dormitory.
The purpose of this editorial is not to shock shockbecause
because shockbecause similiar things probably could if not
have, happened at the UF and most students
realize the potential.
The purpose is to somewhat attempt to dispel
a lack of confidence in the UF infirmary in
matters of coed pregnancies and other confi confidential
dential confidential matters.
At FSU t the coed did not wish to reveal her
pregnancy for fear of social recriminations or
university disciplinary action, or one of hundreds
of other reasons.
It is comforting to find that at the UF,
matters of pregnancy of coeds are at least not
subject to any University disciplinary action.
It has been reported that such matters are
ted as not one of the Student Affairs office
b are treated as a medical matter to be
handled quietly and confidentially between the
doctor and patient.
In their handling of such matters the UF
infirmary has and will, we have been assured,
treat the relationship in the strictest confidence.
The position of the University is equally clear.
Dean of Student Affairs Lester L. Hale told
The Alligator yesterday that matters of confi confidence
dence confidence such as pregnancies if the coed so
desires are not requested by his office.
They are not wanted and it would be considered
a breach of ethics for us to receive one.
We applaud the attitude of the infirmary and
the dean f s office in the matter.
Earlier this week we reported that the infir infirmary
mary infirmary does not have 24 hour doctor service.
This is not entirely factual. Beginning last fall
the infirmary has a person qualified to dispense
medicine and treatment in the building at all
times. Dr. Hall, head of the infirmary, explained
that some students have been misled because
a nurse might sometimes be over-protected of
the doctor sleeping upstairs during the evening.
However, during the school terms, any person
can simply walk into the infirmary anytime
and say I want to see a doctor and the student
will see one.
This is the official policy f And we believe
it to be a good one.
Th Florida AliKator nmnm the light to ragalato the typographical tone of all adrertUemanta and
to rartaa or tan away copy which It eooaldara objectionable. tone oi au aorertlaeinenU and

The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect inwertton of an wiv rti
scheduled to na several times. Notices tor correction must he given before neat laaartu*.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the nfHnt.l id the
.*pt daring M.
editorials represent the official opinions at their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second
matter at the United States Poet Office at Gainesville. is entered as second class

DAVID A. WEST
THE -w r-. w m m Editor-in-Chief
FLORIDA I il il JL AL LEONARD ANDY MOOR
Executive Editor Sports Editor

| This Week
Bruce Views
Frolic Plans
ByBRUCE CULPEPPER
President, Student Body
This year student government is
going to try to make Summer Fro Frolics
lics Frolics *a larger production. It was
with this in mind that Chairman
Steve Gardner and I decided to
bring the New Christy Minstrels
to campus. We are thrilled that
we could obtain them on Friday,
July 16th. We have changed the
name of the event to Florida
Frolics/ in hopes that anyone in
the surrounding area will feel free
to attend.
The price will be $1.50 per per person,
son, person, with any profits going to Dol Dollars
lars Dollars for Scholars. Steve is now
making arrangements for publicity
in the Orlando, Gainesville, and
Jacksonville areas. Tickets will go
on sale on campus Monday.
The New Christy Minstrels
should be a treat for the whole
campus. We were able to schedule
them through an entertainment
agency that was introduced to us
this spring at the Southern Univer Universities
sities Universities Student Govern ment
Association convention. The New
Christy Minstrels performed there
and were great!
In the past, because of the low
number of students enrolled during
the third trimester, it was declared
infeasible to bring a high-priced
group to campus.
Summers are usually uneventful
however, so we felt that outstand outstanding
ing outstanding entertainment is needed and
would be appreciated.
Good Kiss
EDITOR:
Every boy that has ever at attended
tended attended the U. of F. has met with
many traumatic experiences
at curfew at the various girls
dorms. There is probably not one
of us that haven't caught too many
redlights, or had a watch that might
be 30 seconds slow, or had just
one last goodnight kiss and found
that our date was reaching for the
door, the key was turned and the
girls inside shook her head, turned
up her nose and walked away, re resulting
sulting resulting in a minor offense for our
date.
Well, I would like to pay tri tribute
bute tribute to two live "humans" who
have worked the doors of Jennings
this half trimester. I do not know
their names so can only acknow acknowledge
ledge acknowledge them as the blonde and the
shorter dark haird one. Believe
It Or Not: these two actually treat
their fellow students as humans
and not as slaves or beasts that
must be locked up and punished
just because they didnt get in
the cage door in time.
I have seen the following un unbelievable
believable unbelievable acts of kindness: (1)
When the lights are blinked, these
girls inform everyone of the time
left. (2) Couples that sometimes
allow that last "little one to run
longer than intended are told that
the door is about to be locked.
(3) I actually heard them ask a
girl that lingered outside the door
(with her date) if she had a late
permit. (4) (Youll never believe
this one) Once or twice the door doorkeeper
keeper doorkeeper has allowed in a girl that
comes running across the patio if
she is only 15 or 30 seconds
late.
WAYNE BOUNTON

EDITORIAL
His Homework
He attended the University of Florida and
graduated with honors. He attended Harvard and
received a masters degree in business admin administration.
istration. administration. He now attends sessions of the Florida
Legislature. He receives no degrees.
In fact his job was once described as a bedlam
of worries headaches and thankless effort which
pays SIOO per month and every two years some someone
one someone tries to take it away from him.
Since his University of Florida days Florida
Alligator's man-of-the-year Ralph Turlington
has in a sense been repaying the state for his
education.
But in a truer sense Ralph Turlington is re repaying
paying repaying a concept that of state-run institu institutions
tions institutions of higher education.
He has done it effectively. This past session
he was elected by his colleagues as the most
effective house member.
As chairman of the appropriations sub-com sub-committee
mittee sub-committee on higher education institutions, Turling Turlington
ton Turlington for the first time was able to obtain sub substantial
stantial substantial funds to go directly to the Board of
Regents to use as they see fit-not earmarked
by the legislature for a particular program or
building.
He supported vigorously the non-political
concept of the Board of Regents and this year
the chancellor system.
While some might expect Turlington to use
his power and esteem to gain favors solely for
the University of Florida he doesn't see it that
way.
As opposed to the idea that what is good for
General Motors is good for the nation, Turling Turlington
ton Turlington believes what is good for higher education
will be good for the University of Florida.
This often means he does not see eye-to-eye
with particular requests ofTigertHallifhefeels
they are solely for the perpetuation of the UF
as the biggest university in Florida.
However, when he does agree with plans of
the University of Florida and sees the idea
as beneficial to the higher education of Florida,
woe be to the opposition.
He was recently named the most effective
legislator in debate. While his speaking talents
have been recognized since his college days, the
state is beginning to take note that he also learned
to do his homework.
Turlington spends hours in huddles with
university officials to learn every possible fact
about the program he will push and when he seeks
to speak in committee or on the floor of the
house, the legislators are hard-pressed to
logically disagree.
For his work in consistently informing the
Florida Legislature to the needs of higher edu education,
cation, education, we award Ralph Turlington The Florida
Alligator man-of-the-year award.



Hj
mk M j a 3-alii Bf,/'
xfs w
mllSPvi \-" -Jim
W J1 V -f'w^Kl
Dr, and Mrs. C.A. Robertson are presented
with the Festschrift., Giving the book to Dr.
Robertson is Dr. Aubry Williams
mi > if
ajsk. jpts§3& '%' *' I# 9 £ .?'
*" / a[ -.|lfi
s? j '-'
He gave bacK as
as misU*

campus news briefs

DANCE TONIGHT
There will be a Florida Union
Street Dance tonight from 8:00
-12:00 in the Rawlings parking lot,
Dsic jockey Larry Havill will pro provide
vide provide the music. In case of rain it
will be held in the F.U. Social
Room.
Undergrads Will
Use New Library
Undergraduate students will
have free access to the stacks and
reference materials in the new
Graduate Research Library, ac according
cording according to Mrs. M. Goggin, as assistant
sistant assistant director of reader's ser services.
vices. services.
Over a million books will have
to be moved from the Main Library
when the building is completed in
late 1966.
The Main Library will contain
materials most generally used by
the undergraduate, especially
magazines and periodical jour journals.
nals. journals.
Family Finance
Workshop Here
Thirty-six teachers and school
administrators from six states are
attending a workshop in family fi finance
nance finance at the University of Florida.
Hie workshop here, continuing
through July 30, is one of 17
offered by universities in the U.S.
in cooperation with the National
Committee for Education in Family
Finance. Each teacher in atten attendance
dance attendance has been awarded a scholar scholarship
ship scholarship to defray part of his or her
expenses.
Subject matter includes per personal
sonal personal income, budgeting, banking,
consumer credit, renting and buy buying
ing buying a home, life insurance, social
security, pensions, savings and
investments, personal taxes, wills
and estates.

PRE-MED, DENT
All Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental
students should register with the
Pre-Professional Counseling Of Office,
fice, Office, 107 Anderson for Term B,
June 28 through July 2. Registra Registration
tion Registration ends today and will not be
extended. Be sure to bring with
you your instructors' full names
and your course and section
numbers.
TUTOR SOCIETY
Hie Student Tutor Society,
located in room 203 of the Florida
Union, has reopened for business
after being closed during the A
term of the spring trimester. Ap Appointments
pointments Appointments for obtaining a tutor
can be made by seeing the Secre Secretary,
tary, Secretary, Phyllis Alter, or the Presi President,
dent, President, Cary D. Ser, Monday, Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday and Friday from 3:30 to
5:00 p.m., or Tuesday and Thurs Thursday
day Thursday between 2:00 and 5:00 p.m.
DAMES TO MEET
> The Architecture and Fine Arts
Dames will meet Tuesday at Uni University
versity University Women's Club to form a
motorcade to go to 4607 Clear Lake
Drive. This informal meeting will
include a Tupperware Party. The
dress is casuaL All wives of
students and all married women
students in the College of Archl
tecture and Fine Arts are cordial cordially
ly cordially invited to attend.

Dr. C.A. Robertson Is Honored
At Retirement After 43 Years

By JANE YOUNG
Dr. C.A. (Archie) Robertson is
leaving the UF.
Fifty-three years ago he came
here as a student, returned to
teach in 1922 and has remained to
watch the University grow and to
become head of the Department of
English. Last year at homecom homecoming,
ing, homecoming, the class of 1915, of which
Dr. Robertson is a member, was
inducted Into the Grand Old Guard.
There are two requirements for
this honor, he said. First, you
have to be a graduate of the UF,
and secondly, you have to have
survived fifty years after gra graduation.
duation. graduation.
Festschrift Presented
The greatest honor, however,
was bestowed upon Dr. Robertson
by four of his associates. These
men prepared and dedicated to Dr.
Robertson a Festschrift.
Festschrift is a German word,
translated meaning a writer's
feast.
The four editors of the Fest Festschrift,
schrift, Festschrift, Robert A. Bryan, Alton C,
Morris. A.A. Murphree and Aubrey
L. Williams, collected 17 essays
written by former colleagues and
friends of Dr. Robertson. The
essays written for the book cover
several centuries of literature.
In dedicating the work to Dr.
Robertson, the editors used a quo quotation
tation quotation from his beloved
Shakespeare felt was particularly
applicable to him:
And I will undertake all of

Air-Conditioned Dorm Planned

By DIANE DAWSON
Staff Writer
A new fourteen-story residence
hall to be built on the site of
Flavet II is expected to be ready
for 800 students by September
1967.
It has not been decided yet
whether the new dorm will house
women, men, or both.
Hie high- rise structure ten tentatively
tatively tentatively will consist of four
separate buildings, according to
assistant director of housing Wil William
liam William E. Neylans.
Two unconnected towers will

Most Dorms Are Used

Although the number of students
living in residence halls is way
down during Term B, the dorms are
far from empty.
Presently, Jennings, Rawlings
and Reid Halls are open for women
students. Male students are living
in East and Tolbert Halls and
all of Murphree Area except Flet Fletcher
cher Fletcher Hall, which is being re renovated.
novated. renovated.
Broward Hall is currently
housing 400 men and women, mem members
bers members of eight groups attending short
courses and seminars on campus.
A total of 30 groups will have
used the dorm by the end of the
summer, according to William E.
Neylans, assistant director of
housing.
Peace Corps trainees are being
housed in Mallory Hall, while Gra Graham
ham Graham Hall is being used by the
Foreign Language Institute stu students.
dents. students.
Hume Hall has been the home
for prospective freshman and their
parents during early registration.

Friday / July 2, 1965/ The Florida Alligator,

these to teach, I doubt, not but
this populous city will yield many
scholars," Pericles IV, 6, 196.
According to Dr. Murphree, the
most impressive aspect of the ban banquet
quet banquet given in Dr. Robertson's honor
was the many out of town guests
who attended. Friends came from
as far as Pennsylvania and South
Carolina for the occasion.
The unique tribute, in fact the
first presentation of a Festschrift
at the UF, had been planned for
two years, Murphree said.
I'm still stuttering in delighted
wonderment and trying to get my
feet back on common earth again,"
Dr. Robertson said. I am still
and will always be deeply moved.
I'm not stopping to think whether
I deserve it or not.
He Aided Library
According to Dr. Murphree, one
of Dr. Robertson's many accom accomplishments
plishments accomplishments has been in helping to
build the UF library.
For the past 30 years the
library has been a main pre preoccupation
occupation preoccupation of mine. That, next to
teaching kids is the nicest part of
my life. I receive great personal
pleasure from working with so
many of my colleagues, and, of
course, working with those directly
connected with the library."
Os Dr. Robertson's work with
the libraries, Paul B. Kebabian,
Associate Director of Libraries
said, Among the University fa faculty,
culty, faculty, Dr. Robertson has been in
the forefront of those who have

house the students. The rooms will
be arranged in suites for four.
Each is to have two bedrooms, a
bath, and a kitchen-study area with
a built-in sink, refrigerator, and
stove.
The entire building is to be air airconditioned.
conditioned. airconditioned.
A separate building will house
the communications center, li library,
brary, library, counselors' offices, and
mail boxes.
The fourth building is planned as
a recreational center. It may con contain
tain contain a snack bar.
Each residence structure will

Simpson, Trusler, Weaver and
South Halls are available for
groups such as the 4-H and PTA
which were here recently.
Yulee, Fletcher and North, which
is being re-painted, are the only
halls not being used at all this
summer.
77 UF Cadets
At Fort Bragg
Approximately 77 Army ROTC
advanced cadets from the UF are
attending the 18th Airborne Corps
Summer Camp at Fort Bragg,
North Carolina, according to Lt.
Col. James W. Bryant, assistant
professor of military science.
The six-week camp, June 19 to
July 30, is required for advanced
Army cadets between their junior
and senior years in college.
Outstanding cadets from each
of 12 companies and 48 platoons
are chosen at the conclusion of the
camp. Last year five U.F. cadets
were chosen from their platoons,
and one cadet, Randall C. Williams,
was chosen outstanding cadet from
his company. The cadets are rated
with their contemporaries for
these awards.

supported the growth and develop development
ment development of the library collections.
As Chairman and member of the
committee on university libraries,
his stimulating guidance and con concern
cern concern have covered a period of
over 20 years, during which the
library holdings have increased
from 250,000 to over 1,000,000
volumes,*
The UF has changed a great
deal since Dr. Robertson first
came here. Reminiscing, Dr,
Robertson said, We were a very
poor school, but we were rich
in one man departments. These
men were extraordinarily strong
teachers. We had no library for
many years to come. About 400
were enrolled my first year. Every
student knew every other student,
and most instructors knew all of
the students. Social life had to be
spun out of our inventiveness. In
spite of the poverty of the library
and laboratory facilities, the
schooling was extraordinarily
good. The succession of classes
during the 1910*s provided the in intellectual
tellectual intellectual and political leadership
for Florida during the next 30
years. Four of my classmates suc succeeded
ceeded succeeded each other as chairman
of the Board of Control.
From 1934 to 1936, Dr. Robert Robertson
son Robertson served as acting director of
the Department, but I ducked out
to Just teaching again until the
war.** In 1950 he was appointed
head of the Department of English,
in which capacity he has served
until June 30, when he retired
at just 70.**

contain a lobby, television and
laundry rooms, as well as apart apartments
ments apartments for resident assistants.
Each tower will have two ele elevators.
vators. elevators.
The dorm will probably be open
to graduate and upper division stu students,
dents, students, according to Neylans.
"It is unlikely that it will be an
all men's dorm. Probably it will
be a women's or a coed hall,"
Neylans continued.
Bids for construction will be
opened early this December and
building is scheduled to begin in
January of next year. The earliest
possible completion date has been
set for August or September 1967.
Construction is being -financed
by a $3.7 million bond issue re recently
cently recently passed by the Board of
Regents.

Wants Them
Back!
Dr. Stanley has lost a couple
of boxes.
Dr. Robert G. Stanley re recently
cently recently came to the UF and had
several boxes of work shipped
from California.
"The boxes arrived at Rolfs
Hall on April 22 and stood on
the first floor for adaybefore
being moved to a storage
area," Dr. Stanley said.
"Two of the boxes have been
lost and contain several
years of laboratory research
notebooks, IBM data sheets
manuscript material and un unbound
bound unbound periodicals."
The boxes are cardboard,
about 16 inches long and 12
inches high. They are labled:
RED, Fireplace Logs, Pak-A-
Fyr. If they are located, Dr.
Stanley would appreciate' a
call at FR 6-2600.

Page 5



, The Floricka Alligator/ Friday, July 2, 1965

Page 6

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

wanted
Girls to share apartment. Private,
air-conditioned bedroom. 3 blocks
from campus. $25/month. Call
8-1161. (C-152-ts-c).
A FEW HUNDRED more hungry
budget minded students to enjoy
SPUDNUTS DONUT SHOP, 1017
W. Unlv. Open every night till
midnight. (C-140-ts-c).
Desperately need ride to Phila Philadelphia
delphia Philadelphia or South Jersey in August.
Call Don after 9 p.m. at 8-2193.
(C-150-tf-nc).

Bib TODAY & SADDAY
KW 12:55 3:35
W 6:20 9:00
H -r I '*,r < ' .v v
m
i TCCHMCOLM* PANAVBNMT
* STARTS SUNDAY
THIS IS REALLY ONE!
CLYDE MYj

flKje>>> < ; : H|^H
j^^Kr
VC; /.vjtfHH
JOHN WAYNE
KIRK DOUGLAS
PATRICIA NEAL
TOMTRYON
PAULA PRENTISS
BRANDON fa WILDE
JIU. HAWORTH
DANA ANDREWS
ft HENRY FONDA
m&
Mi
aAioito pr minor# film
PE RFORMA NC E
DAI 8:15

autos
STATION WAGON, White Volks Volkswagen,
wagen, Volkswagen, 1965. 30 miles per gal.
ExceUent model, not yet available
in UJS. Only 3600 miles. 372-
8082. (G-152-2t-c).
*57 Chev. V-8, auto. New paint.
Good tires. 1616 NW 3rd Ave. or
caU 8-1161. (G-153-3t-c).
60 Corvair. 4 door, automatic
transmission. Heater. A real buy
at $475. Call FR 2-5625 after 5
p.m. (G-153-tf-nc).
1962 Corvair Monza sport coupe,
automatic transmission, bucket
seats, radio. LOW MILEAGE. Will
trade for older car or motor motorcycle.
cycle. motorcycle. Call 376-8863. (G-153-ts-c).
1960 Fair lane 500. Automatic
transmission, power steering,
power steering, power brakes, ra radio.
dio. radio. Low mileage. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. $695. Call 376-7051. (G-

I FUNLAND |
I AMUSEMENT CENTER I
lOll W. Univ., 2 blocks from I
campus where students meet I
VAMAHA il,ll, WAVrM
I MOTORCYCLES I
I For The Discriminating!
I CYCLERAMA I
m!) \ Do your laundry
Every 10th LoaaFt?E
KOIN KLEEN
704 W. Unlv. Ave.,

personal
Tena Fafard would like to inform
all her friends she is now with
Rarae*, 319 W. Univ. Ave., Phone
372-5549. Specializing in hair
coloring, cutting naturally curly
hair; also specializes in childrens
hair cuts. (J-152-st-c).
_ n.___ I I I
FLYING TO MEMPHIS? Student
or staff member making trip any anytime
time anytime between July Ist thru 17th
please call 376-2058 after 5 p.ip.
(J-152-3t-c).
Drummer available. Experienced.
Can follow any group. Call Lefty
Wright, 372-6474. (J-153-lt-c).
Student specials noon and night,
7 days a week, 97?. Meal tickets
available at 10% discount. Longs
Cafeteria downtown between the
theatres. (J-153-ts-p).
services
For experienced baby-sitters. Call
Julie or Eileen Bird at 6-0340.
(M-152-2t-c).
IRONING DONE IN MY HOME.
Call FR 6-4086 if no answer, call
after 3 p.m. (M-149-Bt-c).
Professional typing in my home.
Call Carol Parker anytime. 2-
6353. (M-153-4t-c).
Detailed charcoal portraits, $5.
Call Margot at 8-2306. (July 3-10
only call 6-0760). (M-153-2t-c).
IN A HURRY? Passport and ap application
plication application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios. 372-0300. (M (M---153-ts-c).
--153-ts-c). (M---153-ts-c).

HAVE A BLAST, /'Mj^
QR S a
//l
PUBLICATIONS Wishes Yoo A?
{** Happy & Safe 4th of Joly^
OUR BUSINESS OFFICE WILL BE CLOSED
ON THE sth. PLEASE PLACE YOUR
ADVERTISING FOR TUESDAYS ALLIGATOR BY
4 P.M. TODAY
Call Udlv. Ex: 2832

for sale
EGR & MATH STUDENTS. New
(used once) Post Versa-Log Slide
with instruction book, sls.
Dietzgen Drawing Set, $7.50. Both
$21.50. Call Bob after 4 p.m.
2-5464. (A-152-2t-p).
SCUBA TANK. Volt single 72
with new J-valve and tank boot.
SSO. Call Robin 2-6410. (A-151-
3t-c).

1959 Curtis trailer, 8x36 with
10x20 enclosed cabana. Both are
fully carpeted and in excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Many extras included. Im Immediate
mediate Immediate occupancy. For informa information
tion information call 376-9277 or 372-0243,
ask for Paul (A-151-ts-c).
BOAT FOR SALE. 16 ft. Carter
Craft. 30 hp Evinrude motor .Gator
Tilt Trailer, wind-shield, canvas
top, remote controls, skiing equip equipment.
ment. equipment. A give-away at S6OO. Call
FR 2-3251 after 6 p.m. (A-142-
ts-c).
Set of 8 Spalding Top Flite Irons
(Pro. line) 3 Macgreggor Tourney
Woods (pro. line) Bag and 80 as assorted
sorted assorted golf balls. Call 6-3101,
(A-153-2t-c).
Tujica 35 mm electric eye camera,
flash with batteries and bulbs, and
tri-pod, $35. Ben Pearson Colt
35 lb. re-curve bow, 6 alum,
arrows, glove, arm guard and
quiver, S3O. Kodak 8 mm movie
camera, with telephoto lens, $35;
light meter gratis and flood lamps.
Call 8-1203 after 5 p.m., 252-B,
Flavet M.
Miscellaneous hi-fi, stereo equip equipment.
ment. equipment. 2 window fans. Clock radio.
SEWING, original designs and pat patterns
terns patterns made. Call 372-0686. (A (A---153-2t-c).
--153-2t-c). (A---153-2t-c). j| J

real estate
"-
BEAT THE HEAT CAROL
ESTATES: Fully air- conditioned,
2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch.
Close to elementary and junior
high. Large corner lot. Central
heating. SBOO cash, payments $93
per month. Electric stove and self selfdefrosting
defrosting selfdefrosting refrigerator included.
1942 NE 16th Terr. Phone 372-
5893. (1-152-st-c).
4 bedroom, 2 bath, paneled Florida
room. Large corner lot. Fenced.
Swim club membership. 1213 NE
31st Ave. (I-152-st-c).
3 bedroom, 2 bath CCB House.
Central heat, built in kitchen.
Small down payment and take over
payments. 4004 NW 21st Terr.
372-2475. (I-152-ts-c).
For sale lovely furnished 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom house 2 blocks from Medi Medical
cal Medical Center. Call 6-3138. (1-150-
st-c),
for rent
COED or female graduate student
to share spacious and cool 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment with working
mother and baby starting immed immediately.
iately. immediately. $32.50 per month plus 1/2
utilities. 1240 SW 14th St., Call
378-1792 between 10 and 12 a.m.
(B-143-ts-c).
UNFURNISHED 3 bedroom, 2 bath
CCB screened porch house. 1804
NW 38th Terr. $125 per month.
Mr. Kaplan 372-0481 tor appoint appointment
ment appointment to show. (B-149-ts-c).
Large partially furnished apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Can accomodate up to 4
people. 1/2 block from campus.
372-0266. (B-151-3t-c).



Friday, Ju

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for rent
APARTMENT Completely furn furnished.
ished. furnished. One bedroom, swimming
pool, all electric kitchen, central
heat, air-conditioning. S9O per
month. Available immediately.
Couple preferred. 372-3826. (B (B---127-ts-c).
--127-ts-c). (B---127-ts-c).
One bedroom, partially furnished
apartment. Clean, good neighbor neighborhood.
hood. neighborhood. S4O/month. 305 NE 6th St.
Call after 6 p.m. 8-2791. (B-150-
Bt-c).
Newly decorated, three bedroom
cottage. Private beach. SSO per
week. 24 miles to Gainesville. See
it at White Sands Beach, Johnson
or call 475-2831. (B-150-st-c).

aiHQAtOfc SOS
always AttAct
YOU'RE READING
ONE RIGHT NOW

exciting I
1 2400Hawthoa*RoodHot*FM-5011\ NeW Hits! I
I EXCLUSIVE FIRST AREA SHOWING I
FRANK SINATRA
TREVOR HOWARD!
I~
I
. y: ri^Bf&-' H
EARHAKSS the ip 6 of I

for rent
Live RENT FREE for August. Oc Occupy
cupy Occupy 2 bedroom furnished house,
for period July 8 August 31st.
Pay only S7O. Call 376-6569. (B (B---153-lt-c).
--153-lt-c). (B---153-lt-c).
help wanted
Students qualified for work under
new Federal Work Study Program
i.e. combined parents income less
than $3,000 per year, and in interested
terested interested in field biology research.
Call 378-2600. (E-152-3t-c).
SECRETARY WANTED. Due to
graduation, one of our better se secretaries
cretaries secretaries will be leaving and we
will need a replacement around
August 7th. Replacement must be
well-founded in shorthand and typ typing
ing typing and willing to apply self to job.
Above average salary for ex experienced
perienced experienced secretary. Will fill
position with first qualified ap applicant.
plicant. applicant. Write or phone for inter interview.
view. interview. Scruggs & Carmichael, 3 SE
Ist Ave. 376-5242. (E-152-10t-c).

Page 7

help wanted
Part-time student help for B term.
Hours to be arranged from 10:30-
1:30; 4:30-8:30. 2 hours per day.
Call Mr. Ambrose, 378-1752 or
376-4992. (E-152-2t-p).
Medical Secretary typist for
2 physicians. Previous experience
with medical terminology and
typing is highly desirable. Book Bookkeeping
keeping Bookkeeping knowledge. Starting salary
commensurate with experience.
Call 372-5384. (E-151-3t-c).
lost & found
LOST: Lady's White gold Croton
watch. Believed lost vicinity Phy Physics
sics Physics Building and Jennings Hall.
Engraved MAS 6-3-64. Please
notify Peggy 2332 Jennings 2-6381.
(L-153-lt-c).
LOST: Anthropology Department
mascot. Yellow and white kitten.
Sex widely debated. Cries when
not being held. Please call Ext.
2275. (L-153-lt-p).

/\a OnThe Lookout
By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Sports Assistant
Gators May Be In Top 10

Some random comments from an idle mind:
One of the University of Alabama's illustrious and wealthy
alumni, Joe Namath, has been working out with other football
rookies in the New York Jets training camp. The world's first
$400,000 professional football rookie has the Jets' front office
brass holding their breath hoping his recently operated-on knee
holds up.
* *
Golf fans in Orlando were recently treated to the national Pee
Wee golf tourney held, there. Eddie Pearce. 13, of Temple Terrace
and Toro Jenette, 14, of Pensacola played in the finals; scores of
which are not in yet.
' *
Back to the Crimson Tide of Alabama for a second. Their foot football
ball football teams have won 10 bowl games in 18 appearances in the post postseason
season postseason classics. Put that one in your scrapbook of little-known
facts.
* *
One of the South's most sought-after high school hoop stars,
Tom Hagan of Louisville, Kentucky, has been playing on the Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky high school all-stars. The team recently defeated their
Indiana counterparts. Hagan, a 6 foot 2 guard, is slated to Join
Coach Ray Skinner at Vanderbilt in the fall.
* *
Quick now, how many pro golfers now on the tour are ex-
Gators? If you named Doug Sanders, Dan Sikes, Tommy Aaron
and Frank Beard, go to the head of the class.
* *
Another quickie. What three golfers have won the Big Four-
Masters, U.S. and British Open, and PGA? Palmer and Niclaus?
Go to the rear of the class. The correct answer is Ben Hogan,
Gene Sarazen, and most recently, Gary Player.
* *
All Gators can sympathize with ex-Gator football and baseball
star Haywood Sullivan. Now manager of the hapless Kansas City
Athletic baseball team, Sullie has the distinction of being on the
only team having a worse record than the New York Mets.
* *
Gator star halfback Jack Harper was recently the houseguest
of ex-Gator backfield coach Pepper Rodgers in Los Angeles.
Rodgers joined the UCLA football staff after last year's pigskin
season.
* *
The sports staff is now divided. Two, including yours truly,
pick the Cleveland Indians to take the American League Pennant.
One lonely soul is sticking with his Chicago White Sox to take the
flag.
* *
A prediction: Look for many national magazines to put the
Gators in the top 10 in their pre-season picks for the football
season. I would rather see them picked first in November than
September. See you around and about.

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817 W. Univ Ave

Save with Budget* Rent-A-Car:
$ v
a full 24-hour day mile*
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The cars are the same! The price is the difference!
Businessmen and Students know IMh SjL BUDQtT* Y9i
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Bowlers Notch
High Scores
Some phenomenal scores have
been recorded already In the first
week of play In the Florida Union
Student Bowling League.
The league, which bowls at Palm
Lanes, saw a 244 scratch game
from Walter Jordan and a 620
series from Barry Biebel. Ken
Levine rolled a 257 handicap (£ipe
and a 675 handicap set to top the
loop in those departments.
Transportation to Palm Lanes
Is available to students. The bus
leaves the Florida Union at 6:40
on league nights.



7 The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 2, 1965

Page 8

HARD WORK PAID OFF
'Recruiting Best Ever' Graves

By ANDY MOOR
Sports Editor
Athletic Director Ray Graves is
extremely pleased with the out outcome
come outcome of this year's recruiting pro program
gram program and with good reason.
For the first time in memory,
the Gators have signed the state's
top athletes in every sport. In
addition, all the new UF recruits
are good students, according to
Graves.
"We are most satisfied with the
results of this year's recruiting,"
said Graves. "It's certainly the
best we've had since I've been
at UF."
A total of 95 boys in 7 sports
have signed grants-in-aid with the
Gators. Os these, 41 signed football
scholarships while a record 27
linked track pacts. Although each
sport recruited less than 10, swim swimming
ming swimming t
ming, tennis and basketball came
up with top recruits.
"This is an indication that our
hard work has paid off," com commented
mented commented Graves. "All our coaches
have been spending a great deal
of time on recruiting and the re results
sults results have shown up."
According to Graves, it was the
best year for the UF program for
two reasons: (1) the state's top
athletes were good students and (2)
the whole staff worked together.
"The reason the top student-ath student-athletes
letes student-athletes are choosing Florida is be because
cause because we offer a wide variety of
curriculum," said Graves. "To
my knowledge, we have more fields
of study than any other school in
the south and are only surpassed
by three schools, I believe, nation nationwide.
wide. nationwide. With the addition of three
new schools soon, including veteri veterinary
nary veterinary science and dentistry, there
will be little that UF doesn't offer."
Work for this year has ceased,
but already the job of scouting next
year's seniors has been taken up.
"Our coaches have been to the
high schools of all prospective 1966
Baby Gators. We check their
grades and curriculum and talk
to teachers and administrators
about each boy. We will keep close
eyes on each of the boys we con consider
sider consider to be top prospects," Graves
stated.
Os all the "blue chip" football
players in Florida, Graves could
think of only one end Ted Hend Hendricks
ricks Hendricks of Hialeah who signed
with another school. Hendricks will
enter Miami U. in the fall.
"We really wanted to sign Ted
as we considered him a top end
and team player," observed
Graves. "We were really disap disappointed
pointed disappointed when he signed with
Miami."
Miami Coach Charlie Tate has
launched an all-out assault on
south Florida, signing 15 boys
to football scholarships from that
area alone.
"It is interesting to note that
although Miami signed all these
fine players, we weren't even able
to talk to most of them. Os the
15 boys Tate signed, 13 could not
meet the UF entrance standards,"
Graves noted.
Two of the recruits who had al already
ready already signed Gator grants changed
their minds when other non nonathletic
athletic nonathletic offers came their way.
David Hants, a top prospect from
West Palm Beach Forect Hill,
signed a UF grant but decided
against coming here when he found
he was to receive a SSOOO per
year academic grant from Prince Princeton.
ton. Princeton.
"We just couldn't compete with
an offer like that," mused Graves.
"However, this is an indication
of the scholastic abilities of the
tew UF signee's."
Another of the "quality pro program"

gram" program" recruits, Jay Olner of
Clearwater, had signed a grant
with UF and disavowed the agree agreement.
ment. agreement. Olner will enter the U.S.
Military Academy at West Point
in the fall.
"Many of the other boys we have
under contract have been given
similar offers, but decided to be become
come become Gators anyhow," said
Graves.
One top scholar athlete who

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Athletic Director Ray Graves is most happy
with this years recruiting. Ninety-five of the
nations top prep athletics have signed UF
scholarships in seven sports.

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could have just about named his
school was Larry Smith of Tampa
Robinson, a near-unanimous All-
America halfback.
"Larry was much sought after
and was considering both Prince Princeton
ton Princeton and West Point up until the
time he signed his UF pact," said
Graves.
Why did Smith and many other
top student-athletes decide to come
to Florida?

"In my opinion, it's because we
sell the student a top-notch edu education,
cation, education, answered Graves. "Also,
Florida (the state) has a bright
future due to the tremendous
growth of the past decade. Natural Naturally,
ly, Naturally, the school has improved with
the growth.

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According to Graves, the pro progress
gress progress of this years program should
carry over and enable more suc successes
cesses successes in the future.
The Gator athletic picture for the
next few years under the new
quality program indeed looks
bright.