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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
(li| THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

I I
mK 11

t I 1 sJr^^Bi
I JKW'
::i ; '. v y 1
RAIN REIGNS ON NORMAN STAGE
. .Diana Hollingsworth and Richard Strahan
Fla. Players Open
Production 'Rain

Rain -- Florida Players pro production
duction production of Somerset Maugham's
book adapted for the stage will
have its final performance tonight
and tomorrow. Both nights, the
curtain will rise at 8 p.m.
With set design by Henry
Swanson, the production opened
Wednesday night appropriately
under rainey skies.
Grant Boosts
UF Students
Employment
EUNICE I. TALL
Student Affairs Editor
Sum mer employment for UF stu students
dents students is being boosted by a $36,600
grant from the Federal Govern Government.
ment. Government.
The Student Financial Aid Office
this week announced the new pro program
gram program which will help students from
low income families go to school.
The project is in coordination with
President Johnson's current Anti-
Poverty Act,
The program provides for full fulltime
time fulltime employment for students who
are not necessarily now in school
but who have been admitted to the
UF and will be enrolled as full fulltime
time fulltime students in September.
The money is available to
students who come from families
in which the combined family in income
come income for a one child family is
$3,000 or less. Another S6OO
income is allowed for each addi additional
tional additional child.
If a student is married he may
apply if his parents and his fife's
parents do not have an income of
$3,000 or more. /
(See 'Employ on P. 2)

Vol. 57, No. 148

The production, directed by Dr.
Donald R. Henry, stars Diana
Hollingsworth as Sadie Thompson,
Richard Strahan as Rev. Davidson,
Albert Wehlburg as Joe Horn and
Alan Henderson as Dr. MacPhail.
Also included in the cast are
Mary Lang an, James Wood, Chip
Wood, Louis Liounis, Cindy Hall,
Cindy Schwab and Marvin Rooks.
The play was originally produced
on Broadway in 1922 and won rave
reviews.
No reservations for the per performances
formances performances can be made. Tickets
may be picked up at the box office
in the front of the auditorium.
General admission for the public
is 80 cents and may be purchased
in Room 354 of Tigert Hall.

Slogan Contest Opens Monday

The UF's fifth annual contest to
select a slogan for the Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming weekend celebration opens
Monday and continues through July
14.
Slogans should have a general
Homecoming theme and should be
of contemporary significance. The
first place slogan in 1964 was
Gators Prepare A Collegiate
World's Fair. There are no re restrictions
strictions restrictions on eligibility or the
number of entries an individual can
submit.
More than 1,000 entries were
received a year ago.
First prize this year will be a
Nassau cruise for two aboardP&O
Steamship Lines from Miami. Sev Several
eral Several other attractive prizes are
planned for top finishers in the
slogan competition.

University of Florida, Gainesville

Richer Wins, Loses
In 'Freedom'Hearing

By JANE YOUNG
Academic Affairs Editor
Ed Richer, controversial hum humanities
anities humanities instructor, won one round,
lost one and is hoping to get into
round three in his hearing Tuesday.
The UF Senate Committee on
Academic Freedom and Tenure
ruled they had jurisdiction to hear
the question but then said Richer
did not state specific enough
grounds to make out a cause of
action.
Officially, they sustained the
University motion of demurrer
with leave for Richer to amend.
Fletcher N. Baldwin, who along
with Stanley K. Laughlin defended
Richers petition, said the ruling
favorable on the jurisdictional
question was the main question.
Laughlin said the sustaining of
the demurrer motion submitted by
Robert J. Farley, attorney for
the UF, was unexpected.
The committee set a2O day
time limit for the next step by
Richer.
I can't wait, Richer said.
Law Professor Baldwin said,
We are going to take the full 20
days, and we are not sure just
what we will in fact submit. We
will comply with the committee's
request. We will also submit a
brief explaining our action.
The Committee's action
Tuesday, at least temporarily can cancelled
celled cancelled the second part of the
hearing that was set for
Wednesday.
The preliminary hearings were
originally planned for a classroom,
but the committee, with the
approval of the lawyers,
consented to the change to the
Law School courtroom.
Richer was originally notified
his contract would not be renewed
In March, 1964. Last trimester
a petition of over 1,200 student
names was presented to the
administration protesting Richer's
dismissal.

FOR HC 65 THEME

DOUG THOMPSON

Hr P-WirMPP-^ry- nB,-'t V \V Igl
M&v \'::> lMf~
;dl3
I s.. wf^ m
N^ v t.
j||l
lli&5& % jL : ;s&-'- y
RICHER (R) WITH ATTORNEY LAUGHLIN
. .concentration In the courtroom
Student Minimum
$1 Wage Intact

The $1 minimum wage for UF
student workers will remain intact
despite the state legislature's cut cutting
ting cutting the school's overall budget
request by some $lB million.
UF students will be reaping the
$1 per hour minimum for their
services beginning July 1 even
though the $1.3 million base from
which they were paid in 1963-65
was increased by only about
$16,000* UF Dean of Academic
Affairs Robert Mautz said hopes
are to get additional funds for
student wages from the Federal
Government's student work pro program,
gram, program, have been realized.

Homecoming is scheduled Oct.
15-16 when the Florida Gators host
the North Carolina State Wollpack
in the football climax to a festive
program that includes reunion
gatherings, a pre-game barbecue,
parade and Gator Growl the
largest student-produced talent
show in the country.
Slogan Chairman Doug Thomp Thompson
son Thompson of Belle Glade said entires
must be limited to seven words.
Originality and clarity are nec necessary.
essary. necessary. In case of ties, th£ entry
with the earliest postmark will be
awarded a prize*
Entires should be mailed or
delivered to: Homecoming Slogan
Coldest, Florida Blue Key Office,
Florida Union, to arrive by mid midnight
night midnight on July 14.

Friday, June 11, 1965

Student wages form a portion
of the UF's education and general
fund, which was appropriated $41.4
million to run on until 1967* The
school had asked for ssl *2 million*
The UF will be running on a
total budget of just under SIOO
million until legislators meet again
in 1967 to dole out more. The UF's
original request to the state budget
commission to make ends meet was
$114.9 million*
"Naturally we're disappointed
that we didn't receive the money
we deemed essential to operate the
university," Mautz said, "but the
legislature treated us equitably
within the framework of its current
fiscal policies."
The legislature's "fiscal poli policies"
cies" policies" on higher education during
the just-concluded session were
increasing emphasis on the state's
new four-year colleges and junior
colleges*
Mautz said the politicians' cut cutbacks
backs cutbacks will result in part in:
failure to provide additional
faculty needed in many areas;
continuing of many over oversized
sized oversized classes;
a great lack of adequate
supplementary personnel, such as
janitors and maintenance people.
The UF will be running on about
$lO million more during the coming
two years than it did during the
s7*l million budget of 1963-65.
But Mautz pointed out that ss*6
million of this is "generated in income,"
come," income," as student fees, so that
the increase granted by the
legislature for '65-'67 is actually
only about $5 million*
Largest appropriation outside of
the general fund was $24.7 million
(See 'Wage' on P. 2)



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 11, 1965

A REVIEW
Great Set
The set and the sound effects of the
Florida Players production of Somerset
Maughams story of Sadie Thompson are
wortn going to see if nothing else.
But there is else.
Based on a variation of the kindhearted
Srostitute looking for better tides theme,
le production entitled Rain has its
setting in Pango-Pango, somewhere in
the Polynesian Islands.
The woman of color, Sadie Thompson
(Diana Hollingsworth), finds herself
stranded on the island during the rainy
season at Joe Horns general store storeboarding
boarding storeboarding house. With her is a missionary
and his wife, along with a doctor and his
spouse.
The obvious conflicts begin at once and
last through all three acts, with Sadie
meeting the man who will give her a new
life (Louis Liounis).
All the famous, if not somewhat over overused,
used, overused, lines are included. To wit: I
thought I knew all about men until I met
you, said by Sadie in Act one, to What
Happened? Mam, theres been an
accident, in Act three.
The acting by the collegians is generally
good. The old islander and general store
owner Joe Horn (Albert Wehlburg) was
obviously the most experienced. His
presentation was excellent and he was
especially good in delivery of his
reflections of life in which he did not
stop to let the audience reflect on the
wisdom of it, as so often is the failing.
Overall the delivery was good. However
the profanity used by the players in
moments of passion was uttered as if a
quorum of the faculty disciplinary com committee
mittee committee was in the audience.
The missionary (Richard Strahan)was
well played. This intended hate symbol
was truly disliked and then pityied by
the audience. Plaudits should go to the
makeup department for his facial re revamping.
vamping. revamping.
Designer Henry Swanson produced
perhaps the outstanding contribution to the
play with his design of the set along with
the effects of the rain in the background
and the visible water dripping outside the
screens.
The plav was extremely creditable. Any
first night flaws such as rushing of lines,
are surely to be wiped out in future
performances.
From Mary Largan, James Wood, Chip
Wood, Cindy Hill, Alan Henderson, Cindi
Schwab, and Marvin Rooks the campus gets
a full performance. Tickets are available
and worth using.

FUNLAND
AMUSEMENT CENTER
1011 W. Univ., 2 blocks from
campus where students meet
FOR RECREATION
SAtfDv// t*h£S
Arf Fir
FoK R /cWfi*
Carmanellas
7 days a week, 11 to 9
706 W. Uwlvrrily Av.

FANTASTIC SAVINGS ON
PICKWICK RECORDS
SPECIAL PURCHASE OF 500 LP'S
M dr A44
Up
A MONO & STEREO
With Artists Such As
NELSON RIDDLE, JOHNNY RIVERS, ART VAN
DAMME, JOE TEX, KAI WINDING, JIMMY
SMITH, PETE FOUNTAIN, JACK JONES AND
LIGHTNIN' HOPKINS.
kA ... CLASSICAL
Mantovam on London m
c r D SELECTIONS
stan Getz on Prestige
p n i M ...Jazz, Pops,
Enc Dolphy on New Jazz Country & Western
To Namo Only A Fowl
The RECORD BAR
123 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. PHONE 376- 1042
Open 9 to 6 Mondays and Fridays 9 to 9^

EMPLOY
(Continued from P. 1)
Another application is pending
for next year in which a much
expanded program for $300,000
has been requested, according to
Hale.
The rate of pay under the work workstudy
study workstudy program is the sl, minimum
comparable with the new
university student pay scale which
begins July 1.
This is a crash program this
summer in which we are really
creating new job opportunities in
excess of what we already have
in order to utilize these Federal
funds, said Hale.
Three types of employment are
available: clerical, maintenance
or labor, and a limited amount
of graduate assistantships.
A person who qualifies under
this program may apply in per person
son person or write to the Student
Financial Aid Office, 124 Tigert
Hall. In doing so, he should present
the necessary notarized affidavit
of his familys Income and assets.
WAGE
(Continued from P. 1)
for the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences and Agri Agricultural
cultural Agricultural projects. Some $28.3 mil million
lion million had been asked for.
The J. Hillis Miller Health
Center request was $24.7 million.
It got $21.3 million. Engineering
fared well, receiving $8.3 of SB.B
million hoped for, while the UFs
Graduate Engineering Education
System got $1.4 of $1.9 million.

Bus Ad Getting
Two New Teachers

Paul Grady of Greenwich, Conn.,
and Dr. Rufus Wixon of Philadel Philadelphias
phias Philadelphias Wharton School of 'Finhnce
and Commerce will join the
Department of Accounting faculty
in the UFs College of Business
Administration next September.
Grady will serve as a visiting
professor of accounting during the
fall trimester. He is a
distinguished certified public
accountant who is known through throughout
out throughout the world for his services to
the United States government and
the American Institute of Certified
Public Accountants.
Dr. Wixon has accepted a full-

\ 3 | f--$- '<' |k t'-sLLj
MOOT COURT TEAM
. .from left, Mac Melvin (alternate), Bob
Manley, Bruce Lazar, Gene Brown, and Gordon
H. Stumpy* Harris.
UF Moot Team
Competition Set

Four students from the UF*s
College of Law will travel to Miami
Beach June 17-18 to compete
against appellate moot court teams
from Miami, Stetson and Florida
A&M as part of the annual Florida
Bar Convention program.
The quartet includes Robert
Manley, Miami; Gordon Harris,
Jacksonville; Bruce Lazar, Win Winter
ter Winter Park, and Gene Brown,
Tallahassee. Professor Fletcher

time position on the accounting
staff. He has been professor of
accounting at Wharton since 1949
and was chairman of the Depart Department
ment Department of Accounting there from
1953 until 1963.

PRE CUFFED IIP
TAPERED STYLING flf
YOUNG AMERICAN SHOP
ACROSS FROM SILVERMAN'S
Use Your Silverman's Student Charge Account
FREE PARKING ON IST FEDERAL BANK LOT.

Baldwin is advisor for the moot
court team.
Florida will be seeking its fifth
straight victory in the argumen argumentative
tative argumentative session to be judged by
circuit and appellate judges and
Supreme Court justices from
throughout the state.
The same Florida team will
participate in the Southeastern
Regional Moot Court Champion Championship
ship Championship at Atlanta next November.
The regional winner qualifies to bid
for national honors at New York
in December. Florida captured
the region title last year, then
won the national best brief*
award as part of judging in New
York.
In the Miami Beach event, Man Manley
ley Manley and Lazar will form one Florida
team and Harris and Brown the
other. Each team will argue for
30 minutes with points awarded
on the basis of presentation,
reasoning and overall ability.



Professor Constans Plans
Retirement After 36 Years

H. P. Constans, a do-it-all
speech professor who taught
senators, congressmen and judges,
is retiring after 36 years at the
university.
Constans came to Gainesville in
UFers Invited
To Arab Fete
Arab Hospitality will visit the
UF campus Saturday, when the club
will hold its annual spring picnic
at C. Yates* private lake. Tra Traditional
ditional Traditional Shish-Kabat> will be
served plus some Arabian dishes.
All UFers, are Invited to attend
for a nominal fee to help the club
In its activities on campus.
For reservations, and additional
information about transportation
and time, call 376-7051 or 372-
0395.

Borida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical too* ot all advertisements and
* or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
ITION E GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible,
orida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment tor any advertisement involving typ typcal
cal typcal errors or erroneous insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
day after advertisement appears.
)rida Alligator wUI not be responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertlsemer.i
ed to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before nest Insertion.
FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida atsi U
ed five times weekly except duing May, June and July when it is published semi-weekly. Only
lLs represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class
at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.
run
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1929 and established the speech
department, serving as chairman
until 1960.
He formed the Florida Players
and the Debate Society and coached
the Debate Team, which over the
years included Senator Smathers
and Congressmen Bennett, Rod Rodgers
gers Rodgers and Gibbons and numerous
other prominent government and
judicial leaders.
During the years Constans has
been here, the university has
awarded 113 advanced degrees in
speech.
Always a good salesman for
the university, Constans helped
bring many top instructors and
administrators, including Dean
Hale, to the University.
Constans received his A. B.
degree from Carleton College In
1921. In 1927 he received his LLB.
from the University of Wyoming,

and in 1928 he received his Mas Masters
ters Masters degree from the State Uni University
versity University of lowa.
In professional organizations,
Mr. Constans has served as Presi President
dent President of the Florida Speech
Association of America.
He is active in civic and social
life in Gainesville and holds
membership in the Kiwanis Club
and the American Legion, having
served as an infantry lieutenant
during World War One,
For many years he was a mem member
ber member of the District Committee
of the Boy Scouts of America.
Constans will continue to live
in Gainesville and expects to do
some traveling in the next few
years.
'Who Killed The
Philosophy Dept.
Forum Scheduled
A forum titled Who Killed The
Philosophy Department?,*' will be
sponsored by Freedom Forum.
The forum will be held Saturday
in the Florida Union Auditorium
at 1 p.m. Featured will be out outgoing
going outgoing philosophy department mem members
bers members Drs. Farhang Zabeeh, Stuart
Silvers, and Charles Critteden.
Also expected to speak will be
Dr. Richard McCleary of Human Humanities
ities Humanities and a speaker from the
Administration, according to
Luclen Cross.
Cross, one of the co-organizers
of the forum, said, This meeting
has been called to inform all
interested students of the facts
behind the present crisis in the
Philosophy Department.'* Cross
expected a large turnout.

Kisers Office Equipment
604 North Main Street
WE HAVE£ Desks IN STOCK
THAT ARE 30" X 54" OR- 32" X 60"
WOOD...USED...SOLID!
JUNE CLOSE-OUT AT THE
RIDICULOUS LOW PRICE OF
Night
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OLD-FASHIONED Hush Puppies,
FISH NIGHT Cole Slow 97<
5 PM 9 PM
Fresh Cedar Key Fish
HUMPTY DUMPTY
DMVMN t KSAINUUU
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEALS
FR2-5387 3tO N.W. 13tl St.

Friday, June 11, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

JSJR
ll|fc k
- 'tlip .gf#, Ac ift £ w
ipPP* VRNH
Jr iv S <|j| islP
s> hV J: I ;% jj
i Blr
AT BROWN BAGGERS BARBECUE
. .JUMBA Pres. Rod Maeie (L) and Charles
Mitchell watch as Rutty Liles pitches horse horseshoes.
shoes. horseshoes.
Leg Council Oles
SBOO in Requests

Legislative Council Tuesday
night passed four requests
amounting to approximately SBOO.
Money was appropriated in the
following manner:
5333 to send a delegate to
the Sigma Delta Chi Journalism
honorary, national convention in
Los Angeles.
.. SBB to help send seven
delegates of the Benton Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering Society to the annual convention
of Florida Engineering Society in
Clearwater.

s24l to send three delegates
to the Florida Bar Convention in
Miami from the Law Review and
the John Marshall Bar Associatiqn.
sl47 allocated to Moot Court
to send delegates to the Florida
Bar Association Convention in
Miami.
In addition, the Florida Alligator
was granted a request to transfer
funds from the Orange Peel budget
of the winter trimester, 1965 to
the Alligator salaries budget of
summer, 1965 totaling $l6O.
* * *
Bruce Culpepper has appointed
seven replacement represen representatives
tatives representatives for Legislative Council for
the term 38.
The include Sam Block, Larry
Gross, Ken Levine, Wayne Mc-
Leroy, Patty Nazarro, Pete San Sansone
sone Sansone and Bill Wood.
Health Center's
Dr. Martin
Gets Post
Dr. Samuel P. Martin, provost
of the UFs J. HUlls MUler Health
Center, has been selected as an
advisor to the U. S. Office of
Economic Opportunity.
In a letter from Richard W.
Boone, director of the Program
Policy and Development Division
of the Community Action Program,
Dr. Martin was invited to join a
group of 30 physicians, medlcdl
educators and health and hospital
specialists who wUI make up the
advisory body.
Boone said, They will help
develop guidelines for use in eval evaluating
uating evaluating health components of com community
munity community action programs and the
development of program models
and ideas which can be adapted
by individual communities seeking
to demonstrate and apply more
effective methbds of organizing
and delivering health and medical
care services to the poor.
oEr\ 0 your laundry
you jhop
* Every 10th LoaaF??c
KOIN KLEEN
704 W. Univ! Ave.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 11, 1965

FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
Editorial Page Editor Sports Editor j

Editorial
Lack of Confidence
*
' ' ; y'.'i '' o
To those unaware of the Infirmary problem problemand
and problemand there can*t be many --we wish to help
point out the gross lack of campus confidence
in the University Infirmary.
The unfortunate results of this attitude take
their toll in the number of students who prefer
to purchase aspirin at the bookstore instead
of going to the Infirmary, even though it's
free
Are the existing Student Health Service
facilities and staff sufficient for a 15,000
student campus?
Many contend that the Infirmary building
itself is antiquated, built to serve a student
body one-fifth the current size. Some argue
that there is a chronic staff shortage which
forces inadequate diagnosis and treatment
because the doctor has too little time to
spend with each sick student.
A different approach urges switching ad administrative
ministrative administrative control of the Infirmary from
the College of Physical Education and Health
to some point in the medical center. These
critics stress that medical expertese at the
top would bring realistic evaluations and
strength in fighting for future appropriations.
Still others are seeking expanded services,
full-time resident physician included What
about a dentist for a toothache or optometrist
for the year-round student who thinks he
needs glasses ?
Considering the last four years of com complaints
plaints complaints about the in-patient services as well
as out-patient clinic (Gator pill distributing
point), we feel that the undermined student
confidence in their medical services cannot
be dismissed simply as typical student gripes.
Some discussion about the Infirmary problem
took place during the recent tuition increase
part of which will go to the health service.
However, many say that this won $ t come near
to providing what is needed
We think that much is wrong with our
Infirmary. But, truthfully, the layman doesn't
know exactly what is wrong.
x The Alligator calls for a study of the
University Infirmary by a medically-oriented
board of experts not connected with the
Infirmary and perhaps not connected at all
with this University.
The study must be a professional and
comprehensive one, one which will be pub published
lished published good or bad, and one which will be
acted on. We also suggest that some
consideration be given to what other
compatible institutions are doing in the student
health field.
Lengthy letters of explanation from ad administrators
ministrators administrators or Infirmary officials might help
but we doubt it will help dispell the wide widespread
spread widespread lack of confidence in the medical air.
It's time for an impartial study in order
to clear the air.

I THIS WEEK
Campaign Reforms Called For

By BRUCE CULPEPPER
Student Body President
LAST TUESDAY the Legislative Council sent
to committee my recommendations concerning
the spring voting procedures on campus. They
will require constitutional revisions, and so,
after committee approval, they must be voted
on by the Legislative Council twice and then
by the Student Body next fall.
MY SUGGESTIONS are MHHHPBb.
these: First, shorten the
election by a week so that it If
occurs on the fourth Thursday 18? Jpllf
rather than the fifth Thursday g|j y M
of the trimester, and second, K :
designate a time, preferably
two weeks before the election, |||
when the candidates and their 111
campaign managers will meet
with the Alligator Editor, the BD|
President of the Student Body, KUC.E
and the Secretary of Interior to discuss the
debate schedule during the campaign.
MY REASONS for wanting the campaigning
period shortened are based upon the facts that
an additional week would give the incoming
president more time to organize his affairs,
as well as, more time to concentrate on his
studies. In the past, SB presidents have generally

A Sorry Tale
of Three Cities

By JOE CASTELLO
Editorial Page Editor
ONCE UPON a time, there
was a splendid city in Ancient
Greece. It was a center of
culture, a seat of learning,
and the first great democracy
which rose to great heights
because of democracys vir virtues
tues virtues and was ultimately
destroyed because of demo democracys
cracys democracys vices. The people
were deeply religious and
believed in a host of deities
which provided a god for every
occasion.
THIS CITY was the home of
one of the worlds great
teachers. But he taught some
dangerous doctrines. He
taught that not only was
democracy not infallible but
also that its administrators
were not infallible. He taught
that morality was a personal
business and that the way to
the good life was through
learning and discipline. And Andhorror
horror Andhorror of horrors he taught
that the city gods did not
exist.
HE PERFECTED the dia dialectical
lectical dialectical method and fathered
all subsequent Western
philosophy; but he was a
troublemaker.
SO THEY made him drink
hemlock.
THEN, ABOUT 400 years
later and only a couple of
hundred miles away, another
great city rose to prominence.
It was also a center of culture,
a seat of learning, and,the
first real republic whose laws
became the basis of all sub subsequent

OPINION

sequent subsequent Western legal
systems. The people were
deeply religious and also be believed
lieved believed in a host of city deities.
THEN, IN one of the back backwater
water backwater provinces of the empire
it commanded, another of the
world's great teachers made
his home. He also taught some
dangerous doctrines. He
taught that not only was the
great empire and its laws not
infallible but also that its
administrators were not in infallible.
fallible. infallible. He taught that
morality was a personal busi business
ness business and that the way to the
good life was through learning
and discipline. And horror
of horrors he taught that
the empires gods did not
exist.
HE PERFECTED human
morality and was Hie father
of all subsequent Western
religious development; but he
was a troublemaker.
SO THEY crucified him.
ABOUT 1400 years later,
the same city was again a
center of culture, a seat of
learning, and the heart of a
theocratic empire whose doc doctrines
trines doctrines have become the
spiritual and moral base for
all subsequent Western civili civilization.
zation. civilization. The people were very
religious and believed in one
God.
THIS EMPIRE was the home
of another of the world's great
teachers. He also taught dan dangerous
gerous dangerous doctrines. He taught
that not only was the great
empire not infallible but also
that its administrators were
not infallible. He taught that
morality was a personal busi business

I
been unable to accomplish anything other than
maintaining the status quo during the latter
part of the trimester in which they were elected.
This is due to the great demands placed on his
time whereby he must not only appoint and orient
his new staff, but also, catch in his school
work. This extra week would, furthermore,
lessen the campaign expenditures by the parties
and candidates during the election period.
IN REGARD to my suggestion for a pre preplanned
planned preplanned debate schedule, I feel that it is most
important that the candidates mutually decide
upon the types of debate, the dates and the
number they wish to be held. While various
campus organizations should be encouraged
to sponsor debates, it is desirable that the
debates be coordinated with the individual
campaign schedules of the candidates. Also,
the candidates should take part in the adoption
of the basic ground rules to the satisfaction of
each one. Certainly this planning session would
not limit the candidates in anyway, but rather
prevent overlapping engagements, misunder misunderstandings,
standings, misunderstandings, or undue advantage.
THESE TWO proposals will not correct all
the ills of our campaign system. However,
they are starters, and I welcome any further
suggestions from the student body.

CASTELLO COMMENTS s

ness business and that the way to the
good life was through learning
and discipline. And horror
of horrors he taught that
the empires god did not exist.
HE PERFECTED the teles telescope
cope telescope and was Hie father of all
subsequent Western science;
but he was a troublemaker.
SO THEY sent him to the
Inquisition.
ITS AN OLD pattern that
probably originated when the
first group of witch doctors
decided to exorcise someone
from the tribe because he did
not believe the sun was god
and, incidentally, probably
didnt like the way the chief
was running things. Since then,
men who have gained some
success by following a certain
way of life have come to fear
men who question that way.
Men of learning are always
suspect as potential trouble troublemakers
makers troublemakers because they question
the shallowness they find in
others.
THEREFORE, the men who
have the power because things
are done a certain way use that
power against men who think
things should be done another
way; and, when the mm in
power can enshrine their way
as divinely appointed, a theo theocracy
cracy theocracy is born which may
assert anything from the
divine right of kings to Hie
sanctity of a national hero such
as Hitler.
MAYBE THIS is why our
forefathers decided to
separate church and state
and guarantee religious free freedom
dom freedom for all including the
freedom not to believe at all.



Ed Richer: His Day In Court 1,
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ALLIGATOR
INTERVIEW
By JANE YOUNG
Academic Affairs Editor
Q. DO YOU FEEL THAT THE
ADMINISTRATION ARGUMENT
THAT YOU WERE DISMISSED
BECAUSE YOU WERE NOT
WORKING FOR YOUR PHJD. IS
VALID?
A. Not at all; it has absolutely
no validity, none what ever.
g. YOUR INTENT THEN-IF
YOU WIN THE CASE, WOULD BE
TO STAY ON AS AN INSTRUCTOR?
A. Pll cross that bridge when
I come to it.
\
Q. DO YOU REALLY WANT
THE JOB?
A. I would really want the job
were this an institution that could
seriously reconsider its original
decision. I mean by that, that a
job in C-5 as an instructor is
not that grand a destiny, and that
while it has been for the most
part a happy job and I have learned
a lot and enjoyed it a great deal
and like many members of the
faculty, there is nothing about any
job that warrants an abasement of
oneself. One of the preconditions
for wanting a job in a university
is that you can function here as a
free person. This is not a free
Institution, vis-a-vis me. There
are people in the philosophy de department
partment department and elsewhere who would
agree with me. I would have to
say, yes I want my job, given
certain conditions, that is a ser serious
ious serious gesture of concern for aca acalemlc
lemlc acalemlc freedom and that would
constitute a serious reconsider reconsideration
ation reconsideration on the part of the adminis administration.
tration. administration. It is an awkward question
in the context of current events,
because, obviously, I'm unhappy.
Pm not just unhappy about losing
the job, because there isn't any
job that is that great of a job. It
Isn't, technically speaking, the job
that is an issue. Let's put it this
way, it's a job plus a cause.
Q. WHAT IN YOUR OPINION
INFLUENCED THE administra administration
tion administration PREJUDICIALLY IN
TERMINATING YOUR con contract.
tract. contract.
A. A series of things and the
administration is very sensitive
about this and I don't blame them
because the administration is not
all together in agreement about
what's happened to me. I know
for a fact that some key members
of the administration did not
participate in Hie decision and
some of them regret it. So it is

The Ed Richer Story

not the administration. Princi-
pally involved is Vice President
Philpott. Alabama's loss is our
gain. A series of things happened
in *63 and '64 which called atten attention
tion attention to me. This involved civil
rights, the peace movement, action
that I undertook, statements that
I made and things that I wrote.
All of these activities were con constitutionally
stitutionally constitutionally protected activities.
My academic freedom has been
violated because the decision to
terminate my contract was made
with these activities in the minds
of the decision makers and these
activites were interpreted by
panicky members of the adminis administration
tration administration as injurious to the insti institution.
tution. institution. An academic decision not
to renew my contract simply was
not made. These activities include
being arrested In Ocala, which I
don't think was a critical thing,
organizing the Student Peace
Union, making public statements
about local civil rights activities
in the context of a municipal
election in March of '64 which
certain members of the adminis administration
tration administration felt that their candidates
would loose if the Student Group
for Civil Rights persisted in
picketing locally. I think that some
one in the administration triggered
the decision making process
because he felt that these activities
were not the proper activities of
an instructor in university college.
Q. BY THAT SOMEONE, DO
YOU MEAN DR. PHILPOTT?
A. The objective evidence
available to us. indicates that Dr.
Philpott took an abnormal interest
in me.
Q. WHAT DISTINCTION DO
YOU MAKE BETWEEN OTHER
UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL WHO
HAVE BEEN INVOLVED IN SIMI SIMILAR
LAR SIMILAR ACTIVITIES AND HAVE NOT
BEEN DROPPED?
A. There were four faculty
members who went to Ocala. The
Ocala incident is not a critical
one in this issue. The usual dis discourse
course discourse of my case points out thi*
the others are protected in one
way or another, but that I was the
vulnerable one.
Q. YOUR PETITIONING OF
THE COMMITTEE HAS BEEN
CRITICIZED AS A SMOKE
SCREEN TO PROMOTE A CAUSE
THE CIVIL RIGHTS CAUSE.
A. If it had been instigated to
promote a cause, it would have
been to siqiport academic freedom.
Maybe academic freedom and civil

RICHER, bottom left, faces 5-man committee.

rights have a connection. No, the
petition for reinstatement is based
on the fact that an Improper de decision
cision decision was made and due process
had been violated. It is very obvious
that my counsel is motivated by
this factor and not specifically out
of some cause, such as Negro
rights.
Q. HAS IT OCCURED TO YOU
PUT YOUR CASE IN ANY KIND OF
LARGER CONTEXT?
A. When you become a pub publicly
licly publicly visable sacrifice, in order
to purify the village, there seems
to be a compulsion on the part
of the villagers to begin heaping all
of their great anxieties, crimes,
sins on your back, so that when
you are driven out you'll take all
the poison of the village with you.
This is sort of a magical process
that is going on here. I have known
about the sacrificial process intel intellectually
lectually intellectually for years. I know it to be
a universal phenomenon. We do it
in our presidential elections, and
it's a commonplace event. We do
it on New Year's Eve, the old
comes out and the new comes in
and you hope to purify and you
get a new chance. But to find
yourself concretely in this pro process
cess process is to find unusual things
happening to you. There are fe fern
rn fern ales, for example, who
neurotically identify with about aboutto-be
to-be aboutto-be sacrificed animals. I have
been hunted more than I ever
hunted. We study it in C-5 in a
play called The Visit" and in
discussing "The Visit" the class
can barely contain Itself when they
recognize the process that is going
on in "The Visit." They know that
their teacher is involved in the
same process. It is an extremely
disturbing process to be involved
in. Os course, I'm an unwilling
scapegoat, which makes a dif difference.
ference. difference. I am self-conscious about
the* process so that I can defend
my sen against its tendency to
drive you insane, which is the
triumph of the process. In this
fashion Hie victim becomes really
fit for sacrifice. Everybody agrees
that he is mad. They single him
out, he goes road because he has
been singled out and then they are
all pleased that they were so wise
in singling this guy out. I think
to a large extent that the rumors
and hysterical talk comes from
the least stable element in the
village and these are the people
who are compulsively in need of
annual sacrifice. I found It very
instructive and I wouldn't undo
recent history for anything.

Friday, June 11, 1965, Th Florida Alligator,

Hi' -ate
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FOR RICHER: from left,
Richer, Baldwin and
Laughlin
k
FOR THE ADMINIS ADMINISTRATION:
TRATION: ADMINISTRATION:
UF Law School 9 s Far Farley
ley Farley

.
LAWYERS HUDDLE:
Farley left and Bald Baldwin
win Baldwin
T

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 11, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

wanted
1 GIRL to share 2 bedroom apart apartment
ment apartment behind Norman with 2 coeds.
$22.50 per month. Call 2-8810.
(C-148-ts-c).
2 STUDENT WIVES interested in
church nursery care. Sunday 10:45
to 12:15 am. Wesley Foundation,
University Methodist Church.
$2.00. Call Mrs. Charles Beall
2-8183, before 5. (C-148-lt-c).
.a. .
WANTED: Broken-down Vespa
or Allstate motor scooter. Need
not be in running condition. Call
376-8863. (C-148-lt-c).
DULLSVILLE? Spend a weekend
in New Orleans? Riders needed,
one-way or round trip. Flexible
departure time June 18-22. Call
6-4391 or 6-4318. (C-148-2t-c).
ROOMMATE (S) for Fall and
Spring term. SEG in EE needs
roommate to share apartment ex expenses
penses expenses this September. If
interested call Bill, Room 418,
2-9168. (C-148-3t-p).
MALE ROOMMATE wanted for
September. 2 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath
house, 3 years old. 10 minutes
drive from campus; $37.50 per
month plus utilities. Call Daniel
Shain 2-9138. (C-148-2t-p).
COED or female graduate student
to share modern air-conditioned
apartment close to campus with
graduate student for B term. $45
per month. 1931 NW 4th Ave. Call
Ext. 2764 or 378-1558. (C-148-
lt-p).
WORKING LADY, no drinking or
smoking from 35 to 50 to share
an apartment close to stadium end
of campus with secretary who
enjoys quiet life. Write c/o Florida
Alligator, Box 1, Room 9, Florida
Union. (C-147-2t-c).
RIDERS to Ulinois-Indiana, June
16th. Air-conditioned *65 Pontiac
Call 8-1273. (C-146-3t-c).
A FEW HUNDRED more hungry
budget minded students to enjoy
SPUDNUTS DONUT SHOP, 1017
W. Univ. Open every night till
midnight. (C-140-ts-c).
personal
SUMMER DAY CAMP. Jewish
community sponsored Camp Bnal
Israel opens Monday June 14 (con (continuing
tinuing (continuing thru August 6) 12:30 5:30
p.m. Monday Friday. Sports,
Arts & Crafts, Songs & Snacks.
Private tutoring, Jewish studies.
For more information contact Mr.
Jack Zucker, FR 8-1569 weekdays
6-7 pan. (J-148-3t-c).
GROUBP PLAYDAY, Sunday,
June 13. Happy Birthday Susan
Schneider Jay Rita Phyllis
Jacs Murph. (J-148-lt-p).
JOANNE: I had a wonderful time
Wednesday evening. CARL. (J (J---148-lt-p).
--148-lt-p). (J---148-lt-p).
HOUSE HUNTING IN MIAMI? We
have completely furnished 3 bed bedroom
room bedroom house on Key Blscayne dear
school and beach. Would like to
exchange for house in Gainesville,
September thru December. UF
professor. Call 378-1479. (J-147-
2t-c).

autos
*63 MONZA. Excellent condition
2 door, 4 speed, red leather in interior,
terior, interior, radio and heater, white
wall tires. Real sharp. $1385. Ext.
2575 (Rosa) or FR 2-3783 week weekends
ends weekends or nights. (G-148-lt-c).
1962 Corvair MONZA Sport coupe
automatic transmission, bucket
seats, radio. LOW MILEAGE. Will
trade for older car or motorcycle.
Call 376-8863. (G-148-2t-c).
ECONOMICAL *63 PLYMOUTH 2
door sedan. 6 cylinder, 25000 miles.
Very clean. Guaranteed. SI4OO.
Call 8-2793 after 5:30 p.m. (G (G---148-lt-c).
--148-lt-c). (G---148-lt-c).
1949 DODGE Coupe. Fine running
condition. Fair body. Perfect
for transportation. Must sell. A
good buy at $75. 8-2122. (G-148-
2t-p).
1958 IMP ALA Sport Coiqpe. V-8,
standard transmission, radio and
heater, tri-power. Call Wayne 2-
5374 after 7 p.ro. (G-148-4t-c).
1955 CHEVROLET Wagon, $275.
1950 PACKARD, $95. Call 376-
8371. (G-148-lt-c).
1962 AUSTIN HEALEY Sprite.
Fair condition. MUST SELL. Call
Alex Trent, 2-9303 after 6 p.m.
(G-146-3t-c).
1955 CHEVROLET Bel-Air. 4-
door, automatic transmission.
Good mechanical condition. Call
372-6202. (G-146-3t-c).
1957 PORSCHE Speedster, signal
red. Owned and carefully main maintained
tained maintained by Porsche enthusiast.
Equipment includes Michelin tires,
Marchal driving lights, Koni
shocks. Good car for gymkhana
and/or concours preparation.
Asking SISOO firm, including
spares. See at Miller Brown
Motors or call Dr. Pennypacker,
at Ext. 2661 or 376-8603. (G (G---143-6t-c).
--143-6t-c). (G---143-6t-c).
services
VACATIONEE RS our lovely furn furnished
ished furnished 2 bedroom, 2 bath near
WATERFRONT home in CLEAR CLEARWATER.
WATER. CLEARWATER. For rent month of July.
Call 2-7673. (M-146-3t-c).
IN a HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley-
Roosevelt Studios, 372-0300. (M (M---141-llt-c).
--141-llt-c). (M---141-llt-c).

gimmer Makes Bardot Look Like An
kward School Girl" Sat. Eve. Post
vw
EIXB S TECHNICOLOR*
(*m fmmKi b+r tn* Tim )
iat 1, 3, 5,7, 9 Out at 10:34
Dr^anAnnie|s^

real estate
3 BEDROOM, CCB house, kitchen
equipped. Central heat. Immacu Immacuately
ately Immacuately clean. Air conditioning
optionaL SSOO down and take over
payments. 2 blocks from Metcalf
Elementary. 2001 NE 15th Terr.
Call 376-1725. (I-148-ts-c).
ATTENTION MARRIED STU STUDENTS!
DENTS! STUDENTS! Two bedroom home on
nice lot dead-end street,
with privacy. Only $7500. Nothing
down. Homestead Exemption. FR
2-6408. (I-144-ts-c).
'
for sale
COMPLETE set golf clubs. 8 irons
Wilson Dyna-weight blades. 4
woods. Leather bag. Phone 376-
1834, 232-C, Flavet HI. (A-148-
3t-c).
1962 ALLSTATE Scooter, SIOO.
Portable Royal typewriter, S2O.
Also all kinds of LP Records.
376-5733, 1511-B NW 3rd Ave.
(A-148-2t-c).
FACTORY BUILT 8* hydroplane.
Good condition. Also 16 hp Mer Mercury
cury Mercury rigged for boat. Call Van
Williams, 6-7672. (A-148-2t-p).
ONE YEAR old Kelvlnator 16,500
BTU Air-conditioner, $169.1 1/2
year old Macy*s single mattress
and box springs, extra firm; SSO.
Call 376-8371. (A-148-lt-c).
PALACE RANCH HOME House
Trailer 8x42. Factory air airconditioning.
conditioning. airconditioning. Pine paneling. 2 bed bedroom.
room. bedroom. SISOO. Contact Art Sandlin,
666 Tolbert, 372-9220. (A-146-
st-p).
AIR CONDITIONER, Coldspot
11,000 BTU. Used one season.
ExceUent condition. $l3O. Call
376-6837. (A-147-2t-p).
One Room AIR CONDITIONER.
Call 8-1273. (A-146-3t-c).
1962 BMW Motorcycle R-27, 250
cc. S4OO. Call 8-2095 after 6 p.m.
(A-146-3t-c).
*6O PLYMOUTH, *6l ANGLIA, *65
SYMPHONIC STEREO CONSOLE
with Garrard turntable, one set
AMERICANA ENCYCLOPEDIAS.
Accepting offers, 6-0537.
(A-146-3t-p).

for sale
BOAT FOR SALE. 16 ft. Carter
Craft. 30 hp Evinrude motor .Gator
Tilt Trailer, wind-shield, canvas
top, remote controls, skiing equip equipment.
ment. equipment. A give-away at S6OO. Call
FR 2-3251 after 6 p.m. (A-142-
ts-c).
help wanted
BUSINESS MANAGER and two
advertising salesmen for a student
publication in Fall. Reply to P.O.
Box 13754, Gainesville. (E-148-
4t-p).
MALE STUDENT HELP. Good
short order cook. Interested in
golf. Attractive employment. Con Contact
tact Contact Ironwood Golf Club. 376-0080.
(E-147-3t-c).
PART-TIME Secretary for Fall.
General office work. Call Hillel
Foundation 2-2900 or apply in
person 16 NW 18th Street. (E (E---147-2t-c).
--147-2t-c). (E---147-2t-c).

Save with Budget' Rent-A-Car:
$ c
a tall 24-honr day mile*
only
the gas you use.
The cars are the same! The price is the difference!
Insurance
Businessmen and Students know fflKjL AUDfIiE
the importance of keeping expenses WS
down. So does Budget. Thats why Iflfitf y^ar
our rates are less. You can save up
to 40ft by calling Budget!
CALL 378-1010
Fr ~ w,lk u d 527 W. Uni v. Ave.
Bndgd*Rent-A-Car of (Trailways Bus Terminal )
Gainesville 4UD4CT MMT-A-C** COH*!
[MuISEHIB STARTS *% COLOR
BMrt-w wwartg m TOHITE J HITS
first area showing
From the famed classic that has fascinated |
I over 14,000,000 readers in 15 languages' I
I *%s r -J
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lost & found
FOUND: Blue note cards on
Metabolism and a black leather
tobacco pouch between Flint and
Leigh. Call 372-9182 or 737 Tol Tolbert.
bert. Tolbert. (L-148-lt-p).
LOST: Man's watch at Wauburg
Playday. Call Ed at Ext. 2741 or
at 6-6458 after 7:30 p*m. (L-148-
2tc).
ALLIANCE
TV SERVICE
Fast, Expert Service
on all makes
TELEVISION
RADIO
STEREO
10% DISCOUNT
on parts to all
U of F students
817 W. Univ Ave
Phone 376-9955



I for rent
TIFUL 2 bedroom Cypress
id, air-conditioned, apart apart-1
-1 apart-1 block from campus. SIBO
month. 3 coeds or males*
i*R 6-8366 after 5 for appoint appoint(B-146-3t-c).
(B-146-3t-c). appoint(B-146-3t-c).
CONDITIONED Furnished
nent for 38. $l3O. Call
135. (B-146-3t-c).
ACTIVE Room with private
ice in quiet modern home,
for student who needs a
ible place to study. FR 2-
(B-146-ts-c).
ISHED House Trailer near
rsity for couple or single
n. Partly air-conditioned,
er month. Phone 376-8063.
6-ts-c).
tTMENT, 3 bedroom. Extra
. Partially furnished. New
sn. Ideal for 3 graduate stu stu.
. stu. Quiet area. SBS per month.
required. 023 NE 3rd Ave.
992. (B-147-ts-c).
LE STUDENTS to share large
onditioned room in private
. Separate units. Study room,
hen, utilities and linens
led. 231 SE 2nd St. (B-147-
SUB-LEASE for B term 1
block from campus. Furnished
12 bedroom apartment with kit kit!
! kit! chen. Excellent for 2 people or
I family. SBS per month. Call 372-
7453 before 9:30 a.m. or from 4
to 7:30 p.m. (B-146-4t-c).
MOTORCYCLES I
For The Discriminating I
CYCLERAMA I
It figures!
5 Bjjj3
JANE FONIU
ISM
Ibauodl
H I in COLUMBIA COLO* |

for rent
2 BEDROOM air-conditioned furn furnished
ished furnished apartment. 3 blocks from
campus. 1616 NW 3rd Ave. Avail Available
able Available June 15th to September Ist.
SBS/month. 372-0481, Mr. Kaplan.
(B-147-ts-c).
4 BEDROOM, 1 bath, furnished,
air-conditioned apartment. Ideal
for 4 or 5 students. Available
September. $l5O. 220 SE 7th St.
Phone 372-0481 for appointment.
Mr. Kaplan. (B-147-ts-c).
2 BEDROOM furnished apartment.
319 NW Ist Street. Ideal for 4
students. SIOO per month. 372-
0481, Mr. Kaplan for appointment.
(B-147-ts-c).
AIR-CONDITIONED EFFICIENCY
Apartment. Available for **B
term. No deposit, just move in.
Call FR 2-2736 anytime. (B-148-
2t-p).
UNEXPECTEDLY AVAILABLE.
Convenient and comfortable effi efficiency
ciency efficiency apartment for summer
school. For mature people. Apply
321 SW 13th Street. No car needed.
(B-148-lt-c).
MODERN Furnished apartment,
share with male graduate student.
Air-conditioned, S9O, B-term. Apt.
#42, 1824 NW 3rd PI., Roberto
Pagano, Campus Ext. 2271. (B (B---148-st-p).
--148-st-p). (B---148-st-p).
AIR-CONDITIONED, Furnished 1
bedroom apartment. S9O/month
until August 15th, sub-lease, 3
blocks from campus. 372-6957. (B (B---148-3t-c).
--148-3t-c). (B---148-3t-c).
MODERN 1 bedroom, furnished
air-conditioned apartment avail available
able available immediately. Sublet till
August 30th. Call 372-7178 any anytime.
time. anytime. 3 blocks from campus. (B (B---148-3t-p),
--148-3t-p), (B---148-3t-p),
1 MALE STUDENT to share
furnished air-conditioned apart apartment
ment apartment with swimming pool. 38.
$35 per month plus 1/4 utilities.
376-2281. (B- AVAILABLE June 15th- August
15th. Large furnished house near
UF. For responsible party, chil children
dren children considered. Also furnished
air-conditioned suite. Call 376-
5673. (B-148-2t-c).
FURNISHED Apartment for 2
people, 4 blocks from campus.
3 1/2 large rooms, sublet entire
B-term for sllO. Call 372-3029,
6 to 8 p.m. (B-148-3t-c).
COED or female graduate student
to share spacious and cool 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment with working
mother and baby starting immed immediately.
iately. immediately. $32.50 per month plus 1/2
utilities. 1240 SW 14th St., Call
378-1792 between 10 and 12 a.m.
(B-143-ts-c).
1
APARTMENT Completely furn furnished.
ished. furnished. One bedroom, swimming
pool, all electric kitchen, central
heat, air-conditioning. S9O per
month. Available immediately.
Couple preferred. 372-3826. (B (B---137-ts-c).
--137-ts-c). (B---137-ts-c).
CLOSE TO CAMPUS. Air-con Air-conditioned
ditioned Air-conditioned apartment for 38. S7O to
S9O per month. 1518 and 1530 NW
4th Ave. Call 376-4353 evenings.
(B-141-ts-c).
FURNISHED 2 bedroom air-con air-conditioned
ditioned air-conditioned apartment. One block to
campus. $97 per month. Call
McKinney-Green, 372-3617. (B (B---144-st-c).
--144-st-c). (B---144-st-c).
Very nice 2 BEDROOM Apartment
on large lot. Plenty of shade.
Couple preferred. 376-1746. SIOO.
(B-146-ts-c).

1967 SEC Title Possible-With Owens

Mondays signing of All-America eager Andy
Owens may well have ushered in a new era in UF
basketball.
The 6*6 Tampa Hillsborough star is probably
the best high school basketball player Florida has
ever produced. He has all the credentials that
greats are made of.
Owens can shoot from inside and outside with a
great variety of shots including the jumps and
hook. He is also a competent ball-handler and has,
on occasion, outleaped much taller opponents. In
addition, he is a sharpshooter from the foul line.
While leading Hillsborough to the state finals twice
in as many years, Owens averaged close to 25
points per game for a team which had two other
outstanding players. To top off his high school career,
he was named to the 10-man coaches All-America
team, becoming only the second Florida boy in the
last decade to achieve this high honor. St. Peters Petersburgs
burgs Petersburgs lan Morrison was the other.
Owens may be just the man Coach Norm Sloan

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Friday/ June 11 1965 # The Florida Alligator/

At The Knothole

By ANDY MOOR
Sports Editor

needs to take the Gators to a 1967 SEC Champion Championship,
ship, Championship, something UF has never done. In that season,
giants Jeff Ramsey and Gary Keller will be seniors
as will guard Skip Higley. They should be seasoned
enough at that time to give the club the leadership
It needs. Other expected lettermen who will return
in *67 wUI be juniors Harry Winkler, Gary McElroy
and Mike Rollyson.
Coming up from the freshmen squad with Owens
will be two more top notch guards, Mickey Nor Norlander
lander Norlander and Kurt Feazel. This pair of out-of-staters
was sought by more than 50 schools (as was Owens)
and should add necessary depth to the UF attack.
Tommy Bell, St. Petersburg Northeasts scholar scholarathlete,
athlete, scholarathlete, may also bolster the squad.
The quality program of recruiting, adapted
by Sloan this year, seems to have paid big dividends.
Instead of signing just any of the top Florida
players, Sloan searched the country far and wide
for top-notch ball players who showed top potential,
both athletically and scholastically.

College
Coeds Shoot
For Golf Title
UF will host the 21st U. S.
Women's Collegiate Golf
Tournament June 20-25.
Sixty-six of the nation's top
coed golfers will be on hand for
the contest, which will be held
at the University Golf Club.
British Amateur champion Carol
Sorenson heads the field. Miss
Sorenson, a zero handicapper from
Arizona State University, won last
year's Trans Mississippi
Championship and was a member
of the U. S. Curtis Cup Team,
which defeated Great Britain in
overseas action. The Jamesville,
Wis., native copped the 1962
collegiate title and is a former
Wisconsin state champion.
Last year's winner, Patty Shook
of Valparaiso, Ind*, University,
will be in the university city to
defend her crown. She and Miss
Sorenson are the only zero
handicappers entered.
What caliber of competition
challenges the top pair? The list
includes Roberta Albers, Univer University
sity University of Miami, (Fla.); Sharon
Wilder, Aquinas, (Mlclu), College;
Patty Johnson, University of North
Carolina; Sue Hilton, University
of Western Ontario; Ann Baker,
University of Tennessee and Nlcki
Nordstrom, Arizona State, all two
handicappers.
The 66 participants represent
43 colleges and universities from
25 states and Canada, according
to tournament chairman Betty
Graham. Only 51 coeds competed
in the 1964 contest, held at East
Lansing, Mich.
Play is scheduled to begin on
Sunday, June 20, with a practice
round and is to continue with
Monday's qualifying round while
match play will begin Tuesday and
culminate Friday morning with the
finals. Rounds will start daily at
8:30 a.m.
" l \ 'At*

Page 7



\, The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 11, 1965

Page 8

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All America Owens Inks

Andy Owens, a six foot six inch
Tampa Hillsborough center, was
signed Monday to a basketball
scholarship by Gator basketball
coach Norman Sloan,
The talented pivot man was
named to the Coaches' High School
All-American basketball team,
Owens was reportedly sought by
an estimated 55 colleges. He
scored well in the classroom,
also, and graduated with a B plus
scholastic average.
Owens poured an average of
27.2 points per game through the
hoop in his senior year. He led
the team to the finals of the State

Gators To Host
USTFF Decathlon

The U. S. Track and Field Fed Federation
eration Federation Decathlon Championship
will be staged June 25-26 at the
UF track, Gator track coach Jim Jimmy
my Jimmy Carnes announced Tuesday.
Carnes, the meet director, said
invitations have been sent to out outstanding
standing outstanding decathlon performers
around the nation and that a field
of some 15-20 is expected to
compete.
The meet is open to all amateur
performers. Anyone wanting to
participate who didn't receive an
invitation should contact Carnes.
The decathlon will be scored by
the latest IAAF scoring table with
the first five finishers receiving
trophies.
Events to be run include the 100
meter dash, broad Jump, 16-pound
shot, high jump and 400 meter
run, all scheduled for Friday.
North All-Star
Cagers Named
North team for the summer high
school all-star basketball game in
Gainesville was announced
Wednesday by Carey McDonald,
Executive Secretary of the Florida
Athletic Coaches Association.
The North-South cage classic is
sponsored by the Florida High
School Activities Association and
will be held July 31 at Florida
Gym.
North coach will be Joe Houston
of Grand Ridge.
The Yankee squad includes
Larry Goff (Gonzalez Tate), Henry
Ezell (GracevUle), Tommy Lee
(Pensacola Senior), Dennis Hackle
(Jasper), Wayne Long (Jackson (Jacksonville
ville (Jacksonville Forrest), Ronnie Sapp
(Fernandina Beach), Jerry
Beckham (Cedar Key), Dennis Can Cantrell
trell Cantrell (Daytona Beach Seabreeze),
John Parker (Orlando Edgewater)
and Ladon Boyd (Pensacola Es Escambia).
cambia). Escambia).
Rainouts Curtail
Murals Softball
Rainouts played havoc with the
intramural softball schedule for
the week and, consequently, the
semi-finals and finals have been
moved back.
Winners in the four brackets
were the Purple Bras, Buster
Buds, Flavet IH and Pi Lambda

High School Basketball
Tournament in each of his last
two seasons.
This latest recruit brings
Sloan's total to six. Owens joins
Tom Bell, St, Petersburg North Northeast;
east; Northeast; Kurt Feazel, Harrisburg,
Illinois; Mickey Norlander, Vir Virginia,
ginia, Virginia, Minnesota; Neal Walk,
Miami Beach High; and Spunk
Bryant, Gulf Coast Junior College,
Miss.
Bell signed an academic
scholarship, but says he intends
to play for the Gators. Bryant
will be eligible to play for the
varsity next season.

Saturday events feature the 110
meter high hurdles, college discus,
pole vault, javelin, and 500 meter
run. Starting time for both days
is 2 p.m.

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IN ALL-AMERICA GAME

Dupree on East Squad

St. Louis-bound All-American
Larry Dupree, captain of the 1964
Fightin" Gators, will perform in
the fifth annual All-America Game
in Buffalo, New York, on June 26.
Playing for the east squad, the
speedy, shifty, and hard-running
halfback reports directly to the
National FootbaU League
Cardinals after the game.
Leading ground gainer each of
the past three seasons for UF,
the 195 pound team leader piled
up a career total of 1,727 yards
rushing in spite of bad breaks
that would have halted most
gridders.
Though plagued by sickness and
Gators, Seminoles
Split in Baseball
Florida State lost out in the
NCAA regionals Wednesday, but
the Seminoles managed to accu accumulate
mulate accumulate a 32-11 overall record
which compares favorably with
UF's 20-13.
The teams fought to a stalemate
in their games, however, as each
won two contests. At Perry Field,
the Gators won 8-6 and were
beaten by Coach Fred Hatfield's
charges 3-2, In Tallahassee, FSU
won the first test by a 5-4 count
but the Gators took the second
11-10.

Injuries during his last two
seasons Dupree was the Gators'
best blocker and strongest, fastest
runner. He led the club to a 7-3
malic in 1964,
The versatile scatback made
not one, but two AU-America
teams. First Look Magazine
honored him, and then he was
named to the first team of the
American Football Coaches
Association's All-America.
Dupree will join two other
Florida food)all standouts for the
east. Former Florida A&M ace,
Bob Hayes, "the world's fastest
human" will report later to the

See Whats New ia
f **'
The Browse Shop
OF TIME AND THE RIVER Thomas Wolfe
THE WISH TO FALL ILL Dr. Karin Stephens
SENSORY PSYCHOLOGY Conrad Mueller
THE EDUCATION OF TEACHERS
.. .Hodenfield & Stinnett
GRADUATE RECORD EXAM Edward Gruber
TECHNIQUE OF THE NOVEL Thomas Uzzell
INTERMEDIATE QUANTUM MECHANICS.. .Bethe
TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
ELEMENTARY COORDINATION CHEMISTRY..Jones
.SOLAR ENERGY ....Row
HOODED AMERICANISM David Chalmers
Canpes Shop & Bookstore


NFL Dallas Cowboys. Miami
University completes Floridas
contribution with mammoth 6-5,
230-pound Fred Brown, tri-captain
of the 1964 Hurricanes. At end,
Brown will be the tallest on the
East Squad.
Playing both ways, but ma&ly
on defense, die lengthy Californian
still managed to pull down 11
passes for 138 yards. The Los
Angeles Rams drafted him as a
third round pick.
The annual affair is co cosponsored
sponsored cosponsored by the American
Football Coaches Association and
The Buffalo Evening News.