Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
|h| THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR^

BURKE
. .Takes reins

Board Loses
Epperheimer

William Epperheimer, executive
secretary to the Board of Student
Publications submitted his resig resignation
nation resignation yesterday.
Gator Advisor
Is Proposed
A full-time faculty advisor for
The Florida Alligator was pro proposed
posed proposed at yesterday's meeting of
the Board of Student Publications.
The proposal, introduced by
Board chairman John Webb, would
create a Job of advising The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator in all editorial policy and
publication. Present at the meet meeting
ing meeting to back the idea was Dean of
StixtentAffain^ste^lale.
See editorial on P, 4
mmmmmmmmmmmmmamm
NO action was taken further than
discussion of the proposal.
Immediate reaction was mixed.
Strongly against the proposal was
board member A1 Leonard, only
student member present, and
Alligator Editor David West.
''The Idea of additional aid to
The Alligator in itself isn't bad,"
said West, "but this is a wolf
in sheep's clothing."
According to Webb, the idea will
be formally discussed by board
members over die summer.
m .m.mamUMAV.V.VAV.V,

Lakeside Lassies Vie for 6 Miss Wauburg 9 Tomorrow

Canoe jousting, sld shows, folk singing, and a
beauty contest, will highlight the annual fun in
the sun** recreation day at Camp Wauburg tomorrow.
Ed Koren, 2VC, chairman of Playday, predicted
that approximately 2,000 students will attend the
activities. The bus to Camp Wauburg will be running
from 9:30 aon. to 6 pan. to accommodate travelers.
Beginning at 1:13, the activities will feature
pony rides all day for die children and two ski
divers representing the North Central Florida Jump
Club.
The beauty contest to determine Kiss Wauburg
is scheduled tor 3 pan.
The list of contestants and their sponsors include:
Donna Kay Berger, Phi Gamma Delta; Lynda Beth
Lippman, Delta Phi Epsilon; Karen Campbell, Phi
Kappa Tan; Debbie Dalehite, Phi Mu; Jana Feldman,

Vol. 57, No. 146

EPPERHEIMER
.Illinois-bound

In a special Board meeting,
Epperheimer said he was resigning
in order to Join the Journalism
faculty at Southern Illinois Uni University.
versity. University. He will also hold a similar
position to his post here
supervising business management
and production of the school's daily
paper.
He came here in 1962 as student
publication advertising manager
and was later appointed executive
secretary in 1963 when K. B.
Meurlott resigned.
For a successor, the board
elevated Gary Burke, student
publications advertising manager
lor the past two years. Burke, 26,
is a UF graduate and former
publications student business
manager.
For the present, Burke will
serve as acting secretary until
the board finalises its plans for
a possible reorganization of posi positions
tions positions in the Union basement.
Epperheimer has previously
edited newspapers in Illinois and
New York.
In accepting the resignation to
be effective June 30, Board of
Student Publication Chairman John
Webb praised Epperheimer tor his
accomplishment and guidance he
has given the Board and student
publications in recent years.
-A' ...............a... mm m m m a-

Pi Lambda Phi; Cindy Fenton, Delta Tau Delta;
Anita Garcia, Alpha Delta Sigma; Cindy Hampton,
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Jeanine Louise Husber, Arab
Club; Lin Mantel, Phi Gamma Delta; Sandra Kay
Smith, Phi Mu; Janie Steiner, Sigma Nu; Sandra
Shapiro, Alpha Epsilon Phi; Lynda Woodbury, The
Bent Card Coffee House.
More than $250 worth of prizes will be awarded
the winners.
Judges include Bruce Culpepper, SG president;
Dr. Frank Mature, executive committee member of
IFC; Brooks Henderson, assistant basketball coach;
Norm Sloan, head basketball coach; Harvey Sharron,
Florida Blue Key; SG Vice President Dick Thompson
(summer president of the FU Board), and Dr. Delbert
Sterrett, program director of the Florida Union.


University of Florida, Gainesville

EDUCATORS BREATH SIGH OF RELIEF
'Academic Freedom'
Bill Dies off Floor

The Academic Freedom' bill is
dead.
The bill, to regulate the sche scheduling
duling scheduling of speakers at state
universities, died quietly
Wednesday night the House
Higher Education Committee
called off for the second time a
scheduled public hearing on the
The bill had aroused the
opposition of state university per personnel
sonnel personnel and students.
"While the bill was reportedly
tor academic freedom, it was in
fact administratively un unworkable,"
workable," unworkable," Vice President for
Academic Affairs Robert B.
Mautz said Thursday. With the
number of speakers which appear
at toe UF in one day, it would
make a restrictive rather than a
liberating law, be said.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz
Journied to Tallahassee on Mon Monday
day Monday to testify against toe bill but
Rain to Fall
On Norman
"Rain" will definitely come to
the UF campus next week, if not
inform of that aqueous liquid from
above, then at least in the form
of toe Colton-Randolph play.
The Florida Players presenta presentation
tion presentation of the saga of Sadie Thompson
featuring Diana Hollingswroto and
Richard Strahan will run next.
Wednesday through Saturday, June
9-12.
Tickets for "Rain" will be
available starting at 3 p.m. the
afternoon of performance at the box
office at Norman Hall Auditorium.
Students with ID cards may pick
up tickets at no charge. General
admission tickets are 80 cents,
and there is a 55 cent charge for
high school students.
Curtain for toe Wednesday and
Thursday night shows is at 7:30
p.m. On Friday and Saturday eve evenings
nings evenings the performance begins at

never had a chance to speak to
the committee when the hearing
on the bill was proposed.
Dr. Reitz was joined by offi officials
cials officials of Floridas top state
universities and colleagues from
many private institutions. No
healing was ever made on the
bill. Privately, members of the
Higher Education Committee had
said the bill would not be voted
out of toe committee to toe House
calendar.
The state educators had put their
appearance in anyway to get on

Richer Hearing
Sunday at 1:30

Instructor Edward J. Richers
hearing before the Academic Free*
dom and Tenure Committee is set
for Sunday at 1:30.
The committee will meet in
Room 223 of the Law Buildii*
to decide if it has jurisdiction
in the case of the controversial
faculty member's case.
The hearing will be open to the
public at the request of Richer.
Richer is asking for a review
of the decision not to renew his
contract at the UF.
There is a question of
jurisdiction because the UF con contends
tends contends that the decision not to renew
Riche r*s contract was an adminis administrative
trative administrative decision and not subject
to review by the committee.
The council for die UF and
Richer met with Ernest M. Jones,
Committee chairman on Thursday
of last week to discuss the case.
At die present time, neither side
is willing to make a statement
about the case.
Representing Richer will be UF
law faculty members, Stanley K.
Laughlln and Fletcher N. Baldwin.
Representing the UF will be Robert

|p
I 1
I V*
m &
P
f
I i

Friday, June 4, 1965

record against any such legislation
as the academic freedom bill which
was sponsored by the now defunct
Legislative Investigations
Committee.
Even if the committee had re reported
ported reported the bill out to the House
and the House had passed it,
there was no comparable com committee
mittee committee set up in the Senate. This
action would have been necessary
before the Senate could take a
vote on the bill. And with the Legis Legislature
lature Legislature closing today, the bill was
destined to death even before its
birth.

J. Farley, former dean of the
College a? Law at the University
of Mississippi. Farley is presently
on the UF law faculty.
Richer was originally notified
his contract would not be renewed
in March, 1964. Last trimester
a petition of over 1,200 student
names was presented to the
administration protesting Rlcher*s
dismissal.
Haviser Keeps
Flavet Seat
Following a see-saw battle tc
determine who was the real chair chairman
man chairman of the UFs Mayor's Council,
Skip Haviser appears to have the
position in hand.
Andy Baboulls yesterday with withdrew
drew withdrew his petition from the Honor
Court which had asked for the
election to be reversed and declare
him the winner.
Baboulls contested the election
because the March 22 election was
held under the old Mayor's Council
voting procedure. Baboulls said he
felt for the good of stability for
the council he would withdrew his
petition.



Page 2

l, The Florida Alligator, Fr?day / June 4, 1965

8,000 Gator Greeks Hit Streets

Eight thousand Gator Greeks,** the Inter-Fraternity Councils
official publication to incoming freshmen and perspective rushees,
have hit the streets.
The annual issue was edited by Jim Carleto in May and has been
printed in magazine format instead of the traditional newspaper
layout.
The 14-page booklet features pictures of fraternity activities,
letters of welcome from administrators and student leaders,

Industrial Editors
At JM Huddle
Fifty Industrial editors from
throughout Florida are expected
to attend a conference at the UFs
School of Journalism and Com Communications
munications Communications today through Sunday*
The editors will hear famed
after-dinner speaker Dr. Frank
Goodwin, professor of marketing
at the University tonight.
Journalism faculty will conduct
sessions on photography, typo typography
graphy typography and layout Saturday.
A special panel at 3:20 p.m.
Saturday features Malcolm King
of General Telephone Company,
Freda J. Sanders of Prudential
Insurance and Joe Ward of Minute
Maid discussing problems en encountered
countered encountered by industrial editors.
A program highlight will be
Saturday's luncheon address via
long-distance telephone from
Cleveland, Ohio by William J.
Girgash, president of the Inter International
national International Council of Industrial
Editors. Southern Bell Telephone
Company is setting up special
two-way speakers for the talk.

Elementary Education Opportunities
Termed f Terriffic 9 for Men

Opportunities for men in ele elementary
mentary elementary education today are
terrific according to T. A.
Anderson, Coordinator for
Education Placement Service.
Although many men have in the
past felt that teaching elementary
school was ''beneath their
dignity, positions are opening
19 so rapidly for men that they
can no longer be ignored.
Male elementary teachers are
in such demand that men advance
rapidly to principal positions.
Secondary school principals are
frequently shifted into elementary
princlpalships after a short sum-
Quakers Slate
Sunday Discussion
The Society of Friends (Quakers)
will have a discussion open to
interested persons on Sunday at
the Meeting House, 1921 N.w.
2nd. Avenue, at 10 a.m. The topic
will be 'Nonviolent Warfare* part
n. The discussion leader will be
Dr. Paul L. Adams.
UF Study Eyes
Tax Structure
The ratio of property assess assessment
ment assessment levels to actual market
value of property one of the
most crucial problems facing local
governments in Florida is
spotlighted in a study released by
the UF*s Public Administration
Clearing Service.
Robert J. Garrett and Dr. Roy
L. Lassister Jr. are co-authors
of The Burden of Ad Valorem
Real Property Taxes Under Vary Varying
ing Varying Assessment Ratios.*'
The Garrett-Lassiter study
breaks new ground for the impact
of fractional assessments on the
distribution of the burden of die
real property tax.

UF in National Spotlight

Two national magazines focus
their spotlight on the UF this week
with a pair of pictorial articles
devoted to far-ranging topics.
Mademoiselle Magazines,**
June edition includes seven pages
of photos by Duane Michels illus illustrating
trating illustrating fashion trends in bathing
suits and dresses modeled by
University coeds.
Associate Fashion Editor Bar Barbara
bara Barbara Smallwood coordinated
arrangements for the assignment
three months ago and used eight
students for pictures on campus
and at Daytona Beach. The group
included Ann Breslauer, Vicki
Smith, Norma Marks, Penny Port,
Paula Maret, Karole Kirchhoff, Sue
Potts and Nan de Grove.
U. S. News and World Report
Magazine had a story in its May
10 issue on the UFs J. Hillis
Miller Health Center. Readers
Digest is making plans to reprint
the article in its July edition.
The June 15 issue of LOOK
offers an eight-page feature on
final examinations at the Uni University,
versity, University, using freshman coed
Barbara Blake of Roanoke, Va.,
as its principal subject. Picture

mer school program.
Anderson stressed that male
elementary teachers are particu particularly
larly particularly needed to give the school
child a better idea of the male
and female role in society.
Psychologically, a good
balance between men and women in
elementary education will neutra neutralize
lize neutralize complex extremes suffered
by young children,* said Anderson.

Kisers Office Equipmeit
604 North Main Street
WE HAVETh f illrin IN STOCK
THAT ARE 30" X 54" OR 32" X 60"
WOOD...USED...SOLIDI
JUNE CLOSE-OUT AT THE
RIDICULOUS LOW PRICE OF
CITY AUTOMATIC |
TRANSMISSION, INC I
1409 S. Main St. Hi. 372-5196 I
Specializing in Transmissions Only |
All Work Guaranteed I
Free Pickup & Delivery I
10 Per Cent Discount I
To AH Florida Students
I Showing Identification §

i_* *_iViViVAVaViViViVi'i'AVi

a color cover. IFC paid approximately SI,OOO for the publication.
We published early this year so that the Greeks could be used
by fraternities during summer rush, pre-registration sessions,
and Fall Rush Week,** said Jim Hauser, president of IFC.
This Gator Greek is among the finest fraternity publications
printed. There have been outstanding comments from members of
the administration and students on the fine quality and presentation
of our system,** he said.

Editor Betty Leavitt and Photo Photographer
grapher Photographer Charlotte Brooks spent
12 days here before and during
Music Teachers
In Conference
Music teachers from throughout
Florida will participate in the con concluding
cluding concluding sessions of the 15th annual
Clinic-Credit Conference courses
in music on the UF campus today
and Saturday.
The in-service courses for
music instructors in state schools
are offered through the Florida
Institute for Continuing University
Studies, with the cooperation of the
Universitys College of Education
and the Department of Music.
The first portion of the annual
program is held in conjunction
with the state music clinic ami
convention of the Florida Music
Educators Association each
January. Teachers taking the
courses then work on an individual
project with professors of the
Department of Music.
This weeks emphasis will be
on What*s Happening in Music
and Music Education.** Fridays
first, general session at 9 a.m.
will be devoted to a discussion of
state and national legislative pro programs
grams programs In the arts, new educational
media in the teaching of music
and current activities of the
Florida Arts Council and the Music
Educators National Conference.
MOTORCYCLES I
For The Discriminating 1
CYCLERAMA I
378-288 21 SE2ndPI J

the winter trimester exam period
depleting Miss Blake at work and
lpUy

I DREAMED I WENT TO A COFFEE HOUSE IN MY
qL d f
iftrigLlMfaMJHfc- Hi u>
a wgjrf -o
I' jfcZ- >
' I OQ i
miss BENT CARD Lynda Woodbury
S6 Wirts Ss&) Hw to
Tin trows* Shop
~> '
r 4 -A,
POWER AND THE GLORY. .Graham Greene
LIE DOWN IN DARKNESS
007: A REPORT O.F. Snelling
THE POINT OF THE LANCE Sargent Shriver
PHILOSOPHY OF CIVILIZATION...AIbert Schweitzer
$&
THE NEGRO REVOLUTION IN AMERICA
...Brink & Harris
EVOLUTION OF PHYSICS......... .AIbert Einstein
THE AGONY OF MODERN MUSIC...Henry Pleasants
THE PUBLIC ARTS Gilbert Seldes
TOR THE DEAD John LeCarre
Caapis Skop t leokstore

Chamber Music
Concert Tonight
The Brask Schieber Duo
Robert Schieber, violist; and Wil Willard
lard Willard Brask, pianist; two faculty
artists of the UF Department of
Music, will present a chamber
music concert in University
Auditorium tonight at 8:15 p m#
Clarinetist Terence Small will
share the program with the
Brask-Schieber Duo. Small will
offer Hindemiths Sonate fur
Klarinette und Klavler" (1989) and
will join Schieber and Brask it
Mozarts Trio in E flat Major,
K* 493, for Piano, Clarinet, and
Viola. The viola and piano works
are Ecdes* Sonata In G Minor
and Schumanns Marchenbilder
(Pictures from Fairyland), opus



'Balloon Astronomy
Talk Slatod
Balloon Astronomy** is the
topic of a talk by Dr. John Strong,
Monday in Bless Auditorium in the
Physics Building.
Strong is professor of experi experimental
mental experimental physics in the Laboratory
of Astrophysics and Physical
Meterology at Johns Hopkins
University. The public is invited.
Dance Club
Slates Films
The Modern Dance Club,
Orchesis, will show films at 8
p.m. Monday in the Women's Gym.
There will be a regular dance
session before the presentation at
7 pan. All interested persons are
urged to attend, according to Myraa
Slotsky, president.

GETTING
married ?
j Secure treasured moments forever. /]/ Vy / M U \ \ 1 \ \
Only the very finest in thoughtful ness, /y / j I 11 \ \ -jj Ijl I
originality, dependability, equipment /. / 1 / / 11
and knowhow can preserve those '/ / / I j \ $0 l1
matchless memories in a truly incom- / /J J I / I \ A I
Coll 376-4995 for an appointment. jW \ *r \\ I
GOING TO CAMP?
BOYS SOCKS GIRLS
GYM PANTS SWEATSHIRTS SHORTS
T-SHIRTS TENNIS RACQUETS & BALLS
T-SHHJTS popu N W|NDBREAKERS (Bemrudas & Jama,cos)
NYLON TANK SUITS BLOUSES
Jimmie Hughes Sporting Goods
1113 W. University Ave. 1 Block East of Campus
[m m

r H
j I |
I GOTA mm I i
I MANS JOB E9 I I

Job Opportunity Picture Bright

Job opportunities tor grad graduating
uating graduating UF students are broader
today than ever before,** says
Maurice E. Mayberry, director of
the UF Placement Service.
Every year since 1 have been
here the demand tor college grad graduates
uates graduates has increased between two
and four per cent,** he said.
Os 500 graduating students who
were asked to fill out post-grad post-graduate
uate post-graduate questionnaires, 22 per cent
indicated they were already
employed vqpon graduation, 28 per
cent were going to graduate school,
7 per cent were going to fulfill
their obttgattog and 49

FOR UF GRADUATES

per cent were still unemployed.
Most of the 43 per cent who were
unemployed, however, apparently
found employment, because in the
three or four weeks that elapsed
between the time the question questionnaires
naires questionnaires were filed and the time of
graduation the University Place Placement
ment Placement Service was hard pressed to
find students to fill all the Jobs
available.
There was an obvious over overabundance
abundance overabundance of Jobs. Many accounting
Jobs went untouched along with
opportunities in chemical
engineering, civil engineering,
biological sciences, and

Friday, June 4, 1965, Th. Florida Alligator,

Journalism. There were also
opportunities in a broad number
of less technical Helds open to
students with varied educational
backgrounds.
John Paul Jones, placement
director for the School of
Journalism and Communications
said there were 81 openings for
only 37 graduating Journalism stu students.
dents. students. He also said that four or
five new Jobs are listed each week.
The big problem is trying to
fill the needs of the media, he
said. There are plenty of Jobs,
but not enough students to fill
them.
T. A. Anderson, Coordinator of
the Educational Placement Service
said there are openings for school
teachers in almost any city in any
state.
Os the 233 April graduates from
the school of Education 25 per
cent were placed and, said Mr.
Anderson, 50 per cent were
probably offered jobs. He said that
on April 20 and 21 there were
52 recruiters from different parts
of the country in the Norman Hall
Gymnasium trying to match stu students
dents students with Jobs.
Mayberry said the job base is
spreading out, thus causing these
more varied opportunities. In the
past opportunities were more
limited to particular technical po positions.
sitions. positions. Today there is a greater
chance for advancement in a
greater variety of Jobs, he said.
UF Miss Trying For
College Queen
Miss Jo Ann Notarls, a senior
at the UF, has been selected as
one of the most outstanding col college
lege college girls in the State of Florida.
She has earned a trip to New York
City, where she will compete for
the title of National College
Queen.
Based on her scholastic accom accomplishments
plishments accomplishments and her leadership in
campus activities, Miss Notarls
was chosen as State Winner from
among thousands of college stu students.
dents. students. She will represent Florida
during the 11th Annual National
College Queen Pageant. The City
of New York plays host to this
event each year, honoring collegi collegiate
ate collegiate women from across America.
oft ffeM£'BAK£l>
£Asa§na:
THE Hi T F Tub
UJhl olF CAMPUS
if
tormanellas
Amy
GATOR ADS SELL

Delta Enter Cindy
In Wauburg Contest
Delta Tau Delta entry in the
Miss Wauburg contest tomorrow
is pretty Miss Cindy Fenton.
Cindy hails from Eau Gallle,
where she won the title of Miss
Brevard County.
Prof To Review
Dr. William Childers, of the
UF English Department, will re review
view review the number one best seller
Herzog** Thursday night, June
10, at 8:15 p.m. in the Florida
Union Auditorium. A reception for
Dr. Childers will follow.
tracy sleeveless nothing
shirts are now ih stock
in all colors.. .and, we
just received a great new
sportswear group in bur burgundy
gundy burgundy and white that you
ought to flip fori come
see us. .
twig

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator, Friday June 4, 1965

/OTm THE Editor Managing Editor |
Florida ALLIGAIOK sZc

Student
Newspaper?
Well, it appears Dean Hale will have a dream
come true.
No, it is not having a regular voice-piece
to his student body. He will probably have
that soon via a column on this page
He wants a full time advisor to The Alligator
editorial stoff.
Hale wants someone to aid in putting out The
Alligator not all publications just The
Alligator.
He originally (at least for the past four
years) wanted the person to be called an advisor.
But when the proposal reared its bureaucratic
head before the Board of Student Publications
advisor became known as a pub publisher.
lisher. publisher.
The idea presented by Board Chairman John
Webb (Dean Hale was unavoidably detained from
the beginning of the meeting) appeared to go over
big with faculty members.
This publisher as proposed would, among
other things, aid in the training of a staff, help
edit copy, help with the assignment sheet, help
the board find a staff for the paper, help the
board in selecting new editors, and help pro provide
vide provide an overall educational process in putting
out the student*s newspaper.
Oh, he will stay away from the editorial page.
But under the Hale-Webb proposal, the
publisher ** will be able to call an emergency
Board meeting before deadline to seek the
faculty-majority board aid in ruling something
out of the paper.
The proposal did not pass. It never was
formally put into the form of a motion.
A committee ujas never appointed to study
it. Webb explained that I guess a few of us
will informally discuss it this summer.**
Hale explained the publisher** idea would
be a better way for the faculty to get closer
to the students.
Perhaps too close.
Good Luck, Bill
Bill Epperheimer is lea vin g the UFs
publication complex to go to join me faculty
at Southern Illinois University.
As Executive Secretary to the Board of
Student Publications, he was always a man
in the background. He sought neither notoriety
nor prominence in the area of student pub publications.
lications. publications. He felt that student publications
belonged to students and never encroached on
student initiative but was always available
for guidance.
Having worked with Bill for three years,
his name justly deserves to be on the mast masthead
head masthead of every student publication produced
for students. Os course ne would not have it
that way. But those who knew Bill, knew his
name was on the masthead that really counts.
It will remain there many years after his
departure.
I 7%. Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements and I
to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
' NO POSITION E GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible. 1
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving typ typogrcritical
ogrcritical typogrcritical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice is given to the Advertising Manager within
(I) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect Insertion of an advertise me:.,
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before nest insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida anu is
five times weekly except doing May, June and July when it is published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. Tbs Alligator is entered as second class
matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

Communication With Infirmary

By BRUCE CULPEPPER
Student Body President
ONE OF Student Government's primary
functions is to maintain an avenue of
communication between the Student Body and the
administration. Our task la
to inform the appropriate
divisions of the ad minis- ||p
tration of student complaints jr
and opinions. Then, in turn, if fflpl
we must relate back to those JB
interested students, the WT' fij
answers or solutions
reached. In this position, n
whereby we see both sides, |i||| W
Student Government must
encourage change when it is RJ?
practical or prudent and pro- dKU v t
mote toleration when change must be delayed.
ON TUESDAY, the Alligator contained a letter
from a student who had been mistreated at the
Infirmary. I am confident that the man who felt
the worst when reading about that incident was
Dr. William Hall, Director of the Infirmary.
i>r. Hall has Just recently come to the University

By STEVE VAUGHN
Managing Editor
The Pork Choppers'
obnoxious plan for
reapportioning the Florida
Legislature could result in
great forward strides for
the UF.
Those country boys are
scared stiff they might lose
their jobs foUowing the
court-ordered re apportion apportionment.
ment. apportionment. The courts 'one man,
one vote* ruling would wipe
out some legislative seats
from counties where they
count cows in the census.
So the Pork Choppers hud huddled
dled huddled in secret behind the barn
and devised a plan whereby
both the court's require requirements
ments requirements would be met and they
could keep their seats. The i
only trouble is under this
scheme is that the house
would jump to 200 from 112
members and the senate
to 90 from 44.
This would maintain
powerful committee chairs
mans hips and seniority for
the farm lads.
Now, the present state
capitol building could never
stand such a mass of
politicians, lobbiests, news
hounds, and hangers-on that
would result from this plan.
It would creak and crack and
moan and sooner or later
crash down upon the
legislators.
Obviously, there is only
one recourse under the pork
plan: move the legislature to
Florida Field. Only serious
change at the stadium would
be a much-demanded hard
liquor concession.
Even with these readily
available facilities, I can see
nothing but a bleak outlook
for the pork plan.

THIS WEEK

REAPPORTIONMENT-
Fla. Field Goes Wet

Dade County alone would
have 40 representatives and
as many as 80 senators. Just
about anybody could run, and
this would create, oh horror
of horrors, plenty of easy
state jobs for Florida Blue
Key Law School graduates.
Its doubtful there would
still be enough qualified can candidates
didates candidates and a thriving black
market trade in ringer
A vA "MINEI
/P-'Ai ALL
/ MINE!
mk
V<\
candidates from Georgia
would likely spring up.
With so many candidates
running around, election day
would no longer be election
day. It might take at least
one hour for conscientious
voters to puU all the levers.
Elections might draw out to a
week or two.
To some people election
week would be a grueling test
of endurance, since bars
would be shut down for Hie
week, in accordance with the
present state law.
The problem might be
solved by special levers in
critical locations 'labeled
"AH of the above," "AH of
the above except A and B,"

and is making a very sincere effort to upgrade
the infirmary facilities. He is conscious of
student needs and is seeking to correct those
practices which result in unsatisfactory and
inefficient care.
ADMINISTERING the Infirmary involves
weeding out the large number of students who
come there in order to escape tests or secure
pills and drugs for which there is no apparent
need, and then, rendering adequate aid to
students who merit attention. The first group
must be dealt with sternly while the latter
require sympathy.
KNOWING which treatment is appropriate
is sometimes difficult and occasionally leads to
unfortunate mistakes. Rudeness, however, re referred
ferred referred to in the letter, should never occur on
the part of either nurse or student. I'm sure
that such Incidents are the exception and not
the rule. Nevertheless, when mistreatment
occurs, Dr. Hall should be informed.
IF DR. HALL cannot be reached, then bring
your complaints to Room 310 of the Florida
Union. Pepy Hicks, Cabinet infirmary repre representative
sentative representative and I will relate the information to
the proper channels. That's our job. (

etc.
If everybody could ever
get elected, the legislature
might turn into something
with the organization of a
fraternity meeting with 300
brothers. Maybe the
governor could then be
placed on the blackball sys system
tem system to keep him in line.
To retain the great or organization,
ganization, organization, sense of brother brotherhood,
hood, brotherhood, and genuine concern
for the peoples' business
characteristic of present presentday
day presentday legislatures, they'd have
to import the UF's IBM
machine. Voting and legis legislation
lation legislation would be carried on
by punching the card in
appropriate places, and sen senators
ators senators would be introduced by
- saying, "The floor recog recog'l
'l recog'l nlzes Senator A7434," etc.
I All of this, of course, at
' risk of some legislators
claiming "loss of identity."
Some of the more daring
k might go so far as to bend
their IBM cards.
The poorest of all possible
* results of the pork plan would
. be the reinstatement of the
Johns Committee to
investigate .the legislature.
In light of all these results,
I am prepared at this time
to reveal the Florida
Alligator's sure-fire
reapportionraent plan,
guaranteed to work in any
state:
2/3 Finks 23zx Farris
County Reps. 1/2 Scott Kelley
" ~ ** * x
Charley Johns (34) (Leroy)
G. Stallings 4% senators
0 Ed BaU
Can their be any other
answer?



BMaftAtaiffKLLO
Editorial Page Editor
HARRY WAS an average averagetype
type averagetype gey an All-American
kid with a good pair of hands
whe teak his vitamins, loved
his parents, and wore his
goulashes when it rained.
HE HAD one fatal weakness,
however: he couldn't read
maps or understand
directions.
HARRY CAME to the UF
three: years ago and was
dropped his first week when,
on toe advice of a' Campus
Cop, he took a wrong turn
on his way from Hume to
Walker Auditorium and ended
up spending three days in a
Tigert rest room where he
met many lodul dignitaries.
THE ACADEMIC kingpins
he during this period got
Harry reinstated in school
and they chipped together to
buy him a seeing-eye dog.
Armed with dog and campus
map (which he bought from the
Hub for $52.39), Harry man managed
aged managed to make it to classes
for two months until his dog
was run over by a kamikaze
Japanese student on a bicycle.
Only the shrill yell of Ban Banzail"
zail" Banzail" alerted Harry in time
to save his own life.
THE NEXT major set-back
of his college career came
when he took a wrong turn on
his way to Donlgans and ended
up at the King Dollar Store.
When Harry returned to his
fraternity house that evening
to display his new wardrobe
of spats, triple-pleated
, underwear, and ripple-shoes,
he was instantly depledged.
He was so upset that he took
another wrong turn on his
ftwdMWil

Silence Is Golden
EDITOR:
As a resident of the celebrated Green Mansions* (occasionally
referred to as Appalachia South*') behind the KA House, I have a
complaint to register. The KA's just haven't been making enough
noise this summer.
During the Winter Trimester, I could look forward every weekend
to free concert of the finest in contemporary American and English
music every Saturday night, occasionally punctured by rebel yells
and masculine expletives. Even during die week nights, the soothing
sounds of popular music were wafted back to my residence from
the juke box on their front porch.
Now, however, an ominous silence dominates our neighborhood;
and I suspect that some invidious plot is being hatched in the
environs which will be directed against the lady who keeps com complaining
plaining complaining during die regular academic year.
Maybe, however, complete silence will be the most effective
tactic of all: for, given nothing to complain about, she may move to
greener and noisier pastures.
NAME WITHHELD
w
I
Wh KEEP ALERT TABLETS
THE SAFE WAY to stay alert
without harmful stimulants

NoDoz keeps you mentally
alert with the same safe re refresher
fresher refresher found in coffee. Yet
NoDoz is faster, handier, more
reliable. Absolutely not habit habitforming.
forming. habitforming. Next time monotony

Harry Was A Good Old Boy

way bade to Hume and spent
the night in toe sewage
THE NEXT day, Ms iwnd iwndmate
mate iwndmate Hied
complaint! -i j
with housing I Jg
that Harry #
was an un- 7^.
sanitary B& ig
compani o n, /
and Harry Bpl M
was quickly
banished to m/F
the Greeaydr
Castle s CASTELLO
behind the KA house. The
landlady, discovering that
Harry had been balled by a
fraternity, took pity on the
lad because she hated the KAs
who terrorized her by
breathing. She even led him to
class each morning until he;
got reoriented.
HARRY'S ONLY brush with
the Administration came when
by mistake, he got into a line
of picketninnies in front of
Tigert who were protesting
the UF's recent decision to
impeach Senator Charley
Johns because he had made
no progress (towards aPh.D.)
Harry thought it was the line
to the candy machine.
HIS FINAL demise came
when he decided to enroll for
a summer trimester because
he liked grad students for
teachers. One day, Harry
wandered into the library to
obtain a tome on the required
reading list for Discotheque
389 and discovered that he
would have to venture into the
stacks and get it himself.
NEEDLESS TO say, he took
a wrong turn at the Congres Congressional
sional Congressional Record and got lost.
After two days of wandering,

makes {you feel drowsy while
studying, working or driving,
do as millions do ... perk-up
with safe, effective NoDoz
Keep Alert Tablets.

CASTILLO COMMENTS*

through Ancient Mongolian
Literature, Harry had dis discovered
covered discovered only three empty beer
bottles and a pair of torn
panties. On the third day,
however, he took a wrong turn
by the Sanskrit Collection and
spied another human being.
IT TURNED out to be the
President of the Arab Club
who refused him assistance
when he discovered Harry
worked for toe Alligator. After
all, hadn't he failed to cover
the last International Week
Talent Contest?
FINALLY, on the fourth day,
driven beserk by thirst, Harry
scaled one of the bookcases
to survey the wasteland around
him. When the case collapsed,
he was buried under an aval avalanche
anche avalanche of American history.
The noise caused one librarian

I Be Gxquisrte
I fs' Be Rememeebl
/ v / Gainesville's Largest & Finest V X. S
II 1 / Selection of Bridal Fabrics! \ \ I
ft f\/ Special Discount to Bridal rjtn \ \ J 9
I /X Parties* \ ] 31
fj / / Visit Our Bridal Bar / f < \ B
I Custom Dressmaking J I
l r INSTRUCTION COURSES: Specialty Sewing ] I / >
\ *Sewing Original Designs l J S B
I \. \ *Knitting Pattern Making IyTHE ONLY SHOP OF ITS KIND I
N *Hat Making (For special sizes) / \IN FLORIDA V\
\ Finishing & Tailoring Needle Work j I \\
I V \£ oT" CoutmH *a/ 1 Gail Guy tins >\|
I rv <§# powrri £l|ojrl
I V X. J 2407 S W 13th STREET I
x y GAINESVILLE, I
MFR 8199 T X y / (Across From "Old Jerry's Drive-In) |
II iCEMINI I
I dm 4-DAY MISSION I
I imm OUTSTANDING RADIO COVERAGE I
I f Presented In Full By I
I FRISCH'S I
I BIG BOY RESTAURANT I
1 \ 2035 N.W. 13th Street I
1111143 x Bigjig||gfe
I =Rjj Get Complete I
I WDVH w Coverage From I
I more than .0 minutes Flondo $ Dominant |
I from space. Space Station I
I 980 KC WDVH -5000 WTS I
I ENJOY FIRSCH'S QUALITY FOOD TODAY! I

Friday, June 4, 1965, The Florida Alligator.

to have a stroke and another
to phone a complaint to toe
Honor Court that thoe4 nasty
students were stealing books.
THIS LATTER hardy soul,
hoping to catch the culprits
red-handed, boldly sauntered
into the stacks, armed, only
with a pinoenez and a copy
of "Tropic of Cancer" she
had been reading on toe sly,
before she decided to ban it.
Harry's tumble,, however,
caused a chain reaction; and
the stacks began falling like
dominoes. This latter event
caused Harry to be charged
posthumously with destruction
of state property,.
LATEST WORD on Harry is
that he took a wrong turn at
Purgatory and went straight
to Limbo, five miles from
Mic&Dopye

I
UFB INSURANCE
I The National Leader in
I serving the needs of
I college men.
|l Come to see us before
I you graduate
Campus representatives:
| Bob Sifrit
I Mel Ward
I George Corl

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator/ Friday June 4, 1965

* i
mmmmmmm^mmmmmm mm

JW Rent
FOR LEASE starting June 26th
Colonial Manor, Apartment 96.
Call between 5:30 and 9 p.m. FR
8-2265. (B-146-2t-c).
SUB-LEASE from B term 1
block from campus. Furnished 2
bedroom apartment with kitchen.
Excellent for 2 people or family.
SBS per month. Call 372-7453
before 9:30 a*m. or from 4 to
7:30 p.m. (B-146-4t-c).
FOR RENT OR SALE, 8x36, 1
bedroom trailer, new, air-con air-conditioned.
ditioned. air-conditioned. Shaded lot. Call 6-6217
or 6-9864. (B-146-2t-c).
COMFORTABLE Furnished apart apartments
ments apartments available in June. One block
from campus. Couples or 1 girl.
SBO and tg>. 376-6205, 1202 S. W.
Ist Avenue. (B-145-2t-c).
FURNISHED Apartment. 4 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, 1 bath. September occu occupancy.
pancy. occupancy. Can accommodate up to
5 or 6. $l5O per month. 372-0481,
Mr. Kaplan. (B-144-3t-c).
COED or female graduate student
to share spacious and cool 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom apartment with working
mother and baby starting July Ist.
$32.50 per month plus 1/2 utilities.
1240 SW 14th St., Call 378-1792
between 10 and 12 a.m. (B-143-
ts-c).
APARTMENT Completely furn furnished.
ished. furnished. One bedroom, swimming
pool, all electric kitchen, central
heat, air-conditioning. S9O per
month. Available immediately.
Couple preferred. 372-3826. (B (B---137-ts-c).
--137-ts-c). (B---137-ts-c).
CLOSE TO CAMPUS. Air-con Air-condltloned
dltloned Air-condltloned apartment for SB. S7O to
S9O per month. 1518 and 1530 NW
4th Ave. Call 376-4353 evenings.
(B-141-ts-c).
FURNISHED Apartment. 7 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, 2 bath, 3 blocks from
campus. September occupancy.
1616 NW 3rd Ave. Upstairs. $240
per month. Call 372-0481, Mr.
Kaplan. (B-144-3t-c).
FURNISHED Modern 1 bedroom
apartment. Air conditioned. 3
blocks from campus. Sublet June
15 to August 30th. FR 2-7178
after 5 p.m. (B-144-3t-p).
FURNISHED 2 bedroom air-con air-conditioned
ditioned air-conditioned apartment. One block to
campus. $97 per > ionth. Call
McKinney-Green, 372-3617. (B (B---144-5.-c).
--144-5.-c). (B---144-5.-c).
ROOM for rent for one female.
Close to campus. Kitchen
privileges. Available June 21st.
Call 2-1054 between 5:15 and 6
p.m. (8146-lt-c).
Very nice 2 BEDROOM Apartment
on large lot. Plenty of shade.
Couple preferred. 376-1746. SIOO.
(B* i 146-tf-c).
Beautiful 2 BEDROOM cypress
paneled, air-conditioned, apart apartment.
ment. apartment. 1 block from campus. SIBO
per month. 3 coeds or males.
Call FR 6-8366 after 5 for appoint appointment.
ment. appointment. (B-146-8tc).
AVAILABLE June 15th August
15th. Large furnished house near
U of F. For responsible party,
children considered. Also furn furnished
ished furnished air-conditioned suite. Call
376-5673. (B-146-2t-c).

For Rent
AIR CONDITIONED Furnished
apartment for SB. $l3O. Call
, 378-2135. (B-146-3t-c).
ATTRACTIVE Room with private
entrance in quiet modern home.
Ideal for student who needs a
desirable place to study. FR 2-
7883. (B-146-ts-c).
UNFURNISHED, Air-conditioned,
2 bedroom, CBS ranch house. 11
miles from UF. $125 per month.
Contact J. W. Robinson, Box 185,
Flagler Beach, Phone 439-2123.
(B-146-2t-c).
ONE BEDROOM split-level, air airconditioned
conditioned airconditioned apartment, modern,
furnished. Sublet term **B for
SBO/month. Call 2-7727. (B-146-
st-c).
FURNISHED House trailer near
University for couple or single
person. Partly air-conditioned.
S6O per month. Phone 376-8063.
(B-146-ts-c).
Autos
1962 AUSTIN-HEALEY Sprite.
Fair condition. MUST SELL. Call
Alex Trent, 2-9303 after 6 p.m.
(G-146-3t-c).
LEAVING COUNTRY: Have to
sell, *57 Pontiac. Good running
condition. $350. Call Ricardo, FR
2-2938. (G-146-2t-c).
*56 DE SOTO. An automobile
for the individualist. The body
is battered and bent, but mechan mechanically
ically mechanically it's a fine instrument. Phone
8-2998. (G-146-lt-c).
1955 CHEVROLET Bel-Air. 4-
door, automatic transmission.
Good mechanical condition. Call
372-6202. (G-146-3t-c).
1952 TD-MG. Completely rebuilt.
Must see to appreciate. $795. Will
finance. Call 2-1694^G-144-3t-c).
1957 PORSCHE Speedster, signal
red. Owned and carefully main maintained
tained maintained by Potsche enthusiast.
Equipment includes Michelin tires,
Marchal driving lights, Koni
shocks. Good car for gymkhana
and/or concours preparation.
Asking SISOO firm, including
spares. See at Miller Brown
Motors or call Dr. Pennypacker
at Ext. 2661 or 376-8603. (G (G---143-6t-c).
--143-6t-c). (G---143-6t-c).

Save with Budget* Rent-A-Cft'i
$ C I
a full 24-honr day a mile*
the fas yotTMk
The can are the same! The price is the difference!
/ W (Same Insurance Ccgpptage)
Ctreilf imn
Businessmen and Students know m(KJL BVDQKT.
the importance of keeping expenses HIT A CAM jfi?
down. So does Budget. Thats why WMftv WYTFWM
our rates are less. You can save up
to 40% by calling Budget!
CALL 378-1010
m* at 527 w Univ Ave
Blldfrt Wit A Car OI j wa y S Bus Termi nal)
Gainesville Qiw lueen mirt-h-AW cosr|

Wanted
c
WANTED: Broken-down Vespa
or Allstate motor scooter. Need
not be in running condition. Call
376-8863. (C-146-lt-c).
RIDERS to Illlnois-Indiana, June
16th. Air-conditioned *65 Pontiac.
Call 8-1273. (C-146-3t-c).
ATTENTION ACCOUNTING
MAJORS taking 212 or 311! Part
time work. 15 hours per week for
**B term. Possible appointment
as Assistant Business Manager of
Student Publications in FalL Apply
at Room 9, Florida Union. (C (C---146-tf-nc).
--146-tf-nc). (C---146-tf-nc).
TO RENT 3 bedroom furnished
house for fall trimester. UF pro professor.
fessor. professor. References. Call 378-1479.
(C-144-3t-c).
SURFBOARD, Minimum 9 feet 3
inches. Must be reasonable. Will
pay cash. Phone 2-6938. (C-144-
3t-c).
LANDLORDS Married Graduate
student arriving in September is
looking for furnished one-bedroom
modern apartment in S6O to S9O
per month rent range. Hell be here
in June to reserve apartment for
fall. If you have what hes looking
for, hed like to see it in June.
Call University Extension 2832
and leave your name, address, and
phone number for him to contact.
(C-140-tf-nc).
A FEW HUNDRED more hungry
budget minded students to enjoy
SPUDNUTS DONUT SHOP, 1017
W. Univ. Open every night till
midnight. (C-140-ts-c).
' r
Read Estate
: Y _, [ ; ,
HOUSE FOR SALE 2 bedroom,
study (or bedroom), one and 1/2
bath, living-dining room, screened
porch, central heat and air airconditioning,
conditioning, airconditioning, red brick, new roof.
7 blocks to campus; 1 block from
grade schooLCall 372-8935, avail available
able available September. (I-143-4t-c).
ATTENTION MARRIED STU STUDENTS!
DENTS! STUDENTS! Two bedroom home on
nice lot dead-end street,
with privacy. Only $7500. Nothing
down. Homestead Exemption. FR
2-6406. (1-144-ts-c).

Real Estate
BY OWNER 2 1/2 year old,
3 bedroom, 2 bath CCB house.
Large living room,kitchen, master
bedroom with walk-in closet.
Built-in refrigerator, air airconditioning,
conditioning, airconditioning, garbage disposal.
HCM Swim Club membership.
Assume VA mortgage. SSOO down.
2841 N. E. 13th Drive. Phone 376-
2357. (1-145-3 t-c).
HIGHLY Desirable northwest
location by owner leaving town.
Convenient to university and
schools. Corner lot, seven-room
brick home with beautiful view.
For appointment call 372-8830.
(1-144-3 t-c). --MinnniiriliMi
Mmmm
IFI EDS 3

I I^^'
I I 2400 Hawthorn* Road W. 20 ffcone FR 6-5011 1
I STARTS TONITE foIorHITS
I* Exclusive Rrst Arw Staring*
II Nit Wm FRANKIE 5 I
HOPE WELD Wtllll MERRILL
|£w fto&oii_/yjT/ 4 Xdy of IJen will Die!
ills

Lost
LOST: 5/27/65, Mans white
gold wedding band. North end lewen
drill field. Call 376-0621 after £
pun. (L-146-lt-c).
LOST: Brown notebook containing
passport and other valuable papers
with name Emilia Posada Samper*.
Call 376-0200. Reward. (L-146-
LOST: Ladys Benrus yellow gold
wrist watch, with leather band.
Lost on campus. REWARD. Turn
into Alligator Business Office, Rm.
9, Florida Union. (L-146-2t-c).
batik w.



I Services
VACATIONEE RS our lovely furn furnished
ished furnished 2 bedroom, 2 bath near
WATERFRONT home in CLEAR CLEAR
CLEAR WATER* For rent month of July.
|cn a-7s. (M-i4-su).

IRONING done in my home. Call
16-4086. (M-141-6t-c).
BN A HURRY? Passport and
application photos. Call Westley Westley
Westley Roosevelt Studios, 372-0300. (M (M---|l4l-llt-c).
--|l4l-llt-c). (M---|l4l-llt-c).
I ALLIANCE
I TV SERVICE
I Fast, Expert Service
I on all makes
I TELEVISION
1 RAblO
1 STEREO
110% DISCOUNT
I on parts to all
I U of F students
I 817 W. Univ Ave
g Phone 376-9955

I THIS WEEKEND
PLAY
PUTT-PUTT GOLF
3215 NW 13th St.
SPECIAL SALE ON BOOK PASSES e
TO DA y AT 1:00, I
3:03,5:09,7:15,10:10
I AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL S ITI
MW BIANKgr
iBBBy Bingo
The A
CATS
out of the bag!
V Andwlut c*t!
, Vere previewing a motion picture
(it*# matchless, hut, for the moment,
nameless) from a major motion pic*
ture company.
It# a very in* picture Because it#
Way-out and we want a select an*
dience to see it first, to find out how
inch fun the public can take with without
out without cracking up*
Wed like to tell you more about this
real swinger, but weve come to the
end of onr rope*
PREVIEW TONIGHT 9PM J
V.
STARTS SUNDAY
Cbmusm W()unmEsor%& l
RgeunsHouip 11 MJU JHtI
Mm&t g TUUtim JW*i

Sale
One Room AIR CONDITIONER.
Call 8-1273. (A-146-3t-c).
ORNAMENTAL WALL CLOCK,
perfect for office or fraternity
house. Runs one year on flash*
light battery. Never been used.
A timely buy. Call Steve Vaughn,
2-7447. (A-146-tf-nc).
1964 LAWN BOY 19 rotary power
mower. Cost SBS will sell for
SSO. Kodak 8 mm movie camera.
Cost $l6O will seU for $25. Lawn
edger, S3O. Garden tools, $1 each.
Archary target, $2. Garden
Sprayer, $6. 12* Alum, extension
ladder, $6. Electric defroster, $4.
Call 372-6472. (A-146-2t-c).
SOUTHERN CROSS modern sofa
bed, sleeps 2. Perfect condition.
Cost $220, will sell for $75.
Coffee table, $lO, Formica end
table, $6. Hammock and stand,
$lO. Lamp and shade, $5. Lawn
chair and lounge, $4. Globe, $2.
Call 372-6472. (A-146-2t-c).
1962 BMW Motorcycle R-27,
250 cc. S4OO. Call 8-2095 after 6
p.m. (A-146-3t-c).

*
For Sale
PLATINUM SILVER TOY
POODLE, 11 weeks, Choice of
litter. All shots and wormed. Best
offer takes. 376-0967, 513SW27th
Street. (A-146-lt-p).
*6O PLYMOUTH, *6l ANGLIA, *65
SYMPHONIC STEREO CONSOLE
with Garrard turntable, one set
AMERICANA ENCYCLOPEDIAS*
Accepting offers, 6-0537. (A-146-
3t-p).
FUJICA 35 mm electric eye
camera, flash with batteries and
bulbs, and tri-pod, $55. Ben
Pearson **Colt** 35 lb. re-curve
bow, 6 Alum, arrows, glove, arm
guard and quiver, $35. Kodak Bmm
movie camera, with telephoto lens,
SSO; light meter gratis. Call 8-
1203 after 5 p.m. 252-B, Flavet
in. (A-146-lt-c).
HONEY OF A HONDA! Model
90, like new, less than 1,800 miles,
priced at 20 per cent off. Call
Sharon nights at 6-7710, or UF
Ext. 2832 daytime. (A-144-tf-nc).
TWO Compact Westinghouse air airconditioners,
conditioners, airconditioners, sturdy aluminum
frame, 5,000 BTU. Like NEW.
Phone 6-5771. (A-144-3t-c).
BOAT FOR SALE. 16 ft. Carter
Craft. 30 hp Evinrude motor .Gator
Tilt Trailer, wind-shield, canvas
top, remote controls, skiing equip equipment.
ment. equipment. A give-away at S6OO. Call
FR 2-3251 after 6 p.m. (A-142-
ts-c).
PALACE RANCH HOME House
Trailer 8x42. Factory air airconditioning.
conditioning. airconditioning. Pine paneling. 2 bed bedroom.
room. bedroom. SISOO. Contact Art Sandlin,
666 Tolbert, 372-9220. (A-146-
st-p).
Sat.^^
/ I*3*s*7*9
| COLOR
cartouche]
\ Jean- Paul Belmondo#
\ CLAUDIA y
VCARPINALE^
WTT
{SUN MON TUESj^y
--THE BATTLE ,MB
ON THE BOUDOIR
IS MARVELOUS
N.Y. NEW^^V
MORE A
RIBALD A
THAN
LIFE
USpl l **
DIANE ** MARRY H l*
(MOCORBETT
DO YOU
Really Believe Junior &
Moon Maid's Marriage
Was Made In Heaven?

Friday# June 4# 1965, The Florida Alligator#.

IRli w
||||| it k" ** ::!^J
B|HL\ _j
v f *1 3 s I 8l
M&§iroa
i It m n "
THREES A CROWD
. soene from Yum-Yum Tree.
UF Staffers Star
In Gainesville Play

Sex Is apparently a sizzling
seller, what with Gainesville Little
Theatre holding over this weekend
lor two' more performances of its
spicy comedy, Under The Yum
Yum Tree.
Keep Cool
Many styles,
sleeve lengths.;.
galMii
SHORTS: Jamaicas,
Bermudas, Surfers,
Knee Capers, and
Slim Jims
BBYE'S
Next to Florida
Theatre
Free Parking In
Ist Federal Lot
pRoDEFr i |
Shot R.pair Shop
iHeels Attached!
I 5 Mias. I
ISoles Attached!
I 15 Mias. I
At Two Locations
1620 W. Univ. Ave. I
Carolyn Plaza
FR 6-0315
. I 101 N. Main St. 1
Opp. Ist Nat'l *Bank I

The blushing two-act teaser,
which stars a pair of UF staff
members. Is breaking all atten attendance
dance attendance records for the local
thespian group.
The play, as presented by the
Gainesville Little Theatre, Is the
unabridged version as it originally
appeared on Braodway, Director
Pat Cain commented. Many
people maybe hesitant to buy seats
because they saw the movie.
Believe me, the play is nothing
like the movie. It is three times
funnier.
Actually, the play picks up
where the movie left off. In other
words, it's ADULT enter entertainment/*
tainment/* entertainment/*
It is a light comedy, yet one
which analyzes in depth the
problems of premarital sez and
hasty marriages, Mrs. Cain
jpolnted out.
Audiences so far have gotten
greatly wrapped vg in the bedroom bedroomoriented
oriented bedroomoriented plot which skillfully plays
off the innocent heroine with a
will she won't she** refrain.
Last Friday night, as the hero
was carefully springing the- trap
in the Act n seduction scene, a
matronly onlooker audibly
whispered from her seat: Don't
forget to lock the door.**
Starring as Hogan, the lecherous
landlord, is Bill Stensgaard, the
UF*s assistant director -of Plants
and Grounds. A1 Moffett, of foe
Agricultural Extension Service, Is
foe boy friend and Hogan's friendly
adversary. Anne Godey and
Katherine Dantzler are the girls.
The Gainesville Players are
especially pleased with foe success
of their production since all profits
from foe sale of the $2 seats are.
going to foe American Cancer
Society. Gainesville's Inter-Club
Council is sharing the play's
sponsorship.
Hie Little .Theatre- is at 4039
NW 13th Blvd. (turn left off N.W.
13th St. at Aunt Jemima's, then
just keep going). Curtain goes
tonight and tomorrow at 8:30 and
reservations are necessary. Their
phone Is 876-4949.
MUQAton aha
always Attaacc
you are reading ana mV

Page 7



# The Florida Alligator Friday, June 4, 1965

Page 8

Seminoles Edge Gators, 5-4
UF dropped a 5-4 decision to FSU in the first game of their
two-game-set Wednesday in Tallahassee.
In a tight game all the way, the Seminoles got a run off Gator
reliever Kelly Prior in the eighth for the win.
Ray Rollyson started for the Gators while Eddie Howell began
on the mound for FSU. Alan McCune got the win for the Seminoles
in relief as Prior took the loss.
The Gators mustered eight hits off Seminole hurlers.
The loss dropped UF's season log to 19-13 and upped FSUs
to 32-8.
The Seminoles begin a bid for the National Championship in
Omaha, Neb., Monday.
SOFTBALL STANDINGS
BEACKET 1 W L fRACgETm W L
PKT 3 1 NADS 3 0
SPE 2 1 MUSTANGS 3 1
ATO 1 2 OLD TIMERS 2 2
NON UNKNOWNS 1 3
DIRECTIVES 1 2 KA 0 3
BTP 1 3 PLOW BOYS 0 4
PHYSICS 1 3
BRACKET II W L BRACKET IV W L
BUSTER BUDS 4 0 PURPLE BRAS 4 0
CHEMISTRY 2 1 CHAMPS 3 0
SAE 2 2 ROCKETS 2 1
AIAA 2 2 REJECTS 2 2
MBA 1 2 LAW REVIEW 1 2
NEWMANS 1 2 PAD 0 3
LATINS 0 3 INDEPENDENTS 0 4
LEAGUES LEADING HITTERS
Batters must have at least eight at bats
Young, Flavet 111 10 8 .800
Keyes, Mustangs 14 10 .714
Salkin, PLP 10 7 .700
Usher, Flavet 111 12 8 .666
Berry, Rejects 12 8 .666
Dunhill, Physics 11 7 .636
Fuller, SAE 11 7 .636
Conroy, Non Directives 8 5 .625
Morton, MBA 8 5 .625
McQuagge, SAE 8 5 .625
Laell^TlaveMl^ j 615
Ol' *1 11.1111 lUK'MI
4
Refreshment anyone?
Game goes better refreshed.
Coca-Cola! With Its lively lift, big bold taste,
never too sweet... refreshes best.
I things gp
yth m
L Coke
I
I I Bottled under b* MthOfityoi 'mCocA-Col.Cowpar.y by,
I[J Galavilla Coca-Cola Bottling Co.

Sloan Elated With Recruits

Basketball coach Norm Sloan,
extremely pleased over signing
two of the top prep guards in the
nation, is not likely to offer all
his scholarships available for
1965.
In Kurt Feazel (Harrisburg, Illi Illinois)
nois) Illinois) and Mickey Norlander (Vir (Virginia,
ginia, (Virginia, Minnesota), Sloan signed a
pair of big guards sought by over
50 schools and in the process, he
believes, came up with the best
pair recruited since the days of
Tom Baxley and Brooks
Henderson.
Both these boys can do most
anything on the court," Sloan says.
"They handle the ball, play good
defense, drive well and shoot
exceptionally well from outside.
In addition they are good sized
boys for the guard position, Feazel
being 6-3 and Norlander 6-2.
I believe they have the
potential to become a truly out outstanding
standing outstanding set of guards before they
finish their careers at Florida.
We are overjoyed to get them and
it's also comforting to know they
are superior students and campus
leaders."
Sloan has also signed 6-9 Neal
Walk of Miami Beach Senior High
and 6-2 junior college transfer

; 1 \ ||jj 8f 9
,-, ; V
By solving problems in astronautics, Air Force
scientists expand mans knowledge of the universe. Lt Howard McKinley, M.A.,
tells about research careers on the Aerospace Team.

(Lt. McKinley holds degrees in electronics and electri electrical
cal electrical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Tech Technology
nology Technology and the Armed Forces Institute of Technology.
He received the 1963 Air Force Research & Devel Development
opment Development A ward for his work with inertial guidance
components. Here he answers some frequently-asked
questions about the place of college-trained men and
women in the US. Air Force.)
Is Air Fore* research really advanced, compared to
what others are doing? It certainly is. As a matter of
fact, much of the work being done right now in uni universities
versities universities and industry had its beginnings in Air Force
research and development projects. After all, when
youre involved in the development of guidance sys systems
tems systems for space vehicles-a current Air Force project
in Americas space program-youre working on the
frontiers of knowledge.
What areas do Air Force scientists get involved fas?
Practically any you can name. Os course the principal
aim of Air Force research is to expand our aerospace
capability. But in carrying out this general purpose,
individual projects explore an extremely wide range
of topics. Side effects of Air Force research are
often as important, scientifically, as the main thrust.
How important is the work a recent graduate can
expect to do? Its just as important and exciting as his
own knowledge and skill can make it. From my own
experience, I can say that right from the start 1 was
doing vital, absorbing research. Thats one of the
things thats so good about an Air Force careerit
gives young people the chance to do meaningful work
in the areas that really interest them.
What non-scientific jobs does the Air Force *£?
Os course the Air Force has a continuing need for
rated officerspilots and navigators. There are also

James (Spunk) Bryant erf Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville Paxon and Gulf Coast
(Miss.) JC. Walk will play for

A. 1 7, .J 5
B to
St** v; {i-* ":
for a swift frtof of fint food, ' :
try a TRADITIONAU
_ ---- -* :
:MHMnMMMHMHWMwMpWM 111 L /, '
6xpectenceo t.Vs
STEREOS-RADIOS (USED)
* '; *;:* ''t
DISCOUNT PRICES
ON T.V. ANTENNAES
*
,
LUUVnO *-376-7171 .,
i - u v ;~i .*aJ

the Baby Gators next tall while
Bryant, another guard, will be
eligible for varsity competition.

many varied and challenging administrative.-manage administrative.-managerial
rial administrative.-managerial positions. Remember, the Air Force is a vast and
complex organization. It takes a great many different
kinds of people to keep it running. But there are two
uniform criteria: youve got to be intelligent, and
youve got to be willing to work hard.
What sort of future do 1 have hi the Air Force? Just
as big as you want to make It. In the Air Force, talent
has away of coming to the top. It has to be that way,
if were going to have the best people in the right
places, keeping America strong and free.
Whafis the best way to start an Air Force career? An
excellent waythe way I startedis through Air Force
Officer Training School. OTS is a three-month course,
given at Lackland Air Force Base, near San Antonio,
Texas, thats open to both men and women. You can
apply when youre within 210 days df graduation, or
after youve received your degree.
How loog will I be committed to serve? Four years
from the time you graduate from OTS and receive
your commission. If you go on to pilot or navigator
training, the four years starts when you re awarded
your wings.
Are thdre other ways to become aa Ah* Force officer?
Theres Air Force ROTC, active at many colleges
, and universities, and the Air Force Academy, where
admission is by examination and Congressional ap appointment.
pointment. appointment. If youd like more information^ on any Air
Force program, you can get it from the Professor of
Aerospace Studies (if theres one campus) or
from an Air Force recruiter.
United States Air Force