Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
WBNMBMfflFWnyPfTnnr n 'MHgl.BiWi'rHrU ffllffiWniwMHhwNWH i >' k wn mnonror

West named editor
of summer I Gator

By EUNICE I. TALL
Staff Writer
David A. West, 22- year-old law
student, has been elected summer
editor of the Florida Alligator.
West is a former managing
editor of the Alligator, and is the
past editor Df the Kissimmee Ga Gazette.
zette. Gazette. His product in Kissimmee
won several Florida Press
Association awards including first
place in Typography and second
in general excellence.
While an undergraduate in the
School of Journalism, West was
elected to membership in Florida
Blue Key, the UFs Hall of Fame,
and Sigma Delta Chi, professional
journalism society. He is a mem member
ber member of Kappa Alpha Order social
fraternity.
**l am pleased the board placed
its confidence in me and I hope
we will be able to put out a product
which reflects favorably on the
UF, stated West.
There are numerous staff
positions available and those
students with or without formal
Journalism experience will be
welcomed.
We hope we will be able to
create a quality newspaper, but
at the same time, keep in mind
our primary obligations to our
scholastic endeavors, added
West, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley
L. West of Gainesville.
West first joined the Alligator
staff in Fall, 1962. He has been its
news and executive editors, editor
of Gator Greek, and Business
Manager of Scope Magazine.
notice
Those interested in work
on the Summer Alligator:
Meeting today, 4 p.m., in
Room 8, Florida Union.

8 £ "KW- "ISM
. pfylp ;' .V
iii IflfE \ £
ra'"- !%
DAVID WEST
. .new editor

Journalism school |
first in Hoarst
V
President Lyndon B. Johnson #
will make awards to the UF School
of Journalism and over-all winners
in the William Randolph Hearst $
Foundation Journalism Awards $
Program at the White House next
Tuesday. ft
The seven-month competition,
open to major and pre-major £
journalism students of the #
accredited colleges and waiver- §
sities of journalism throughout the
United States, was won by Charles £
Powers of Kansas State University. *:
In Washington at the White House
ceremony, will be UF President
J. Wayne Reitz and Journalism :£
School Director Rae O. Weimer, :£
who will receive the first place ig
over-all school gold medallion,
Monday, George Reedy, press £:
secretary of the White House, ;:j:
See HEARST 9 on p. 10 %

FLORIDA ALLIGATOR 1

Wholl be next UF veep?
Reitz is remaining mum

Philpott is
Auburn-bound
By JANE YOUNG
Staff Writer
I wish I knew! said UF
Pres. J. Wayne Reitz when
asked about a successor for
Vice President Harry M.
Philpott.
Philpott will become
president of Auburn Univer University
sity University in Alabama Sept. 1.
Speculation Isbhmhh|hH|
-.*und
several indivi- k; >k.
duals, including
Robert B. Mautz
to fill thePpP- g
vacancy.
is now UF Vice*
President in /*Jj
charge of Aca-\.*:
demic Affairs.
pnupott, who YOUNG
has been Vice
President of the UF since 1957
said that he did not know when
he would leave the UF. This
will be totally at the con convenience
venience convenience of Dr. Reitz and the
UF, he said.
Leaving the UF has put a
real note of sadness into the
situation, Philpott said.
He said he is going to
Auburn this weekend to work
on the budget. Dr. Philpott
has been working with the UF
budget during the past months.
1 hope I don't get the two
confused, he said.
We expect approximately
a 20 per cent raise in faculty
salaries at Auburn, he
continued.
Auburn University does not
have a University College pro program
gram program and The Junior College
program is just getting off the
ground in Alabama, he said.
As to problems that might
arise I prefer to be
surprised by them, said
Philpott.
Dr. Reitz said, *'We regret
exceedingly losing him from
the UF. He has contributed
greatly to this institution
during his eight years as Vice
President. At all times he has
used his fine talents and
capabilities in advancing the
best interest of this institution
and has worked effectively
with administration, faculty
and students. In addition, he is
a very warm and personal
friend whom I shall miss
greatly from a personal stand standpoint,
point, standpoint, as well as his service
to the University.
Philpott will succeed Dr.
Ralph B. Draughon who is
retiring. Dr. E. T. York Jr.,
UF provost of agriculture was
also under consideration for
the presidency.
An ordained Baptist
minister, Dr. Philpott was
Dean of Religious Life and
Head of the Department of
Religion and Philosophy at

Vol. 57, No. 140

ROBERT MAUTZ, MAYBE?

§ S
| Philpott: much irony!
By STEVE VAUGHN |
Managing Editor |
S
UF Vice President Harry Philpott is Auburn-bound and his ;$
reasons for leaving have a ring of painful irony. j£:
Philpott said two main factors influenced his decision to take &
over the presidency of Auburn: $
of full cooperation from the Alabama Board of
Trustees and Auburn faculty.
An Alabama legislative program which will hand over $lO
million for college building and a 23 per cent increase in appro appropriations.
priations. appropriations.
The irony is that while Philpott heads off into
a promising Alabama sunset with visions ofHMBHHBIH 0
plenty of coins to run his school, Florida
legislators are preparing to whack nearly $lO
million from the UFs current budget request. EH. v
And while hes promised full cooperation
from Alabama lawmakers, educators and poll pollticians
ticians pollticians here have about as much regard for one
another as a pair of rattlesnakes. -i;
Philpott stressed that hes not leaving
because of any discontent." The people here |VIH|
are the finest I*ve ever worked with," he said. hPSBBBHBIII :j:j
You couldn't blame Philpott for moving to a §:
higher position even if all was in harmony VAUGHN
between the legislators who hand out the money £
and the administrators who spend it here. But by leaving he is
added to the ranks of a growing list of college administrators and
educators who have abandoned Florida for greener pastures in
recent years.
Many have thrown up their hands in disgust and left after £
experiencing a few years of the vice-like grip of politics on higher
education, although Philpott said in his instance this had nothing
to do with it.
Former FSU President Gordon Blackwell blasted the situation :g
when he packed his suitcase and headed north to South Carolina
and the presidency of The Citadel. Dr. George Harrell, former x
dean of the UFs Medical School, said the same thing when he jg
folded up his stethoscope and took off for Pennsylvania. £
Not being able to get as much money as they'd like to buy their :$
chalk adds further sourness to the professors' already dim views ::)
of Johns Committees and trimesters. UF President J. Wayne $:
Reitz is the second lowest-paid of all state-supported University
presidents. £
Some feel the situation will never get any better. Others are
looking to the Board of Regents, conceived by Gov. Farris
after he wiped out the Board of Control, as the instrument that ij:
will eventually weed pork-barrel politics out of higher education. £
According to the way things are supposed4ogo, the nine Regents, £
appointed to terms of staggering years, cannot become the playtoy £
of any particular governor. £
The Regents are a definite improvement," said Philpott. He :£
said the biggest change he'd hope for the UF and other state ig
schools in the future would be that university presidents have fe
more freedom in operating their institutions as theyd like. ||
This is the kind of freedom PHILPOTT WITH HUBERT HUMPHREY
. .during then-senators visit here

Friday, May 14, 1965



Page 2

1, The Florida Alligator, Friday/ May 14, 1965

By ERNIE LITZ
Editor-In-Chief
AT LAST after three years
of toiling away in the bowels
of the Florida Union Pm going
to hang up my typewriter and
call it a day.
AS FAR as a public state statement
ment statement goes on my retirement
(or resignation if you prefer)
I can only reiterate Steve
Vaughns column of Tuesday
and say that it is for personal
reasons.*
THE FLORIDA Alligator
has meant a lot to me. Through
it I*ve met, and worked with
many wonderful people.
STUDENT publications, as
are all extra-curriculars,
time consuming and difficult
work. Yet, those of us here
feel we are in some way con contributing
tributing contributing to a better informed
campus. Sometimes we take
actions, or express opinions
which arouse strong feelings
in the student body. .yet
at all times we must con consider
sider consider the presentation of the
news in objective fashion our
goal. Any less would be a
great failure on our part.
AT CERTAIN crucial times
during my tenure we have
chosen controversial stands
because we felt that it was
the right thing to do, not
because we felt that personal
gain would result.
THE STUDENT news media
on this campus are beset with
many problems. Grades, stu student
dent student politicians, understaffing

Rawlings home to become park

Hie Board of Directors of the
UF Foundation have stamped
unanimous approval on a plan to
establish a county park at the
homesite of Pulitzer Prize Prizewinning
winning Prizewinning author Marjorie Kinnan
Air Society
head named
Alan E. Wright of Gainesville
has been elected new commander
of the Dale Mabry Squadron of
Arnold Air Society, the UF*s Air
Force ROTC honorary leadership
fraternity.
Wright and five other ROTC
cadets were elected for the
1965-66 academic year,
Robert D, Hodson Jr. of Venice
will serve as administrative
officer with Wright, Other cadets
include Charles M. Heltsley Jr.,
Orlando, executive officer; George
N. Whipple, Jacksonville, oper operations
ations operations officer; Robert A. Gomez,
Jacksonville, comptroller, and
Stephen R. Fowler, Dunedin,
chaplain.
|^ODER?^|
Shoe Repair Shop
I HEELS ATTACHED I
I 5 MINS. I
I SOLES ATTACHED I
I 15 MINS. I
I At 2 Locations I
I CAROLYN PLAZA I
FR 6-0315
And
101 N. Main St.
I Opp. Ist Nat'l Bank I

Summing-up
and constantly going to class
(somehow Ive always felt that
the university would be a lot
more fun if tl re were no
classes.)
TO ALL THE wonderful
people on the Alligator staff
now, in the publication lab,
business office and
advertising department I say
thank you for the pleasure
of working with you. .to
Bruce Culpepper I say it*s
time to stop smiling and
handshaking, the campaign is
over (all kidding aside I think
Bruce and all the other
pseudo intellectuals of the
third floor and SG are doing
a fine job). .Dr. Reitz, a
wish that he could deal with
problems as well In the next
ten years as well as he has
in the last ten years. .to
Harry PhUpott a big wish
for success at Auburn, he*s
a great loss to Floridas
great University. . to
Spurgeon Cherry of the
Intramural Department, more
toys to keep al the UFs
children happy. .to Glenn
Laney, a silver chalice for
all-campus champion. .to
Sid Strifes, a blindfold so he
can adjudicate justice
(seriously Sid too is doing a
fine job). .to Dean Hale a
recording of the voice wanna
have a cookie little girl?*. .
to Steve Vaughn a whip and a
prayer book (the same ones
turned over to me by Walker
Lundy). .and finally to John
Webb, another heart of gold

UF FOUNDATION GIVES OK

Rawlings in nearby Cross Creek.
The Board, conducting its
annual meeting in Orlando, auth authorized
orized authorized Executive Director Alan
Robertson and Secretary George
Corrick to work with counsel
representing the Foundation and
the Alachua County Commission in
preparing a lease agreement in
line with a proposal outlined at a
commission meeting last week.
Robertson is dean of University
relations and development for the
University and Corrick serves as
director of the Division of Develop Development
ment Development Services.
Mrs. Rawlings, who wrote
The Yearling** and Cross

ifpll
Night /^pSb
Humpty
Dumpty
FRIDAY All The Fl*
You' Con Eot,
OLD-FASHIONED Hush Puppies,
FISH NIGHT Cole Slow 97 c
5 PM 9 PM
Fresh Cedar Key Fish
HUMPTY DUMPTY
Drive-In A Restaurant
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEALS
rH24387 3K)N.W.I3e9i

to go with the one he has now.
TOO FEW students realize
the problems and difficulties
that go into the production
of The Florida Alligator. Its
a fascinating and wonderful
surreal world in The Alligator
offices and to those of you
interested Im sure Editor Editorelect
elect Editorelect Dave West can use some
hands around here to help him.
Why not stop in and say hello
and offer yourself to him..
Im sure that Dave will raise
his hand, er, and welcome you.
I wish him and his staff the
best of luck, after all, A
GREAT UNIVERSITY
DEMANDS A GREAT
STUDENT NEWSPAPER.
I AM reminded of my
favorite folk fable. .
THE KING has called in
his wise men for a confer conference.
ence. conference. He tells them that he
is tired of having to use the
same greetings and saluta salutations
tions salutations for all occasions and he
wants them to decide on a
saluation that can be used for
ALL occasions. He told them
that they had until sunrise
the next morning to arrive
at an answer.
THE WISE men were sent
to a chamber where they de debated
bated debated all night long, until they
had finished their assingment.
JUST BEFORE sunrise the
next morning the king had
them brought to him and he
asked them for their decision.
Do you know what they replied?
. .AND THIS too, shall
pass.

Creek,** left her estate to the
University when she died 12 years
ago. The University cannot sell
the property but has suggested
leasing 25.6 acres to the county
at $1 per year for a boat ramp,
parking area, picnic tables, rest
room and water facilities.
Estimated cost to develop the
property 15,6 acres of which
would be in Orange Lake is
$42,740.
Orange Lake currently has no
piftllc boat ramp and Alachua
County officials have expressed
optimism about development of
the area for sportsmen and family
use over a three-year period.

CONNECTICUT COMPANY GETS NOD

Leg Council Oks
insurance bid

By EUNICE I. TALL
Staff Writer
Legislative Council Tuesday
night accepted a bid for next year's
student insurance which offers a
reduction in rates and an increase
in coverage.
The contract was awarded to
Insurance City Life Co. of Hart Hartford,
ford, Hartford, Conn.
The individual single student
fee will remain at the current
$17.25; however, student and
spouse combination costs have
been reduced from $46 to S3B;
student, spouse, and children, S6O
to $53; student and child
(no spouse), $36 to $30.50. Ma Maternity
ternity Maternity coverage will also remain
at $42.
In coverage, students will be
allowed $5 a day maximum costs
for the infirmary, an increase of
$2 over this year's plan.
"As far as I now know, the
coverage costs for hospital
and medical expenses will re remain
main remain the same," said SG Vice
President Dick Thompson.
According to Thompson,
approximately 40 per cent of the
student body, 6,400 students, par participated
ticipated participated in the program this year
under the Guarantee Reserve Life
Insurance Co., Hammond, Indiana.
The program is offered to all
full time students attending the UF
and their dependents. Eligible
dependents shall be the student's
spouse and all unmarried children
over two weeks but under 19 years
of age.

a $
1 (knees news % I
| g
X I Latest items in our coverage of
I i Bermuda events! The shorts g
|g> I story this Summer is more varied
5 I V l^an ever including solid colors :
l A and editions in Madras, prints, I*
X 1 -f homespun and the like. Get the
L. l latest in an early visit. g
w \J You 1 II ike our selection
6 from $7.98 £
j|| -sizes .3-18
& /) SOLD EXCLUSIVELY AT X
| dikmum J

OTHER BUSINESS
In other Legislative Council
business Pat Kelley was elected
floor leader of Progress Party;
Liz Henson, appointed acting sec-
retary for the summer; and Bill
Ryals, approved secretary of
Married Students Affairs.
Thirteen students have been
approved for membership at
large" to serve on the council for
the summer session.
They include John Dodson, Larry
Tyree, Liz Henson, A. J. ivie,
Claude Spears, Alex Roberts, Tony
Ponticelli, Ernie Litz, Bev Faber,
Hal Rainbolt, Bev Matson, Bill
Olinger, and Tommy Kennon.
U8H8..H...H.U. . I |
I tootsie i
John Romain n
Sandals 4 Styles $
Size 5 to 10
I SILVERMANS I



Birds photographs
now on display
Dato Loke Wan Tho, the
distinguished Chinese photogra photographer,
pher, photographer, risked life and limb countless
tiroes to capture the rare
photographs of birds in the
exhibition Birds of Asia, which
opened at Florida Union Bryan
Lounge on May 7, and will be on
view until May 30.
Loke is a dedicated ornith ornithologist,
ologist, ornithologist, as well as photographer;
to photograph these exotic species
he scaled jungle-covered moun mountains,
tains, mountains, lived in parched deserts and
ventured into forbidding forests.
His diligence was rewarded with
a number of firsts: several of
these birds have never before been
recorded on film, nor was the
character of their nests known.
The sixty black and white photo photographs
graphs photographs in this show, which is being
circulated throughout the country
by the Smithsonian Institution
Traveling Exhibition Service, were
taken in the inaccessible wilds of
Malaysia, India and New Guinea.

t 4 wJSSBh
and wear knit that stays fresh and crisp to the eighteenth and beyond. Stays tucked-in,
too. An extra-long back tail keeps down while you swing. Many A JT>
standout colors, $5. Pick out a few at your Arrow retailer's.
MKIVI
nlk llillillr r \|
You dont have to plav coif in the
60j> f to look goodm ARROW* Mr. < b
why most golfers prefer this knitted i % 'Jf^m
wash and wear Decton that still if t 1 ~ i j I
looks crisp after 18 holes. Be bold. Bfcjjj k : r 1 } I
stop in and see our wide selection of J'J x K
colors before your next round. $^ # QQ
Belk-Li'ndsey l\ Pj
, SHOPPING CENTER 1|

| Viet, Dominican program set tomorrow |

:: Policy Program Con Con:s
:s Con:s frontation, a special
:: three-hour program
:: dealing with the Viet Nam
fa and Dominican Republic
|; problems, will be broad broad*:
*: broad*: cast on the UF campus as
:j:j part of a nationwide radio
:: hookup Saturday.
:$ The broadcast will be in
:|:| University Auditorium
:: through loudspeakers from
:: Ito 4 p.m. as it originates

STREET DANCE
Theres another street dance
tonight.
The dance, sponsored by the
Florida Union, will be held on the
south side of the Union. In case
of rain, it will move inside to
Club Rendezvous. Disc jockey Stu
Bowers will run the record
machine.

from St. Marks Episcopal
Church in Washington, D.C.
Hans Morgenthau, pro proses
ses proses so r of international
relations at the University
of Chicago, will serve as
moderator for the panel of
participants that includes
McGeorge Bundy, national
security advisor for Presi President
dent President Johnson, and political
science experts from Cor Cornell,
nell, Cornell, Yale, Wisconsin,

Prof seminar-bound

Dr. Delmas D. Ray, associate
professor of accounting in the UFs
College of Business
Administration, has received an
appointment to attend an accounting
seminar at the University of
Chicago this summer.
The seminar, sponsored by the
Ford Foundation,, is scheduled July

Friday, May 14, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

Harvard, Michigan State, :£
California and Columbia. >
$
Pi Sigma Alpha, the $
political science fraternity
and the Florida Union For Forums
ums Forums Committee will >:
co-sponsor the program
locally. Don Gordon, a
graduate student and
president of Pi Sigma :£
Alpha, will preside at the :£
meeting.
tj

19 through Aug. 27 and will have
a central topic of Mathematical
Models and Computers in Account Accounting
ing Accounting Research and Teaching,
Dr. Ray was chosen from a
large number of applicants nomi nominated
nated nominated by the deans of their colleges
of many of the business schools
throughout the United States.
Twenty-five professors from 25
different universities will attend
the six-week session.
Faculty Spring
frolic tomorrow
The Faculty Club's informal
spring frolic will be held at the
Faculty Club on west Newberry
Road Saturday, from 8:30 p.m.
12:30 a.m.
General chairman of the event,
Vice President Charles Eno,
invites all members to enjoy an
evening of dancing, entertainment,
refreshments and bridge under the
direction of Dr. and Mrs. Joe
Busby. Decorations are being
arranged by the University
Women's Club under the
supervision of Mrs. Twes Kundel.
Dancing will be to the music of
the Gene Bardo band.

COCA-COLA" AND "COW* AffC I*COI*rCACO TAADI-MAAICS
WHICH lOfNTirv ONLY TH* FAOOUCT OF TMC COCA-COLA COMPANY.
H H < ~E.
I
Cf.'Er
:/ -y >.:.:
HL
i ill ***^'^Hifl
Studies piling up?
Pause. Have a Coke.
Coca-Cola with a lively lift
and never too sweet, refreshes best.
things gQ
better,!
Coke#
r* **
Bottled under the authority of The Coca-Cola Company by:

Student wives
can go swimming
The UF swimming pool is open
to both faculty and student wives
this summer who have the proper
ID card.
Student wife ID cards can be
picked up from the SG treasurer's
office on the third floor of the
Florida Union.
Swim cards can be obtained
upon presentation of the ID in Room
227 of the Florida Gym. The cards
are good through the summer.
DANCE LESSONS
The Florida Union is offering
advanced dance lessons every
Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. in the
Social Room of the Union. Price
is $lO for single persons, $lB
for couples. Interested persons
are requested to sign up in Room
315 of the Union.
English screening
exam time set
The English Screening Examin Examination
ation Examination for Engineering Students will
be given in McCarty Auditorium
on Tuesday, May 18 from 7 to
9 p.m. All engineering students
who have been admitted to the
upper division are required to take
this examination.
Baby sitters
are wanted
The Student Government Baby Babysitting
sitting Babysitting Service has a complete list
of sitters for the summer months.
Those needing a sitter should call
University Extension 2547 between
3 and 4:30 p.m. Monday Thursday
and a sitter will be provided.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 14, 1965

Profile of an
underdeveloped
nation
SECOND OF A SERIES
By JOSEPH CASTELLO
Editorial Page Editor
WE SHOULD now consider the JpT
problems facing the underdevelop- Jl|||
ed nations of the world and analyze fji|. gflH
the Russian, Chinese, and IRgl JiPl
American solutions to these "f 1
problems.
BASIC PROBLEM
THE BASIC problem confronting
these nations is that they are A
underdeveloped: they all lack the CASTELLO
resources, capital, or technology
necessary for industrialization
and many lack all three. The
problem is to accumulate suffi sufficient
cient sufficient capital from an inefficient li!p>
agricultural economy to train \ 'k"
personnel to exploit whatever
resources they may have. \
THIS BASIC economic problem ||m|||r
is complicated by the fact that
all are emerging from at least a 1 Wk
century of colonial exploitation
whose common economic denomi-
nator was that the wealth earned Hn
by the labors of the many was
concentrated into the hands of the i jik|l ij
fbw. Thus, our own beloved Latin :
American republics, although not 9E|f :
subjected to the political rule of / / H ji
an alien power, were the victims / /SP :
of a minority landholding class W j:
and foreign industry. J j m
After all, Latin America gave / /Jn
the term banana republic* to the / / /
literature of political science. The [J / ij:
end result of colonial rule no Wjtify
matter whether in Latin America,
Africa, or the Far East was li lithe
the lithe creation of a nation whose YES, WE HAVE jij
economy was dependent on the V
mother country and which was nr dm m .rci $
overwhelmingly peasant. NO REPUBLICS!
TRADITIONALLY, the peasantry is a rockbed
conservative element with only two basic desires
which are seldom fulfilled: land and peace. After iji
all, political rights are of little moment to a man V
who, at best, earns a marginal subsistence: he *:
wants land, freedom from oppressive taxes or $
dues, and freedom from harassment by standing i|:
armies and forced drafts. Needless to say, the
agricultural serfdom which characterized vir virtually
tually virtually all colonial rules fulfilled none of the basic
desires. Therefore, the peasantry in colonial
nations as was also true in Russia and China jij:
became potentially revolutionary because he had no i|i;
stake in the status quo. :j:
HOWEVER, he had not yet developed a political iv
consciousness because another characteristic of :j|:
colonialism was the systematic destruction or |:|
manipulation of native political systems with only jij
a token effort to replace them with Western forms. jij
Therefore, the only symbol of national unity avail- |
able was the national hero who led the struggle jij
for independence: Dr. Kwame Nkrumah, Simon
Bolivar, and Ho Chi Minh are good examples.
NATIONAUSM
V
FINALLY, the dominant political force in these |
nations became, and still is, nationalism. This iji
combination of common opposition to colonial rule $
and the charisma of the qational hero was, in most
cases, the only politlbal cement which could bind
together the shakey foundations of government in a
nation which lacked political traditions and faced
almost insuperable economic problems If the leader
disappeared, as happened in the Congo after Lu Lum
m Lum umbas murder, the government also
disappeared. And, once die common enemy of
colonialism was vanquished, dissident and sep separatist
aratist separatist interests began to assert themselves and
the fledgling government was torn by internal
dissension, often to self-destruction.
CONTINUED IN TUESDAY'S EDITION &

OPINION AND CRITICISM

Foreign Policy -two views

t AN EDITORIAL
1966???
ij The current legislative success of
Governor Burns* Roaa Bond Program has
i marked the beginning of the 1966 Florida
gubernatorial race. In an attempt to regain
ade County after Robert King High made
Eolitical hops on the liquor price-fixing
ill, Burns has railroaded his personal
highway program through the legislature
j to recapture the urban votes. Scott Kelly
is yet to be heard from; but we expect
him to come out against the Civil Rights
and Voting Bills to establish himself as
Goldwater r s successor as king of the back backlash.
lash. backlash.
The Alligator is looking forward to a
wide open campaign next year which should
dramatize such essential issues as:
Education (whether it should be eliminated
or not); Urban Renewal (whether cities (in
Florida) should be abolished or not); Civil
Rights (whether there are any or not);
Migrant Workers (whether they should be
legally enslaved or not); and Floridas
relationship to the federal government
(whether or not we should break precedent
and establish one).
We expect some of the following to be
promised: the Johns Committee should be
reactivated as the most successful method
of destroying the states university system,
thus saving the taxpayer millions of dollars;
Florida should secede from the union if
forced to re- apportion; and the migrant
workers should be legally enslaved to
save the citrus industry millions of dollars
annually. If the above programs are enacted,
there will be millions of dollars available
to complete the Cross-Florida Barge
canal WITHOUT RAISING TAXES! The
pressing need for completing the canal
before the projected date lias been indicated
by the fact that, by that time, barges will
be use .Os course, the canal
wiH stjll provide a fishing refuge for the
Florida Legislature when not in session.
The three leading lights of Florida politics
mentioned above have all indicated sym symlathies
lathies symlathies tending towards these developments
in Florida; however, we feel that none of
them are as pledged to the forces of
reaction, ignorance, and inefficiency as
another man weve come in contact with
recently. This man, we feel, is the paragon
Florida legislator, and we are backing Kim
as a dark horse candidate for governor in
1966.
The man is Representative George
Stallings of Jacksonville, who recently sug suggested
gested suggested the tripartite division of Dade Countv
to emancipate the people of Dade from Metro
Government. His record in the Florida
Legislature is impressive and represents
an ideal all Florida Legislators seem to be
striving to attain. Consider:
CornmUtee prominent member of the Johns
He is famous for his attempts to ban
flouridation and *Communist-tainted text textbooks.
books. textbooks. 9
He led the House fight in 1959 against
slum clearance and Urban Renewal.
He battled against Governor Bryants
school bond program in 1961.
He demanded a Johns Committee investi investigation
gation investigation of Bryants moderate handling of the
St. Augustine Civil Rights demonstrations.
Finally, he stated in 1964 that he was for
Barry Goldwater, the only candidate who
can. restore honesty and integrity to the
halls of government.
In view of the above qualifications wp
earnestly believe that. If Rep; stalling! i
is elected governor, Florida can lo6k
forward to another four years of the type
JLf at ? government which has become
traditional here: rurally dominated, dis discriminatory,
criminatory, discriminatory, and anachronistic.

Talk cheap,
action needed,
on policy
By LUCIEN CROSS
Columnist
THE OBJECT of this column is to explain
the reasons which have compelled me to protest
our war in Viet Nam and our more recent
intervention in the Dominican Republic. Although
I am fully aware of the argument which can
logically be supported on moral grounds, I will
not use it in my own explanation because I wish
to reach those people who would argue that
politics deals with reality and that morality is
basically unreal. Therefore, I will base my
discussion upon why I feel a change in American
policy is necessary to protect us from World
Communism,
IT WILL first be necessary to explain the
situations in South East Asia and the Dominican
Republic and then relate them to the world
situation and our national security.
JFK ON VIET NAM
ON APRIL 6, 1954, in a speech"
to the U. S. Senate, Kennedy de defined
fined defined the Asian situation in the
following statement: To pour
money, material, and men into
the jungles of Indo-China without
at least a remote prospect of
victory would be dangerously
futile and destructive. . I am
lankly of the belief that no amount
LKvJoo of American assistance in Indo-
China can conquer an enemy which is
everywhere, and at the same time nowhere, an
enemy of the people* which has both the
sympathy and support of the people. Thus,
he indicated that officials here realize that the
revolution in Viet Nam is a popular one.
REGARDING the effectiveness of our foreign
aid program in South Viet Nam, Hugh B. Hester,
Brigadier General, U. S. Army (Ret.) states:
The billions of U. S, dollars spent in this mad
venture have been worse than wasted. They
have provided the means for the murder of
scores of thousands of Vietnamese, thousands
of French and now hundreds of U. S. citizens,
and the impoverishment of a whole generation
of (Vietnamese) people.
IN THE light of these statements it is easy
to see why continuation of our present policy
borders on the ridiculous. Since the Vietnamese
people (80% by Eisenhower's best estimate in
1954) hate their government and since we support
that same government, it is understandable,that
they have become Anti-American,
EFFECT OF POUCY
BUT LET me return to the basis for my
stand. What we must realize is the effect of
our policy on the rest of South East Asia, for
these facts are known in Indo-China and are
especially vivid to those countries that border
on South Viet Nam.
CERTAINLY the Communist will not miss
the chance to point to our planes bombing the
hamlets and villages of South Viet Nam and
ask the rest of South East Asia if this Is what
America means by freedom. The results are
both obvious and frightening at the same time.
Is it any wonder that South East Asia is going
communist, when offered the choice between
Democracy which offers bombs marked Freedom
and Communism which otters bread marked
Peace.
YET EVEN more unrealistic is the action
we have taken in the Dominican Republic. Here
we are not only putting down a popular revolution
striving for constitutional government, but
violating the O.AJS. (Organization of American
States) charter, article fifteen, which states
that no foreign power has the right to interfere
with the affairs of a sovereign state. Thus, we
are both disillusioning the rest of South America
and turning the Dominican people against the
United States.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 5



I ASK YOU. **ln such an atmosphere, where
will these people turn for aid and support?*
It is the answer to this question and its
implications that have forced me to realize
the desperate need for change. Simply and
plainly, our foreign policy is illogical. Illogical
in the same way it would be illogical to shut
all the doors and windows of our house in order
to keep out flies while, at the same time, we
take down the walls.
TO ME and many others like myself, it is
evident that this policy must be changed now.
This is why we are protesting. We do not ask
America to simply pull out and forget about the
Communist threat. We ask, instead, that the
officials of our country seek a more responsible
answer to the threat of Communism.
OBVIOUSLY, economic aid is not found in
either bombs or bullets, nor will a dictatorship
insure freedom. Therefore, I ask my country
to act as the world leader it professes to be
and search for means which are not contra contradictions
dictions contradictions to the ends we seek.
YET EVEN those of you who agree with my
basic argument may still condemn me for
making an empty protest, i. e one which offers
no adequate solution. But I ask these people
to examine their own stand. You have accepted
the fact that America is wrong, but you balk
at the idea of change for fear that the cure will
be worse than the disease. What you fail to
realize is that a change for the worse is much
more likely to occur if you do nothing. But if
you too accept the burden and work for a sensible
change, the likelihood of improving the situation
is greatly increased.
YET TALK is cheap and I would be little
more than a hypocrite if I had not done what I
now ask of my country. Therefore, I will outline
a proposal in the hopes that it will be both good
enough to indicate the possibility for improve improvement
ment improvement and weak enough to provoke thought and
invite criticism.

the /slP^\
FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
CLASSIFIEDS GET RESULTS
1 I
1 *' * 11 I i n mmmmtmm >
prompts this cool new look
f 0 I. '' ''
Coming up now...a lightweight sport coat in 55'i Dacron*
polyester and 45' i wool, that lives your diverse life with zest
and poise. Travels well, sheds wrinkles and thrives on wear...
with the kind of limber tailoring that defiends on the greatest
natural shoulder in America. Could this same great look be for
you? Most decidedly. In Corn and a field of other fresh hues.
$45.00
oitve/mm
225 W. University Ave.
ltnlont jihrr ...

'

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4

FIRST, WE could withdraw diplomatic
recognition of unpopular governments, i.e., gov governments
ernments governments which rule without the consent of the
people. Second, we could work out a plan for
nationalization of industry in underdeveloped
countries, while at home, compensating
American businesses for their losses thus
suffered. Third, we could offer these countries
economic aid programs without attaching the
usual strings. For example, helping countries
build their own factories through loan arrange arrangements.
ments. arrangements. Fourth, we could establish an adequate
peace force. This could be accomplished by
giving young people of draft age the choice
between serving in the armed services or in
a peace force.
REMEMBER, these four suggestions do not
present my idea of *the answer. They are
only my attempt to find a rational solution
to the world situation. I fully realize that it
would be naive of me to believe that I could
solve a problem of such magnitude; and it is a
result of this awareness that I must actively
protest. I demonstrate, talk, and write because
I must reach others. Unless others join me in
trying to find a solution no solution will be
found.
THUS, IN retrospect, I have written this
column not simply to clarify my stand but also
to ask those of you who have understood to help
me find an answer.

Air Force ROIC
has now been updated to fit into todays
busy undergraduate schedule
Here are the facts about the new two-year AFROTC Program.

Who is eligible for two-year AFROTC? Any
male undergraduate who still has two years re remaining
maining remaining in college. Its an especially good break
for junior college students who plan to complete
their baccalaureate requirements at a four-year
institution.
Whats the curriculum like? It's been thoroughly
revamped. You wont find pat answers and tra traditional
ditional traditional ritualized solutions to problems. New
instructional methods teach the student to arrive
at his own conclusions, and to test them against
those of his classmates and instructors. Symbolic
of the change is the new title Department of
Aerospace Studies.
How will students for the new program be
chosen? First, you must pass the Air Force Offi Officer
cer Officer Qualifying Test and have a medical examina examination.
tion. examination. Then you meet with the interview board of
senior Air Force officers, who will decide whether
you are to be selected to attend the Field Training
Course. This will be held during the summer
before your junior year. Its purpose is two-fold;
to let the Air Force judge you and to let you judge
the Air Force. Only after you are both satisfied
will you be enrolled in the program. So you see,
you have everything to gain and nothing to lose
by applying now. But you must act fastapplica fastapplications
tions fastapplications will be closing for next year's juniors. Forms
are available from the Professor of Aerospace
Studies, or from Headquarters Air Force ROTC,
Maxwell AFB, Alabama.
As an AFROTC cadet, will I receive pay? Yes,
you will be paid for the Field Training Course

Friday, May 14, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

| The Florida Alligator riwm the right to typographical tone at all iJwrtwaiwte Mdl
. to reeise or tarn away copy which It tioMari objectionable.
NO POSITION B GUARANTEED, thoegh dosliwd position will Da (Iron whenever poastble.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment few any advertisement involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice Is ft von to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement >
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before neat Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official stedent newspaper of the University of Florida atw is
published five times weakly except doing May, June and July when it in published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of Uwir authors. Tbo Alligator is entered as second dies i
matter at the United States Post Office at GatoesvlUe. j
CITY AUTOMATIC
TRANSMISSION, INC
FREE v.^l
FCTIMATCC WORK
ESTIMATES ; jmlgiglP^ 9 ** GUARANTEED
* Specializing in transmissions only
* Free pickup and delivery
107. DISCOUNT
To all UF students showing ID's
1409 S. Main St. Ph. 372-5196

which will amount to approximately $l2O. Dur During
ing During the school year, you will be paid S4O a month,
and you will also get free uniforms.
Will I have a chance to fly while I am in
AFROTC? Senior graduates are eligible for the
Flying Instruction Program. This involves 36%
hours of flight training and 35 hours school. Successful completion earns you a civilian
private pilots license.
United States Air Force
Headquarters, Air Force ROTC
Attn: 01
Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama
Please send more information about the new
Air Force ROTC program.
Name
College now attending
Address
Expect to transfer to
Address
Expect degree In (Year)
Home Address
ii i ii niixn ..in ii aiMpawf

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 14, 1965

I GATOR CLASSIFIEDS 1

Por Rent
ALL UNITS GROUND FLOOR, 2
rooms furnished, refrigerator.
Few air-conditioners. No kitchens.
2 blocks from main air-conditioned
library, classes, food centers,
Post Office, Laundry, etc. Rates
$80 $161.87 entire semester. 6-
6494. (B-140- st-c).
1 BEDROOM furnished apartment.
Special rate, $55 per month. Water
furnished. Near the University.
17 SW 24th Street. 6-8819. (B (B---140-3t-c).
--140-3t-c). (B---140-3t-c).
SUMMER RATES. Haunted
House. Efficiency, bedroom. $35
per month, S2O per month. Every Everything
thing Everything supplied except gas. Down Downtown
town Downtown location. Off-street parking.
372-0481, Mr. Kaplan. (B (B---140-3t-c).
--140-3t-c). (B---140-3t-c).
1 BEDROOM Furnished apartment
at 1214 NW 23rd Blvd. $75 per
month. Phone FR 6-2472, Weseman
Realty. (B-140-2t-c).
APARTMENTS FOR RENT.
Furnished. Low Summer Rates.
$75. 1616 NW 3rd Avenue.
Can accommodate up to 4 students.
372-0481, Mr. Kaplan. (B (B---140-3t-c).
--140-3t-c). (B---140-3t-c).
AVAILABLE June Ist. Will have
comfortable and convenient effi efficiency
ciency efficiency apartment for one or two
people across from campus, at
321 SW 13th St. (B-140-lt-c).
6 room upstairs APARTMENT.
Utilities furnished. SBO per month.
Call 6-0672 after 5:30 p.m. (B (B---140-3t-c).
--140-3t-c). (B---140-3t-c). )
Clean SINGLE ROOM $25 per
month. 3 blocks from University.
Utilities furnished. Boys only.
1614 NW 3rd Place, call 3-7366
or 2-2946. (B-140-lt-c).
3 Large Furnished ROOMS. Newly
decorated. $55 per month. Couples
only. Call 376-6642 or after 9
p.m. campus switch board 6-3261
and ask for Mrs. Cooper. (B-140-
3t-c).
COTTAGE ON Lake Geneva. Sleeps
4. White sand beach. $35 per week.
Call FR 2-1220. (B-140-3t-c).
APARTMENT Completely furn furnished.
ished. furnished. One bedroom, swimming
pool, all electric kitchen, central
heat, air-conditioning. S9O per
month. Available immediately.
Couple preferred. 372-3826. (B (B---137-ts-c).
--137-ts-c). (B---137-ts-c).
ROOM FOR RENT coed or
working girl, 1 block from campus.
$35/month. 376-2643. After 5;00.
(B-137-ts-c).
NICE, CLEAN, Shady furnished
apartment. Tile bath, electric kit kitchen.
chen. kitchen. Ideal for a couple. Call
372-1843. SIOO. (B-138-st-p).
2 FURNISHED Apartments. Small
$65, utilities furnished. Large,
Air-conditioned, SIOO. Both one
bedroom. 329 NW 14th Drive. Call
372-2752 afternoons and evenings,
(B-138-st-p).
$35 PER MONTH per person for.
3 or 4. Air-conditioned, 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, tile bath. Completely furn furnished
ished furnished and covered patio. 616 NW
19th Ave. Lee Crane 2-4620 or
leave message at 2-4251. (B-138-
3t-e).

Por Rent
FURNISHED 4 bedroom air-con air-conditioned
ditioned air-conditioned apartment. Low Summer
Rates. Near downtown post office.
372 0481, Mr. Kaplan. (B (B---1
--1- (B---1
1 BEDROOM Unfurnished apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Kitchen equipped. Venetian
blinds. 1/2 block from University.
Separate entrance. AVAILABLE
NOW. Air-conditioning optional.
Call 6-6112. (B-138-3t-c).
FURNISHED ROOM for rent in
private home. Call 372-3770 after
5 p.m., 536 NE 12th Court. (.B (.B---1
--1- (.B---1
I | || H| M | j
TRAILER FOR RENT. 1 bedroom,
2 single beds. Located on lot.
FOR SALE Bx3B trailer, 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, large kitchen, living, dining
area. On lot. Call before 2 week weekdays
days weekdays 376-9864. Anytime weekends.
(B-139-2t-c).
Wanted
LANDLORDS Married graduate
student arriving in September is
looking for one-bedroom modern
apartment in S6O to S9O per month
rent range. He'll be here in June
to reserve apartment for fall. If
you have what he's looking for,
he'd like to see it in June. Call
University Extension 2832 and
leave your name, address, and
phone number for him to contact.
(C-140-tf-nc).
GOLF CLUBS, right handed,
average length. I am just learning
to play and am tired of renting
clubs. If you have an old set that
is no longer used, why not get
some money for it. I am a poor,
boy so please keep the price low.
Call 8-2148 between 6 p.m. and
midnight weekdays or anytime
weekends. (C-140-tf-nc).
A FEW HUNDRED more hungry
budget minded students to enjoy
Spudnuts Donut Shop, 1017 W. Univ.
Open every night till midnight.
(C-140-ts-c).
DRIVER WANTED to drive car to
New Orleans between June 15th
and July Ist. References required.
Call 372-4024 after 6 p.m. (C (C---139-2t-c),
--139-2t-c), (C---139-2t-c),
STUDENT NUMBER, Student body,
Your identity is barred from any
recognition 'til you tear or bend
your card. Coming Soon! (C-139-
2t-c).
MALE SUBJECTS over 21 needed
for experiments in Communication
Sciences Laboratory. Must pass
tone test qualifications. $5 per
hour. Call Mrs. Hazouri at Ext.
2039 for appointment. (C-139-4t (C-139-4tc).
c). (C-139-4tc).
WANTED girls to share large
apartment. Single rooms. Air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Near campus. $25 per
month. Call FR 8-1161. (C-137-
4t-c).
ONE FEMALE Roommate to share
air-conditioned 8 bedroom house.
Close to campus. Call 6-8961 after

Por Sale
GREEN MODERN Sofa bed, sleeps
2. Excellent condition. Cost $220,
will sell for SBS. G. E. vacuum
cleaner and attachments, $lO.
Wizard vacuum sweeper, $lO.
Black vinyl swivel chair, $lO.
Call 372-6472. (A-140-2t-c).
KODAK 35 mm camera, case,
flash, G. E. exposure meter all
for $35. Voit slalom water ski,
$lO. 2 pairs of water skis, $lO
per pair. Archery target, $2. Call
372-6472. (A-140-2t-c).
TRAILER 28x8, 1957 Detroiter.
Clean, excellent condition. Full
bath, large windows, very efficient
heater, complete kitchen. Inquire
Lot C-14. O'Neal's Mobile Home
Court, 3001 SE Hawthorne Road.
(A-140-lt-p). (
Like new 1/2 ton FEDDERS Air Airconditioner.
conditioner. Airconditioner. Priced to sell. Call
372-6330 after 5 weekdays or any anytime
time anytime weekends. (A-140-lt-c).
1959 CURTIS Trailer 8x36 with
10x20 cabana. Both are carpeted
and many extras. Ready for occu occupancy
pancy occupancy June 20th. Call after 5:30
p.m. 372-7540. (A-140-3t-c).
1963 ADMIRAL Air-conditioner,
3/4 ton, $75. 1961 Westinghouse
laundermat, $65. Couch, S4O. All
$35; Baby stroller, car bed,
swing-O-matic swing, bottle
warmer, infant seat and play pen.
2-1961. (A-139-3t-c).
BAR, sls. Stools, $lO. Rug lOx
15, S2O. Record cabinet and book bookcase,
case, bookcase, S2O. Pallete bed, $lO. Phone
5-6190 between 5 and 7 p.m. (A (A---139-2t-c).
--139-2t-c). (A---139-2t-c).
AIR-CONDITIONERS FOR SALE.
2 Admiral 110 volt AC units in
excellent condition. $75 each. Call
Charlie Mayo, FR 6-8366 after 5
p.m. (A-139-3t-c).
10x55 1964 NASHUA Trailer. 2
bedroom, bar, washing machine,
built-in fold-away bed. Take up
payments or WILL RENT to couple
only. 376-0732 or see Floyd Howell
at Texaco Station 1-75 and 26.
(A-138-3t-c).
MUST SELL 1963 Horizon mobile
home, 45x10. Small equity plus
payments of $76.07 per month or
pay balance of $3,324. Call 378-
2854. (A-138-st-c).
2 EXCELLENT QUALITY Hi-Fi
speakers. Oner 15" and one 12".
Call Don 8-2TC45. (A-138-3t-c).
FUNLAND I
AMUSEMENT CENTER I
1011 W. Univ., 2 blocks from I
campus where students meet I
forrecreationl
SPORTSMENS I
CYCLE CENTER
617 N. Main St.
SUZUKI I
Soles & Service |
AIIIQAtOR AOS
Always AttRACt

(you*re reading one now)

Real Estate
FOR SALE Attractive new home
near University and Medical Cen Center.
ter. Center. Available immediately. (Would
consider renting) 815 SW 10th
Street, FR 2-0328. (I-139-2t-c).
TAKE UP PAYMENTS and pay
closing costs on a repossessed
3-bedroom, 2 bath house. Central
heat, CCB & newly painted. Phone
372-3826. (I-138-ts-c).
t
Lost & Pound j
FOUND Phi Delta Theta Fra Fraternity
ternity Fraternity ring. At the handball courts
at the Medical Center. Contact
Gene Howard, 2-6762. (L-140-
lt-c).

hm
I :
$- rs* /
* 1:41 4:14 6:47 9:20 ?Ep /
JUUEANDREWSDICK VAN DYKE
' DAVID TOMLINSON -GEYNIS JOHNS
ppwi
BIG SHEF
Two 100% pure beef Open Flame Broiled hamburgers teamed
with melted cheese, topped with crisp lettuce, creamy mayonnaise
and chopped pickle, served on a hot, toasted bun.
1 \ compare this value with other 1
I N. double-decker hamburgers I
costing much more
I ONLY
l\l§fc 39*
Irri^NlAl 715 NW '3tf> St I
HAMBURGERsI OPEN: 11 A.M.
zj CLOSE 12 P.M. I
I \ \ ~l I I iwftnrt nemotwile Swim
\ \ C h,t Srilems Irrtunjpoln I

Help Wanted
BOYS 12 to 16 years old for
established paper routes on and
adjacent to University grounds.
Contact the Gainesville Sun 378-
1411. (E-137-st-c).
THRU SAT.^
|
Billy Budd\
ONLY*
\Lordof the Flie s/
V 1,3,5,7,9^X
iSEKRI



Autos
1959 ENGLISH FORD. Good
condition* $225. C3.1l FR 2-1553.
(G-140-lt-c).
*62 IMPALA Convertible, R&H,
power steering, automatic trans transmission,
mission, transmission, white sides. Call 378-
2319. (G-140-st-p).
VW Camper 1961. SBSO. Call
Bud Tritschler, 372-9317 before
noon, Friday. (G-140-3t-p).
1957 CHEVY. Bel-Air, 4-door,
hard-top. V-8, power steering,
automatic transmission. Low
mileage. Tires and battery with
guarantees. $645. See and Drive.
FR 6-2037. (G-140-lt-c).
1957 CHEVROLET Good con condition.
dition. condition. V-8, power steering, power
brakes. S4OO. 372-6538. (G-140-
3t-c).
1960 VOLKSWAGEN, sunroof, seat
belts, window washer, rain shields.
$795. Call 372-6931 after 5:30 p.m.
(G-140-2t-p).
0
1940 FORD SEDAN. Top con condition.
dition. condition. Low mileage. Original
owner. Antique license. Call 372-
0300. A CREAM PUFF! (G-137-
st-c).

UiJIJJWIJJIII
I 2400 Hawthorne Road Rf. 20 Phone FR 6-SOll l
STARTS TONITE 3 WEIRDOS
"IF YOU LOVE A THRILLER, (AND WHO I
DOESNT), HERE ARE THREE SPINE- |
TINGLING, NERVE-SHATTERING, SPELL-1
binding^jair-raisin^shockersl^^l
brain lit
STORMI win
S Wouldn't
idea ever JfV nn M 1
conceived UIG 9
bythe 4Srm WILL LIVE I
human V I FOREVER I
brain!!! 1 ASA I
JEFF ANNE I
3rd Late Adult Shock Senaatlon!
ROBERT POLiy I JOAN fifnr
I I ] SIM I BERGEN ICRAWFORDPJGE
Ml I Ml'l ROBERT VAUGHN BUM
II 141 McdAIN TfspuM] lliil
Mew: \m SHARON HUGUENY pNfl
Rim IMI These are the lllUAdifl
M 12*4 WH "BORDERLINES", whose |\'|jl|||j
fl HHL.TiI NIGHTS have become
fl NIGHTMARES without end I
caretakers!

Autos
1956 BUICK Hard-top. Good con condition.
dition. condition. $250. Call Sarda,Ext. 2887.
(G-140-lt-c).
Leaving country. *6l TEMPEST,
stick. *63 FORD Galaxie station
wagon. Perfect condition. ALSO
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS Tables,
chairs, sofa, washing machine,
refrigerator, etc. Private 376-
0229. (G-138-7t-c).
1960 AUSTIN HEALEY Roadster.
White with white top. Over-drive.
Price $1050.6-0756.(G-139-2t-c).
1962 VW Sun-roof. One owner.
Top condition. $1090.248-S, Flavet
in. Phone 8-1853. (G-139-2t-c).
STUDENT NUMBER, Student body,
Your identity is barred from any
recognition til you tear or bend
your card. Coming Soon! (G-139-
2t-c).
1964 VOLKSWAGEN. Very clean.
White walls. $1490. 6-0756. (G (G---139-2t-c).
--139-2t-c). (G---139-2t-c).
1963 FALCON FUTURA Con Convertible.
vertible. Convertible. 6 cylinder, 4 speed floor
shift, radio and heater, bucket
seats. Must seU. 378-1969. (G (G---139-ts-c).
--139-ts-c). (G---139-ts-c).

Autos
1960 CORVAIR 4 door sedan. Blue,
radio, heater, automatic trans transmission.
mission. transmission. Clean and in good
mechanical condition. Sid 280
Sledd, 372-9184. (G-138-3t-c).
1963 VOLVO PIBOO (sports coupe)
Perfect condition, very low
mileage. Call 376-3261, ext 2780
before 5:00. 376-4168 after 5. (G (G---138-3t-c).
--138-3t-c). (G---138-3t-c).
Personal
FREE KITTEN 1 gray and
black striped female, 10 weeks
old. Call 2-6018 after 5:30 p.m.
(J-140-tf-nc).
STUDENT NUMBER, Student body,
Your identity is barred from any
recognition til you tear or bend
your card. Coming Soon! (J-139-
v 2t-c).
LETS FORM A BIKE CLUB. Phone
FR 6-2920 or FR 2-6574. Also,
WANT TO BUY English style
saddle. FR 6-2920 or P. O. Box
13291. (J-139-3t-p).
ATTENTION: Students, Charlie
and Mildred are still in the laundry
business. We are now located at
Launder-It, 1122 West University
Avenue., next door to McCollum
Drug Store. Dry cleaning, fluff
dry, shirts (hand and machine
ironed). Come by and say hello.
(J-137-Bt-c).
DESPERATELY need ride for two
to Sarasota on May 21st. Contact
Don on Monday and Thursday eve evenings
nings evenings at Ext. 2832 or any night
after 9 p.m. at 8-2193. (J-139-
3t-nc).

NEW LOCATION: FRISCHS BIG BOY
13th Street at 21st Avenue
Now Accepting Applications for:
GRILL COOKS FRY COOKS DISHWASHERS POR PORTERS
TERS PORTERS FOUNTAIN HELP WAITRESSES SANDWICH
WRAPPERS CARHOPS FOOD PREPARATION ******
Above average company benefits include: hospitalization, paid
vacation, training program, meals and uniform. Experience helpful
but not necessary. Apply at
APPLY 2035 NW 13th STREET

Does
this :
\ /
* \ /
j \ /
spot
feel sticky?
9 my i J
NEITHER DOES OLD SPICE STICK DEODORANT
Dries as it applies ... in seconds. And stays dry! Gives
you fast . comfortable . dependable deodorant
protection. Lasting protection you can trust. Try it.
Old Spice Stick Deodorant for Men. 1.00 plus tax.
,y =-
J ... 'L..'S r. ' --

Friday, May 14, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Services
TYPING Dissertations, thesis,
term paper, etc. Experienced.
Electric typewriter carbon
ribbon. On approved Graduate
School list. Mrs. L. H. Cameron,
6-3609. (M-140-lt-c).
IRONING DONE IN MY HOME,
by piece. Reasonable. 902 NW
7th Avenue or leave message at
FR 6-3471. References. (M-139-
2t-c).
WILL CARE FOR infants and
children in my home. Located on
Archer Road. Phone FR 6-9884.
(M-140-4t-p).
DEFY GOLDFINGER!
Got your passport
Got your health certificate
Get your
INTERNATIONAL
STUDENT ID CARD!
Then, a student ship to
Europe will be a fascinating
experience.
Book your passage with us ask
for speeial folder and student jobs
in Holland.
Write: Oept. 007,
U.S. NATIONAL
STUDENT ASSOCIATION
265 Madison Avenue
New York, N. Y. 10016

3 UF docs
honored
Three physicians on the pedia pediatric
tric pediatric staff at the UF's College of
Medicine have been elected to the
international 250-member Society
for Pediatric Research, it has
been announced.
Selected on the basis of re research
search research abilities related to child childrens
rens childrens health and disease were:
Dr. Douglas R. Shanklin, asso associate
ciate associate professor of pathology and
pediatrics; Dr. Melvin Greer, as associate
sociate associate professor of pediatrics
and medicine, and Dr. L. Jerome
Krovetz, assistant professor of
pediatrics and physiology.
The College of Medicine re researchers
searchers researchers are among 27 elected
throughout this continent for mem membership
bership membership in the 36-year-old society,
bringing to nine the College's re representation
presentation representation in that body.
Ibe others, all faculty mem members
bers members in the Department of Pedia Pediatrics,
trics, Pediatrics, are: Dr. AndrewE.Lorincz,
Dr. Donald V. Eitzman, Dr.
Gerold L. Shiebler, Dr. Howard
A. Pearson and Dr. William B.
Well Jr. ;
Dr. Greer was elected on the
basis of research in the area of
benign Intracranial hypertension
and metabolic abnormalities in
mental retardation; Dr. Shanklin
for his research on the respira respiratory
tory respiratory disease problem of the new newborn,
born, newborn, and Dr. Krovetz for funda fundamental
mental fundamental Investigation into charac characteristics
teristics characteristics of blood flow in the cir circulatory
culatory circulatory system.
The Society is composed of out outstanding
standing outstanding young investigators up
45 years of age and Includes mem members
bers members from fee UJS., Canada, South
America, Mexico and Europe.
SG EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
The new hours for the Student
Employment Service are 3-4:30
p.m. Monday through Thursday.
SG has a complete listing of sum summer
mer summer Jobs which vary from summer
camp counselors to truck drivers.
If you want summer employment
outside the immediate area of
Gainesville come to Room 309 of
the Florida Union and check the
listings.

Page 7



Page 8

z The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 14, 1965

Competition for
Fulbright grants
hos began
The competition for 1966-67
United States government graduate
grants for academic study or
research abroad, and for profes professional
sional professional training in creative and
performing arts, is officially open,
the Institute of International
Education announced.
Application forms and
information for students currently
enrolled in the UF may be obtained
from the campus Fulbright
Advisor, Glenn A. Farris, Inter International
national International Center, Building AE. The
deadline for filing applications
through the Fulbright Advisor on
this campus is October 26, 1965.
The Institute conducts
competitions for U. S. government
scholarships provided by the
Fulbright-Hays Act as part of the
educational and cultural exchange
program of the Department of
State. Under this program, more
than 800 American graduate stu students
dents students will have the opportunity to
study in any one of 55 countries.
The purpose of the awards is to
increase mutual understanding be between
tween between the people of the U.S. and
other countries through the
exchange of persons, knowledge
and skills.
Three types of grants will be
available under the Fulbright-Hays
Act: U. S. government full grants,
joint U. S. other government
grants, and U. S. government
travel-only grants.
A full award will provide a
grantee with tuition, maintenance,
round-trip transportation, health
and accident insurance and an
incidental allowance. In Japan,
Nepal, India and the Republic of
China, a maintenance allowance
will be provided for one or more
accompanying dependents.
' I Ml I >1
European Club
picnic slated
The UF European Club picnic
is scheduled for Saturday, June 5
beginning at 8 a.m.
The picnic will be held at the
lakeside cottage of Mr. and Mrs.
Yates* International House. In Interested
terested Interested Europeans are requested
to call Jan Hoeller at Extension
2177 (day) and Brooke Greene at
FR 2-3482 after 6 p.m. for
further information.
tv:?-:':':'/:-!- 11 '-' 1 111 11 !ll I' l l'' I' :
PAGKANT
'^Bl
Umm : WNMWtmr
HirSfaVtar r *****
UMBftWK fmrnm
THE BRAVEST MAN I EVER MET
by Rev. Martin Luther King
THE AMERICAN THE RUSSIANS
APPLAUD
HOW TO ASK FOR WHAT YOU WANT
AND SET IT
CAMP IN COMFORT THIS SUMMER
PA6EANT reflects the world about us.
Each month it brings you timely ar articles
ticles articles and picture stories some in informative,
formative, informative, some controversial, some
humorous. The June issue sparkles with
more than 30 stimulating features.
PAGEANT
AMERICAS LIVELIEST
THOUGHT-PROVOKING
MAGAZINE

Frenchman calls
for allied cooperation

Monsieur Pierre Emanuelli,
executive secretary of the French
Association for the Atlantic
Community, called for greater
cooperation among western allies
in a speech given in the Law
School Auditorium Tuesday night.
Emanuelli pointed out that
differences between the goals of
U. S. foreign policy and that of
France under President DeGaulle
were not as far apart as UJS.
citizens think. He cited the
*failure** of the American press
to actually relate French policy
and how often it distorts impli implications
cations implications of DeGaulle statements.
As an example he cited the
meeting between DeGaulle and
Soviet Foreign Minister Gromyko.
He said that the American press
had warned that the meeting meant
that France was going to pull
out of NATO,** whereas France
had no such intention.
A prime pdint of Emanuellls
speech was devoted to Gen.
DeGaulle*s *lndependent Third
Power** proposals. He pointed out
that the reason for the strong
feelings on this issue, by DeGaulle
as well as leaders of other
European countries, is the far farflung
flung farflung interests of the United States.
With American military right in
Viet Nam, the Dominican Republic
and elsewhere throughout the world
many Europeans feel American
strength, as well as goals, are
other than in Europe and they would
feel more secure if they possessed
their own military capability.**
Emanuelli recalled Gen.
DeGaulles remark that**We would
not have seen the Hungarian blood bloodshed
shed bloodshed if they had had one atomic
bomb.**
Emanuelli strongly emphasized
that Frenchmen are still deeply
aware of the Common link with
America.**
He also admitted that sincethe
death of Pres. Kennedy there is
less feeling that there is a chance

if she doesnt give it to you...
get it yourself!
JADE EAS&.
After Shave, 6 oz., $3.50
Deodorant Stick, $1.75 g
Buddha Cologne Gift Package, 12 oz.. s>.so-dgjllH&k 7
Spray Cologne, $3.50 llfes-
Buddha Soap Gift Set, $4.00
Cologne, 4 oz $3.00 =-
After Shave, 4 oz. $2.50 swank, new VbK sole distributor
B-L Men's Weor Dept.
THE orTwiTH MORE
' GAJN'jVUUE shopping center *
S. >OO2 NORTH MAIN STREET v
Store Hours- 100.rn.-9 0.m.. Mon, ttim Sot. Use Your Choree Account Or Loyowq^

for conciliation of mutual
problems.**
Emanuelli pointed to recent his history
tory history for die strong nationalistic
policies of DeGaulle.
Emanuelli also cited misin misinterpretation
terpretation misinterpretation here for DeGaulle*s
plans for NATO. DeGaulle is
simply pointing out that if the
European nations are to have a
greater share of the costs, they
want a greater share of the
responsibilities.**
Finally, Emanuelli criticized the
overemphasis on the part of
Americans for the concept of
sovereignty.** He said that it is
a concept no longer greatly
applicable in the modern world
of nuclear war, as it was in the
nineteenth century.
LIFE INSURANCE
Guaranteed by
Top Company
No War Clause
Full Aviation
Coverage
Campus representatives:
Bob Si frit
Mel Ward
George Corl
376-1208

1. Ive been weighing the
possibility of becoming a
perpetual student.
Last week you said you
were considering the
merits of mink farming.
3.1 must admit the thought
did enter my mind.
Has the thought ever
entered your mind
that you might get a
job and make a career
for yourself?
5. You mean earn while learning?
Right. And you can
do it at Equitable.
Theyll pay 100 X of
your tuition toward
a qualified graduate
degree. At the same
time, the work is
challenging, the pay
is good, ana I hear
you move up fast.

For complete information about career opportunities at Equitable, see your
Placement Officer, or write to Edward D. McDougal, Manager,
Manpower Development Division.
The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States
Home Office: 1285 Ave. erf the Americas, New York, N. Y. 10019 C Equitable 1965
An Equal Opportunity Employer
EQUITABLE
Theres big news about Living Insurance
from Equitable. A new series of policies
that give liberalized benefits and new
benefits unique with Equitable. Theres
even a new look to all Equitable policies,
making them easier to read and understand.
So if youve been planning to buy insurance
nows the time to do it. Call The Man
From Equitable. Look ahead with m
LIVING INSURANCE. .FROM EQUHABU
FRANK LENTZ
5 SW 2nd Place
FR 2-1260

2. With graduation drawing near
, I realized how much more
there was for me to leam.
You didnt also
realize, did you,
that when you graduate
your dad will cut
off your allowance?
4. What about my thirst for
knowledge?
Just because you work
doesnt mean you have
to stop learning.
6. But what do I know about
insurance?
With your thirst for
knowledge, Im sure
youll be the star
of their development
program.



208 W. University
Across from Silverman's
Extra-Tapered
Ivy Shortsleeve
SPORTSHIRTS
Solids, Plaids, Madras &
Stripes From $4
Ivy Seersucker & Poplin
BERMUDA
SHORTS
Dacron/Cotton Blend
L 54 95
NEW ARRIVALS
Hang Ten Surfer Shorts;
Keds Boating Shoes;
Water-Repellent Whal Whalers;
ers; Whalers; Levi Shorts, Slacks
& Denims; Sportcoats.
COME IN AND BROWSE
Your Silverman's U of F
Charge Card Is Good Herej
Young
American
Shop
Across From Silverman's
Free One-Hour Parking
On l|t Federal Bank Lot

Max Lerner
interview on
TV tonight
The Philosophy of Max
Lerner, an interview with a man
whose basic interest, in his words,
lies not with the Democratic
Party or with any political organi organization,
zation, organization, but with ideas will be
telecast today at 8:30 on Channel
5.
Lerner, professor of American
Civilization at Brandeis
University, Waltham, Mass., a
former Harvard scholar, writer
and philosopher, will be inter interviewed
viewed interviewed by WUFTs Mark Damen
in the TV series In the Margin
of Culture.
He will give his views on a
wide range of questions: Is world
war as history has known it a thing
of the past? Will modern mass
media create amass man? What
is the role of the individual in
this space age? The nation? Has
communism changed as a world
force?
Author of the much-touted and
sometimes maligned book
America as a Civilization, Ler Lerner
ner Lerner has commented on this
country's social, cultural,
economic and political milieu in
his column in the New York Post
since 1949.
In addition, he has written such
well-known social commentaries
as Ideas are Weapons, The
Portable Veblen, and The Mind
and Faith of Justice Holmes,
STEAK SUPPER
The Presbyterian University
Center is presenting a steak
supper at 6 p.m. Sunday at the
Center. Cost is sl.

6xpeience£> t.Vs
STEREOS-RADIOS (USED)
DISCOUNT PRICES
ON T.V. ANTENNAES
/*/>! 608 N Ma!n St
LvULn O Ph3767171
See Whets Mew Ib
The Browse Shop
THE WHITE GODDESS Robert Graves
CULTURE & BEHAVIOR Clyde Kluckhom
JAPANESE LITERATURE Donald Keene
THE QUARE FELLOW Brendan Behan
FORGOTTEN LANGUAGE Erich Fromm
FOUR PLAYS Eugene lonesco
MARQUIS de SADE.... Simone de Beauvoir
TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
ION EXCHANGE Helferich
DYNAMIC PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Rose
810-CHEMICAL MECHANISMS Ingraham
Ceapes Shop ft Bookstore

m ... rv_.
\ dip I* 11 £ m '
B 4 JMg, 1 TOr Fw'
, i- ." "/ ~ '-v ~ v s JljH, |,
w
f ML jp yfc
Bk jfe .* B f JH -Bfa >& K :

. .newly elected executive editors for the UF Law Review are, front
row, 1. to r., Dennis McGillicuddy, Rod Magie, Dick Adams, and Gene
Brown. Second row, 1. to r., Tom Smith, Bruce Lazar, Bob Manly,
Lanny Curry, Stumpy Harris, and Stephen Turner.

Law college names too scholars

Richard M. Robinson of Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville has been chosen the leading
scholar in the UF's College of
Law for the recently concluded
winter trimester.
Robinson, son of Mr. and Mrs.
W. T. Robinson, 1110 NW 16th
Ave., scored top grades in courses
dealing with civil procedure, torts
and criminal law and procedure.
Five other students won two
awards apiece for leading grades
in various courses, some of which
had more than one section. They
were:
GAINESVILLE Benjamin E.
Hendricks Jr.; JACKSONVILLE
Jerome R. Wolfe; MlAMlGerald
T. Bennett and OCALA L. E.
McClellan Jr.
In addition to the six law stu students
dents students with multiple awards, 41

ROBINSON HEADS LIST

others were designated for single
honors In their classes. They
included:
BARTOW Michael J. Minerva;
CORAL GABLES Jon W. Zeder;
FT. WALTON BEACH Robert E.
Lee; GAINESVILLE Lucius M.
Dyal Jr., Norwood Gay, Robert
N. Golden, Kenneth G. Had cock,
Gordon H. Harris, Paul C. Huck,
Charles Intriago, D. J. McGilli McGillicuddy,
cuddy, McGillicuddy, William A. Patterson, and
Charles A. Williams; and INVER INVERNESS
NESS INVERNESS John Roscow.
JACKSONVILLE Hume F.
Coleman, Charles F. Henley Jr.,
Charles C. Howell IH, Benjamin
W. Redding IH; LAKE CITY
Thomas W. Brown; MELBOURNE
Dorsey F. Henderson Jr., R. A.
Lazenby; MIAMI Herbert T.
Schwartz; MIAMI BEACHVictor

ATO president Kynes gets
advertising scholarship
Three SSOO scholarships for the study of advertising have been
awarded at the Fourth District (State of Florida) Advertising Federation
of America convention.
The scholarships went to Charles Allen Kynes Jr., of Miami, a
junior at the UF; C. Scott Ellington, of Lynn Haven, a junior at Florida
State University and John Walter Lawson, of St. Petersburg, a junior
at Florida State.
The scholarship awards are made annually to deserving and
promising students of advertising in the state.
Highly active in extra-curricular affairs at the UF, Kynes is
president of the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity, a member of Blue Key
and vice president of Alpha Delta Sigma.
PHONOGRAPH
Record Accessories
In keeping with our policy
of the lowest prices possible SALE
UST PRICE PRICE
CL-55 Cleaning Cloths SI.OO $.49
RCO-24 Record Covers (Outside) .98 .59
RCI-12 Record Covers (Inside) .9$ .59
RCK Record Cleaning Kits $1.50 .98
RPM-45 Adaptors 5@25$ .25 .19
RPM-90 Adaptors 10@49$ .49 .37
SP-25 Record Centers .25 .19
RB-100 Record Brushes SI.OO .49
NE-79/ Sapphire Needles SI.OO .59
NE-69 Sapphire Needles .50 .39
NE-99 Steel Needles 25@25$ .25 .25
RBP-1 Record Brush Pen sl*so .98
Combo Cleaning Cloth & Brush $1.25 .69
AS-12 Anti-Static Record Spray $1.50 .98
*6OW Record Racks $2.98 1.69
*4OX Record Racks $1.98 .99
TtetKOIDBU
123 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. PHONE 376- 1042
Open 9 to 6 Mondays and Fridays 9 to 9

Friday, May 14, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

D. Comras, Richard J. Mandell;
MON TICE LLO Norman Sauls;
NEW SMYRNA BEACH Gary M.
Sams; NICEVILLE Wallace F.
Spence.
ORLANDO William A. Had Haddad;
dad; Haddad; ORMOND BEACH Julian
E. Markhan Jr.; PALM BEACH
W. P. Byrd Jr.; PANAMA CITY
Russell Stewart; PENSACOLA
L. F. Ray Jr.; SARASOTA A.
D. Vandroff, D. S. Yost; ST.
PETERSBURG Orrin M.Gowin;
SOUTH MIAMI Michael Jonas;
TALLAHASSEE Walter T.
Moore m; TAMPA Brian Ellis;
WINTER PARK Wilfred K.
Smith.
OUT OF STATE CONNECT-
I Knight;
ILLINOIS Tolondo James A.
Gardner.

Page 9



Page 10

. The Florida Alligator. Friday, May 14, 1965

UF information director Birmingham-bound

W. H. (Hoke) Kerns, 35, was
yesterday appointed Director of
! Public Relations of Birmingham
Baptist Hospitals.
The appointment of Kerns,
presently Director of
Informational Services at the UF
was announced by L. R. (Rush)
Jordan, Executive Director.
Kerns, whofl
assumed hisl Ik
present duties inff
1962, previously
directed the Of-r
fice of Health
Center RelaJ*
tions in the
Universitys J.j.'j.V*'''.
Hi 11 i s Miller |
Health Center.
He joined the UF _. ..
staff in 1954. NtKINi
Jordan said Kerns will interpret
the rapidly expanding programs
of the Birmingham Baptist
Hospitals and will direct and
develop their public, patient and
professional relations programs.
We are most fortunate to add
Mr. Kerns to our management
team, Jordan said. He brings
to Birmingham Baptist Hospitals
a wide professional competence
and reputation in health and
educational public relations and
great personal energy and en enthusiasm.
thusiasm. enthusiasm.
A native Floridian, Kerns is a
graduate of the UF School of
Journalism and Communications.
In 1951-52 he served as Assistant
Editor of the Bradford County
Telegraph in Starke, Fla. After
Army service as a Public In Information
formation Information Officer, he joined the
UF faculty as Assistant and later
Associate Editor of the News
Bureau.
(Cont from p. 1)
Stephens College for six years
before coming to the UF as
Vice President in 1957. From
1947 to 1952, Dr. Philpott had
been at the UF as an Assistant-
Associate Professor of
Religion.
Philpott said that appropri appropriations
ations appropriations for Auburn University
will enable the university to
expand its programs and add
new faculty.
The hope that I have is
that we are going to make
Auburn as good as Florida,
if not better, Dr. Philpott
said.
ashawav VANTAGE
For Tournament Play
Approx. Stringing Coat
a
f i isiuway PROTECTED^
U For Club Play
< Approx. Stringing Coat
Tennis $7 i
Badminton $6 A
MUITI-PLY^B
PJr For Regular Play 1
Approx. Stringing Coat
Tennis $5 J
Badminton $4 A

In 1959 he was selected to
establish the Office of Health
Center Relations in the $25 million
J. Hillis Miller Health Center. He
continued to be responsible for
operation of this program after his
appointment to direct University Universitywide
wide Universitywide informational programs in
1962.
In 1963-64 Kerns served as
chalrinan of the seven-state South Southeastern

Emanuefli: an interview

By JANE YOUNG
Staff Writer
I am French, there is no
question about that, said Pierre
Emanuelli, deputy general of the
French Association for the
Atlantic Community (FAAC).
Os the FAAC, he said, We try
to publicize, defend and explain
NATO in France.
Bringing frenchmen to the
United States to see the country
for themselves, is one way in
which NATO is explained. It is
not enough to speak to people of
our greatest ally, the United
States, said Monsieur Emanuelli.
He believes understanding comes
through familiarization. It
(America) is a totally different
world, he said.
Three tours have come to the
United States under the direction
of Monsieur Emanuelli. The people
making these trips are usually
community leaders from the
provinces of France.
American friendliness, he said,
made a great impression on
visitors to this country, but
unfortunately, one meets either
friendliness or mechanical
smiles.
These mechanical smiles of
public service leave an impression
of superficiality, he said.
Monsieur Emanuelli told of sev several
eral several examples of friendliness. One
group was eating in a restaurant
and unable to order fresh fruit
for dessert, as is the custom in
France. An elderly couple who
had introduced themselves to
Monsieur Emanuelli asked if
anything was wrong. He explained
to them that the group missed
YOU CAN EARN UP TO 14 HOURS OF
COLLEBE CREDIT WHILE
SIUDYHUi
IS SUMMER
IN THE NATION'S CAPITAL
AT THE GEORGE
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
A program designed to make
the unparalleled resources of
Washington, D.C. available to
students in other colleges and
universities.
JUNE 14-JULY 21
JULY 22-AUGUST 27
Special 3-week workshops in
Education begin June 14,
July 6, and July 26
e Air-conditioned classrooms,
library and residence hall
Urban campus just four
blocks from the White House
write for catalogue:
Dean of the
Summer Sessions
The George
Washington
University /. -
Washington, D.C. / *\
20006 \V3S| Wi*}
~Ji wm

eastern Southeastern District of the American
College Public Relations
Association. He is presently a
member of the Information Com Committee,
mittee, Committee, American Association of
State Universities and Land-Grant
Colleges.
In addition to his major duties
at the UF, Kerns has edited the
Florida Alumnus, official
magazine of the University Alumni

having fresh fruit. The couple
gave the group some prunes they
were taking to their daughter.
In Boise, Idaho, during another
tour, the group was received
graciously and to show their
appreciation collected S3OO to buy
two TV sets for the local hospital
in the name of the Association.
This is my tenth trip in four
years and every time 1 feel my myself
self myself more European, Monsieur
Emanuelli said. You lack garlic
in your life.
Twenty years ago a few French

yfr v . " . nr rir n \
Chevrolet Impala Sport Sedan
*
THE NO. 1 WAY /SSSSgESP
What's your vacation planWorlds Fair, Yellowstone, Niagara,
Mackinac Bridge, summer cottage? See us for the right Chevrolet
so youll make it in style. Like a lively Corvair. Or the style and
economy of a Chevy 11. Or a youthful Chevelle, favorite in its size
class. Or a luxurious Jet-smooth Chevrolet. The last three are available
with the economical, spirited Turbo-Thrift Six. You can order a
4 Monza with up to 140 hp. You cant find a newer car or a better time
to buy one. Come inpick yours now!
Red Hot and Rolling! See your Chevrolet dealer for a new
CHEVROLET CHEVELLE CHEVY H CORVAIR

Association. During his editorship
the magazine won six awards from
the Florida Magazine Association.
A Captain in the Army Reserve,
Kerns has served on active duty
tours with the 4th U. S. Army
Corps in Birmingham the past
two years. During these duty tours,
he has served as Informational
Officer for the annual Veterans
Day observance.

businessman came to the United
States, but only for business. Now
there is an interest, a desire to
see the country and its people,
he said.
Public relations for NATO in
France is carried on in the
provinces. Conference-dinners
are held periodically to discuss
NATO and its problems. In Paris,
student seminars are held and once
a year a seminar of NATO country
students is held. Ambassadors and
high NATO officials address the
group.

(Cont from p. 1)
will speak at a luncheon that will
be hosted by Sen. Spessard Holland
of Florida honoring Dr. Reitz, and
tiie team of writers that won for
theUF.
Other over-all winners in the
1964-65 competition, listed alpha alphabetically,
betically, alphabetically, are: Michael Bartei*,
University of Nebraska; James
Clotfelter, University of North
Carolina; Michael Morrison,
Michigan State University; Charles
Reid, UF; and Patricia Wilkinson,
UF.
The Foundation presents $40,900
in scholarships and grants to stu students
dents students and schools of journalism
that are eligible for the seven sevenmonth
month sevenmonth competition*
I MOTORCYCLES I
3 For The Discriminating*
I CYCLERAMA I
|378-2811 21 SE2ndPIJ



North-South All-Star Game coming July 31

The UF gridiron will be the site
of the hardest fought duel between
the South and the North since 1865.
On July 31, 56 footballers (28 on
oarh side) will line up to represent



ALLIANCE
TV SERVICE
Fast, Expert Service
.on all makes
TELEVISION
RADIO
STEREO
10% DISCOUNT
on parts to all
U of F students
817 W.. Univ Ave

united chupch of chist
(CONGREGATIONAL, CHRISTIAN,
and EVANGELICAL & REFORMED)
welcomes you
The United Church of Christ of Gainesville extends
a warm invitation to all college students to join our
worship services. We believe in freedom of thought
and conscience. We have no creedal obligations. We
are seeking a vital and relevant religious fellowship,
and cordially welcome ail fellow searchers regardless
or race, color, creed or national origin.
We are a young church and we like young people.
Join us Sunday mornings throughout the summer at 10
a.m. in the auditorium of the Florida Union. For
more information about our summer plans for students,
call Warren and Charlotte Menke, our Youth Spon Sponsors
sors Sponsors (376-0694), or talk to Norman Nelson or Sally
Tolbert, our Student Representatives on campus.

SUMMER FUN
GOLF by McGREGOR
Jack Nkklns CUks 3 Woods, 8 Irons Reg. $122.50 Value I
$99.95
(Compartment Bag FREE)
Also Bags, Carts, Hoad Covors, Balk
McGREGOR SUPER 88 GOLF BALLS CIO
Reg. $14.75 doz. (WHILE THEY LAST:) lIvVT f
TENNIS
Rackets BY BANCROFT AND DUNLOP I
Balls BY PENNSYLVANIA I
The Popular TRETORN BALL Non-Pressurized
FRATERNITY & SORORITY I
SHIRTS LETTERED |
Jimmie Hughes Sporting Goods
1 Block East of Compos

their section in the annual Florida
North-South All-Star High School
Football Game.
The field general for the Gray,
high school All-America Larry

Gridders score high

UF football players achieved the
finest academic record every com compiled
piled compiled by Gator gridders in the Just
completed Winter Trimester.
According to Florida Athletic
Director Ray Graves, the Gators
came through with flying colors to
record an overall academic
average of 2.342 out of a possible
4.0. No Gator gridders were elimi eliminated
nated eliminated from school for academic
reasons while 72 made an honor
point average above 2.0 and 11
were over 3.0.
Top man academically was sen senior
ior senior guard Melton Callahan o'

Smith of Tampa Robinson, will be
protected by the biggest offensive
line forces in the South's history.
Chief battle strategist for the
North will be Coach Byrd Whigham
of Wildwood. Assisting him will be
J. M. Pfeil, Summerfield, Lake
Weir; and Joe Latham, Walnut Hill.
Nick Kotys, Coach of State AA
Champion Coral Gables, will be at
the helm for the South. Assisting
him will be John Burgess, Tampa

Waycross, Ga with a 3.60. Tackle
John Whatley earned a 3.40 to be
the top junior, Jack Card was tops
among sophomores with a 3.21 and
Wayne McCall was the leading
freshman with a 3.28.
I am proud of the average
earned by the football squad and
the way they buckled down to get
themselves eligible for com competition
petition competition in the fall," said Graves.
"We have never before had tri trimester
mester trimester grades turn out as well as
these have and it is most
encouraging."
Those making three-point
averages or better, in addition to
Callahan, Card, Whatley and Mc-
Call, were Max Bilinski (3.12),
Charles Casey (3.0), Dick Kirk
(3.0), Don Knapp (3.0), Richard
McCarl (3.0), Bill Rlchbourg (3.0)
and Mike Waxman (3JLI).
SERVICES OF
Services of Christian
Worship Will Be Held
EVERY
SUNDAY
AT 8:45 A.M.
Presbyterian
Univ. Center
1402 W. University
EVERYONE WELCOME

Friday. May 14. 1965. Hie Florida Alligator/

Plant; and Jim Maynor, Palm
Beach Senior.
The game is sponsored by the
Florida High School Activities
Aneo^jatton,
Representing the North will be
Ends Ted Hendricks, Hialeah,
6-6, 200; Chip Glass, Tampa
Chamberlain, 6-5, 210; Junior
Phillips, Fort Myers Sr., 6-1,190;
John Ashschwede, Lakeland, 6-0,
195; George Dean, Tampa Robin Robinson,
son, Robinson, 6-3, 225; Steve Ely, Tampa
Plant, 6-0,185.
Tackles Henry Lohse, St.
Petersburg Admiral Farragut,
6-4, 230; Ed Wright, Miami Senior,
6-1, 210; Steve Headley, Cocoa,
6-0, 205; Rick Long, Tampa Plant,
6-2, 210; Richard Traut, Key West,
6-4, 240.
Guards Ron Stoeppelwerth,
Fort Lauderdale Sr., 6-1, 220;
Ken Diaz, Coral Gables, 6-0, 200;
Carlos Luis, Coral Gables, 6-0,
190; Bruce Chambers, South Dade,
6-0,190.
Centers and Linebackers Tom
Adelhour, Miami Senior, 5-10,185;
Dave Barnhart, W. Palm Beach
Sr., 6-1, 200; Gunnar Paulson,
Hollywood McArthur, 5-11, 205.
Quarterbacks Larry Rents,
Coral Gables, 6-1, 150; Bill
C apple man, Dunedin, 6-0,180.
Backs Steve Gray, St. Peters Petersburg
burg Petersburg Dixie Hollins, 6-0, 185; Al Alberto
berto Alberto Morrell, Clewiston, 6-0,190;
Ken Hutcherson, Satellite Beach,
6-0, 190; Eddie Tuttle, Winter
Haven, 6-0, 190; Bob Czipulls,
Miami Norland, 6-0, 180; Dave
Hallstrand, Miami Palmetto, 6-0,

SEC trackmen threaten
records in weekend meet

Apparently the sprint records
are safe from assault in the 33rd
annual Southeastern Conference
track meet scheduled for the
Louisiana State University campus
today and Saturday but the other
marks are in imminent danger.
Nine of the existing records in
the 17 events have been equalled
or bettered in the preliminary
competition to date. In three events
(mile, 2-mile and triple jump)
two or more SEC varsity athletes
have reached or surpassed the
standards.
The six other events being
threatened are the 880, high
hurdles, high jump, pole vault,
discus and javelin. Records are
recognized only when accomplish accomplished
ed accomplished in the annual conference meet.
Floridas Jim Brown has done
the 880-yd. run in 1:51.2, one

GAINESVILLE
\ to TAMPA
and POINTS SOUTH
\ CALL 378-1966
V OR
YOUR TRAVEL AGENT
FLIGHT NUMBERS
city
Lv Gainesville 2:sopm s:oopm
Ar Tampa 3:4opm s:sopm
Lv Tampa I:sopm 3:sopm
Ar Gainesville 2:4opm 4:4opm
MiiMAMduumi
I

180; Larry Smith, Tampa Robin Robinson,
son, Robinson, 6-3, 200; Oscar Gonzalez,
Tampa Hillsborough, 5-9, 175.
On the South squad are Ends
Dean Patterson, Pensacola Senior
(6-0, 210), Walter Townsend, Bun Bunnell
nell Bunnell (6-5, 185), Billy Rhodes,
Eustis (6-2, 200), Ted Archer,
Pensacola Escambia (6-6, 200).
Tackles Allen Folkins,
Orange Park (6-2, 220), Harold
Clifford, Orlando Colonial (6-2,
250), Steve Parker, Kissimmee
Osceola (6-2,200), Harold Reid,
Jasper (6-2, 200), Guy Dennis,
Walnut Hill (6-3, 250).
Guards Billy Joe James,
Pensacola Senior (6-1, 210), Jerry
Jackson, Panama City Bay (6-1,
210), Bob Young, (6-0, 200), Jaz
Beach Fletcher, Dale Turllrgton,
(6-1,195), Gainesville.
Centers David Mann, (6-0,
200), Pensacola Senior, Joe
Farless, (6-0, 190), Sanford
Seminole.
Quarterbacks Gary Pajdc,
(6-2, 185), Jaz Pazon, Howell
Montgomery, (6-0, 170), Blounts Blountstown,
town, Blountstown, Chuck Eason, (5-10, 180),
Tallahassee Leon.
Backs Randy Jones, (5-9,
155), Wildwood, John Batten, (6-0,
190), Orlando Boone, Dennis
James, (6-1, 200), Tallahassee
Leon, Bobby Hess, (6-2, 195),
Pensacola Escambia, Dorsey
Motes, (6-0, 175), Baldwin, Jim
Brown, (6-0, 210), Jaz Rlbault,
Bill Perry, (5-10, 165), Palatka,
A1 Griffin, (6-3, 225), Gainesville,
Danny Jones, (5-8,160), Wildwood,
Bain Culton, (6-2, 215), Talla Tallahassee
hassee Tallahassee Leon.

tenth of a second better than the
marie set by Ken Winter of Auburn
in 1963, and Gator vaulter Ed
Vehling has gone 1/4 inch past
Christophers record.
Defending champion Tennessee
has five men among the fourteen
who have shown they can reach
the records. Rocky Soderberg has
done the mile in 4:11.4 and Bob
Redingtop in 4:12.2 to catch the
record of 4:12.2 established by
Fred Ablngton of Vanderbilt in
j^WATERSKIE^^I
Students interested in Water
skiing at Lake Wauberg will find
facilities for skiing open the
following hours: 2-6 p.ro. Friday;
1:30 6:30 p.m. Saturday and
1-6 p.m. Sunday.

Page 11



Page 12

z The Florida Alligator/ Friday, May 14 # 1965

Gators enter

UFs baseball troops, hopeful a
two-game sweep of Georgia over
the weekend signals the end of a
mid-season slump, return to action
Friday at Rollins.
Coach Dave Fuller's team, now
15-9, take on the Tars in a single
game at Winter Park, then return
to Gainesville for a doubleheader
with the same team Saturday*
Allen Trammell continues to
pace the Gators ih hitting. The
nations secone-leading batter, he
now has 42 hits in 92 trips for a
batting average of .457.
Trammell, a second-team all-
SEC defensive halfback in football,
leads the Gators in hits, runs
scored (20), doubles (10), runs
batted in (27) and stolen bases
(8).
In addition, the Eufaula, Ala Alabama
bama Alabama native is tied for the lead
in triples (2) and home runs (1).
The only department Trammell
fails to lead the Gators in Is at

-*m
' "M
n Rr
' fIH w\-. i m <: 'WxfcooJ&s. >. ?'T,T u '*

First team to upset the Gators applecart
was the Florida Southern* Above, third base baseman
man baseman Don Pendley dives back to first against
the Mocs*
isl
M&
M
vW ; .4> v V,'::v
Things turned bad in the Miami series following
the trimester break* Catcher Bud Williams
turns to recover wild throw by Gator hurler
in second Hurricane tilt.

Gators sign
Keighley to
tennis pact
UF has signed Mike Keighley
of Miami to a tennis scholarship,
head coach Bill Potter stated
recently,
Keighley, of Archbishop Curley
High, joins what is certain to be
strongest Gator freshman tennis
team on record. He is ranked in
the top 20 in singles (18 and under)
in the state, and went to the
semi-finals of the recent state
tournament losing to state
champion Armistead Neely, also a
Gator signee.
MURAL SCHEDULE =
Monday May 17th
Independents vs. Rockets Field 8
Purple B. vs Rejects Field 7
Champs vs PAD Field 6
PKT vs Non-Directives Field 5
Physics vs BTP Field 4
SPE vs PLP Field 3
SAE vs Chemistry Field 2

bats*
Fuller was very pleased with
Gator pitching against Georgia,
as junior Dan Griffin and sopho sophomore
more sophomore Kelly Prior turned in strong
efforts allowing the Bulldogs only
two runs each day.
Following the Rollins series the
Gators have three home games
remaining: May 21-22 against FSU
and May 25 against Jacksonville*
Florida will be on the road against
FSU May 28 and 29 (doubleheader)
to conclude the season*
In the Rollins series Fuller will
likely start Ray Rollyson in the
opening game and come back with
Danny Eggart and either Griffin or
Prior in the second game of the
twin-bill.
Available in relief will be
Florida ace Adrian Zabala, who has
a mark of 4-0 with an ERA of
1:00. Rollyson is 2-2, Griffin 3-2,
Eggart 3-3 and Prior 1-0*

iBP f-gji
|B|3WI fill i>. I B
Jjj Ek
Senior Captain Randy
Morcroft nas played
his final SEC game
for the Gators* All
that remains now are
the series with
Rollins, Jacksonville
U. and arch rival
Florida State*

homestretch vs. Tars
W *ll A
ffffW
-- > -- Bin VBk
'i < 3j(Bgfc£ls
mm
; K' J I
Early In the season Coach Dave Fuller had
hopes of a great year for his charges* Here
he tosses the ball to his top pitchers (left
to right) Danny Eggart, Danny Griffin, Ray
Rollyson and Adrian Zabala*
COMPLETE 24 GAME BASEBALL STATISTICS
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 24-GAME BASEBALL STATISTICS, 1965
(15-9 Overall, 9-3 SEC)
Player G AB R H .BA 2B 3B HR RBI SB
Allen Trammell, LF 24 9 20 42 .457 10 _2 1 27 8
Tommy Shannon, RF 24 82 14 22 .268 2 0 0 15 1
Bill Blomgren, RF 24 88 1 2 23 .261 6 2 0 14 2
Bud Williams, C 17 37 9 9 .243 2 0 0 3 1
Randy Morcroft, SS 24 95 17 23 .242 2 0 0 4 2
Don Pendley, 3B 22 76 15 18 .237 2 2 1 12 2
Charles Casey, CF 18 38 8 8 .211 3 2 0 0 0
Ron Creese, 2B 19 54 9 9 .167 0 0 0 1 4
Jack Kenworthy, C 19 48 6 8 .167 1 0 0 6 0
Bruce Moore, 2B 18 56 10 9 .161 2 0 0 6 1
Less Than 25 Tiroes At Bat
Bob Hawkins, IB 5 6 0 3 .500 0 0 0 1 o
Adrian Zabala, P 11 7 0 3 .429 0 0 0 0 o
Dan Griffin, P 2 4 0 1 .250 1 0 0 1 o
Danny Cushman, 3B 12 21 6 5 .238 0 0 0 4 l
Brownie Johnston, P 8 9 1 2 .222 1 0 0 0 o
Ray Rollyson, P 9 13 0 2 .154 0 0 0 0 o
Rufus Frazier, CF 12 14 1 2 J 43 0 0 0 0 o
Danny Eggart, P 10 18 1 0 .000 0 0 0 0 o
Jim Boyesen, OF 9 8 2 0 .000 0 0 0 0 o
Joe Bekeris, OF 2 2 1 0 .000 0 0 0 0 o
Danny Orr, P 43 1 0 000 0 0 0 0 o
Kelly Prior, P 3 4 0 0 .000 (j o 0 1 o
Pitching Records
G W-L IP H R-ER ERA BB SO
Adrian Zabala 18 4-0 27 17 7-8 1.00 12 18
Ray Rollyson 10 2-2 41 2/3 26 9-8 1.73 17 28
Danny Griffin 8 3-2 23 10 6-6 2.35 9 12
Kelly Prior 6 1-0 22 13 7-6 2.44 10 21
Danny Eggart 11 3-3 49 1/3 59 26-19 3.47 12 1 25
Danny Orr 8 1-0 18 17 5-5 2.50 5 n
Brownie Johnston 5 0-2 17 18 10-5 2.64 5 15
Charles Casey 5 1-0 8 6 8-4 4.45 7 14
Ed Woolfolk 1 0-0 11 0-0 .000 0 0
Jack Withrow 3 0-0 4 7 3-3 6.75 3 5
Nell McMillan 1 0-0 2 2 1-1 9,00 0 0
RESULTS
Florld Opponent Florida Opponent
15 Fla. Southern 8 5 Auburn
2 Fla. Southern 3 1 Georgia 2
2 Kentucky 0 9 Georgia 5
25 Kentucky 1 1 Mia roi 2
4 Tennessee 2 7 Miaroi
10 Tennessee 2 2 Mte ml 3
* l Ga, Tech 12
10 Yate 5 3 Ga. Tech 4
3 Mich. State 8 1 Auburn 6
2 Miami 0 4 Auburn e
7 Mich. State 2 4 Georgia l
4 A* 3 1 Georgia \