Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Its a one-way world
Construction of the UFs new chemistry research unit ?>r*d
graduate research library moved into full swing last week,
bringing several changes in traffic patterns on the campus.
Union Drive, the east-west roadway between the Florida
Union and Tigert Hall, is barricaded for one block between
Buekman Drive, adjacent to the Union, and Newell Drive, the
one-way northbound road from Union Drive to W. University
Ave.
Murphree Way, which previously had been northbound from
Union Drive past the University Library to W. University Ave.,
now becomes a southbound thoroughfare from University Ave.
to Stadium Rd.
The four-story chemistry research unit will go up just south
of Leigh Hall across Union Drive from the Florida Union. The
C. A. Fieland Construction Company of Tampa will build the
new addition, following its low base bid of $1,438,000.
Tassinari Construction Company of Gainesville started pre preliminary
liminary preliminary ground-clearing for the graduate research library last
week on the north end of the Plaza of the Americas. The contract
for that six-story structure was bid at $1,786,000.
Both buildings are estimated 18-month projects. The traffic
changes will continue until further notice.
It 'a ............... _ _ _ _ _

UF endowment
hits 2.5 million
Endowment to toe UF increased
from $270,000 to more than $2.5
million in the past year, the Board
of Directors of the UF Foundation
was told this weekend.
John Donahoo, Jacksonville at attorney
torney attorney and chairman of the Boards
Deferred Giving Committee, re reported
ported reported the Foundations 1964
report revealed some $270,000 in
bequests In probate. Three
bequests this year had increased
the value of endowments to
approximately $2,520,000.
The Foundation is a non-profit
corporation devoted to the
securing of support for University
programs and projects for which
state funds are not available. Its
Board of Directors is composed
of 24 distinguished Florida
citizens.
They are: William H. Dial, Or Orlando
lando Orlando banker; Phillip D. OConnell, |
West Palm Beach attorney;
Chester H. Ferguson, Tampa
attorney and businessman; A. D.
Davis, president of Winn-Dixie
Stores, Inc., Jacksonville; Emmett j
Anderson, Forty Myers attorney;
Irving Cypen, Miami Beach
attorney, and Woodrow Register,
St. Petersburg banker.
Donahoo reported that the
greatly increased endowment, an
marked for scholarship funds, was
made possible by bequests from
three generous Floridians.
See MONEY* on p. 8 I

Some dorms closed
By LIZ BREWER
Staff Writer
For most people a summer home is a house in the mountains
or at the beach. For approximately half the UF student body
a summer home Is a dormitory.
Open for the summer are Murphree and Tolbert Areas for
men, and Jennings and Rawlings for women. Reid Hall will open
on June 18 for graduate women.
, According to the Office of Housing, fewer contracts have been
broken by students wanting to live off-campus this summer.
Usually, more students try to move off-campus in the ftn T
Students are only allowed to break their housing contracts
under exceptional conditions.. Otherwise, they must contract
tor a year three trimesters if they are in attendence.
A larger percentage of greeks live in the dorms, due to the
dosing of many houses. Sororities require a certain number of
residents to remain open. Open this summer are Delta Delta
Delta and Delta Gamma. Fraternities require half of their
membership to remain open. A partial list of those open Include
Sigma Phi Epsilon, Theta Chi, Pi Kappa Phi, and Delta Tab Delta.
Off-Campus Housing estimates that at any one time about
half the student body lives off-campus. During the summer there
is an increase in married couples off-campus due to teachers
returning for accreditation courses.
Housing for married students remains ooen all year round.

FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Vol. 57, No. 139

YOU WOULDNT KNOW THIS PICTURE WAS
PRINTED UPSIDE DOWN IF WE DIDNT TELL YOU.
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(Leg Council
| buddies
( tonight
\
l There will be a
meeting of the
Legislative
Council tonight in
the Florida union
Auditorium at
7:30 p.m.
The parties will
\ caucus at 7 p.m.-
Action Party in
Room 208 and
Progress Party in
the Florida Union
Auditorium.
5

Sculpture show
at Art Gallery
Works by contemporary
American sculptor Richard
Stankiewicz will be featured in a
one-man show at the UF Gallery
of Art today through May 30.
Stankiewicz was the Ford
Foundations artist in residence
at the Tampa Art Institute
during the month of April.
The unique exhibition contains
17 welded metal sculptures and will
afford the University, Gainesville
and area public an unusual oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to see and study
revoiuuunary and avant garae
works by a most imaginative, able
and creative sculptor.
Stankiewicz first came to the
attention of the art public in
See SCULPTURE on
p. 9

The foreign situation
There is nothing foolproof or even desirable about democracy."
The balance of power has been settled in Europe/'
War has become an inconclusive instrument of diplomacy/'
The Russian peasantry became the human fodder for in industrialization,*'
dustrialization,*' industrialization,*'
World Communism is significant only to the degree that it
can further Russian national interests.'*
INSIDE TODAY'S 'GATOR
Today on Page Two, Editorial Page Editor Joe Castello begins
his assessment of the current United States Foreign Policy.
This column will run as a series for the next two weeks and will
treat such topics as the failure of liberalism, the importance
of the underdeveloped nations, and the prospects for the United
States.

Tuesday, May 11, 1965

.%£ WAn.V.W. # *V%%V.%V*W.V.%%V.W.%V.V.V. #
| Lerner talks on
| American change
By EUNICE I. TALL
I Staff Writer
| With vivid memories of C-l assignments in Max Lerners
$ America As a Civilization/ students filed into University
ij: Auditorium Sunday night to hear this noted author and professor
:j: outline Five Revolutions in American Life/'
America is a revolutionary country in the sense that is achieving
| an accelerating pace of change,*' Lerner told a near capacity
i crowd of 1,000. Brought to campus as the final speaker in the
:j Religion-In-Life week program, Lerner stressed that we must
i recognize, channel, and understand the changes that are occurring
\ about us/'
£ Currently a professor of American Civilization and World Politics j
% at Brandeis University in Boston, Lerner has visited the UF on j
i several previous occassions. :
\ A university is the convergence point of major revolutions of \
| our times. We must mirror and master these revolutions to make |
f. certain we will not have a Brave New World squeezed dry at human \
See LERNER on d. 9

GE gives UF
*5,000 grant
The award of a $5,000 grant to
the UF has been announced by the
General Electric Foundation.
The grant was made for graduate
research and study in the field of
Chemistry.
Joseph M. Bertotti, General
Electric Foundation Secretary,
in making the announcement said,
The Graduate Grant Program
provides financial assistance in
those areas of study where the
need is greatest. At the same
time, it allows the recipients flex flexibility
ibility flexibility in the use of the funas so
as to best cope with the needs of
the individual institution."
Over 100 Graduate Research and
Study Grants will be distributed
to 58 institutions under the
$540,000 program. It is part of the
$1,450,000 Educational Support
Budget approved by the General
Electric Foundation for 1965.
Bartley to speak
Dr. Ernest Bartley, UF
Professor of Political Science,
will speak Thursday at 8:15 p.m.
in the Florida Union Auditorium.
Bartley, who teaches the UF
Political science course in
American Federal Government and
Constitutional Law (PCL 201 and
301), will speak on The Politics
of Hysteria."
The program will be presented
by the Union Forums
Committee.
. m m m .. a m a m a aa-** A



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 11, 1965

U.S. Foreign Policy--an assessment

By JOE CASTE LLO
Editorial Page Editor
THE recent U. S. intervention in the Dominican
Republic, in patent violation of the 33 year-old
Montevideo Pact which accepted the principle of
non-intervention in the Western Hemisphere, hope hopefully
fully hopefully may cause a rather agonizing re-appraisal of
the whole of United States foreign policy at the
current time.
THE Dominican business has highlighted certain
basic principles of U. S. foreign policy which may
not be entirely accurate: namely, the world is divided
into two antagonistic camps, the U. S. has a white
man's burden to make the world safe for democracy,
and any change in the present international status
quo must be communist-inspired. The underlying
assumption of such a policy is the infallibility and
desirability of democracy as a political institution institutionwhich
which institutionwhich is another way of saying that we're right
and die rest of the world is wrong.
SUCH A policy, however, overlooks many
significant realities of the contemporary world:
FIRST, communism and democracy are
not the only nor the most Important political
JOHNSON FACES
.a troubled world
and ideological forces, operating in the world
today. Nationalism is probably the dominant
political and ideological force in all but two
nations of the world. In Russia and the United
States, nationalism has been subsidiary to
world communism and world democracy,
respectively.
SECOND, the political struggle is not
between democracy and communism but
between liberalism and totalitarianism.
THIRD, the economic struggle Is not be between
tween between capitalism and socialism but between
industrialization and economic stagnation.
FOURTH, there is nothing foolproof or even
desirable about democracy.
* FIFTH, the political development of the
United States was an historical freak which
cannot necessarily be duplicated by other
nations lacking our political, social, and
economic traditions.
SIXTH, the overwhelming majority of the
populations of the world's underdeveloped
nations is peasant.
SEVENTH, the present international status
quo was determined by two world wars and
Western colonial powers; and, In many areas,
it bears little relation to current political
and economic realities.
EIGHTH, economic stability is a necessary
requisite of political stability.
NINTH, the only political cement in many
underdeveloped areas is the personal

CASTELLO COMMENTS

charisma of a national hero who is the only
symbol of national unity.
THE CURRENT international situation, viewed in
terms of the above factors, lends itself to conclusions
other than those drawn by people wearing the blinders
of American political morality which assumes that
democracy is an innate good and communism an
innate evil.
The myth of bipolarity
IT IS ture that the world is presently divided
into two antagonistic camps; but the ultimate in incompatibility
compatibility incompatibility of these two camps is more a myth
than a reality. The current bipolar division of the
world does not reflect a permanent, IrresolUble
ideological split between two moral forces, one of
them innately good and the other innately bad, but
rather a conflict of national interests arising from
the co-existence of three world powers one de determined
termined determined to maintain the status quo, two equally
determined to alter it.
THE UNITED STATES
IN THE past fifty years or so, the United States,
because of its vast natural resources and
geographical isolation, has emerged as the dominant
world power. Our industrial and military superiority
assures our ultimate control of the Western Bloc
nations; and our faith in the innate rightness of our
political institutions has, until recently, assured us
that we will be able to also control the emerging
nations of the world. Therefore, we are reasonably
content with the present international status quo.
RUSSIA AND CHINA
RUSSIA and China, however, have suffered different
and less fortuitous historical circumstances. Until
the First World War, Russia had traditionally con controlled
trolled controlled most of the nations of Eastern Eruope for
over two hundred years. This area was lost to her
as a result of the First World War, however; and it
was not until 1945 that she could again exert her
hegemony over these nations. The fact that the
Russian government was then communist and not
tsarist Is of little consequence; what is important
is that it was Russian.
FURTHERMORE, Russia has traditionally
regarded a favorable or at least equitable
European balance of power as essential to its
security; and, now that the balance there is de decidedly
cidedly decidedly against her, she must seek to redress this
imbalance by weakening the present European status
quo wherever she can.
FINALLY, for the first time in decades, she has
developed sufficient national power to effectively
undermine feeling her national oats, and out to get
everything she can NOT IN THE INTERESTS
OF WORLD COMMUNISM BUT IN THE INTERESTS
OF RUSSIA HERSELF. World Communism is
significant only to the degree it can further Russian
national interests.
CHINA occupies a somewhat similar position in
the contemporary world in that, for centuries, she
controlled the area of Southeast Asia. However, the
internal dry rot of the Ming dynasty sapped her
national power and allowed her to be divided into
"spheres of influence" by Western colonial powers,
Including Russia. Under a communist regime,
however, China has rebuilt her national power to the
point where she can again expect to re-assert her
traditional hegemony over Southeast Asia. Further Furthermore,
more, Furthermore, she needs the resources of this area for
continued development; and, therefore, she is also
an expansionist power, bent on altering the status
quo AGAIN NOT IN THE INTERESTS OF WORLD
COMMUNISM BUT IN THE INTERESTS OF CHINA.
Her ideological warfare with Russia reflects only
her more pressing need for expansion.
IN ALL fairness to the communist nations, it
should be noted that the U. S. is also interested
in- aiding these underdeveloped areas NOT IN
THE INTERESTS OF WORLD DEMOCRACY BUT
IN THE INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES.
We advocate democracy because we rather naively
assume that a democratic government will be
receptive to us.

First of a series

NEW BALANCE OF POWER ||
THE ONE inescapable political fact of the post-
World War Two era is that each world power (there
are now three: The U.S., Russia, and China) cannot
afford to be isolated politically by either of the
remaining two. The balance of power, for all practical
purposes, has been settled in Europe: the focus of
attention must now shift to the underdeveloped
countries of Hie world, if for no other reason than
the fact that they're the only ones left. Eacn power
must control a certain number of these lesser
powers to assure its own national security; the
conflict arises because Russia and China are not
assured control of a sufficient number under the
present status quo.
THEREFORE, the present "Cold war" is not a
permanent conflict of incompatible ideologies or even
a contest between democracy and communism: it
is the result of three major powers each attempting
to extend their hegemony into the as yet uncommitted
areas of the world that they may be safe from one
another. The present situation is almost a classic
example of the conflict of national interests, not
the ideologies used to cloak these interests and
make them palatable to world opinion.
FURTHERMORE, there is no reason to suppose
that these national interests are ultimately incom incompatible:
patible: incompatible: the growth of economic interdependence
between all nations of the world and especially the
great powers may ultimately resolve all of the
present incompatibilities, me world could con conceivably
ceivably conceivably reach a point where even conventional or
limited war was economically unfeasible. If the
world's industry depends on U. S. steel (novpun
intended), Russian oil, and Chinese labor, then a
war between Hie three powers would be suicidal.
THE BOMB
RETURNING from visions of utopia to the current
less-than-perfect scene, we should note one otter
postwar development: the bomb, which has eliminated
warfare as a very satisfactory instrument of
diplomacy. Before the development of modern tech technology,
nology, technology, war could be used as the ultimate arbiter
for all international disputes, much as dll civil
disputes were decided by trial by combat. Now,
however, war has become an inconclusive instru instrument.
ment. instrument. A conventional war at the present would be
inconclusive not only because the conventional forces
of the current powers are fairiy evenly balanced but
also because a conclusive victory in a conventional
war would undoubtedly trigger the use of the bomb.
And a nuclear war, by eliminating everyone, would
also be inconclusive.
THEREFORE, warfare, except for limited warfare
which is only of limited and* will probably
eventually prove to be more trouble than its worth,
is not too effective a tool in the struggle for the
underdeveloped nations. Instead, the struggle Is now
one which must be fought on poHHeai, economic,
and ideological fronts. I intend to deal with the
concept of "wars of naHonaj liberation" later.
TO BE CONTINUED FRIDAY



WANTED:
an editor
By STEVE VAUGHN
Managing Editor
What the Alligator needs is
an editor.
Every newspaper should
have one, you know. They do
come in handy every once in
a while. The problem is, the
Alligator hasnt got one, not
lor die summer trimester,
anyway.
This unlikely but real
situation has caused much
gritting of teeth and scratching
of heads among members of
the Board of Student Publi Publications,
cations, Publications, who sit down every
so often to choose Alligator
editors. Theyve come up with
two summer editors so far,
and both have taken the Jobs
but then bitten the dust for
one reason or another.
Now theyve got to find
another, and search parties
are out. Theyre looking for
somebody whos going to be
here all summer, who has a
little journalism background,
and who can read and write
to an acceptable degree.
The board thought Itself in
pretty good shape following
the original summer elections
in April. Sharon Kelley, stu student
dent student government beat chief
during the winter trimester,
was elected to the post, be becoming
coming becoming the second female
Alligator editor in all history-
At die same time, newcomer
Drex Dobson, an FSU refugee
since January, was elected
summer managing editor.
But school grades and fate
were wicked. Neither Miss
Kelley nor Dobson ever took
over their jobs.
Just before school was out
in April, Dobson cut his eye
with a glass in a freak
accident. The doctor took a

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look. niriiwmnwMl him In QO
shape to read copy, and or ordered
dered ordered him home to Cocoa for
.the summer.
Editor Kelley, meanwhile,
fell victim to academic mis misfortune.
fortune. misfortune. The mathematicians
figured out her grade point
average for the winter,
shook their heads, and de declared
clared declared she should be placed
on probation for the summer
trimester. That flushed the
editorship right away.
Now re-enter Ernie Litz,
the winter editor who had lost
to Miss Kelley in the summer
elections. Ad man Gary Burke,
acting as secretary of the
board for vacationing Bill
Epperheimer, rounded up a
quorum and called an emer emergency
gency emergency huddle down in his office
in the basement of the Florida
Union. Litz emerged editor.
But last week, Litz
announced he was not going to
retain die job due to per personal
sonal personal reasons."
So now the board is back
where it started in April.
Presently there is much
beating of the bushes in an
attempt to shake out some somebody
body somebody who can do the job. An
ad in Fridays paper which
read like a wild west poster
announced "Wanted, Alligator
Summer Editor." Appli Applications
cations Applications are being craved down
in the Union basement.
Its not really that bad a
job. You get to be a powerful
campus magnet, mold opinion,
build empires, and lose your
dimes in the lousey coke ma machine
chine machine at the end of the hall.
And die editors pay for two
issues a week 1s pretty good.

The World of Cinema
The Servant...brilliant

, By DON FEDERMAN
JOSEPH LOSEY has said of his film "The Servant,"
* far as films are concerned, and more and more
interested in theme, character, ambience. These
tell, or should tell, the story .the reason for
telling a story, and the differences in telling a story
clneroatlcally, can only be the particular eye through
which its told and the particular ways in which the
image is supplemented by speech and other sounds."
AND SO Losey tells an old tale,
one of servant and master in which I
the roles become reversed, one oi |
an 18th Century house where
specific roles and conduct ar flra
required but which becomes a del
of corruption in which the ideal ||£/
of class and role are utterly fluid fi J.jfll
one which begins very j
and ends in an absurd and ero erotesque
tesque erotesque nightmare of evil (or at^^*^ 1
least a new brand of evil)' FEDERMAN
entrenched.
BUT THIS film is no ordinaryfilm.lt is incredible
and it is in the way Losey has desired; that is, the
greatness of this film is in the attention to details.
There are thousands and Losey subtly and
masterfully weaves them, places them, paces
them to tell a powerful story. In particular, one
notes the surroundings, the well-ordered, classical
interiors of Tonys home as contrasted with the
moderness of Barrett the servants room, the mirror
as focus for the ever-changing roles, the gestures
of servility to Tony and the odious ones behind his
back, the beautifully-placed comic scenes involving
people whose characters do not reflect the class
they belong to, the growing decay which becomes
more and more evident as new ideals replace old
ones, the use of physical barriers as in the bar
scene when Tony is convinced to take Barrett back,
and the parodistic games played by Tony and Barrett
late in the movie as Tony attempts to cling to a last
vestige of Innocence (but the fall is already quite
evident). One could say more about details, but
this review is already taking on the idea of notes for
a review rather than a review proper.
A FEW words about character. There are no
honest figures in Loseys film. Honesty is the one
attribute that no one can maintain. Tony is indolent
and vain, weak in the easy ways of the old order,
Barrett is cunning and vicious and senses Tonys
susceptibility. Both play a game which they know to
be unreal, but Barrett being the more realistic and
stronger, prevails. Vera, a devils accomplice,
serves more the purpose of a thematic device (her

Soo Whats MiW ,B
The Browse Shop
OF TIME AND THE RIVER Thomas Wolfe
POTENTIAL BARRIERS IN SEMI-CONDUCTORS
...B. R. Gossick
ENERGIES OF ART -..Jacques Borzun
THE HAMLET William Faulkner
CHESS FOR FUN AKID BLOOD Edward Lasker
WHERE ANGELS FEAR TO TREAD....E.M. Forester
MANHATTAN TRANSFER John Dos Possos
TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
HANDBOOK OF CHEMISTRY Lange
COORDINATION COMPOUNDS Martin & Martin
MODERN ELECTROPLATING .Lowenheim
Cawpos Shop & Bookstore

Tuesday, May 11/ 1965/ The Florida Alligator,

OPINION

seductive charms and debased morality facilitate
Tony's deterioration). Susan, Tony's fiancee, is
perhaps the "strongest" of all, and she does make
attempts to counteract Barrett (from the start she
senses his evilness), yet given two chances to save
Tony, she does not, and in the final horrifying party
scene, indulges herself in a kiss with Barrett as
Tony, debauched and drunk, grovels before the
laughing guests. She does lash out at Barrett at the
very end, yet runs from the house, for if she knows
evil, she cannot stop it. Barrett writhes with hate
before her (for he Is known), but his final gesture
is a triumphant smile because he knows he cannot
be stopped.
SO, IN a sense, what is being played out on die
screen is a drama, not only of evil and its cor corruptive
ruptive corruptive effects, but one also of false, stifling values
which give rise to new and vicious ones which tend
to supplant them. It is a drama where people lose
touch of what is real when they try to maintain a
comfortable, but out-moded social order. Tony is
destroyed because he really wants to believe, as he
calls them, "the beloved old things" and a household
run "just like his mother's and grandmother's."
Tony cannot come to terms with much of the demands
of the modern type, and so he succumbs. So the film
is as much a brutal commentary on the old as it is
on the new. It is a terribly despairing picture of a
society made up of the roost distraught values.
IN SHORT, Joseph Lossy has fashioned one of
the most brilliant, engrossing, and down right
incredibly structured movies to come to this town
in a long time. Even if this review or first seeing
doesn't result in you taking it all in, you're going
to like this film. It unfortunately plays only through
Wednesday, and it's (naturally, where else) at the
State.
******

AND NOW for a review of "Mary Poppins."
ITS CUTE!!!
******
SINCE THERE won't be a formal review for
Friday's paper, let roe recommend the weekend
movie, at the State, "Billy Budd." Ustinov's in interpretation
terpretation interpretation seems to me better than Melville's
story. His focus on the captain Vere as the man
destroyed by his rigid insistence on the main maintenance
tenance maintenance of an inhuman code of conduct which destroys
the beautiful and good Budd seems to be more
appeallx* than a drama of the struggle between good
and evil per se. If a little obvious in Imagery, the
movie still makes for exciting action and poignant
drama. An excellent film, if not recommended with
the same abandon as "The Servant."

FUNLAND
AMUSEMENT CENTER
1011 W. Univ., 2 blocks from
campus where students meet
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d&*£r jf 3Ciijr
706 We*t Univeriht Avenue,

Page 3



> The Florido Alligator, Tuesday, May 11, 1965

Page 4

On The Musical Scene ...

PIANIST RICHARD SYRACUSE
. .performs in University Auditorium tonight
in a Lyceum Council presentation Concert
begins at 8:15 p.m.

* j£
I A ROYAL ALi RAY j
For Spring, the Establishment has assembled a truly royal I
I array of cotton Oxford shirts in colours calculated to give the 1
a gentlemans wardrobe a noble variety. Whether striped or solid I
of hue, cut and tailoring are of the most scrupulous authenticity. |
I Exclusively I
I A OF NEW HAVEN 1
I flrag I
M Hmt Hveiiue

Pianist opens
summer series
of concerts
tonight
Richard Syracuse, a brilliant
young pianist, opens the summer
trimester concert series on the UF
campus in University Auditorium
tonight at 8:15. Syracuse will
appear under the auspices of the
Lyceum Council.
This young artist was last heard
In Gainesville in November 1964,
when be appeared with the Italian
violinist Salvatore Accardo.
Syracuse will offer the Bach-
SOoti Organ Fugue in G Minor;"
Beethoven's Appassionato
Sonata;" Prokofiev's Sonata in
A Minor;" and Three Preludes
and the Andante Spianato and
Grande Polonaise" by Chopin.
There will be no advanced ticket
sales. UF students are admitted
on their LD. cards. Admission for
the general pdblic is $2, UF faculty,
high school students and children
sl.
We can do no better than to quote
verbatim the reviews of Syracuse's
New York concert of last
December. The New York Herald
Tribune reported the following:
A remarkable young pianist
made his local debut last night in
Town Hall as winner of the Concert
Artists Guild Award. He is Richard
Syracuse, a native New Yorker who
won the 1962 Alfred Case 11a In International
ternational International Competition in Naples
and who placed fifth in last spring's

...with Reid Pools

Queen Elizabeth International
Competition in Brussels.
Dark and handsome, Syracuse Is
richly endowed with all the
requisites that could launch him on
a major career. His tone, unusually
warm and resounding, already sur surpasses
passes surpasses some of our touring
soloists. His fingers are strong
and flexible enough to ripple and
roar through Liszt's Me phis to
Waltz in a manner that is absolutely
dazzling.
Beethoven's Appassionata"
Sonata could not have been more
beautifully phrased or unfolded.
Prokofiev's "Sonata in A Minor"
and an interesting 12-tone Ballade
by Jacqueline Fontyn showed Mr.
Syracuse to be quite at home in
contemporary styles. In Chopin
the "Andante Spianato and Grande
Polonaise" there was a heroic
sweep to the music.
After a sampling of Brahms
UF Karate Club
to meet Saturday
The first regular summer
meeting of the UF Karate Club will
be held Saturday at 10 a.m. in the
Gym. New members are welcome.
No experience is necessary to join.

~ .... (
GOING TO
NEW YORK?
NEW ENGLAND?
FWTUM Q
tCMMU
him n
umwint
VNUW
unn
MUI
Youre miles ahead with
new Trailways service!
More new Thru-Liners more often new
scenic route as far as Maine.
[FROM GAINESVILLE Qne way
FT. MYERS v
The only thru service $6.45
new york mm
Faster service via Trailways C
Express $58.15 4
PHILADELPHIA agr
Thru service over 3 hours
faster 128.50 M
BOSTON %
Faster Thru service-Express
route $41.45 -JBr
trailways.
527 W. University Ave. Ph. 372-6327

and more Chopin as encores, one
would say on first hearing that
there is probably nothixg he could
not play with command. Syracuse
is a Juilliard graduate in the
classes of Mme. Rosina Lhevinne
(the teacher of Van Cliburn).
The New York Times said: Thfe
was one of Hie most accurate
performances this listener has
ever attended surely no more
than five notes were missed all
evening."
Liszt's "Mephisto Waltz" was
glitteringly played and clearly
articulated throughout. Chopin's
"Grande Polonaise," which foi foilowed
lowed foilowed Hie "Andante Spianato, was
brilliantly done, as was
Prokofiev's "Sonata in A Minor
No. V*
Syracuse is an undemonstrative
performer, and his hands stayed
glued to the keys, his long fingers
gliding effortlessly through the
music. His tone was solid in forte
playing, and never did volume
cause a line to become unclear.
Syracuse Is very definitely a
pianist with the equipment of the
masters."



Monsieur Pierre Emanuelli,
executive secretary of the French
Association for the Atlantic
Community, will deliver a public
lecture at the UF today.
Emanuellis topic for the 8:15
p.m. address in the College of

Selene Symposiem concludes today
The second annual Florida Junior Science, Engineering and
Humanities Symposium is being conducted on the UF campus through'
today.
Co-sponsored by the University and the U. S. Army Research
Office, Durham, N.C., the three-day program has attracted 202
students and 78 teachers from throughout the state.
Most of the participating students will be completing the 11th
grade next month and will have had courses in biology and chemistry.
Teachers will meet to discuss recent developments in the science
curriculum and other common problems.
The symposium began with a dinner in the Student Service Center
at 6:15 p.m. Sunday. Gen. Allen T. Stanwix-Hay, director of technical
data and standardization policy in the UjS. Secretary of Defenses
office, discussed The Challenge of Accomplishment. Gen. Stanwix-
Hay is a 1933 graduate of the University.
Robert L. Bailey of the Department of Electrical Engineering
spoke on the topic, Creativity in Engineering, yesterday in the
J. HHlis Miller Health Center Auditorium, followed by reading of
the 10 research papers five each in the Auditorium and Room
H-611.
Dr. Franklin A. Doty, assistant dean of academic affairs, was the
scheduled guest speaker for the noon luncheon at the Student Service
Center. Students attended lab sessions with scientists during the
afternoon Monday. Career panels on physical and biological sciences,
mathematics, medicine and engineering are scheduled after dinner
that evening.
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.oillraaotaO it astno ItoH aaiti baitnll adi it latlcm,

JERRY'S IN TOWM^
\
Another JERRYS Opens
TOMORROWMay 12
at the Corner
of NW 13th st & 16th Ave
at 2310 S.W. 13th Street. Both units will be
under the supervision of Mr. Paul Maggard. 1

French political expert speaks here tonight

-AT 8:15 IN LAW SCHOOL AUDITORIUM

Law Auditorium is France,-
DeGauUe and the Atlantic
Community. The lecture will be
followed by a reception in honor
of Emanuelli by the Departments
of History and Political Science.
Emanuelli, a well known

authority in both France and the
United States on Atlantic problems,
is on the Florida campus to
participate in discussions with
University students interested in
international history and European
affairs.
Since 1959 Emanuelli has been

SG remaining active during summer

WF
,§|
BILL RIVES
. .summer Honor
Court Clerk
FORUMS
COMMITTEE
The Florida Union Activities
Committee has openings avail available
able available on several committees for
the spring trimester. Apply in
Room 315 of the Florida Union.

Tuesday, May 11, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

active in his current position,
responsible for publicizing the
NATO Alliance throughout France.
In recent years be has visited
most Western European countries
and traveled throughout Africa.
He has come to toe United States

,By EUNICE TALL
Staff Writer
Student Government projects are
continuing full-force this summer
in contrast to previous summers
of dormant activity.
Doug Thompson, in addition to
being secretary of labor, will
assist SG President Bruce
Culpepper in coordinating the
cabinet which meets each
Wednesday night in the Florida
Union.
Together, we will plot out our
partys platform and assign a task
to each cabinet member who will
In turn be responsible for its
fulfillment, explained
Culpepper.
For example, Secretary of
Men's Affairs Dave Waldrop is
detailing a list of students ob objections
jections objections to Food Service, in order
to enhance its benefits, he
continued.
Culpepper hopes to accomplish
as many platform promises as
possible this summer. Aiding him
will be nine temporary cabinet
members who have been appointed
to replace those absent for the
summer term.

eight times since 1961 and on the
invitation of the UJS. Department
of State, he recently toured Cape
Kennedy, North American Air
Defense Command headquarters
at Colorado Springs, Colo., and
the main Strategic Air Command
base at Omaha.

They include: Truman
Scarborough, Secretary of
Interior; Pat Kelly, Student Af Affairs;
fairs; Affairs; Bill Lichter, Academic
Affairs; George Garcia, Housing;
Pepy Hicks, Alumni Affairs; Alan
Gaither, Athletics; Cheryl
Erickson, Inter University
Affairs; Betsy Sandstrom, School
Traditions; and Harry Atkinson,
Inspector General, and Bill Rives,
Honor Court Clerk.
In addition to his basic respon responsibilities
sibilities responsibilities to Student Government,
Culpepper is currently preparing
a request to install lights on the
handball courts behind Murphree
Area Housing.
There is a definite need for
these lights, and many people have
desired them for years, stated
Culpepper.
If and when the pfoject is
cleared, Legislative Council will
appropriate the money, an
estimated $7-SB,OOO.
FOLK DANCING
Folk Dancing is scheduled again
tonight at 8 p.m. in toe Florida
Union Social Room. At a cost of
$1 per trimester, the dancing is
scheduled every Tuesday.

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 11 1965

Page 6

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted
j
BOYS 12 to 16 years old for
established paper routes on and
adjacent to University grounds.
Contact the Gainesville Sun 378-
1411. (E-137-st-c).
WAITER WANTED 4 til 8 p.m. 6
nights. Apply in person. Larry's
Wonderbouse, 14 SW Ist Street
behind Sears, downtown Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. (E-138-2t-c).
For, Sale
1963 ADMIRAL Air-conditioner,
3/4 ton, 375. 1961 Westinghouse
laundermat, 365. Couch, 340. All
335; Baby stroller, car bed,
swing-O-matic swing, bottle
warmer, infant seat and play pen.
2-1961. (A-139-Bt-c).
BAR, 315. Stools, 310. Rug lOx
15, 320. Record cabinet and book bookcase,
case, bookcase, 320. Pallete bed, 310. Phone
6-6190 between 5 and 7 p.m. (A (A---139-2t-c).
--139-2t-c). (A---139-2t-c).
AIR-CONDITIONERS FOR SALE.
2 Admiral 110 volt AC units in
excellent condition. 375 each. Call
Charlie Mayo, FR 6-8366 after 5
p.m. (A-139-3t-c).
JAZZ LOVERS NOTICE! 100 al albums
bums albums for sale. 31*00 to 31*75.
Stereo and Mono. Brubeck, Davis,
Mulligan, etc. Need Money. FR
2-2880. (A-139-lt-c).
10x55 1964 NASHUA Trailer. 2
bedroom, bar, washing machine,
built-in fold-away bed. Take up
payments or WILL RENT to couple
only. 376-0732 or see Floyd Howell
at Texaco Station 1-75 and 26.
(A-138-3t-c).
MUST SELL 1963 Horizon mobile
home, 45x10. Small equity plus
payments of 376.07 per month or
pay balance of 33,324. Call 378-
2854. (A-138-st-c).
2 excellent quality HI-FI speakers.
One 15" and one 12". Call Don
8-2845. (A-138-3t-c).
3 LAST TIMES 3 HITS I
I*FIRST AREA SHOWING 4
Pi i min i
S 3 PERKINS
lii"
Blffiqd
I"JOY I
mm PETER. BOWS Color I
Imchtow I
I COMEDY OF TERRORS
1 STARTS ~ EXCLUSIVE I
I or JS* I

1940 FORD SEDAN. Top condition.
Low mileage. Original owner. An Antique
tique Antique license. Call 372-0300. A
CREAM PUFF! (G-137-st-c).
1960 FORD ZEPHER (size of Fal Falcon).
con). Falcon). Brand new white walls. 2-
9410. (G-138-2t-c).
1960 CORVAIR 4 door sedan. Blue,
radio, heater, automatic trans transmission.
mission. transmission. Clean and in good
mechanical condition. Sid 280
Sledd, 372-9184. (G-138-3t-c).
1963 VOLVO P 1800(sports coupe)
Perfect condition, very low
mileage. Call 376-3261, ext 2780
before 5:00. 376-4168 after t. (G (G---138-3t-c).
--138-3t-c). (G---138-3t-c).
1957 VOLVO. Very dependable.
3350. Call 466- 3237 Mlcanopy.(G Mlcanopy.(G---1
--1- Mlcanopy.(G---1
Leaving country. *6l TEMPEST,
stick. '63 FORD Galaxie station
wagon. Perfect condition. ALSO
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS tables,
chairs, sofa, washing machine,
refirgerator, etc. Private 376-
0229. (G-138-7t-c).
1960 AUSTIN-HEALEY roadster.
White with white top. Over-drive.
Price 31050.6-0756. (G-139-2t-c).
1962 VW Sun-roof. One owner.
Top condition. 31090.248-S, Flavet
m. Phone 8-1853. (G-139-2t-c).
STUDENT NUMBER, Student body,
Your Identity Is barred from any
recognition 'til you tear or bend
your card. Coming Soon! (G-139-
2t-c).
1964 VOLKSWAGEN. Very clean.
White walls. 31490. 6-0756. (G (G---1
--1- (G---1
1963 FALCON FUTURA con convertible.
vertible. convertible. 6 cylinder, 4 speed floor
shift, radio and heater, bucket
seats. Must sell. 378-1969. (G (G---139-ts-c).
--139-ts-c). (G---139-ts-c).
1:41 J r
4:14 j&W /
6:47 /
9:20 m /
**.* .
WALT DISNEYS!
i mmimi
iACHIEVEMENTJ iACHIEVEMENTJJUUE:,W^IMOK
JUUE:,W^IMOK iACHIEVEMENTJJUUE:,W^IMOK

Wanted
FEMALE COMPANION to share
driving and expenses to Norfolk,
Virginia. Would prefer to leave
the end of May. Contact 6-8639.
(C-139-lt-c).
DRIVER WANTED to drive car to
New Orleans between June 15th
and July Ist. References required.
Call 372-4024 after 6 p.m. (C (C---139-2t-c).
--139-2t-c). (C---139-2t-c).
STUDENT NUMBER, Student body,
Your identity is barred from any
recognition 'til you tear or bend
your card. Coming soon! (C-139-
2t-c).
MALE SUBJECTS over 21 needed
for experiments in Communication
Sciences Laboratory. Must pass
tone test qualifications. 35 per
hour. Call Mrs. Hazouri at Ext.
2039 for appointment. (C-139-
4t-c).
MALE ROOMMATE to share 60
2 bedroom, 2 bath trailer. Clean
and new. 340 including utilities.
Call 376-7559 or 2-6852 or see at
Lot #4O Shady Nook Trailer Park.
(C-138-2t-c).
WANTED: Female roommate for
large, clean apartment near the
campus. Very low rent plus
utilities. Call Jean or Beverly;
376-0523. (C-138-4t-c).
MALE ROOMMATE wanted thru
August. Swimming pool. 4 minutes
from campus by car. 330 per month
plus 1/3 utilities. Fred Fevrier
8-1710. (C-138-2t-c).
ROOMMATES WANTED: 3 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, 2 bath house with party
room and bar. 330 each monthly
beginning May Ist. Phone 2-3021.
(C-138-2t-c).
WANTED girls to share large
apartment. Single rooms. Air con conditioned.
ditioned. conditioned. Near campus. 325 per
month. Call FR 8-1161. (C-137-
4t-c).
ONE FEMALE Roommate to share
air-conditioned 3 bedroom house.
Close to campus. 335 per person
per month. Call 6-8961 after 5:30
(C-137-st-c),
Heal Estate
FOR SALE attractive new home
near University and Medical Cen Center.
ter. Center. Available Immediately. (Would
consider renting) 815 SW 10th
Street, FR 2-0328. (I-139-2t-c).
TAKE UP PAYMENTS and pay
closing costs on a repossessed
3-bedroom, 2 bath house. Central
heat, CCB A newly painted. Phone
372-3826. (I-138-ts-c).
WED>
/he Servant'\
| 1 :003:00*5:007:059:10 I*
a THUR AT I*3*s*7*9
\Billy BudcL*
Road Runner^ y

For Rent
BEAUTIFUL NEW Furnished
contemporary home overlooking
ravine* Quiet and private* Res Responsible
ponsible Responsible parties only. Near
Medical Center. 825 SW 10th St.
FR 2-0328. (B-138-2t-c).
APARTMENT Completely furn furnished.
ished. furnished. One bedroom, swimming
pool, all electric kitchen, central
heat, air-conditioning. S9O per
month. Available immediately.
Couple preferred. 372-3826. (B (B---137-ts-c).
--137-ts-c). (B---137-ts-c).
ROOM FOR RENT coed or
working girl, 1 block from campus.
$35/month. 376-2643.(After 5:00).
(B-137-ts-c).
2 BEDROOM Furnished apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Air-conditioned $65 for 2,
$75 for 3. Near downtown post
office. 372-0481, Mr. Kaplan. (B (B---137-3t-c).
--137-3t-c). (B---137-3t-c).
NICE, CLEAN, Shady furnished
apartment. Tile bath, electric kit kitchen.
chen. kitchen. Ideal for a couple. Call
372-1843. SIOO. (B-137-ts-c).
2 FURNISHED Apartments. Small
$65, utilities furnished. Large
Air-conditioned, SIOO. Both 1
bedroom. 329 NW 14th Drive. Call
372-2752 afternoons and evenings.
(B-138-st-p).
SMALL CCB COTTAGE.Bedroom,
electric kitchen and tile shower.
Linda Ann Court, South Ocala Road.
Cool and Shady. Couple preferred.
Baby welcome. 376-5826. (B-137-
3t-c).
<*
2 BEDROOM Air conditioned
apartment. 3 blocks from campus.
Ideal for 3 or 4. 372-0481. Mr.
Kaplan. (B-137-3t-c).
EFFICIENCY Furnished $35 per
month utilities furnished except
gas. Downtown location, off-street
parking. Furnished bedroom $25
per month. 372-0481, Mr. Kaplan.
(B-137-3t-c).
2 BEDROOM Furnished apartment
downtown location. 2 for SSO, 3 for
S6O. 372-0481, Mr. Kaplan. (B (B---1
--1- (B---1
$35 PER MONTH per person for
3 or 4. Air-conditioned, 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, tile bath. Completely furn furnished
ished furnished and covered patio. 616 NW
19th Ave. Lee Crane 2-4620 or
leave message at 2-4251. (B-138-
3t-c).
FURNISHED 4 bedroom air-con air-conditioned
ditioned air-conditioned apartment. Low Summer
Rates. Near downtown post office.
372 0481, Mr. Kaplan. (B (B---1
--1- (B---1
LAKE COTTAGE, ,3 bedroom, 2
bath. Pine paneling. Access to Lake
Winnott. 22 miles from Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. 372-0481, Mr. Kaplan. (B (B---138-3t-c).
--138-3t-c). (B---138-3t-c).
2 BEDROOM Furnished bouse with
glassed-in porch. Air conditioned.
Suitable for couple with children
or either single boys. SBS. 513
NW Bth Ave. or call 376-0850
or 376-5897. (B-138-st-c).
1 BEDROOM Unfurnished apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Kitchen equipped. Venetian
blinds. 1/2 block from University.
Separate entrance. AVAILABLE
NOW. Air-conditioning optional.
Call 6-6112. (B-138-3t-c).

For Rent
1
FURNISHED ROOM for rent in
private home. Call 372-3770 after
5 p*m., 536 NE 12th Court. (B (B---139-2t-c).
--139-2t-c). (B---139-2t-c).
TRAILER FOR RENT. 1 bedroom,
2 single beds. Located on lot!
FOR SALE Bx3B trailer, 2 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, large kitchen, living, dining
area. On lot* Call before 2 week weekdays
days weekdays 376-9864. Anytime weekends.
(B-139-2t-c).
SUBSTANDARD HOUSING. 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom house located at 3202 NW
12th Terr, available to respon responsible
sible responsible tenant that will agree to
Improve the property in exchange
for low rental. Best offer will
be considered if you are a do-it do-ityourselfer.
yourselfer. do-ityourselfer. Phone FR 6-2472,
Warner W. Weseman, Realtor,
1113 N. Main St. (B-138-2t-c).
Personal
STUDENT Student body,
Your identity is barred from any
recognition til you tear or bend
your card. Coming Soon! (J-139-
2t-c). /
LETS FORM A BIKE CLUB. Phone
FR 6-2920 or FR 2-6574. Also,
WANT TO BUY English style
saddle. FR 6-2920 or P.O. Box
13291. (J-139-3t-p).
LEARN TO PLAY THE BANJO.
Folk Bluegrass Country. Im Impress
press Impress your friends. For
instructions, call 372-3021. (J (J--
- (J--
ATTENTION: Students, Charlie
and Mildred are still in the laun laundry
dry laundry business. We are now located
at Launder-It, 1122 West
University Ave., next door to Mc-
Collum Drug Store. Dry cleaning,
fluff dry, shirts (hand and machine
ironed. Come by and say hello.
(J-137-Bt-c).
TAKE THE ONE YOU' LOVE for
a laundry date at the Gator
Groomer. Thats M in this sum summer.
mer. summer. The utmost in romantic
atmosphere. Next to University
Post Office. (J-137-ts-c),
DESPERATELY need ride for two
to Sarasota on May 21st. Contact
Don on Monday and Thursday eve evenings
nings evenings at Ext. 2832 or any night
after 9 p.m. at 8-2193. (J-139-
3t-nc).
Services
k
RUBYS ALTERATIONS, 1238 SW
3rd Avenue. Phone 6-8506. (M (M---139-lt-c).
--139-lt-c). (M---139-lt-c).
IRONING DONE IN MY HOME,
by piece. Reasonable. 902 NW
7th Avenue or leave message at
FR 6-3471. References. (M-IS
2t-c).
TYPING Dissertations, thesis,
term papers, etc. Mrs. L. H.
Cameron, 6-3609. (M-138-3t-c).
GERMAN TUTORING BY German
lady. Contact 372-7627. (M-137-
SUc).



v sill?*'. § '
CREWS
Blve Key -ex
ekes good
ia Amy
Lieut. Michael W. Crews of
Sunset Part, Wauchula, Florida,
is among three officers of the
595th Signal Company (Support)
who have been promoted to first
Lieutenant, it was announced at
the U. S. Army Signal School.
Lieut. Crews, a platoon leader
of the 595th, is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. J. W. Crews Sr., of the
Sunset Park address. He attended
Hardee County High School in
Wauchula and in 1963 took his
degree at the UF, where he was
a member of Beta Theta Chi,
Phi Kappa Phi, and Florida Blue
Key.
While assigned here, he lives
with his wife Jayne at 709 Pine Pinebrook
brook Pinebrook Road, Eatontown, N.J.
Education prof
publishes book
Dr. Arthur P. Combs, professor
of education, has announced pub publication
lication publication of his new book, The
Professional Education of
Teachers: A Perceptual View of
Teacher Preparation.
The book presents a discussion
of the implications for teacher
education growing out of modern
existential-perceptual psychology.
The book defines the effective pro professional
fessional professional worker in personal and
perceptual terms as a person who
has learned to use himself
effectively and efficiently.
The book also discusses the
factors determining this
effectiveness of teachers in
respect to the place of subject
matter, the teacher's concepts of
students, teacher's purposes
and the discovery of methods.
MODERN
Shoe Repair Shop
HEELS ATTACHED
S MINS.
SOLES ATTACHED
IS MINS.
At Two Locations
CAROLYN PLAZA
FR 6-0315
And
101 N. Main St.
Opp. Ist Nat'l Bank
FR 6-5211

Physics Building renamed
Williamson Hall

The UF recently honored Dr.
Robert C. Williamson in special
ceremonies renaming the
university's Physics Building as
Williamson Hall.
Dr. Williamson, who retired
from the UF faculty three years
ago, is former chairman of the
Department of Physics. He is a
member of the American
Association for the Advancement
of Science and the American
Association of Physics Teachers,
a Fellow in the American Physical
Society and helped to establish
the Florida Academy of Science.
Dr. J. Bartley Rosser, director
of the U. S. Army Mathematics
Research Center at the University
of Wisconsin, was the dedication
speaker. An expert on rockets,
Dr. Rosser spoke on Miscon Misconceptions
ceptions Misconceptions About Space. Dr.
Rosser received the first master's
degree in physics conferred by
the UF under the supervision of
Dr. Williamson.
Dr. Williamson headed the
University's physics department
from 1930 to 1958. He was pre presented
sented presented a citation by Dr. Ralph
E. Page, dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences, prior to the
official naming of the building

,-ini
jh
' * .. V-v. : *
Being an Army officer is a challenge. Officers must be
leaders ... able to take responsibility ... get impor important
tant important jobs done.
It isn't easy to win a commission as an Army
officer. But if you are taking the Basic Course in
ROTC you're well on your wayprovided you can
measure up to the high standards required for admis admission
sion admission to the Advanced Course.
As a student in one of the 247 colleges and univer universities
sities universities offering senior ROTC training, you are in a
privileged group. There's no better way for any
college man to get the training and skills needed to
be an Army officer than through the on-campus pro program
gram program created specifically for that purpose ROTC.
Here you learn to be a leader ... to develop the

Iff youre good enough to be en Army officer, dont settle for lose.
ARMY ROTC
.

by University President J. Wayne
Reitz.
Dr. Williamson, 77, earned his
bachelor and doctor degrees at
the University of Wisconsin. He
taught at Wisconsin from 1919
until 1930 when he joined the UF
faculty. He went to Burma in 1958
for the UF's four-year project
financed by the Ford Foundation
ami retired when he returned in
1962.
Dr. Williamson and his wife
live at 2732 SW sth Place in
Gainesville. A reception in their
honor was held following the dedi dedication
cation dedication ceremony in Bless
Auditorium. Special guests
included Dr. and Mrs. Robert
Williamson and their son from
Madison, Wls.
Painting lossons
givon at Union
Another series of six lessons
has started in Room 215-of the
Florida Union. The instructor is
Mrs. Hilda Morris and she will
teach drawing. The cost is $5 for
the six lessons. Sign up for these
in Room 315, Florida Union, at
once, as the class is limited.

Tuesday, May 11, 1965, The Florida Alligator/

- - '
S Night AHL
Larrys
Large Dal Monico,
TUESDAYS Baked Potatoes
Tossed Salad*
STEAK NIGHT 5-9 P.M. Hot Buttoiod Rolls
$1.07
JUST 1/2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS
LARRY'S
RESTAURANT

A MESSAGE TO ROTC COLLEGE MEN
Usr
IF YOUVE GOT
WHAT IT TAKES
TO BE AN
ARMY OFFICER,
STAY IN
THE ROTC
qualities that add a vital plus to your academic
training ... qualities that will pay off for the rest of
your life in whatever career you choose to follow.
There are other advantages too. Pay, at the rate
of S4O per month during the Advanced Course plus
allowances for summer training and travel. Fellow Fellowship
ship Fellowship and social activity. The chance to work with
modern Army equipment, and perhaps to qualify for
Army flight training it it is offered Jit your school. And
then gold bars and a commission as an Army officer.
Why not talk to your Professor of Military Science
now. Let him know you're interested in signing up
for the Advanced Course. Then if you are offered an
opportunity to join, dont pass it up. It's the program
thats best for you... and best for your country.

Page 7



, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 11, 1965

Page 8

r
| Which om
| of thoso M
is a fake?
i ROBERT MAUTZ
; ROBERT MAUTZ
...either
Tbe name was tne same
: but the face was different at
:j the UF when Robert B.
; Mautz, top, vice president
for academic affairs,
: greeted Robert K. Mautz of
\ the University of Illinois at
the 17th annual meeting of
jj the American Accounting
\ Association's Southeastern
jj Section on the campus.
: Robert K. Mautz, who in in:
: in: structs accounting at
: Illinois, was guest speaker
\ for the luncheon session of
: the accounting group. The
a Mautzes are not related.

MAKE IETTEK GRADES
Stody To Backgroead Mask
witk a ZENITH FM RADIO
Gainesville Pioneer FM Dealer
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HpM§SflH| rn i irUX 608 N MAIN ST. Performance Is
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w OaiaosTlllos largest Selection of
ZENITH RADIOSTVsSTEREO
-

Christmas-three times a year...at bookstore

We celebrate Christmas three
times a year, said Sam P. Getzen,
director of the Campus Shop and
Bookstore.
Getzen was referring to the
onslaught of students into the book
store during the start of each
trimester. During this time
students are purchasing books and
supplies for the coming trimester.
Getzen, a mild mannered and
smiling personality, does have

Tau Beta Pi taps 16 students
Sixteen UF students have been tapped for membership in Tau Beta
Pi, the national engineering honor society.

Members are selected on the
basis of distinguished scholarship
and high character. They are
tapped from the upper eighth of the
junior class and from the
upper fifth of the senior class in
the University's College of En Engineering.
gineering. Engineering.
The students are:
HIALEAH Mario Guerrero.
JACKSONVILLE Walling
Cyre, Randolph E. Lee Jr., Paul
C. Tremoulet.
MERRITT ISLAND William
C. Beverly Jr.
MIAMI James D. Hill.
PENSACOLA Walker W.
Reins chmidt.
PINELLAS PARK William
Thayer.
SANFORD Douglas W. Mil Miller.
ler. Miller.
ST. PETERSBURG Joseph
T. Cutter.
TALLAHASSEE Charles S.
Klnard.
TAMPA James Forney,
James D. Jeffers H.
WINTER GARDEN Reginald
L. Tisdale.
KENTUCKY CORBIN Jack
T. Humphries.
CUBA HAVANA Carlos F.
Navarrete.
Murals need
The UF Intramural Depart Department
ment Department needs student officials
to participate in its summer
program.
Those interested please call
our Intramural Office, Room
229, Florida Gym and signup.

1 iii . an i
for a swift treat of fine food,
try o TRADITIONAU

problems. Shoplifting effects the
sales of the store, but the cases
are few in number.
Ab educated guess would place
about one-half of one per cent of
our gross sales lost to shop shoplifting,*'
lifting,*' shoplifting,*' said Getzen.
Items shoplifted are not confined
to one area, however. Small
items are probably the major ones
taken, said Getzen.
Probably the largest item ever
taken was a 'super autograph

I | I IS I

Continued from p. 1
They included bequests from the
late Frederick W. Brecht of
Melbourne for approximately
SBOO,OOO, the late Mrs. Avonelle
C. Noah of Ormond Beach for
approximately $300,000 and the
late Miss Metta Heathcote of St.
Petersburg for approximately
$1 million.
Donahoo told tbe Board, I feel
that we are experiencing only the
beginning of substantial support
of die UF from private sources.
The interest of three outstanding
Floridians manifested itself in
three sizeable bequests to the
University this year.
Foundation President Dr. Clyde
O. Anderson, St. Petersburg phys physician,
ician, physician, commented that the
Foundation offers citizens of
Florida an opportunity to give much
needed support to the UF because
personal contributions may be
made as memorials and also may
encourage work at the University
in which donors have an interest.
MED DAMES
TO MEki, EAT
There will be a Covered Dish
Supper and meeting of tbe UF
Med Dames at 7:30 p.m. Wed Wednesday.
nesday. Wednesday.
The affair will take place at the
home of Mrs. Rufus Vaughn, 2019
N. W. 31st Terrace. Dress is
rngnal,

hound* it was at least four feet
long, said Getzen.
Getzen said that the store uses
preventive measures to stop the
shoplifting. The idea is to observe
and keep those in suspect aware
of our presence, he commented.
We have a unique clientele here
unique in many ways, continued
Getzen. The store tries to stock
as many items as college students
might need.
Tbe book store does not limit

Max Shulman
3r for Kellogg's
j (By the Author of Dobie Gillis
Rally Round the Flag Boys, etc.)
v

ITS SO PEACEFUL IN THE COUNTRY

Frankly, I didnt want to move to
the suburbs at first. But my wife
insisted and Im glad she did, be because
cause because otherwise I might never
have known the joys of country
livinglike fresh air and carpen carpenter
ter carpenter ants and sumpage and, best of
all, our homey-folksy weekly
newspaper, The Westport Peasant.
What excitement at our house
on Thursday mornings when The
Peasant is delivered by our el elderly
derly elderly but still spry newsboy,
Blind Pew! We rush outdoors, my
wife and three sons and I, and
spend many a happy hour search searching
ing searching for the newspaper among the
briers and poison sumac. At
length it is found and we go in inside
side inside with many a cry of Halloo!
and take our places at the break breakfast
fast breakfast table, each with a section of
The Peasant propped beside his
bowl of Oryza Sativa.
(Oryza Sativa, as everyone
knows, is the botanical name for
rice which, as everyone knows, is
one of natures richest sources of

nutritioncontaining, as every everyone
one everyone knows, niacin, thiamine, and
iron. What better way to start the
day than with a bowl of riceall
that energy, all that go power!
But, you protest, a bowl of rice is
hardly the most appetizing dish
to set before a person first thing
in the morning. True, my friends,
true. But I am not talking about
any old rice; I am talking about
Kellogg's Rice Krispiesnour Krispiesnourishment
ishment Krispiesnourishment plus taste-appeal, eye-ap eye-appeal,
peal, eye-appeal, ear-nose-and throat appeal!
Not only are Rice Krispies good
for you, but they are also yummy
to eat. Me, I love Rice Krispies.
My wife, Oryza Sativa, loves Rice
Krispies too. And so do my three
sons, Snap, Crackle, and Pop.
We love Rice Krispies, all of us,
we do, and so will you.)
But I digress. We were talking
about our weekly newspaper, The
Wcstjfort Peasant. My own favor favorite
ite favorite part of the paper is the column
called "Ask Harry Homespun.
Each week readers send in pies piestions
tions piestions about home-making, gar gardening.
dening. gardening. child-rearing, and other
suburban matters, and shrewd
but kindly Harry Homespun dips
into his vast store of country
wisdom to supply answers that
are cogent, pungent, and to the
point. Let me quote some uues-

its function to merely selling items
though. At present it is sponsoring
a record being made by the student
'gator band.
"We work with Student Govern Government
ment Government on senior invitations and
announcements because of our
location," said Getzen. 85 per
cent of the profit goes to the
Dollars for Scholars fund. "The
other 15 per cent is a handling
expense," said Getzen.

tions and answers from Harry
Homespuns last column:
Q: I am thinking of buying
some power tools. What
should I get first?
A: Blue Cross.
Q: How do you get rid of
moles?
A: Pave the lawn.
Q: What is the best way to put
a wide car into a narrow
garage?
A: Butter it.
Q: What do you do for elm
blight?
A: Salt water gargle and bed
rest.
Q: What can Ido for dry hair?
A: Get a wet hat.
Q: Whats the best thing for
termites?
A: Wood.
Q: Do you know anyone who
wants to buy 14 St. Ber Bernard
nard Bernard puppies?
A: No.

I sit and read these and other
gems from Harry Homespuns
column and so engrossed do* I
become, that I do not realize, until
Oryza Sativa reminds me, that it
is time to go to work. So off I go
to the station and board the
faithful commuter train, and as
the sturdy engine clicks off the
10 miles to the city in a neat 2H
hours,.! think how fine it is to
live in the suburbs where the sky
is bright with birds and the earth
you stand on is earth you have
watered with the sweat of your
brow, and the house that shelters
you has echoed with the ringing
of tools you held in your own
two hands, and then I think back
think back with pityto those
empty sunless days when I was
a city dweller and the only things
I had were money in the bank
and all my fingers.
> ISIS Mm SMmm
*
P.S. A note as to guijj*
dislike) these col- RICE
umns will help RRISPIiSi||
determine our
plans for them. retag.
Write Kellogg
Company, Dept.
TET, Battle
Creek, Michigan.
O r.T



iIMH
' H He;
' xjs|||
&m i Hrasik
QL|ir v :^wsji%
>-'
You can stand on your head looking for a place
to park on most campuses, And all you end
up with is a headache. But W not if you ride a
Honda. It needs only as much elbow room as you with
an armload of books. So you can squeeze in a little closer
to that 8 o'clock class than your 4-wheel competition.
A Honda helps keep you solvent as well as sane. Prices
start about s2ls*. You'll get up to 200 mpg, depending on
the model. And practically never need service. The
star performer above is the CB-160. Just one of the 15
Honda models. With its 4-stroke, twin cylinder engine
and 16.5 HP, this showoff does better than 80 mph. Look
into a Honda soon. No more headaches.
See the Honda representative on your campus or write:
American Honda Motor Co., Inc., Department C 3,
100 West Alondra Blvd.,
Gardena, California 90247. || C 3 LJr\
world's biggest seller!
* jM
*ptus dealer's set-up and transportation charges >**

Guatemalan
ghris UF library
25 boob
Twenty-five books repre representing
senting representing all types of Guatemalan
writings have been presented
to the UF library by Miguel
Collado, Guatemalan tourist
attache.
The books, some of which were
on display here last week, Include
history worts, poetry, and
scientific writings, according to
Collado. The books are represen representative
tative representative of both modern writing and
older works of Guatemala.
Collado, sent here by the
Guatemalan government, Is touring
the United States to "promote
the culture and tourist attractions'*
of his country. His display of
pictures and books will be exhi exhibited
bited exhibited at colleges and clubs
throughout the nation.
"I felt I have been so well
treated here, that I want to do
something in gratitude on the part
of my country, and because of the
Interest of the students and people
in Gainesville, I am donating these
books to the UF library,'* Collado
said.
SCULPTURE
(Continued From Page I)
1959 when he was presented in
the Museum of Modern Art's
exhibition, "Sixteen Americans,"
along with such names as Jasper
Johns, Robert Rauschenberg and
Louise Nevelson who also have
become significant figures in
contemporary American art.
The University Gallery's hours
are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m.
on Sunday. The Gallery is closed
on Mondays.

I T v
I
li jpi
| vU
Mm
*n m MMIHMBBU
Gainesville I I
Stockman H
At the Gainesville Livestock Maiket Vv

luesday, Moy IT. 1965, The Florida Alligator, I

(Continued From Page 1)
Information/* he stressed.
Revolutionary man should meet the revolutions of our time
with alertness and refuse to become dehumanized.**
He should not succumb to the fanaticism of a true believer,
but at die same time, he should find something be can believe in.
' That's my dream of a possible roan in a possible emerging
society. A Dream of Possibility/* Leraer said.
WEAPONS TECHNOLOGY
His five revolutions begin with one of Weapons Technology/ 9
Were living in a time of unthinkable weapons with a surplus
of power. We dont dare use diem; and we don't dare stop making
them/* the author said.
Lerner suggested that we (America) act in concert** with other
nations to prevent die diffusion of these weapons to other countries.
He felt we should get together to organize a concert of powers
in terms of national self interest, which should eventually lead to
disarmament and ultimately to a world policing force of nuclear
weapons. :
I think it*s possible to prevent a nuclear war. It*s possible,
but not guaranteed. It depends on human efforts.**
His second revolution is one of Access/* allowing people equal
access to equal opportunities in American civilization.
Poverty, racial discrimination, alcoholism, war, and religious
hatreds are pathetic obstacles that stand in the way of the develop development
ment development of all young people/* he said.
UPROOTING REVOLUTION
The third revolution is one that troubles me deeply/* said
Lerner. It is an Uprooting Revolution that is taking place.**
Maintaining the Identity of the Individual is very difficult.
For instance, the big media (press, etc.) must recapture the
sense of the individual as a human being who has choices which
must be respected.
Big organizations assault the identity. The traditional American
family is being broken down. It ceases to be a producing unit and
becomes a consuming unit/* Lerner said.
There is a breakdown in the sense of trust with parents, a lack
of fidelity, an emptiness of identity.*

His fourth topic included the
explosions in our culture which
are developing new elites in know knowledge,
ledge, knowledge, reading, intellectualism,
communication, etc.
What has been created in the
past now becomes more accessible
to more people. The commanding
and intellectual elites must have
respect for each other in a

LERNER

country where the two clash/ 9 he
explained.
Lastly, Lerner presented his
Time and Values Revolution* 9 in
which automation has made new
available time for all.
He stressed that we must
recapture the sense of work; not
necessarily work on the Job, but
leisure-time work which is
unpaid/ 9
This type of work offers ful fulfillment
fillment fulfillment and gives lives value.
We also must recapture the
sense of play, meaning a total
expressiveness of the body, mind
and spirit; play in the sense of a
new feeling for the senses.* 9
We must gain a capacity for
the reality of life: in adventure,
ideas, risks, and love/ 9
If we do these things I suggest
to you, we can become new
emerging men in a revolutionary
age/* he concluded.
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Page 9



Page 10

I, Th Florida Alligator, Tuwdoy. May 11, 1965

: -. m
jHNjHj
Hi m Hi j
w -- ' &* *-**% s£i| : .U.ij^F'
|*% : iHF^ : ~ ''^y v Ws§ &iirilf^'7 l^hh> - H
v,X v. F 9H "'*>,
Hk j| HS S # My
ga
. m -f | USA v -.' : HHPIr ,Vv:;av^
;;.' HSi W Mr* 1 Vjmjfc j/m;-M^
qm/ymk^ 1 j|W* ,,,: t m^H
jl ,^,.. wimmLH hbk |fi :;: .1 Cj| # It-
AT THE GUATEMALAN FASHION SHOW
. Modeling at the Guatemalan Fashion Show were back row (l. to r.)
Ana Serrano, Elsa Saavedra, Lourdes Angulo, Lourdes de Cardenas,
Consuela Maingot, Frances de Hernandez and Eugenia de Aguirre,
(foreign students wives). Front row (l. tor.)Rita Aquirre, Gina Cazali
and Aldo Aguirre. The show presented at the Florida Union Auditorium
was termed very successful.** Miguel Collado from Guatemala
lectured with color slides and a color film about this country was
also shown.

Two UF stvdents
claim prizes
ii Alabama
Chemical
Engineers
Coaffereace
.....V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V

Many Cuban students stay on for 3-A

The number ox Cuban students
enrolled at the UF during the spring
trimester is proportionately
higher than the number of
American students enrolled for
the same period, according to
Foreign Student Advisor Glenn A.
Farris.
Although a good number of
Cubans as well as other foreign
students seek employment during
the summer months, a very high
number of them desire to avail
themselves of the trimester sys system
tem system to complete as much academic
work as possible,** he said.
Such is the case of Ana Isabel
Serrano, (2UC), her brother,
Ramon E., (2UC), and her sister
Dalia Elena, (2UC). All three
students came from Cuba two years
ago, finished high school in Avon
Park, Fla, and are planning to
attend the UF year-round until
they graduate.
Miss Serrano said she likes the
trimester system, but said some sometimes
times sometimes it is too rushed.**
Farris said that each year there
is a noticeable increase in the
enrollment of Cuban students by
reason of the transfers from Miami
Dade Junior College.**
The Cuban students who came
during the winter trimester are
mostly transfers rather than
entering freshmen, he said.
Two hundred and five Cuban
students were enrolled in the UF
during the winter trimester, an
Increase of 17 over the fall
trimester's enrollment of 188.
Not as many Cuban students have
come directly from Cuba since the
mass exodus slacked off, he said.
Today they come from otter col colleges
leges colleges and highschools in the United

First and third prizes for the best papers presented at a nine-state
conference of student chapters of the American Institute of Chemical
Engineers were won by UF students recently in Tuscaloosa, Ala.
James Magurno Jr. of Clearwater took first place for his paper
describing his method of concentrating orange juice, using a small
plant built with the help of other students.
Kenneth Bushea of Marathon placed third with his description
of experiences as a cooperative student working at Cape Kennedy,
alternating periods of study with time devoted to practical experience.
The University of Alabama hosted more than 100 students and
professors from 13 universities in the southeastern United States
for the three-day session.
The winning UF students were accompanied by Douglas Miller of
Sanford, president of the local student chapter, and Dr. R. B. Bennett,
chapter counselor.
The orange juice project, for which a patent has been requested,
was evolved in a plant design class supervised by Professor R. A.
KeppeL
A donation from the Peninsular Florida Section of the American
Institute of Chemical Engineers helped defray part of the Alabama
trip expenses.
rrrvTTmnTmTi'.v.-.'.-.-.-.-.*..-. ....................... ........... ... .

When the Cuban students finish
school, they are free to seek
employment in the United States
which will act as their host for
an indefinite period of time,'* the
Foreign Student Advisor said.
He said there is no time limit
on how long a refugee from any
foreign country may remain in the
United States without filing a
declaration of intent to become a
citizen, although a sizeable number
have taken the initial steps to
achieve immigrant or United
States* citizenship status.
Each trimester,*' he said,
some Cuban students make the
trip to Toronto, Canada, to satisfy
the United States* residency
requirements at theU.S. consulate
generals office.**
The only handicap in their re remaining
maining remaining refugees, he said is that
certain corporations have defense
contracts which do not permit the

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hiring of non-citizens.
Cuban students have some pro problems
blems problems which are not encountered
by other foreign students, said
Farris.
On the average, they are
younger than the other foreign
students, and therefore are en enrolled
rolled enrolled mostly for undergraduate
work which precludes their
eligibility for graduate assistant assistantships.
ships. assistantships. Consequently, they have to
work at lower wages than the
graduate assistants.*'
The language difficulty
encountered by the fathers of Cuban
students and the restrictions
placed on the fathers' persuits of
professional careers make it
difficult for Cuban parents to
provide as much as they would like
for the support of their sons and
daughters.**
Many Cuban students worry
about parents and relatives who
are still in Cuba.* he said.

June grad? read this:

Students interested in a career
in the government service who will
receive their bacherlors degree in
June are offered an opportunity
to apply for fellowships to study
at three different universities.
Each fellowship has a total value
of $3,000. The stipend is $2,500
and the remainder of the grant
consists of fees and tuition at
the three cooperating universities.
Beginning this June, fellows will
serve a three- months* internship
with a government agency in Ala Alabama,
bama, Alabama, Kentucky, or Tennessee
such as the TVA, the Marshall
Space Flight Center, a city or a
department in one of the state
governments. During die 1965-66
academic year, they will take
graduate courses in public ad administration
ministration administration at the universities
of Alabama, Kentucky, and
Tennessee.
Completion of the twelve twelvemonths*
months* twelvemonths* training period entitles
fellows to a certificate in public
administration. They can be
awarded a masters degree at (me
of die three universities attended
upon completing a thesis and
passing appropriate examinations.

NEWEST MAGAZINE IDEA
IN
****** k
is-ss- 1
35# at your Newsstand or send SI.OO for the next 3 issues and receive
genuine Grump ButtonFEE. GRUMP, Dept JK, 230 Park Avenue, New
York, N. Y. 10017.
< I
DIAMOND RINGS J
TRADITIONALLY
THE STORE FOR BEKUmI
CUSS RINGS KaSmVIKwM I
Ay. 372-8658 |

For information and appli applications,
cations, applications, students should write to
Coleman B. Ransone, Educational
Director, Southern Regional
Training Program in Public
Administration, Drawer I, Uni University,
versity, University, Alabama. The deadline
for submitting applications is
March 1. 1965.
Sfreef donee
scheduled Sat.
There will be a street dance
on the South side of the Florida
Union, Saturday, May 14 from 8-
12 p.m.
Disk-Jockey Stu Bowers will
be the emcee and the dance will
take place in Club Rendezvous
If it rains.
The dance is sponsored by the
Florida Union Board of Student
Activities.



Track team tackles tough
Tennessee in SEC meet

By DICK DENNIS
Sports Assistant
UF's depth-laden trackmen
march to Baton Rouge, Louisiana,
this weekend for the Southeastern
Conference Title Meet,
Heavily-favored, defending
champion Tennessee figures to set
up the biggest roadblock against
the Gators. Louisiana State, Ala Alabama,
bama, Alabama, and Auburn must also be
watched closely in the run for
the SEC Crown.
Young UF track coach Jimmy
I CYCLE CENTER I
IA R
STUDY I
THIS SUMMSIt ...
in the Nation's Capital! I
H
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
FULLY ACCREDITED
Special courses hi BsferwMUt, Politics, m
IstsrutieuS ielsUsu, ImUmss aiuL^
TWO S-WEEK DAY SESSIONS M
Mon. Juna 21stWad. July 2tthM
Thurs. July 29thWad. Sapt IstM
ONE S-WEEK EVENIN6 SESSION' :
Mon. Juna 21stWad. Aug. 18th
ALL AIR-CONDITIONED
CLASSROOMS A DORMITORIES
Far aSSitisMi iafsnutieu Mi Bullstiu,
writs:
Director, Summer Sessions
The American University
Mass, and Nebr. Aves., N.W.
Washington; D.C. 20016
THEE
AMERICAN
UNIVERSITY
Whom World Boonts &
SSmdmSt MooS

ATTENTION!
ALL HUNGRY GATORS
You expect more aad...
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W W Small Large X-Large
851.45 $1.75 $2.15
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LONDON (ROIL STEAKS sl.lO
All the above served with baked (with sour cream or
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14 SW First Street (Behind Sears) FR 2-2405
SECOND COFFEE OR TEA ALWAYS FREE

Carnes respects the Volunteers*
power, but foels Florida can still
win.
**We*re probably the only school
that has a chance to beat
Tennessee. They have proven that
they can be very tough to beat,**
Carnes commented.
On paper, Tennessee seems to
hold the advantage. A point total
compiled from the best SEC spring
clockings gives Tennessee a 20-
point bulge In a hypothetical meet meet-74
-74 meet-74 points to 54 for Florida. ISU
would score 30, with Alabama and
Auburn tied for fourth with 24
markers each.
Those statistics certainly don't
mean we can't win nor, of
course, do they mean we have
second place cinched. We're
planning on winning, and we can if
we have a good day," observed
Carnes.
The mile and two-mile events
shape up as the Volunteers* strong strongpoints.
points. strongpoints. Last year Tennessee
finished 1-2-3-4 in the mile, and
they have a good chance of doing it
again. Florida's No. 1 distance
runner, Dave Wilson, is injured
and listed as a doubtful starter
by Carnes.

22 game baseball statistics
(Georgia Series not inducted)
Player G AB R H 3A 2B SB HR RBI SB
Alien Trammell, LF 22 84 19 39 .484 10 11 24 8
Bill Blomgren, RF 22 81 10 22 .272 6 2 0 14 0
Tommy Shannon, IB 22 77 13 20 .260 2 0 0 14
Randy Morcroft, SS 22 88 15 21 .239 1 0 0 4 2
Don Pendley, 3B 20 68 14 16 .235 I 2 1 12 2
Bud Williams, C 15 84 7 8 .235 2 0 0 3 1
Charles Casey, CF 18 38 8 8 .211 3 2 0 6 0
Danny Cushman, 3B 11 20 5 4 .200 0 0 0 4
Ron Creese, 2B 17 50 9 9 .180 1 0 0 6 0
Jack Kenworthy, C 18 46 6 8 474 2 0 1 8 1
Bruce Moore, 2B 16 50 10 7 440 2 0 1 3 1
Pitching Records
G W-L IP H R-ER ERA BB SO
Adrian Zabala 13 4-0 27 17 7-3 1.00 12 18
Ray mnyaon 10 2-2 41 2/3 26 9-8 1.73 17. 28
Danny Griffin 7 2-2 14 7 4-4 2.57 5 8
Danny Eggart 11 3-8 -49 1/3 59 26-19 3.47 12 25
nanny OIT 8 1-0 18 17 5-5 2.50 5 11
Waif Prior 5 0-0 1 3 9 5-4 2.89 9 14
Brownie Johnston 5 0-2 17 18 10-5 2.64 5 15
Charles Casey 5 1-0 8 6 8-4 4.45 7 14
Ed Woolfolk 1 &-0 11 0-0 0.00 0
jack Withrow 3 0-0 4 7 3-3 6.75 3
Neil Mnisillan 1 0-0 1 2 1-1 9.00 0 0
-

Vol coach Chuck Rohe said, I
think we'll have some real
competition from Florida."
Carnes believes the Gator
victory will have to be achieved
in a team sense and not by a
group of individuals.
Our basic strength lies in our
overall team depth. We are par particularly
ticularly particularly strong in toe relays and
field events. Tennessee, too, has
exceptional depth. The other teams
rely on a few strong individuals.
Florida harriers have recorded
the best times in the SEC in three
events. Track Captain John
Anderson, a junior, paces toe con conference
ference conference in both the 100 and 200-
yard rtaahftg, Middle-^*** l ****
runner Jim Brown has recorded
toe fastest 880-yard run.
Qualifying heats begin Friday at
Baton Rouge, with toe finals on
Saturday.
Floridas finish in the meet
will count heavily In toe totaling
of points for the All-Sports trophy
awarded to the SEC school that
does well in the greatest number
of sports.

WANTED
Summer Editor
for the
FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
Apply at Room 9,
Florida Union by p.m.,
TUESDAY, MAY II
Board of Student Publications

Tuesday, May 11, 1965/ The Florida Alligator,

| sports}

Gators end SEC with wins;
Rollins, FSI, JU remain

UFs baseball Gators got back
on the winning track Friday and
Saturday with a double sweep over
the Georgia Bulldogs.
The two victories stopped the
Gators losing streak which saw
them drop 7 of their last 9 games.
Coach Dave Fuller's troops still
have nine games remaining before
closing out toe season on May 29
at Tallahassee.
UF will ***** on Rollins on the
14th at Winter Park, and host the
same squad the next day here.
Jacksonville U. is also on the Gator
docket before they dose out the
season.
The victories over the Bulldogs
left the Gators with a 15-9 season
record and a 9-3 SEC final mark.
This placed UF second to Auburn
in the ftpfti SEC Eastern Division

standings. The Tigers closed with
a 10-3 SEC record.
Gator hurler Walt Prior stopped
Georgia on five hits Saturday as
UF topped the Bulldogs 7-2.
Second-sacker Bruce Moore
knocked in three runs for the
Orange and Blue on two hits, while
Allen Trammell, Randy Morcroft,
and Tom Shannon each collected
two hits. First baseman Shannon
and Prior each got credit for an
RBI to aid the Gator cause.
UF got a run In the second
inning, three in the fourth, and
wrapped it up with three more in
the fifth. The Bulldogs runs came
in the fourth frame.
Tfie Gators Trammell, the
SEC's leading batsman, blasted a
2 run triple in the third inning of
Friday's game to help bury the
Bulldogs 4-2.
UF starter Danny Griffin went
the distance on the mound in giving
up 3 hits to the Bulldogs. The win
upped his record to 3-2. In a pit pitchers*
chers* pitchers* duel witnessed by 300 tens
at Perry Field, the Gators were
themselves limited to only 4 hits
by the Bulldogs Woody Chastain.
Third baseman Don Pendley, cat catcher
cher catcher Bud Williams and Griffin
got the three other Gator safeties.
UF scored 3 runs in the second,
one in the seventh, while Georgia
scored single runs in the first
and third frames.
Gators siga Neely
te tennis pact
Signing of Tampa Plant's
Armistead Neely this week assures
Florida of the roost talented fresh freshman
man freshman tennis team in its history next
year.
Already set to become members
of the team are Clearwater's Steve
Beeland, Palm Beach's Jamie
Pressly and Fort Lauderdale's
Bill Powell. All are ranked ama amateur
teur amateur tennis players in the state.
Neely Is the state high school
singles champion and the second secondranked
ranked secondranked junior in Florida.
"This gives us more ranked
young players than any school I
can think of," said Gator Athletic
Director Bay Graves. "It pregrides
the core of what should be an out outstanding
standing outstanding freshman team and
the first step In the rebuilding of
our tennis program."
Florida expects to announce the
names of at least four more players
who have accepted tennis scholar scholarships
ships scholarships within the next two weeks.
The Gators previously an announced
nounced announced the signing of ten boys
to track scholarships, will
announce a list of swimming, golf
and baseball scholarships*
ALLIAMCE I
TV SERVICE I
Fast, Expert Service I
on all makes
TELEVISION I
RADIO I
STEREO 1
io% discount!
on parts to all
U of F students
817 W.. Univ Ave
Phone 376-9955 |

Page 11



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 11, 1965

(The new weight room in the gym is now open
to the public. Facilities are available for almost
any kind of workout. Pictures show equipment
in use J
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The Volkswagen Station Wagon holds the entire population of Jiggs, Nevada.

Jiggs, Nevada is populated by five adults, four children, and
one big dog that doesn't like photographers.
That happens to be just how many you can comfortably seat in a
> Volkswagen Station Wagon.
(In fact, the VW not only holds the whole town of Jiggs, it also
holds about twice as much as a conventional wagon: 170 cubic feet.)
Next to people, the scarcest thing in Jiggs is gasoline.
Theres only one pump in the whole town. You have to drive 25
miles to get to the next one.
And you could get to the next one (its in Elko) in a VW on
about one gallon of gasoline.
O. H. Breschini, who runs the only saloon in Jiggs (We haven't

MILLER-BROWN INC.
AUTHORIZED
4222 NW 13th Street OCA "


NEW LOOK IN UF WEIGHT ROOM


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had a shooting in two years.") says the summers get better than
105 above.
And Will Peters, who makes the best coyote bait in Elko County,
remembers the winter of '36 when it got near 50 below.
Fortunately, there's nothing in the VW that can freeze at 50
below, or boil at 105 above.
The engine's air-cooled so it gets along just beautifully.
Once all the people were in, they liked the seats, windows, and
sunroof so much nobody knew how to ask them to get out.
So before riding off into the fading sunset, one new VW Sta Station
tion Station Wagon was contributed to the town of Jiggs, Nevada.
(Sometimes it pays a town not to get too big.)