Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
THE
FLORIDA
University of
L Florida
Gainesville
L
G
A
T
0
Vol. 57, W 3
No. 134
Monday, April 12, 1965

By JULIE McCLURE
Staff Writer
UF women residents may have
a long wait for those extra
telephones in their dorms, but it
is not Southern Bell that is caus causing
ing causing that busy signed
According to Assistant Director
of Housing, William E. Neylans,
The placement of additional tele telephones
phones telephones on campus depends upon two
things: the number of profiting
phones and the need (that is the
ratio of students per phone).
There is no set ratio for deter determining
mining determining the need for phones on
campus, Neylans said. All we
can go on is the number of com complaints.
plaints. complaints. If a certain number of
students per phone have no com complaints
plaints complaints about the situation, then if
in another area, where the ratio
is the same and the students com complain,
plain, complain, why, we can't consider their
request a legitimate complaint.
At least 50 per cent of the
phones on campus must be pro profitable,
fitable, profitable, said Neylans, or we
cant justify additional phones.
Office Manager of the Commer Commercial
cial Commercial Department for Southern Bell,
Earle Higginbotham said, All
costs for installation and mainten maintenance
ance maintenance of the pay phones on campus
are assumed by Southern Bell, but
we install the phones where and
when the university tells us, for
the most part.
The only times Southern Bell
might be skeptical about placing

No phone relief Jn sight

Legislature to 'hold the line

A general hold-the-line policy
is now in effect in respect to many
of the recent issues of the present
Florida legislative session,**com session,**commented
mented session,**commented Manning J. Dauer, head of
the political science department.
According to Dauer, in the recent
message from Gov. Haydon Burns
it is evident that there will pro probably
bably probably be no new taxes in the near
future.
If any of the taxes are to be
altered, the intangible tax and the
auto licence tax will probably be
the only ones that the 1965 legis legislature
lature legislature will be working with, said
Dauer.
Gov. Burns has appointed an
interim study group to look at
many of the tax policies now in
effect. Tliis group is to report
on the overall tax policies to the
1967 legislative session/* replied
Dauer.
Reapportionment will not be
taken up in the present session
but will be dealt with in a special
session called by Gov. Burns to
convene in June, said Dauer.
A raise of SSOO per teacher has
been proposed for Florida public
school teachers for the coming
year in order to bring the salaries

The UF received a $400,000
grant Friday from the U. S. Office
of Education for its proposed
Graduate School and Center for
International Studies.
Overall cost of the project is
an estimated $1,200,000 with the
remaining SBOO,OOO requested
from state funds in the 1965-67
biennium budget.
Announcement of the grant ap approval
proval approval came via separate
telegrams to University President
J. Wayne Reitz from U. S.
Senators Spessard Holland and

new phones are where there has
been excessive vandalism to the
phones or where there has been
no profit in the particular area in
question, said Higginbotham.

UF receives $400,000 grant

up to the national level, continued
Dauer.
At the present time the state
of Florida is 12 per cent behind
the national level in public edu education
cation education funds,** said Dauer.
According to Dauer, a proposal
of a five per cent increase this
year for UF professors has been
presented, with a three per cent
increase in 1966. The national
increase per year is six per cent.
In two years, that will put Florida
16 per cent behind the national
average, continued Dauer.
A bond issue for new university
construction in the state has been
approved by the vote of the people
for 75 million dollars as the ini initial
tial initial beginning, with 25 million each
biennium. This will take care of
about one-third of the increase of
student enrollment, said Dauer.
A 300 million dollar bond issue
has been set for main highways
in Florida. This has been put ahead
of Florida educational funds.
Public utilities will also be put
on the waiting list along with tax
policies, replied Dauer.
As it appears now the hold holdthe-line
the-line holdthe-line policy will keep some
issues from action for about two
years,** concluded Dauer.

George Smathers and Congress Congressman
man Congressman D. R. (Billy) Matthews of
Gainesville.
The four-story building is
planned north of the University
Auditorium and south of the Plaza
of the Americas. Construction is
expected to begin this summer on
a new graduate research library
at the north end of the Plaza.
In addition to Graduate School
facilities, the structure would
house the Center for Latin
American Studies, the Division
of Sponsored Research and the

According to Higginbotham,
Southern Bell and the university
work fairly close together and the
university telling us where and
when to install the phones.
The university gets 15 per cent
commission from the receipts
from the campus pay phones, said
Higginbotham.
The money from the com commission
mission commission goes to the presidents
Concession Fund (also the re receipts
ceipts receipts from the vending machines
on campus), back to housing and
other small funds, said Neylans.
If the students really wanted the
. additional phones, said Neylans,
they would send their requests to
housing through their Hall Coun Councils.
cils. Councils. This is the only way we can
consider taking action on the
matter, he added.
The desire for additional tele telephones
phones telephones has been a long standing
request heard time and time again
during our campaign, said Dick
Thompson, student body vice
president.
According to Administrative
Assistant, Bill Fleming, the survey
of the telephone situation in the
dorms has not been completed yet.
When the survey has been com completed,
pleted, completed, we will make a formal re request
quest request in conjunction with the area
Hall Councils involved for addi additional
tional additional telephones, said Fleming.

it if
He JR
MANNING J. DAUER

Departments of Foreign languages,
Political Science, History, Socio Sociology,
logy, Sociology, Geography, Anthropology,
Economics, Agricultural Econo Economics
mics Economics and Geology.
Space for 12 classrooms, a
lecture hall seating 200, two
laboratories, six libraries and
reading rooms, 43 faculty offices
and 102 graduate student offices
is shown in preliminary drawings
for the building.

UF prof proposes
new income tax

A UF accounting professor has
proposed a new method of com computing
puting computing personal income taxes to
eliminate what he calls a "basic
inequality in the progressive tax
structure of the United States.*'
In a report issued by the Uni University's
versity's University's Bureau of Economic and
Business Research, J. T. Ball
says a tax credit system is the
answer to achieving fairness
among different taxpayers.
"Except for a few minor dif differences
ferences differences caused by the nature of
their Income source, similarly
classed taxpayers with the same
income will pay the same tax,"
Ball explains. "The inequality,
however, exists among taxpayers
deviating from the average."
Ball points out that the personal
exemption of S6OO should have the
same value to all taxpayers, but
under the present plan, only those

Student Art Exhibition
ft I
:|ij The Annual Student Art Exhibition spon- s
:* sored each year by the Department of g
i? Art at the UF is being held this year the
£: week of April 12-16. '&
The entire third floor of the new %
% Architecture and Fine Arts Classroom |
:& building, including the Teaching Gallery,
S will be used as an exhibition area and g
the show will consist of the best works $
:* chosen from the area of advertising design,
% ceramics, drawing, painting, photography, 4
£ printmaking and sculpture. |

The space expansion for grad graduate
uate graduate and research activities is
related to the growth of the
Graduate School from 1,000
students in 1955 to 2,000 this
year with a projected enrollment
of 3,000 by 1970.
The percentage of doctoral can candidates
didates candidates has produced an increase
ranking the University among the
leaders in the southeastern United
States.

with the same taxable income and
rate schedule obtain equal benefit
from it.
"The solution is a tax credit
system which would have taxable
income assuming the role now
held by adjusted gross income,"
Ball states.
Taxable income results from
the reduction of standard deduc deductions
tions deductions and personal exemptions
from adjusted gross income.
With a tax credit structure as
proposed by Ball, a credit would
be given for the total deductions
and exemptions and the tax imposed
on adjusted gross income. All
restrictions and limitations on
deductions and exemptions would
continue to apply. Determination of
the amount of the credit would be
a purely mechanical computation.
See TAX onp.2



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 12, 1965

Hair and hair pieces
By DEE WRIGHT
Fashion Editor
Now is the time of the year when many girls acquire new hair
styles. The newest and most popular looks feature straight but
curly hair and the use of hairpieces. Several boys, asked their
opinions on girls* hair styles, gave us a clue to the male reaction
to feminine hair trends.
QUESTION: In general, which type of girls hair style do you
prefer? Also, what do you think of the new straight hair styles
and the use of hairpieces?
DAVE DRAPER, 2UC: Teased hairdos act as good roach roachnests.
nests. roachnests. Then theres the Cyclops look hair over one eye. Then
theres the straight hair Freedom Party* look. I like the Cyclops
look best you always have the urge to poke the other eye out.
What happened to the African sheepdog look? It must be on its
way out now.
GEORGE ROSE, 2UC: I like girls hair best long. The new
straight hair styles arent bad. I disapprove of hairpieces. They
detract from the beauty of the hair.
J. B. SPRENKLE, 3EG: I like girls* hair best when its put
up on top like stacked up real high. I like the beat look ~
straight hair real long. Hairpieces have their place. Theyre
very convenient for formals. I dont object to them.
CARO SHAGRO, lUC: I like girls hair long and straight, as
long as its cut evenly. I dont know about the hairpieces ~ I
cant tell the difference. I really think girls should stick with
their natural hair. If they want to bleach it or anything, its okay.
TED FIELLAND, lUC: I like girls hair best long, soft, and clean.
I hate to get stuck with those hairpins when Im biting ears.

tax

(Continued From Page 1)
An individual, taxpayer, electing
the standard deductions, would
read his tax liability from the tax
table which would incorporate the
credit and show only the net tax
due.
The tax credit system would
offer obvious disadvantages to two
groups of taxpayers those with
many deductions and those with
high incomes if introduced at
existing tax rates, Ball asserts.
With a reduction in rates, the
government still would collect the
same amount of total tax revenue
because of the wider tax base.
Greater equality among taxpayers
deviating from the average still
would be achieved the overall
objective of the system.
A tax credit certainly would
strengthen the incentive to pro produce
duce produce more revenue, Ball
explains. It offers a more
positive approach to the matter
and well could make the income
tax a more efficient tool in the
expansion of our economy.
Pre-med students
The American Cancer Society
has made available two Summer
School Research Scholarships to
be awarded to graduates of the
UF who have been enrolled in an
approved medical school for the
fall term of 1965.
Interested students should get
in touch with the Preprofessional
Counseling Office immediately.
moOepn I
Shoe Repair Shopl
HEELS ATTACHED I
5 Mins. I
SOLES ATTACHED I
15 Mins. I
At Two Locations!

> CAROLYN PLAZA
FR 6-0315
And
101 N. Main St.
Opf>* Ist Nat'! Bank I

mm m
' **ld i&l SBBB9 If k \ V r
Emm I
ms ?I I \\l \ 1 wm
1 \ \m \ f
Pi'l \ mw 1% JbhhHH
HHHHH m #
-wk W MM V V
P# p wWiIJW. M Mm Jm OH 1
MMm. M#w
MFk* mr *% JrVr .MHmh
.A Ws

Now theres a new radar system which,
like the frog, can see everywhere with without
out without motion. It does three jobs simul simultaneously:
taneously: simultaneously: searches the entire sky for
missiles, pinpoints the location of tar targets
gets targets already spotted, and sorts out real
missiles from decoys. All in less time
than it takes to blink an eye.
Its done by steering the radar beam

GENERALTELEPHONE & ELECTRONICS
no HOT Mff.tl Timm dsrwiwmfnff fnn lT I -r t -- n |- . cm I*. n C,I T^.., n i*----i-ift Prtrir Iwfcwnwnrir WnwHi

Scholarships not
answer to college costs

Parents who have a vague idea
about putting their youngster
through college with a major assst
from scholarships may be in for a
rude shock.
According to Miss Claire Cox,
author of a new book How to
Beat the High Costs of College,
four years of college will cost
near SIO,OOO, and financial
assistance in the form of scholar scholarships
ships scholarships is declining.
The truth is that there really
are not very many scholarships
in proportion to the total college
population, and the scholarships
being awarded range mostly
below $500, continued Miss Cox.
Mac G. Grigsby, director of
scholarships and financial aid
for the UF, echoed Miss Cox
Wednesday.
Most scholarships awarded by
the UF are for less than $500,
said Grigsby.
Last year we awarded 110
scholarships to honorary fresh freshmen
men freshmen and junior college transfer
students; each scholarship was
for $125, said Grigsby. An
additional 99 scholarships were
given continuing honor students,

electronically, and is the result of de development
velopment development work for missile defense by
the scientists of a GT&E subsidiary.
Producing a radar system as versa versatile
tile versatile as this is the result of the ever in increasing
creasing increasing emphasis on research by the
GT&E family of subsidiariesresearch
that stands as our solid base for future
growth.

and students receiving grant-in grant-inaid
aid grant-inaid help. Most of these were also
for $125.
The fewer than 300 students who
received scholarships from the
UF last year made up less than two
per cent of the student population.
Scholarships from sources
outside the university, and from
the separate colleges within the
university are normally more gen generous,
erous, generous, continued Grigsby, but still
rarely exceed SSOO.
Grigsby said, however, loans and
part-time work are also important
helps in financing a college
education.
Scholarships, student loans and
part-time work all go together
under the heading of financial aid,
said Grigsby. Just because the
proportional number of student
scholarships is down doesnt mean
its more difficult for a student
to finance a college education.
Figures will show that the
number of part-time jobs held by
students is increasing, and so are
student wages, stated Grigsby.
Also, the number of student loans
is increasing.

I CAMPUS CUTIE 1
I
%
i
j
I
I
S
1
| Nancy worked |
in France |
Today's Campus Cutie spent S
last summer In Paris working $
:* as an interpreter In a de- s
:£ partment store. Nancy Nimmo :j:j
:* is a Senior majoring in his history
tory history from Blowing Rock, North
Carolina. ?:
She is political fe- $
$: presentative of Kappa Delta j:.;
|:j: sorority.
Nancy is member of Phi
Alpha Theta history honorary. :?
*j She has served as a Florida:?
:$ Blue Key speaker for two $
years, and worked onorienta onorientation
tion onorientation last year. $
?: Nancy graduates in April,?:
£: and plans to spend the next#
six months working in Scot- ::
jij: land. 8

If you intend to take up any branch of
communications as a career, General
Telephone & Electronics is a good place
to start. Information is available from
your Placement Director. Or obtain de details
tails details by writing to General Telephone &
Electronics Laboratories, 730 Third
Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10017.
Lrl&Jj



Ed Green 4Ph President-Elect of the National Student American
Pharmaceutical Association receives congratulations from immediate
past vice-president Richard Clayton


Ed Green, 4Ph, was elected president of the
National Pharmaceutical Association at the national
convention, March 28-April 2, in Detroit.
This marks the third consecutive year that a UF
student has been elected as an officer in the student
section of the American Pharmaceutical Association.
The section represents over 13,000 students and 74
colleges of pharmacy throughout the United States.
In 1963 Ray Boswell, former UF student, served

Win a Honda
just for being born
v s: '
Jr ihfJJ
1 T^vj, *sfegju|g
J :BB sjT
HH2-.
Your own birth date may have already won you a
Honda in Parker Pen's Birthday Sweepstakes!
For example, if your birth date is December Ist, 1942, your entry is 12*1-42. Just fill in the
coupon belowtake it to your Parker Dealer for his signature-and then send it to us. And you
might as well know this: you winners have your choice of n A p 1/ £ O
Hondas ... the powerful C-110, or the deluxe CA-102. || f\IVIV EIV
Congratulations! Maker of the world's most wanted pens
- I 1
New Compact Jottor. First girl-size ball pen made fK ft.ri.-r d- rwi.r
for girl-size hands. Uses the big 80,000-word Jotter Take this coupon to your Porker Pen Dealer
refill. $1.98. or get a coupon from him
'! 8m j
- I
Address
T-Ball Jotter. The world's first ball pen with stain- i i
less steel-writes a clean, clear line up to 80,000 J cty sut J
words. $1.98. I Set your Parker Dealer right away for complete Sweepstake* |
I rules. No purchase required. Contest voided in Wisconsin, l
Parker 45 Convertible. The pen that fills two ways- } * *r*y, *d wherever else prohibited by lew. Contest
with handy reserve ink cartridges, or from an ink i ,o *** **? * l * s, m _
bottle. Standard model-$5.00. j ££ 7 to fvUt Sw,,p t,k "' * 0 801 *" Ch,c f# '"
, } Birth Date
if I [mmtnl oat vim
O ** <£ T " *** cwruT, mmsvuu, wiscoesia. e.s.a. | "' Dealer Signature

as president. In 1964 Richard Clayton, 5Ph, held
the vice-presidency.
Clayton was also president of the Southeastern
Regional Group which is the largest of eight regions
represented by the national association. The asso association
ciation association has chapters in every school of pharmacy
in the United States.
Green was the voting delegate and is currently
president of the local chapter.

Monday, April 12, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

campus news briefs

LOST AND FOUND
Lost and Found items will
be auctioned tomorrow from
1:30-4 p.m. at the booth in
the Hub. Articles include um umbrellas,
brellas, umbrellas, slide rules, clothing
and textbooks.
SPRO
New officers of SPRO,
Student Public Relations Or Organization,
ganization, Organization, are: Park Tram Trammell,
mell, Trammell, president; John
Chancellor, vice president;
Tom Green, treasurer; Frank
Marconi, secretary; Joel
Senger, historian; Committee
chairmen will be appointed
during the first meeting of
the summer trimester.
ORGANIZATIONS
Applications for regular
meeting room space in the
Florida Union may be picked
up at the Union Information
Desk. Please make requests
for both summer and fall
trimesters and turn them in
to the desk before the
( trimester break.
L OAN INTER VIE WS
National Defense Loan In Interviews
terviews Interviews continue in Room
124, Tigert Hall: today T,U,V,
tomorrow W, X, Y, Z.
FACULTY CLUB
The UF Faculty Club will
hold its annual meeting and
election of officers 4 p.m.
| tomorrow in the Faculty Club.

Manufacturers Representative
SPECIAL
SALE
LAST 6 DAYS!
Formerly Roundtree Ltd.
1227 W. University Avenue
ALL SHIRTS 4 for $lO
ALL SPORT COATS $ll.BB
ALL SWEATERS 1/2 off
*
NYLON PARKAS 1/2 off
WALK SHORT SPECIAL
DRASTIC REDUCTIONS
$59.50 SUITS for $39.88

CIRCLE K
Circle K will hold a supper supperswim
swim supperswim party at the home of their
sponsor, Professor Jones.
Members will meet at Bryan
Lounge, Florida Union, tonight
at 6:15 p.m.
EASTER EGGS I
Entries will be taken today
through noon for the j
Easter Egg Decorating;
Contest sponsored by the j
Poultry Science Union. Eggs :
must, be boiled and will be ;
judged on beauty, originality, :
and spirit of the Easter
season.
DELTA SIGMA PI
Delta Sigma Pi business
honorary announces new off officers:
icers: officers: Ernie White, president;
Stephen Corrls, senior vice
president; Reed Parrish, vice
president; Frank DeVarona,
treasurer; Mike Hardin, sec secretary;
retary; secretary; Michael Cottenier,
chancellor; David Browder,
publicity and historian.
RHO PI PHI
Rho Pi Phi pharmaceutical
fraternity announces new of officers:
ficers: officers: Dan Duze, Chancellor,
Ken Norfleet, vice chancellor,
A1 Kloman, scribe; Benny
Saouud, Guardian of
Exchequer; C. L. Townsend,
historian, and Dennis Haskell,
fiery dragon. New initiates
are Benny Saouud, Dipak Shah,
Dennis Haskell, A1 Kloman,
and Vince Trunzo.

Page 3



The Florida Alligator/ Monday, April 12, 1965

Page 4

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Serve*! By United Press International
ERNIE LITZ STEVE VAUGHN JOE CASTELLO
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor Executive Editor
LOU FERRIS ANDY MOOR
Editorial Page Editor Sports Editor
i/j£wf>otNr
Think of us
The administration announced about a month
ago that graduation had been changed from
Sunday, April 25, to Monday, April 26. Many
students objected to the change because the
weekday graduation would make it difficult
for many parents to attend.
After scheduling commencement exercises
for Sunday, the administration, obviously with without
out without asking the students, took it upon themselves
to change the date.
COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES are heldfor
the benefit of the students, not for the benefit
of the administration. Whether or not the
administration realized that by making the
change many students would be inconvenienced,
is actually immaterial. The fact is that they
did not in any way consult the students involved
before making the change.
The Alligator conducted an impromptu
survey of seniors who are scheduled to graduate
at the end of this trimester. They are the
ones directly affected by the switch in dates
made by the administration.
Admittedly the survey is not complete in
the number of people interviewed, or statis statisically
ically statisically correct in tne methods used to conduct
the survey. The results show that quite a few
students are greatly inconvenienced by the
late switch in tne scheduled date of graduation.
Os the seniors interviewed, roughly 50%
indicated that their parents planned to
come to Gainesville tor commencement, but
now, because of the weekday graduation, their
parents might not be able to come. Twenty Twentyfive
five Twentyfive per cent of those interviewed said that
their parents definitely could not come to
Gainesville for the weekday graduation because
of conflicts with work, etc. A few of the seniors
indicated that they themselves would not be
able to attend their own graduations because
of the weekday date.
The excuse given for the last-minute switch
was that in order to have a Baccalaureate
service, which must be held on Sunday, the
graduation was moved to 'Monday. Over 75%
of the seniors interviewed stated that they
had no plans to attend the Sunday Baccalaureate
service; most of them had no interest.
We ask that before the administration make
any more such changes which will so obviously
affect so many students, they should consult
the students in question first, or have a better
reason than scheduling a Baccalaureate service
for that day which the great majority of the
students dont even have the interest to attend
anyway.
A little consideration would be appreciated.
i
EDITORIAL STAFF: Mark Freeman and Sian Kulp icartoonists),
Sharon Kelley (Student Government Beat Chief). Lee Alexander,
Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles, Dan Taylor, Jay Foley, Sam
Ullman and Jane Young (Tigert Beat Chief), Woody Leonard,
Nancy Van Zile, and Linda Cody, Bob Wilcox, Drex Dobson
REPORTERS: Carl Brown, Bob Wilcox, Dee Wright. Steve
Kanar, Judy Knight, Ann Carter, Thelma Mossman, Fran Snider,
Cynthia Tunstall, Karen Vitunac, Ami Saperstein, Bill Lockhart,
Drex Dobson, Eunice Tali, Kay Huffmaster, Jeffrey Denkewalter,
G. S. Corseri and Ken Simon.
... : ... ;
Hm Florid* Alligator rs*rv. tb. light to rtgtoato tha typographical too* of all advertisements and
to revise or ten away copy which It eoasMere objectionable.
MO POSITION E GUARANTEED, though (feaired poeittoe will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment tor any advertisement involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or erroneous insertion anises notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) oae day after advertisement wears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement
to ne several times. Notices tor correction mast be glveo before east insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR to tbs official student newspaper of the University of Florida aed to
i published live times weekly except doing May, June and July whan it to ptfcUshed semi-weekly. Only
represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator to entered as second class
matter el toe United States Poet Office at Gainesville.

"AND NOW, ON TH IS GRADUATION DAY,

EDITOR:
Upon reading Robert McDaniel's
criticism of SGER, it was
immediately made obvious to me
the prejudice Involved.
He started by asking questions,
questions without thought. If he
sought answers, his argument
might have been valid. He
condemned people because of the
way they look, which I dare say,
are probably quite different from
his "respectable attire.
Long hair, a beard, or over overlooked
looked overlooked clothes is not a valid reason
for condemning lack of res responsibility
ponsibility responsibility or "respectability.
These are relative things. What is
important is that a person thinks
and feels, and many people do not,

EDITOR;
Joe Castello knows better. In
his "petitionanny" editorial Cas Castello
tello Castello regrets that "such a
significant cause as student rights
and freedom of expression has
fallen into the hands of irrespon irresponsible
sible irresponsible leadership. The issues are
real, the facts significant, and the
methods asinine.'* That's an
arresting 'phrase, "student
rights." Tell me, Joe, when did
you first hear it talked about on
campus? Who raised those "real
issues?" When did you become
acquainted with all those "signi "significant
ficant "significant facts?"
You credit Freedom Forum with
having raised a raft of "crucially
important" questions concerning
the regularity, public character,
and honesty of personnel proce procedures
dures procedures at the University. But you
don't like the methods. Tell me,
Joe, what do you think that
irresponsible leadership was
trying to do with its rallies,
marches, and petitions? To what
end do you suppose it adopted the
methods it did? I'll tell you.
Those methods were designed
to provoke people like yourself
into considering the issues we
raised. And we were successful.
You write editorials. Groups
around campus invite our people to
come and explain themselves. And
everybody talks. The quality of
a method, Joe, is best judged by
its success or failure.
Suppose, Joe, that we'd taken the
route you recommend and slipped a
note under somebody's door in
Tigert? Who would have known

Le T TeR s

will not, or cannot.
Within SGER, there are people
who think, and feel, but more
important, do; and to do something
is far better than to do nothing,
that is unless one favors stagnancy.
It is easy to sit back and con condemn
demn condemn someone for their actions.
McDaniels ignores the fact that
SGER people are doing something,
which is probably more than I
Sbuld say for him.
No gain in culture has ever been
brought about by sitting and talking,
alone, it has been brought about
by people with the courage to do
what they felt must be done, at any
cost. More often than not, these
doers have been a minority, and
have been criticised by a com-

PROF SPEAKS OUT

Let the boat rock

about it? What issues would have
been raised? Somebody held a
debate on the UN a week or so
ago. That's a nice, polite, respon responsible
sible responsible way of raising issues. Eight
people attended and the Alligator
didn't even bother to cover it.
If we took your advice, Joe,
what reason would Tigert have,
the next time it wants to fire
somebody, not to go ahead with
it? If University officials know
in advance that everybody is
going to be polite and official
and responsible and quiet and safe,
why shouldn't they do what is
expedient? How, in fact, could
they justify an act of principle
to their superiors in Tallahassee?
After all, it's not their job to
rock the boat; it's ours, and you
dont rock boats by being a good
little boy.
Let me ask you another question.
Do you suppose that we didnt
Notice
We would ask that those
who write letters to the editor
please limit them to 200 words
at most.
Due to a heavy backlog of
letters to the editor, we will
not have space to run all of
them. We will try to print
those which are most fairly
representative of the group of
similar letters.

Prejudice

placent majority.
People like McDaniels do not
think or do, they allow others to
think and dictate for them, without
question. McDaniels has accepted
the opinion of the administration,
right or wrong, without question.
SGER and people like them can
think, ask why, |nd do. These are
the qualities he CbJJdfemns as being
a mockery of justice; these are
the ideals he condemns as being
of another system so out of place
in our time* Let me ask then,
does he also find individual free*
dom, of thought and action out of
place also?
W. SCHAAF, 2UC

know in advance that the sons and
daughters of the establishment, not
to mention their moms and daddies,
in locus and out of it, would blubber
mindlessly about beards, sandals,
carnivals, and baths? Do you
suppose that we expected the
shaved, the washed, and the saved
to like us for obliging them to
think, for raising issues, for dis disturbing
turbing disturbing the banality of their
petrifying lives?
Joe, 1 hate to tell a young man
like you, and its a tragedy that
you need to be told, but upholding
right isn't going to make you
popular; it isn't going to get you
ahead in the world. If you seriously
want a healthier and freer uni university
versity university or a saner and more
humane America, you may have
to pay a penalty for it; nobodys
going to reward you with
institutional goodies.
You used a lot of strong words,
Joe, words like "idiot,
"childish, and "juvenile.*' But
there are lots of words, including
words for people who wont use
methods that work because they
haven't got the belly for it. Joe,
you can build a fine journalistic
career the way you're going. If
you keep up your liberal tone, you
may even finagle a minor reform
out of the establishment. But if
you're serious about student rights
and all those other fine things you
write about, you're going to have
to get off your dignity.
MARSHALL B. JONES
Assistant Professor
Psychiatry and Psychology



The UF may become the head headquarters
quarters headquarters for the new American
Style* of karate, according to
Choule J.Sonu, assistant professor
of coastal engineering.
Sonu was recently authorized by
the Headquarters of the Japanese
Karate Federation to represent
them in the southeastern UJS. and
along the eastern coast.
Sonu intends to make the campus
of the UF a center for karate
since it is his headquarters.
Sonu, faculty advisor and
instructor to the karate club, said
the new style of karate is based
on sound physics and physical
laws.
People think there is some
kind of magic attached to karate
because it came from the Orient,**
commented Sonu.
Sonu says he is strictly amateur,
although he holds the fifth degree
black belt which classifies him as
a master of karate. Professionals
have commercialized the ancient
art of defense and are giving the
impression that anything can be
broken with a single karate blow.
The commercial teacher teaches
karate as if it were offensive
instead of defensive, says Sonu.
Sonu says that he would like to
keep the lessons free at the Uni University
versity University and have the sport accepted
as part of the physical education
program.
Girls too are acceptable for the
lessons. Sonu said girls actually
make better karate pupils than
boys in some cases. He said girls
are more serious about learning
the art in most cases.
Sonu said he taught several girls
at the University of Tokyo before
coming to the UF and they were
good students. American girls are
bigger than Japanese girls and are
more fit for sports, Sonu explained.
Size is no limiting factor in the
learning of karate. Little muscle

...but not
for girls
Relax men the university has
saved you again.
Recent efforts by the UF Karate
Club to gain official permission to
teach Florida coeds Karate have
been squelched.
Assistant Deap of Physical
Education H. Spurgeon Cherry in informed
formed informed the Club of the adminis administrations
trations administrations deciiion, and he added
that he could not personally
endorse the proposed training.
I personally feel that Karate is
a mans sport/* he said, but I
dont really know too much about
it.
Cherry said the action was
decided on largely as a result of
protest letters from faculty mem members
bers members who read about the proposal
in the Alligator.
I must have gotten 20 letters
and phone calls,** he said.
Egg hunt
Tbe UF Dames have slated their
Annual Easter Egg Hunt for
Saturday, April 17, from 10-12
a.m. at the University Womens
Clubhouse, Newberry Road
RAIN or SHlNE.Refreshments wiU
be served.
All children (2-6 years of age)
of students, faculty and staff of
the UF are invited to attend.
Children wUI be divided into
age groups to hunt eggs. Prizes
wUI be given the child in each
group who finds the most eggs and
to those who find the special
prize** eggs. Each child is asked
to bring his own Easter basket.

'American Style
of karate at UF

is one of the factors that help the
women in learning the art, Sonu
said.
Sonu said anyone willing to spend
about four hours a week practicing
can learn karate.
Executives 50 and 60 years of
age work out with the sport to

mjfoub djff,
.. .You like movies like Fellini's
Art galleries like Guggenheim's
And sculpture by Rodin.
the thinken
the hand op QoO
the Standing kiss sjk
All beautifully executed hand-finished museum
reproductions. Here are the Rodins he was of often
ten often accused of casting from life. They are that
realistic!
(From the biggest little gift shop in townJ

ilvet
1129 W. University Avenue v

s. ;
You savor the bouquet of Napoleon Brandy;
You appreciate an Aston Martin;
You meditate with an Andrew Wyeth print;
But when you lost your heart to Joy...
You gave away the silk tie stamped
New Delhi .007.
So you
propose / put
prism in
her eye and
gold on her
fi ng e r with WKtm'aKKm fSPBB
an Artcarved Wmm
RUTHERFORDS
k WITH LOVE.
lIFOR YOUNG MODERNS...
lITTIL I J 6%, PHONE 376-2655
llULlyEJtkiflU* 103 w UN,V AVE

keep physically fit. Karate will
trim down overweight and build
up the smaller person. It makes
a relatively plain looking man out
of most people,* Sonu said.
A member ofSonus University
of Tokyo team had only one arm
but won a black belt.

Monday, April 12, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

I
gu/M
B : iMuir'
B lm\l
\ > iH\
ft n V^ft
*ft* \\
ftb? r uu
Est
1965
SEMINOLE
Ist Shipment Arrives Today
DISTRIBUTION OF FIRST 1,000 COPIES BEGINS
AT 10 A.M. TODAY IN THE INFORMATION
BOOTH ACROSS FROM THE HUB AND CON CONTINUES
TINUES CONTINUES UNTIL SUPPLY EXHAUSTED.
DISTRIBUTION OF SECOND SHIPMENT WILL
BEGIN AT 10 A.M. WEDNESDAY.
PLEASE BRING RECEIPT AND STUDENT I.D. CARD
NOTICE TO GREEKS
WHO PURCHASED SEMINOLES THROUGH THE
HOUSE BLOC PLAN: YOUR BOOKS WILL BE
DELIVERED BETWEEN 1 AND 5 P.M. WEDNES WEDNESDAY.
DAY. WEDNESDAY. A CHAPTER OFFICER (PRESIDENT, VICE
PRESIDENT, SECRETARY OR TREASURER) OR A
HOUSEMOTHER MUST SIGN THE DELIVERY
RECEIPT AND BE RESPONSIBLE FOR DISTRIBU DISTRIBUTION
TION DISTRIBUTION TO THOSE WHO PURCHASED BOOKS, A
LIST OF WHICH WILL ALSO BE DELIVERED.
THE SEMINOLE CANNOT BE RESPONSIBLE IF
AN INDIVIDUAL IN A HOUSE RECEIVES A
BOOK WHICH HE DID NOT PURCHASE AND TO
WHICH HE IS NOT ENTITLED.
SEMINOLE
. -v
-

Page 5



, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 12, 1965

Page 6

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS I

For Rent |
MALE STUDENTS TO SHARE 6
room, furnished apartment, each
with separate, full, unit, kitchen,
telephone, study room, linens, sep separate
arate separate entrance. Maid service. 231
SE 2nd St. (B-133-4t-c).
LARGE ONE BEDROOM Apart Apartment
ment Apartment for 2 or 3. Close to Campus.
915 SW 6th Ave. S9O per month.
Call 2-7683, after 1 p.m. (B (B---133-4t-c).
--133-4t-c). (B---133-4t-c).
2 BEDROOM FURNISHED
STUDENT, Apartments for rent.
Very close to campus. $75 per
month. Call Mrs. Jones, FR 6-
5636. (B-132-st-c).
AIR-CONDITIONED, FURNISHED
MODERN efficiency for 1 or 2,
to sublet May August. $75/mo.
Near campus. Inquire 4-6 p.m.
Apt. 21, 303 NW 17th Street. (B (B---132-st-p).
--132-st-p). (B---132-st-p).
1 ROOM WITH PRIVATE bath
and private entrance. 2 Rooms
which share a bath. 8-1078. (B (B---132-St-c).
--132-St-c). (B---132-St-c).
ROOM in air-conditioned home for
woman graduate student or under undergraduate
graduate undergraduate over 25. Call 2-9725 at
lunch hour or in evening. (B-l 31-
ts-c).
PRICES REDUCED THIS SUMMER
AT KIRKLAND APARTMENTS,
1602 NW Ist Ave. directly behind
the Florida Book Store and only 1
block from campus, the rates for
the coming terms are: Summer
trimester, single SBS, double $75.
Term A or B, single S6O, double
SSO. Phone Jim Hodge FR 6-9345
or see Tues. and Thurs. after afternoons
noons afternoons or MWF after 6 p.m. and
on weekends. Male Students only
please. (B-131-6t-p).
ONE SHARP NEW FURNISHED
2 bedroom apartment. Air-condi Air-conditioned,
tioned, Air-conditioned, each room. $125 per month.
Apt. #2, 39th Avenue & 6th Street,
N. W. (B-130-st-c).
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT, 3
blocks from campus. Air-con Air-conditioned.
ditioned. Air-conditioned. Sub-lease May till Sept.
Married only. Furnished. S9O/mo.
1716 NW 3rd Ave. Apt. 10. Call
372-7032 evenings. (B-132-3t-c).
COOL, CONVENIENT AND
COMFORTABLE, 10x55 Mobile
Home for rent in Hickory Hill
Park. Close to campus and store.
S7B per month. Available April 26.
6-6696. (B-132-st-c).
COED ROOM & BATH in private
home with mother and 2 children.
Full kitchen privileges. Auto Automobile
mobile Automobile needed. Call FR 2-2726.
(B-133-4t-c).
FURNISHED HOUSE 2-bedroom,
freshly redecorated. Convenient
walking distance from Univ. and
town. Ideally located. $l2O/month.
Call Layton 8-2671. (B-127-ts-c).
UNFURNISHED Apartment, 3 large
rooms. Kitchen furnished, tile bath
and 1/2. Large porch and yard.
Enjoy cool shady summer living.
SBS per month. 923 NW 3rd Ave.
376-9992. (B-123-ts-c).
WILL SUB-LET My spacious
apartment for the complete sum summer.
mer. summer. $65 per month. Water in included.
cluded. included. Occupancy 2 or 3. Call
372-7428. (B-132-st-c).
SUNNYSIDE APARTMENTS APARTMENTSavaiIabIe
avaiIabIe APARTMENTSavaiIabIe for May and Sept.rentaL
Two bedroom, furnished kitchen
equipped. Half block east of Law
School. PR 6-0865. (B-132-3t-c).

Por Rent
1 i
HOUSE AVAILABLE TO SUBLET
for summer. May keep after sum summer
mer summer if desired. 5 room air-con air-conditioned.
ditioned. air-conditioned. Suitable for 4 people,
can be seen by appointment. 4401
SW 13th Street. 378-1252. (B-127-
ts-c).
3A & B 3-bedroom, 2-bath,
furnished new house. 5 min from
campus. $l2O per mo. Ideal for
family or group of students. Call
FR 2-8668 after 6. (B-125-ts-c).
FURNISHED APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE April 1 and May 1.
One bedroom modern, air-cond.
apts. near Univ. & Med. Center.
Adults only, no pets. Lease re required.
quired. required. S9O/mo. 372-3488 or 376-
4360. (B-125-ts-c).
AIR-CONDITIONED APART APARTMENTS
MENTS APARTMENTS for 3A and/or 3B.Suitable
for 2 or 3 people S7O per mo.
plus electric. 1829 NW 2nd Ave.
Suitable for 2 or 3 people at 1530
NW 4th Ave. $75-SBO plus electric.
Suitable for 3 or 4 people at 1518
NW 4th Ave. S9O-SIOO with air airconditioning
conditioning airconditioning included. Also
renting for fall at slightly higher
rates. Call 376-4353 evenings.
(B-132-st-c).
2 BEDROOM FURNISHED
MODERN efficiency for 1 or 2
to sublet May-August. $75/mo.
Near campus. Inquire 4-6 p.m.
Apt. 21, 303 NW 17th Street. (B (B---132-st-p).
--132-st-p). (B---132-st-p).
SUMMER SUB-LET or longer
1 bedroom; large living livingstudy
study livingstudy room. One block from
campus. Cool. SBS for 2. Call
8-2113, 117 SW 12th St., Apt. 2.
(B-131-st-c),
MODERN NEWLY BUILT, ONE
Bedroom apt. completely furn furnished
ished furnished large clo&ets and storage
space AIR-CONDITIONED
washing facilities Call 372-
3156. Married couples or one
person only. (B-134-2t-p).
CLOSE TO CAMPUS Spacious,
furnished apt. For 2 or 3 S9O.
911 SW 6th Ave. 376-8280. (B (B---134-3t-p).
--134-3t-p). (B---134-3t-p).
LARGE ROOMS with a fully
equipped upstairs KITCHEN,
available to male students. Occupy
immediately. 104 SW Bth St. or
372-0243. (B-127-tf-nc).
SUB-LET for spring trimester,
air-conditioned apt. in Colonial
Manor. Suitable for 2 people. 1/2
block from campus. Call 6-7015.
(B-134-3t-c).
2-BEDROOM FURNISHED apart apartment.
ment. apartment. Hot and cold water furnished.
Newly repainted. Available April
22. 513 NW Bth Ave. (B-134-3t-c).
FURNISHED APARTMENT for 2.
Swimming pool, air-conditioned,
patio. S9O. Summer only. 503 NW
21st Lane. Apt. 4. 372-8647. (B (B---134-3t-c).
--134-3t-c). (B---134-3t-c).
LARGE 2-BEDROOM furnished
apartment close to campus. Avail Available
able Available for summer trimester. Air Airconditioned,
conditioned, Airconditioned, wood paneled, Water,
sewage free. 921 SW 6th Ave. 376-
8032. (B-134-3t-c).

Four
W jfl £NDS TUESDAY
November iJHB* *^* s *^7
amwftwuwTtDMiiSTS Ou*

Por Rent
ALL UNITS GROUND FLOOR, 2
rooms furnished, refrigerator.
Few air-conditioners. No kitchens.
2 blocks from main air-conditioned
Library, classes, food centers,
Post Office, Laundry, etc. Rates
S9O sls entire semester. 6-
6494. (B-131-st-c).
2 BLOCKS OFF-CAMPUS
Furnished rooms for male students
only. $32 per month, lights and
water furnished. Also community
kitchen. Maid service. See at 304
NW 15th St. or call FR 2-2726.
(B-133-4t-c).
AIR-CONDITIONED HOUSES FOR
RENT. 3 or 4 males or females.
Summer and/or fall. Call Charlie
Mayo, owner, FR 6-4471 or 6-
8366. (B-133-4t-c).
2-BEDROOM APARTMENT, 2
blocks East of Norm an Hall. Furn Furnished
ished Furnished down to pot holders. Ample
for 4. Sub-let summer trimester.
378-2175 between 5:30 & 7:30 p.m.
376-9171 after 7:30. (B-l?3-4t-c).,
.... Ill. I.
Autos
1960 FORD GALAXY, power
steering, cruise-o-matlc, tinted
glass all around. Self adjusting
electric clock, electric windshield
wipers, padded dash, seat belts.
352 cubic inch T-Bird engine, WSW
tires, good rubber, looks sharp
runs good. $975. Call FR 2-0294.
(G-132-st-c).
AM DESPERATE MUST SELL
RELIABLE 1960 Simca. 2 new
WW tires. Best offer takes it.
372-6148. (G-133-4t-c).
1956 MERCEDES BENZ 220
sedan. Radio and heater, runs well.
Must seU, Call Mickey 378-1667.
(G-133-3t-c).
1962 VOLKSWAGEN, air-con air-conditioned.
ditioned. air-conditioned. $1075. Call FR 2-0611
or FR 6-8253. (G-133-4t-c).'
1960 FORD Zephyr (similar to a
Falcon). Very good condition.
New white wall tires, radio. $425.
CaU 376-8863 evenings. (G-134-
3t-c).
52 MG TD. New paint and top,
radio. Very clean. Must sell. Call
Dick Sowrey, 372-9370, 185
Fletcher M. (G-130-ts-c).
MG-TD, *53, new paint, upholstery,
tires, etc. excellent. 376-1736,
1216 SW 2nd Ave. Apt. 105. (G (G---132-3t-c).
--132-3t-c). (G---132-3t-c).
WILL WHOLESALE 631/2Galaxie
500 Fast Back Ford, two tone
white and turq. Fact.-Air, PS,
RAH, V-8, Extra clean. CaU FR6-
0039. (G-133-4t-p).
Lost & Pound
1
LOST: ONE LIGHT BLUE ANGEL
Flight Hat. No rank insignia. The
name Pat Stephenson written on
Inside. Leave at ADPi House or
call FR 2-9295 and ask for Connie.
(L-134-lt-p).
LOST: BROWN WALLET: con containing
taining containing Important identification.
Please contact Jim MandeU (2-
3294) or (6-4838), (L-134-lt-p).

Por Sale
AIR CONDITIONER, Admiral.
Graduating and no longer need it.
Call Dick Katz, 2-9353. (A-134-
3t-c).
FOR SALE 80cc SUZUKI like new.
1964. Inquire Frame D, Room 6.
(A-134-2t-c).
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER.
Six 500 sheet boxes of Buff. Retail
for S2O per box. WiU sacrifice
for $lO per box. CaU Ext. 2832
between 8 a.m. A 5 p.m. (A-130-
ts-s).
1965 YAMAHA 125 cc. Enek of
term sacrifice. $395. Only 1600
miles, free crash helmet and
saddle bags. Can be financed. 372-
6178 before 8 a.m. (A-134-3t-c).
20 FOOT ALUMINUM TRAILER.
Am joining the Army and wiU
sacrifice for S3OO cash. Equipped
for living and ready to move in.
Glenn Wood Park, Archer Road,
Lot 18. Inquire within after 7 p.m.
or caU coUect CY 3-1595, Winter
Haven. (A-134-3t-c).
CRASH HELMET $6.50; Leica 3 c
S4O; Zenith 21TV set $25; Reifler
Drafting Set sl2. CaU 372-6178
before 8 a.m. (A-134-2t-p).
Three-cushion sofa, orange
nylon, exceUent condition. 517 NW
13th Terrace between five and six
p.m. (A-133-2t-p).
SEA RS ALLSTATE COMPACT
Motor Scooter. Good condition.
Must sell before end of trimester.
CaU Van. 372-2535. (A-132-st-c).
TINY TOY POODLES. Excellent
quaUty. Platinum silver. AKC
Registered. Male and Female.
$125 S2OO. CaU 376-0967. (A (A---132-3t-c).
--132-3t-c). (A---132-3t-c).
ANTIQUE ENGLISH TRANTER'S
Patent cal. 45 revolver, $25; 1903
A 3 cal. 30-06 Springfield Rifle,
S2O; 1884 Cal. 45-70 Springfield
carbine, SSO. CaU 376-7187 eve evenings
nings evenings after 7 p.m. (A-132-st-p).
WINCHESTER 94 LEVER-ACTION
30-30, case, cartridges. $65.
Westinghouse washing machine
$45. SUde rule sl2. Call FR 2-
0294. (A-132-st-c).
ODE BANJO Rosewood neck
with hand carved peghead & heel,
ebony finger board with mother motherof-pearl
of-pearl motherof-pearl inlay. S3OO or best offer.
John Pierson 372-8743. (A (A---127-ts-c).
--127-ts-c). (A---127-ts-c).
Services
IN A HURRY? For appUcation
and passport photographs.
Westely-Roosevelt Studios 909 NW
6th St. 372-0300. (M-133-4t-c).
ASK ANYONE ABOUT
JOHN GOLDFARB GOLDFARBTHEN
THEN GOLDFARBTHEN SEE IT I
SHIRLEY MacLAINE
isl; PETER USTINOV
i iMCHARD crenna

| Help Wanted |
WANTED MALE STUDENT FOR
the summer with Senior Life Guard
Certificate and who has a small
amount of capital to invest in'
merchandise in which to operate
a concession stand, located in a
near by resort. For more infor information
mation information caU FR 6-3012. (E-134-
3t-c).
POSITION AVAILABLE WITH A
FUTURE for an ambitious young
man, who is willing to work. If,
youre leaving school, it wiU be
worth your time to investigate.
Robertson Jewelers, GalnesviUe,
Florida. (E-130-st-c).
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS as
National Bank Examiner, U. S.
Treasury Department in Atlanta,
Miami, Tampa, and' Columbia,
S. C. Degree in Economics, Bus Business
iness Business Administration, Accounting
or Finance. Starting salary $6060,
6 months increase to $6450 and
rapid future advancement. Contact
D. B. Smith, 1103 Fulton National
Bank Bldg. Atlanta, or call 404-
526-6625, (E-129-ts-c),
Personal
WANTED RIDE TO N.Y.C. Leave
April 22 after 10 p.m. or early
AprU 23. Male, can drive, etc.
CaU Bud 2-5142. (J-133-2t-c).
I CAN BRING YOU FROM
GERMANY a new 1965,1500 model
VW CAR (not the Beetle) fully
equipped for SIB2O. For further
information caU Michael Tuskos.
2-6471 or leave message. (J-133-
4t-c).
PRECIOUS WHITE KITTEN needs
home. SheU love you and shes
free. Please caU 8-2168. (J-134-
3t-c).
LOCKED, BONDED STORAGE
AREA. $2.00 a month bicycles.
$3.00 a month motorcycles. 75$
a day auto storage. CaU 2-0455.
Neighborhood Service Center, 637
NW 13th Street. (J-129-ts-c).
1
WMMBIf
I nrTijlLiir - t *"**"
TOIWTEf 3S*
H*5T AREA SHOWING
jrTroy Donahue "I
Joey 11691001*1018
"My Blood
Runs Cold"
pamavwom* JEANETTE NOLAN
! iu ~ 1
-2nd Color Hit at Dusk Duskm
m Duskm m vm
SHMinr.
I WTHOftS I
Rrh Adult srxzter Yen JUki FocS
1* "THi CADDY I
111 1



Wanted
1 male roommate to share
Trailer for summer. About S4O
per month including utilities. Call
8-2421. (C-134-3t-c).
A FEW HUNDRED more students
to enjoy SPUDNUTS DONUTSHOP,
1017 W. University. Open to
midnight every night. (C (C---134-3t-c).
--134-3t-c). (C---134-3t-c).
2 UPPER DIVISION Male students
to share brand new 2-bedroom air airconditioned
conditioned airconditioned apartment with 2
others B term. Swimming pool.
8-2024. (C-134-3t-p).
MALE ROOMMATE for summer
in air-conditioned, furnished, 1-
bedroom apartment near campus
(includes living room rock garden,
washing machine, and other spe specials.)
cials.) specials.) Originally SSB per person
a month, for summer only $41.25.
Call 8-2193 or Ext. 2832 in
evenings. John Birchers need not
apply! (C-134-3t-s).
FOR SEPT. MALE student to share
air-conditioned apartment close
to campus. $75/month. 8-1424 call
again if no answer. (C-134-lt-c).
MALE ROOMMATE for A and B
terms. $26 per month plus utilities.
Must have own transportation. Call
8-2208. (C-134-lt-p).
RIDERS WANTED, ROUND TRIP
to New York by private plane
during trimester break. Leaving
April 26th or 27th returning May
3-5. Cost SSO. Call Walt 2-1624.
(C-133-3t-c).
FEMALE GRADUATE Student to
share 2 bedroom apartment with
working student and baby. 1240
SW 14th St. $32.50 per month plus
1/2 utilities. Call 378-1792 be between
tween between 10 and 12 a.m. (C-131-
st-c).
ONE COED WANTED to share
house in NE. S4O per month,
utilities included. Move in May
Ist. Call Irene 6-1360. (C-129-
ts-c).
Real Estate
EXCELLENT BUY: Convenient to
University. Custom built home,
3-bedroom, 2 bath, large living
area. Landscaped yard with
privacy. $2600 FHA evaluation. FR
6-4097. (I-133-4t-c).

Coffee House Performers Wanted
Singles-Groups-Comedians
to supplement a professional bill.
Full week or week-end possibilities.
The Jongleur
Send tapes or resumes, or apply P. O. Box 5705
for auditions to: Jacksonville, Florida
* Salaries vary with ability and experience.
CITY AUTOMATIC |
TRANSMISSION, INC. I
1409 S. Main St. Ph. 372-5196 I
Specializing in Transmissions Only
All Work Guaranteed I
Free Pickup & Delivery I
Free Estimates ulll
10 Per Cent Discount I
To All Florida Students I

I
t
\ 4 eW \

Sebring: danger, discourtesy, disorder j

m
(Alligator Sports Writer Steve Kanar covered the Race at Sebring this
year. In this editorial he tells of the treatment he and other newsmen
and racing fans in general got at the big race.)

Since 1959 I have attended the
Sebring 12-hour Endurance Race.
Each year things have been highly
unorganized, I have always won wondered
dered wondered just how the race is ever
completed without more people
being killed than actually are. I
have seen two people killed right
in front of my eyes the reason:
safety rules were either not made
or were not enforced. There is no
place in racing for this kind of
negligence.
Racing is and always will be
dangerous, but any steps that are
taken to make it safer are always
in order. Why are photographers
allowed to stand on roads that
are for the race cars to use when
they overshoot a corner? Why
are the pits, just a little more
than twice as wide as two cars,
always filled with unauthorized
people? Why are spectators al allowed
lowed allowed to stand so near dangerous
corners? In any race there is no
excuse for such things. In a race
of Sebrings caliber things such as
this are a disgrace. So, when
I went to cover the races this
year, I hoped to find an exception
to the past rule. I didnt.
I always wonder just how many
of the fans come to Sebring to
I YAMAHA BMW 1
Motorcycles |
For The Discriminating §
CYCLE RAMA I
378-2811 21 SE 2nd Place I

"COCA-COLA" ANO "COKE" ARE REGISTERED TRAOE-NA*S
WHICH tOENTtRY ONLV THf PRODUCT OP THE COCA-COLA COMRANV.
Jp(PH|
iMpT
P fIHP% :iiwW -\V\

Game goes better refreshed.
And Coca-Cola gives you that big, bold taste.
Always just right,
never too sweet... refreshes best.
things gQ
better,!
witn
Coke W
Bottled under the authority of The Coca-Cole Company by: BOTTLERS NAME HERE.
GAINESVILLE Coca-Cola Bottling Company

Monday, April 12, 1965 / The Florida Alligator/

A SPORTS EDITORIAL

'. s . '''/ 4 - ">>**^VV-V"y' >-
OF THE
RACE FROM THIS VANTAGE POINT (NOTE
TRACK IN FAR BACKGROUND).

watch the race. Not many I think.
There is probably more beer
consumed in the three square miles
of the Sebring race course than in
any other place in Florida during
a twenty-four hour period.
The thing that IS important is
Sebring*s disorganization in every
espect. First, they were
undecided as to the rules on what
classification of cars would be
allowed to race. This resulted in
the withdrawal of the ferrari
Racing team and a much duller
race. The organizers may well
have favored the American cars

and wanted one to win.
Next, after weekly cor correspondence
respondence correspondence with the officials for
over two months which had ended
with confirmation of my press
credentials, it took two hours and
a long distance call for me to get
them after I got there. The official
then told me that the race would
start in two hours but that they
had provided a special road for
the press on which I could get to
the track very quickly. Ah, I said
to myself, organized at last! Such
was not the case as someone
besides the press was allowed to
use this special road. It took me
two and a half hours to travel
the three miles to the track. The
start of the race as I and several
hundred other mad reporters saw
It Is depicted in an accompanying
picture.
Some other things I noticed:
a car spun out in a place where
there should have been room for
it to do so safely but there wasn't
and it went Into the crowd, Injuring
many people. I saw people dodging
cars in the pits as they blazed
by at about 100 m.pji.; a car hit
one of the bridges that they charge
SB.OO to cross. (This Is where
all the 4 unauthorized* people get
Into the pits. Anyone who can
afford it can have the pleasure of
dodging a Ferrari.) Alas, drivers
put their life on the line but fans
should not have to.
Compared to the Daytona
Continental, Sebring is ridi ridiculous
culous ridiculous and dangerous. Perhaps
next year
\ r'
LIFE INSURANCE
The national leader in
serving the needs of
college men.
See us before you
graduate.
Campus representatives:
Bob Sifrifr
Mel Ward
George Corl
376-1208

Page 7



Page 8

The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 12, 1965

ADRIAN ZABALA SHOWS HIS FORM
. . righthander has perfect ERA
Wire story on FSU meet
highly erroneous' Carnes

By ANDY MOOR
Sports Editor
"Im disgusted with the
inaccuracy of the story released
by one of the wire services on
our track meet with FSU,* said
Gator track coach Jimmy Carnes
yesterday.
The story stated FSU had
drubbed** UF by an 861/2-581/2
score in Saturdays contest be between
tween between the schools and that
Seminole Jerry McDaniel had
taken the baton for the last leg
of the mile relay 15 yards behind'
the Gators* Jim Brown and had
caught him to win,
When McDaniel and Brown took
the batons for the final lap, they
were virtually even. Brown pulled
ahead of McDaniel at the start but
McDaniel came on to pass Jim
later. Also, the meet was no run runaway.
away. runaway. We lost in a near dead heat
in the 440-yard relay and two of
our boys were beaten by a mere
13 inches in the shot put. If these
results had been reversed, we
could have won the meet,** ob observed
served observed Carnes.
McDaniels time for his leg in
the mile relay was 46.5 as com compared
pared compared to Brown 47.3.
If the wire service story were
true, McDaniel would have had to
run more than 15 yards in .8
seconds. Not even Bob Hayes
(the worlds fastest human) or
Henry Carr (world record holder
in the 440) could attempt to
approach this feat,** commented
Carnes.
i
Outstanding performances for
the Gators included Jim Browns
school and meet record of 1:51.2
in the 880-yard run and Harry
Winklers first place finishes in
the javelin and discus events. John
Anderson equalled his best time
in the 100 (9.6) in a losing cause.
The story failed to even
mention the fact that Brown had
set this record nor did it mention
that he had cut 1.5 seconds off
his previous low. To my knowledge,
it may have been the fastest half
mile ever run in the state,** men mentioned
tioned mentioned Carnes.
The teams record now stands
at 5-1. Next meet on the docket is
against Auburn at home on the 24th.
I CYCLE CENTER I
I 617 N. Main St. I

| W jj A MESSAGE TO ROTC COLLEGE MEN
k 4l
3K J IF YOUVE GOT
WHAT IT TAKES
ARMY OFFICER,
IBM THE ROTC
Being an Army officer is a challenge. Officers must be qualities that add a vital plus to your academic
leaders ... able to take responsibility ... get impor- training ... qualities that will pay off for the rest of
tant jobs done. your life in whatever career you choose to follow.
It isnt easy to win a commission as an Army There are other advantages too. Pay, at the rate
officer. But if you are taking the Basic Course in of S4O per month during the Advanced Course plus
ROTC youre well on your wayprovided you can allowances for summer training and travel. Fellow Fellowmeasure
measure Fellowmeasure up to the high standards required for admis- ship and social activity. The chance to work with
sion to the Advanced Course. modern Army equipment, and perhaps to qualify for
As a student in one of the 247 colleges and univer- Army flight training if it is offered at your school. And
sities offering senior ROTC training, you are in a then gold bars and a commission as an Army officer,
privileged group. Theres no better way for any Why not talk to your Professor of Military Science
college man to get the training and skills needed to now. Let him know you're interested in signing up
be an Army officer than through the on-campus pro- for the Advanced Course. Then if you are offered an
gram created specifically for that purpose ROTC. opportunity to join, dont pass it up. Its the program
Here you learn to be a leader ... to develop the thats best for you ... arid best for your country.
If youre good enough to be an Army officer, dont settle for less.
ARMY ROTC
C-465

Nine splits weekend set;
Pendley, Zabala shine

UFs baseball bats opened up a
15 hit barrage against Georgia
Saturday enabling the Gators to
get by the Bulldogs by a 9-5 count.
Georgia had ruined UFs perfect
SEC record the day earlier behind
the two hit pitching of sophomore
Woody Chastain, 2-1.
Don Pendley led the Gator attack
in the latter game with a single,
triple and inside-the-park home
run in five times at bat. Pendley
drove in five runs with his hits.
Charley Casey had three hits and
three RBls in the contest while
AUen Trammell, Bill Blomgren,
Randy Morcroft and Ron Creese
each had a pair of bingles.
Danny Eggart started for the
Gators in Saturdays clash but
lasted only three and one third
innings as he was bombed for five
runs on ten hits. Adrian Zabala,
who had hurled two scoreless in innings
nings innings in Fridays action, came on
to blank the Bulldogs on three hits
for the remainder of the game.
Zabala got the win upping his
season record to 3-0. He has

allowed nary a rim in 19 innings
of mound work thus far.
The loss in Fridays game put
the pressure back on the Gators
in the SEC Eastern Division race
as it left them but one game ahead
of Auburn in the loss column with

EARN BETTER GRADES
V
The Next Trimester
With WOLLENSAK or
REVERE TAK RECORDER
_ as l w as w*
I COUCHS
608 N. MAIN ST.
I TAPE RECORDER
HEADQUARTERS

two games remaining with the
men of the War Eagle in the
loveliest village.
Ray Rollyson began the first
game and pitched well, allowing
only two runs and four hits in
six innings.