Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
|B| THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Vol. 57, No. 132

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SOTMY DAK /AT GATORLAND
. .Mrs. Helen Porter of Flavet 111 relaxes at Camp Wauburg Tfte
warmer days are producing a large number of people seeking more
leisure.

Scholarships offered AFROTC
Cadets participating in the UFs lization Act of 1964.
four-year Air Force Reserve Offi- The first 1,000 scholarships will
cer Training Corps program are-be awarded by review boards meet meeteligible
eligible meeteligible to apply for scholarship ing during the next four months
assistance starting next September and will be announced in August,
under provisions of the ROTC Vita- Tuition, books, fees, supplies and

I worked wifhheadhunters-says Corpsman

By FRAN SNIDER
Staff Writer
The people I worked with were former headhunters.*'
Edwin Price, 3AG, worked with these people during his two years
in the Peace Corp 6. He said he was glad he went to Sarawak, Malaysia.
Price said that the people in Malaysia had a lot of respect for the
Peace Corps. j
"They knew we'd come to help them," he said.
The Peace Corps has set up a booth on the UF campus and the
response has been pretty good so far according to Robert Haupt, another
former Peace Corps member, who is talking to UF students this week.
Haupt said that UF students who come to talk to him in the information
booth are usually interested in how they can tie the Peace Corps in
with their major in college.
He explained that the Peace Corps tries to give people joes in ac accordance
cordance accordance with their capabilities. He is giving interested students an
aptitude test to help in considering their capabilities.
UF students are also interested in what it's like to give up two years
of their lives.
It's the most enriching experience that an individual can undergo,"
Haupt said. "You tend to change. A brighter light is spread on certain

University of Florida, Gainesville

equipment, and a monthly retainer
pay of SSO are benefits Included
in the ROTC scholarship plan.
Interested applicants who have
not taken the Air Force Officer
Qualifying Test must report to
Room 208 of the Military Building
by noon tomorrow. Those who have
taken the examination and have not
completed other advance course
requirements should report to
Room 208 immediately after the
graduation parade Saturday.
Selection procedures lor the first
1,000 of an eventual 5,500 annual
scholarships include three main
factors: score on the AFOQT, aca academic
demic academic grade average for all col college
lege college work and the assessment of
the review board.
UF students must have an honor
point average of 2.5 or better to
be considered.

facets of your own goals.
"It's participating in a dynamic idea," he said.
Haupt taught English in the University of Cartagena in Columbia
He majored in English in college.
Haupt said that the Peace Corps is primarily interested in people
who are adaptive and can learn new things. College students should
finish school before Joining the Peace Corps, Haupt said.
We don't encourage college dropouts," he said.
Hie language barrier is often a problem to people considering joining
the Peace Corps. Haupt said that the Peace Corps will teach a basic
foundation and then Peace Corps members pick up the rest in their
various countries.
The' average age of people in the Peace Corpus is 24. Haupt is 35.
He explained that he had finished college and gone into the Army
before Joining the Peace Corps. He is presently thinking about doing
graduate work.
There are four UF students who are former Peace Corps members.
They include Price, who was stationed in Malaysia, and three students
who were in the Dominican Republic. They are Arthur Mann, 7BA, Ar Arthur
thur Arthur Unger, BAG, and Mike Dillon 7ED.

LBJ proposes
$1 billion in
S.E. Asian aid
BALTIMORE, Md. (UPI) President Johnson last night proposed
a $1 billion program of American aid for Southeast Asia as a step
toward bringing peace in Viet Nam, He invited the Soviet Union to

UF profs call
LBJ proposal
'clever tactic
By 808 WILCOX
Staff Writer
Reaction to last night's presi presidential
dential presidential address labeled America's
proposal for a unified East-West
economic development program in
South Vietnam "a clever effort to
reverse America's image in the
Asian struggle."
Professor John W.Spanier, poli political
tical political science, said "The plan for
economic aid to South Vietnam will
put pressure on the communist na na
na tions to negotiate settlement. Being
similar to the Marshal plan, the
' proposal puts the communist
| nations in a position to help South
1 Vietnam. They will be obligated
to do so."
See REACTION p, 7

Fla. Legislature bogged
down over rules

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI)~ A
scrap over proposed rules which.,
opponents charged would stren strengthen
gthen strengthen the hand Os the tightly tightlyknit
knit tightlyknit small county Senate majority
block, highlighted business yes yesterday
terday yesterday of the day old Florida
legislature.
The minority group led by Sens.
Doyl Carlton Jr. of Wachula and
Ed Price of Bradenton objected
to a rule giving the powerful rules
committee control of the calendar
of bills to be considered in the
final 20 days of the session.
It has been the final 10 days be before
fore before the rules committee took over

Thursday, April 8, 1965

join in.
Johnson, in a major policy
address prepared for delivery be before
fore before a nationwide television-radio
audience, also said the United
States remains ready "for uncon unconditional
ditional unconditional discussions" toward end ending
ing ending the Vietnamese warfare.
"Until that bright and necessary
day of peace we will try to keep
conflict from spreading," the
President said.
"We have no desire to see thou thousands
sands thousands die in battle-Asians or
Americans. We have no desire to
devastate that which the people of
North Viet Nam have built with
toil and sacrifice. We will use
our power with restraint and with
all the wisdom we can command.
"But we will use it."
Johnson said there must be a
"much more massive effort" than
has yet been undertaken "to im improve
prove improve the life of men in this con conflict-torn
flict-torn conflict-torn corner of the world."
In one section of his speech
headed "a cooperative effort for
development," Johnson proposed
an economic investment program
under United Nations auspices in
which he will ask Congress to
authorize a UjS. share of $1 bil-
See LBJ SPEECH 9 p. 7

in past senate sessions, but in the
House, the rules committee takes
control in the last 40 days, Speaker
E. C. Rowell said and nobody has
challenged it.
Brief business sessions in both
Houses were held, with a total of
97 bills received proposing a num number
ber number of appropriations bills that
would add to the proposed sl.l
billion bare bones*' general state
budget and a severance tax mea measure
sure measure that would raise $22 million
in new revenue in the coming bi biennium.
ennium. biennium.
See LEGISLATURE p. 7

V.'.V.V.V.NVWM^Xv.vAV.VA'X^'K'XffIWtj
|To friends of
§ deceased registrar §
x >::
£ Mrs. RJS. Johnson, widow >::
£ of the registrar of the UF,
£ who passed away Sunday, has £
£ asked that friends who intended
£ to send flowers make gifts for £
$ scholarships instead. She ear- £
Her had requested no flowers £
£ for the funeral. £
£ Mr. Johnson had served as :*:*
£ registrar since 1939. He died
£ from heart failure following £
£ an intermittent illness during £
£ the past two years. £
£ Gifts for scholarships In £
:£ memory of Mr. Johnson can be :£
£ forwarded to Room 312,Tlgert £
£ Hall, University of Florida, £
£ Gainesville. Checks should be x
j:*: made to the University "of £
£ Florida Foundation, Inc. jg



The Florida Alligator/ Thursday/ April 8, 1965

Page 2

UF profs toattend
math conference
Thirteen faculty members of the UFs De Department
partment Department of Mathematics will journey to Winston
Salem, N.C., tomorrow and Saturday for the
annual meeting of the Mathematical Association
of Americas Southeastern Section at Wake
Forest College.
All 13 will present technical papers during
the two-day conference, along with three UF
graduate students Alicia Santos of the Philip Philippines,
pines, Philippines, Nina Lupkiewicz of Gainesville and R.J.
Greechie of Dorchester, Mass.
Mathematics topics will be discussed from
3:30 to 5 p.m. on Friday and from 11 a.m.
until noon Saturday. Each session will be sub subdivided
divided subdivided into four separate groups. Floridas con contingent
tingent contingent is delivering 14 of the 36 papers on
the program.
Faculty members from Florida include Dr.
J.E. Maxfield, head of the Department of Mathe Mathematics;
matics; Mathematics; Dr. C.B. Smith, Dr. A.D. Wallace, Dr.
E.H. Hadlock, Dr. Russell Cowan, Dr. Robert
Blake, Dr. John T. Moore, Dr. A.R. Bednarek,
Frederico Sioson, Raymond Smithson, Donald
Catlin and Janet Allsbrook.
Dr. Gerhard Grimeisen, a visiting professor
from Technological University, Stuttgart, Ger Germany,
many, Germany, will join the Florida delegation.

campus news briefs

GAMMA DELTA
Gamma Delta Lutheran Student
group will hold its weekly supper
and show a movie The City of
Necessity*' Sunday at 6 p.m. at
the First Lutheran Church, 1801
NW sth Avenue.
TOASTMASTERS
University Toastmasters will
meet today at 11:45 a.m. in the
Garden Room of the Faculty Club.
AGRICUL TURE DAMES
The Agriculture Dames will hold
a social meeting tonight at 8 p.m.
at the University Women's Club
(Perry House).
SIGMA DELTA CHI
Sigma Delta Chi will meet at
7 p.m. tonight, in the Seminar
Room of the Journalism Building.
BOOK SALE
Students with books or money
in the Student Government Book
Sale may pick them up in Room
311, Florida Union, today from
3:30-5 p.m.
PAINTING EXHIBITIONS
An exhibition of Chagall's illus illustrations
trations illustrations from the Bible will be on
display in the North Wing Gallery,
Florida Union. A circuit exhi exhibition
bition exhibition will be on display in Bryan
Lounge, Florida Union. Both dis displays
plays displays will be exhibited until April
30.

OH HUM...ISNT IT LOVELY
WEATHER FOR A SCANDAL? SEE T
THE GREAT COLE SCANDAL SUIT I
COLLECTION FOR NICE GIRLS. R

LOAN INTERVIEWS
National Defense Loans inter interviews
views interviews continue in Room 124, Tigert
Hall: today-S, Monday-T,U,V,
Tuesday-W,X,Y,Z.
U.RoA.
Students interested in working
on the Religion-in-Life committee
next year or the U.R.A. Bulletin
this summer may pick applications
in Room 207, Florida Union. Dead Deadline
line Deadline for applications is 5 p.m.
tomorrow.
FELLOWSHIP
Florida Christian Fellowship
meet and discuss Faith, Doubt,
and Assurance" tomorrow night
at 7 p.m. in Room 215 Florida
Union. Elections will be held.
SPRO
Student Public Relations Organ Organization,
ization, Organization, will hold its final business
meeting and election of officers
tonight at 7:30 p.m. in Room 226,
Stadium.
ALPHA KAPPA PSI
New officers of Alpha Kappa Psi
are: Dennis Driscoll, president;
D. Mayon Allen, Ist vice-presi vice-president;
dent; vice-president; Tom Hayslip, 2nd vice-pre vice-president;
sident; vice-president; Bill Dierickson, master of
ritual; Warren Payne, correspond corresponding
ing corresponding secretary; John Corley,
recording secretary; Jim
Fletcher, treasurer.

HAWES-POVKBS MOTOR CO.
LAUNCHES
CLEAR THE DECKS
Biggest Clearance Sale of The Year
THUR FRI SAT
W. Ar* So Overloaded With Now
VALIANTS BARRACUDAS BELVEDERES
FURYS SPORT FURYS
...THAT EVENOUR USED CAR LOT IS PACKED! OVER 150 CARS
IN ALL BODY STYLES TO CHOOSE FROM. WE MUST REDUCE OUR
INVENTORY BY AT LEAST 50 BY NO LATER THAN SATURDAY NIGHT!
WE GUARANTEE YOU
THE BEST DEAL OF THE YEAR
to Niohj
SDN*' MAKE YOUR OWN DEAL! &Saf Ukdavi
' S * T f lNa hi HURRY! HURRY! HURRY!
Nci Ngi
IT IS OPERATION "CLEAR THE DECKS 1 11
We Will Not Be Undersold Or Out-Traded!
Hawes-Powers Motor Co.
1 204 N. MAI N STREET
SINCE 1939
CHRYSLER PLYMOUTH VALIANT IMPERIAL SIMCA
NOW BUY THE BEST AND FO R LESS!



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Thursday, April 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

f Light rates fair 9
claims commissioner

Gainesville's city owned elec electric
tric electric power plant does not cheat
its customers by charging abnor abnormally
mally abnormally high electricity rates, ac according
cording according to city commissioner
James G. Richardson.
Pm sick and tired of people
insinuating that the city receives
undue profits from electric rates,
said Richardson.
He explained that the city owned
utility offers some definite advan advantages
tages advantages over privately owned power
companies.
For one thing, said Richard Richardson,
son, Richardson, revenue from the city plant
made up approximately 25 per
cent of the city's total operating
cost last year.
Anderson
blackout
minor
Not a spasmodic eclipse, but
only a defective electrical circuit
breaker caused temporary dark darkness
ness darkness several times in the basement
of Anderson Hall Tuesday
afternoon.
The brake was only minor in
nature and was in the process of
being permanently repaired said
Calvin C. Green, campus engineer
and director of physical plant di division.
vision. division.
Originally Anderson Hall wasn't
built for the current load of elec electrical
trical electrical devices it now supports,
said Greene. Asprecautionary
measure circuit breakers are in installed
stalled installed which melt if electric lines
are overloaded or faulty.
PBK initiates
at banquet
Thirty-eight UF undergraduates
and 16 PhJ). candidates will be
initiated into Phi Beta Kappa, se selective
lective selective scholastic honorary, at the
annual Phi Beta Kappa initiation
banquet, tomorrow. The banquet
will be held at the Student Service
Center.
Judyth Baker will receive the
Phi Beta Kappa creative achieve achievement
ment achievement award at the banquet.
Each of the 38 undergraduates
elected to membership this year
have better than a 3.5 academic
average in the College of Arts
and Sciences.
BEC to install
now offieors
New officers of the Benton En Engineering
gineering Engineering Society, which is the co coordinating
ordinating coordinating body for all the various
societies in the College of
Engineering, will be installed to tonight
night tonight at 7:30 p.m. in Room 319
of the Engineering Building.
Bill Slippy, president-elect, will
receive the gavel from outgoing
president Bill Hartman. Other new
officers will be: Doug Miller, vice vicepresident;
president; vicepresident; David Weiss, secretary
and Ron Bodnar, treasurer.
The Benton Engineering Society
is the sponsor of the annual En Engineering
gineering Engineering Fair which has been
held twenty times on the campus.
This year's fair, described as
biggest and best yet by the So Society,
ciety, Society, was attended, by an estimated
Â¥5,000-100,000 people.

In 1964, Gainesville had an es estimated
timated estimated total revenue of $3,678,-
900. Os that, $882,00 came from
the power plant, he said.
This money went in the general
fund which provided for police and
fire protection, recreation facil facilities,
ities, facilities, library grants and other co community
mmunity community services, explained
ardson.
The money saved in capital cost
is another advantage of a public
owned utility, he stated.
The city can borrow money for
capital expansion at an interest
rate 25 to 30 per cent under what
private utilities can borrow, v con continued
tinued continued Richardson.
This advantageous position re resulted
sulted resulted in a $700,000 saving on the
last plant expansion, he stated.
Another benefit is the low cost
of transmitting and distributing
the electeicity.
Since the plant is centrally lo located,
cated, located, electricity can be sent over
smaller power lines which require
less elaborate relaying equipment.
This means a huge savings to
consumers. The basic rates of an
outside private company may be
cheaper than Gainesville's, but the
cost of relaying the electricity
here would hike-up the rates con considerably,
siderably, considerably, said Richardson.
People don't realize the in inherant
herant inherant problems of producing
electric power in the state of
Florida, he continued.
He pointed out that it takes ener energy
gy energy to create electric power. The
three major sources of commer commercial
cial commercial fuel are coal, gas, and oil.
Florida is remarkable deficient in
all three of these according to
Richardson.
Florida is probably .further
away from local fuel sources than
any other state in the Union. On
top of this we have no water po power.
wer. power. Consequently, not only Ga Gainesville,
inesville, Gainesville, but the whole state
starts off in the hole as far as
power production is concerned be because
cause because all fuel must be imported,'*
explained Richardson.
Gainesville must also carry a
huge electric reserve capacity in
case of emergencies. Cities with
more than one plant don't have to
worry about reserve requirements
because they can draw from other
units in the area.
Keeping a constant reserve
capacity is a financial drain be because
cause because the facilities are not pro producing.
ducing. producing. Yet these reserve units
must always be on stand-by in case
of a major plant failure/* con concluded
cluded concluded Richardson.
House votes LBJ
armored car
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
House has voted $325,000 to build
an armored bubble-top limousine for
use by President Johnson.
Johnson did not ask tor the
money. And the House, except for
a few members, did not know it
was appropriating the funds.
The sum, plus $197,000 to build
a special follow- up car for use
by the Secret Service, was in included
cluded included in a $6.6 billion appro appropriation
priation appropriation bill tor the Post Office
and Treasury departments which
the House passed Monday and sent
to the Senate.
In a report to the House, the
Appropriations Committee noted
that it had written into the bill
an extra $3,877,000-over and above
what the President's budget pad
called for to beef up presiden presidential
tial presidential protection.
The committee noted that this
covered, among other things, the
hiring of 259 additional agents
plus a start toward autonfation
of the Secret Service files. No
mention was made of the plans to
build a new bullet-proof limousine.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator/ Thursday, April 8, 1965

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International
ERNIE LITZ STEVE VAUGHN JOE CASTELLO
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor Executive Editor
LOU FERRIS ANDY MOOR
Editorial Page Editor Sports Editor
.
i/ismtyr
| GUEST COLUMN jj
Petitionanny:
A Great Year

By JOE CASTELLO
Executive Editor
The academic year of 1965 will
probably be long remembered in
some circles on campus as the
year of the Great Petitionanny.
Some will look back and consider
it the first time that students
managed to band together and
assert their rights effectively.
Others will more likely laugh and
consider the whole extravaganza
a tale told by an idiot, full of
sound and fury, signifying
nothing.
It is unfortunate that such a
significant cause as student rights
and freedom of expression has
fallen into the hands of such ir irresponsible
responsible irresponsible leadership. The issues
are real, the facts significant, and
the methods assinine.
The Richer petition represents
a bona fide instance of citizens
redressing their grievances to the
powers that be: this principle of
the freedom to petition is one of
Americas most cherished rights.
The issues raised by the Richer
petition are also of crucial im importance
portance importance for the academic com community:
munity: community: should the administration
be allowed to fire faculty members
arbitrarily without stating the ex express
press express reason for doing, does this
dismissal not set a dangerous pre precedent
cedent precedent that will curb academic
freedom in the classroom, and does
a policy such as publish or per perish
ish perish have any place in a univer university
sity university community, especially when
it can be used as a cover story
to cloak the real reasons behind
a faculty dismissal in a haze of
secrecy?
These issues are of far greater
significance than most students,
especially the members of Free Freedom
dom Freedom Forum, seem to realize: for
they strike at the heart of the

EDITORIAL STAFF: Mark Freeman and Stan Ku!p icartoonists),
Sharon Kelley (Student Government Beat Chief). Lee Alexander,
Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles. Dan Taylor, Jay Foley, Sam
Ullman and Jane Young (Tigert Beat Chief), Woody Leonard,
Nancy Van Zile, and Linda Cody, Bob Wilcox, Drex Dobson
REPORTERS: Carl Brown, Bob Wilcox, Dee Wright. Steve
Kanar, Judy Knight, Ann Carter, Thelma Mossman, Fran Snider,
Cynthia Tunstall, Karen Vitunac, Ami Saperstein, Bill Lockhart,
Drex Dobson, Eunice Tall, Kay Huff master, Jeffrey Denkewalter,
G. S. Corserl and Ken Simon.
The Florida Allies tor reserves the rigid to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements and
to rotrlM or taro away copy which It ooaaMors objectionable.
MO KSmOH B GUARANTEED, though desired position will be (Iren whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment tor any advertisement Involving typ- I I
arrors or erroneous Insertion unless notice la glean to tho Advertising Manager within y
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement H
scheduled to run several times. Notices tor correction must he given before neat Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR la the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and Is D
published flee tiroes weekly except doing May, June and July when It la published semi-weekly. Only |l
represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class II
at the United State# Post Office at Gainesville. ||

university system and cannot be
resolved by petitions, idiotic ral rallies
lies rallies on the Plaza of the Americas,
and a carnival-like camp-out on
the steps of Tigert.
The petitionanny was an opera
bouffe in the classical tradition,
for it garbed such vitally serious
issues as mentioned above with
the trappings of a fraternity party.
The end result was to discredit
real grievances as artificial
causes trumped up by an irre irresponsible
sponsible irresponsible group of publicity
seekers, whereas the result of a
bona fide petition should be to
inform the governmental powers of
the serious nature of the
grievances. In short, the damn
thing backfired because of the
juvenallty of its leadership.
I ask Freedom Forum: if the
purpose of the Richer petition
was to inform the administration
that students were seriously con concerned
cerned concerned with his dismissal, why
hold a childish rally in the Plaza
of the Americas that was bound
to attract the attention of every
trouble-maker on campus and then
present the petition on the steps
of Tigert Hall? Why not just take
the petition to Dean Mautzs office
and present it to him personally
as a responsible person would
do? Could it be that there are not
as many students sympathetic to
Richer case as Freedom Forum
hoped and that they tried to hide
this fact by making the presenta presentation
tion presentation as noisey as possible?
Finally, could it be that most
students feel that the administra administration's
tion's administration's action in the Richer case
was justified and that there has
been no violation of student rights
or academic freedom?

fND NOW ANOTHER REVOLTING
> NG O N FREEDOM, LACK OF
: REEDOM. FREEDOM AND COPS.
FREEDOM AND THE CAMPUS,
: REEDOM AND COPS, FREEDOM
AND POLITICS. FREEDOM AND
SEX. FREEDOM AND FREE SPEECH.
freedom and sin. freedom
and laundry, freedom and
Vtfr ri>t W npAnpe epecrv\kA AMr> cdccivnh
? Le T TeR 2 ~~i

Poor gator
EDITOR:
AFTER READING YOUR April
first issue, it occurs to me that
admidst the shame and disgrace
surrounding the pregnancy of
Albert, or Alberta, something
could be said for the poor gator.
MAYBE AFTER ALL these
years of residence under the
Century Tower our mascot didnt
want to dissapoint us other Florida
Men. After all, why should Albert
be the first coed to make a brick
fall from the Proverbial Century
Tower?
Three cheers for Albert, a true
Gator.
JAY McCAMPBELL
Correction
EDITOR:
CORRECTION in issue of March
30, 1965 page 3, column 3 article
entitled UN boosters to organize
in September.
In regard to the last paragraph
reading At the next meeting of
CCUN, which will be in the third
or fourth week in September, mem members
bers members of The Conservative Club
will join the members of CCUN in
a debate.
We are not two antagonistic
clubs, nor do we have two an antagonistic
tagonistic antagonistic philosophies. Many of
CCUNs members are also
members of the Conservative Club
and vice-versa. The notice should
have read, members of the
Conservative Club will defend the
Conservative stand on the UN, as
at our meeting today the Liberal
stand was defended.

EDITOR:
I AM WRITING this in response
to the guest letter** in the Monday
edition from M. D. Lozott of
Brussels.
I ALSO AM an American. I also
live in Brussels. I also have
been in many countries, including
Sweden, Germany, France, Italy,
England, Australia, Ceylon, Indo Indonesia,
nesia, Indonesia, Egypt, South America, and
others. From this, I have found
one view common in every foreign
country jealousy of the U. S.
Os course, it is stronger in some
places than in others, but it is
always present. Newspapers in
these countries like to play up
anything that goes wrong in the

JACK ZUCKER
President, CCUN

Response from Brussels

Cubans view
EDITOR:
I HAVE HEARD among the people of this campus different opinions
about the controversial issue of Mr. Richer's dismissal as an instructor
and I have also read most publications on the subject, but so far I
have not found any of them presenting the situation as I understand
it.
AS A CUBAN, I consider it of my concern to express my point of
view about a controversy involving a University instructor who has
defended the kind of freedom existing in my country under Castro's
regime.
FIRST OF ALL I don't see how a person who stands for Castro's
dictatorship, therefore for the imprisonment of 100,000 political
prisoners who were denied the rights Mr. Richer claims for himself,
for the murder of undetermined thousands of people whose only guilt
was to defend the freedom Mr. Richer says he is for, and for the
deprival of civil rights to seven million people (not only to a sector of
the population, which would be deplorable anyway; I agree with Mr.
Richer in that respect), can defend the real cause of freedom in the
U. S.
BUT, I DON'T think that this apparent contradiction of his thought
is a major problem in a well-educated and democratic society, where
well-intentioned and intelligent people would not be carried-away by
his ideas.
BESIDES THAT, although I am against the contradiction of his
expressed political thought (which I consider demagogic and incoherent),
I would stand for his right to think however he wants to, and I don't
think that the issue of his dismissal could be based upon it, as has
been inferred by some people.
HOWEVER, AS IMPORTANT as Mr. Richer's freedom of thought,
is the freedom of the University Administration to establish the terms
of its contracts, which may be freely accepted by the instructors or
not, since they are by no means forced to sign them.
OUR COMMUNITY does not have the right to deny Mr. Richer his
freedom of thought, but it has the right to protect what it considers
its interests by hiring an instructor for teaching a subject, not for
teaching his political, social and personal ideas, as respectable
as they might be.
AND, IF ANY instructor does not fulfill the terms of his contract,
I think that the University Administration has the right to dismiss
him.
RAUL PATTERSON

u. s.
VERY OFTEN, I get into argu arguments
ments arguments abroad because as soon as
someone discovers I am an
American, he immediately starts
to tell me how much better things
are here and how bad things are
in America. These arguers may
say that their educational system
is better than ours, but they never
mention that American consultants
are brought into their country for
advice on a wide range of subjects,
or that U. S. engineers are brought
in for many big projects.
YOU COMPARE THE cruelties
of Selma to those which took place
under Hitler. Do you also think
that there are mass-murders and
inhumane tortures? Do you also

think that the KKK is growing so
strong that it will take over the
Nation as did the Nazi party?
YOU CONCLUDE BY saying that
America will soon be an *'unhappy
toy factory. .despised by the
world, and gutted by internal
strife.
THE FACT IS that our demo democratic
cratic democratic system makes for one of
the most responsible governments
in the world (if not the roost
responsible in the world).
WHAT DO YOU, Mr. Lozott,
really think of America?
H. T. BLACKSTOCK, 3BA
112 Avenue Jules Cesar
Brussels, Belgium



Movies important for education

Single concept motion pictures will eventually be
a part of every library and an important advance
in the educative process, Dwight Godwin, manager
of Photographic Services said yesterday.
Godwin made the comments at a demonstration of
the Bmm single concept film as a teaching aid in
the Bryan Lounge of the Florida Union.
The films are approximately five minutes long and
limited in content to one concept and related facts.
The subject material which was shown covered aspects
of physics, biology, anatomy, athletics and nursing.
The film is contained in cartridges which were
merely inserted into an inexpensive Bmm projector
for viewing purposes. There is no threading of the
projector or rewinding of the film. The end and
beginning are attached to create a loop and the
film can be shown over again without touching the
projector or film.
Godwin said the most effective use of the single
concept film in the classroom would be in connection
with a text keyed to the movie along with other audio
visual materials.
After viewing the presentation, Thomas Moffett,
instructor in toe UF College of Education, said the

Likot to done.
Today's Campus Cutie loves
to dance. Michelle Whitney is
a Freshman from Miami
Beach. She plans to major
in Secondary Education.
Michelle served as Pledge
Class Historian for Delta Phi
Epsilon sorority this year.
She also worked on the Inter International
national International Hostess Committee.
Her hobbies include horse horseback
back horseback riding and reading. Her
favorite outdoor sport is
tennis.
This cute coed lists her
social status as "single.
XvX # X # X # X*XC*X*X*C*X%%¥ft*ft*???£*S-X # S
'Buddy Day
at armory Sat.
Saturday is "buddy day for
members of Gainesville's 3396th
Reception Station (UJS. Army Re Reserve).
serve). Reserve).
The local reservists, most of
whom are connected with the UF
either professionally or as stu students,
dents, students, are inviting friends out to
the Gainesville armory for a look
at their unit in action. Several
unit officers will be present to
orient the visitors.
Capt. Bill Felroing, unit recruit recruiting
ing recruiting officer, said he has high hopes
for a good turnout of visitors Satur Saturday
day Saturday because he feels the 3396th
provides an ideal answer to the
young man who is concerned about
his military obligation.
Fleming, the UF's director of
alumni affairs, in civilian life,
noted that a young man 17-1/2
to 26 can enlist in the Army
Reserve, serve 4-10 months active
duty, then return to the unit for
weekly drills while following what whatever
ever whatever civilian pursuits he desires.
In the case of UF students, Flem Fleming
ing Fleming said, the 3396th is especially
compatible since its training sche schedule
dule schedule is allied closely with the Uni University
versity University schedule.
Fleming invited anyone in interested
terested interested to come out on his own
Saturday to get acquainted with
the unit's program and personnel.
Saturday's ann, at lizs Mb
Eighth Ave., will run from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Those needing trans transportation
portation transportation are asked to call 372-
2578.

<|J| y|je#4?
franklins
TOWN A COLLEGE SHOP
401 W. University Avenue
ANNOUNCING our new address:
2401 SW 13th Street
Village Square
OPEN HOUSE
Thursday, April 8 7 PM-9 PM
1965 SEMINOLE
HERE MONDAY
The first shipment of 1965 Seminole yearbooks
will arrive on campus next Monday morning, April
12. Distribution of 1,000 copies will begin at
10 A.M. MONDAY at th
INFORMATION BOOTH
Books will be distributed Monday and Tuesday,
or until first shipment is exhausted.
PLEASE BRING YOUR RECEIPT AND
STUDENT ID. CARD
TO RECEIVE YOUR BOOK
Second shipment will arrive Wednesday, April
14, and final distribution will begin at 10 a.m.
Wednesday at the Infoimation Booth.
Notice to Greeks
who purchased their Semioles
through their houses :
Your books will be delivered to you house
Wednesday, April 14. An officer of your
fraternity or sorority must sign a delivery re receipt
ceipt receipt and will be responsible for distribution
to those who purchased books. The Seminole
cannot be responsible if an individual in your
houre receives a book to which he is not en entitled
titled entitled and did not purchase.

films have the potential of being as important an
audio visual tool as film strips and movies now being
used. He said that education majors could produce
their own single concept film and this in turn would
create its own interest.
Assistant UF football coach P. Fred Pancoast
stated the loops would be a good coaching tool when
players like Steve Spurrier were recorded on them.
It would contain five minutes of all the different
plays a quarterback must be able to handle.
Godwin said the Photographic Services has the
capacity to produce the films inexpensively and also
has information on outlets for broader distribution
on a rental or sales basis.
Commercially there are only a few hundred film
available. Godwin stated the main feature of these
loops is any segment of the university can have a
film made for their own particular uses.
The films are silent so an instructor may make
his own dialogue for the presentation. Some pro projectors
jectors projectors are more sophisticated in that they have
a zoom lense and remote control. The instructor
could stop the loop with the remote and show a frame
at a time.

Thursday, April 8, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

READ THIS SUMMER
Browse Shop
Compus Shop & Bookstore
Vacation
Reading Sale
20% OFF
ALL
PAPERBACK
STOCK
AND
Other Selected Stock Items
WITH PURCHASE
OF 10
OR MORE
-25% OFF
APRIL 5-9
lan Fleming SCIENTIFIC
James Baldwin BIOGRAPHY
Ernest Hemingway FICTION
Herman Wouk PHILOSOPHY
Ayn Rand MYSTERIES
Don Hamilton LITERATURE
Morris West HISTORY
Mark Twain DRAMA
Dylan Thomas ART
Lawrence Ferlinghetti COOKING
Gregory Corsa HUMOR
SCIENCE FICTION
TRAVEL
LANGUAGE
jik-
The Browse Shop


Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 8, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

For Rent
SUMMER SUB-LET or longer
1 bedroom; large living livingstudy
study livingstudy room. One block from cam campus.
pus. campus. Cool. SBS for 2. Call 8-2113,
117 SW 12th St., Apt. 2. (B-131-
st-c).
ROOM in air-conditioned home
for woman graduate student or
undergraduate over 25. Call 2-
9725 at lunch hour or in evening.
(B-131-ts-c).
PRICES REDUCED THIS SUMMER
AT KIRKLAND APARTMENTS,
1602 NW Ist Ave. directly behind
the Florida Book Store and only 1
block from campus, the rates for
the coming terms are: Summer
trimester, single SBS, double $75.
Term A or B, single S6O, double
SSO. Phone Jim Hodge FR 6-9345
or see Tues. and Thurs. after afternoons
noons afternoons or MWF after 6 p.m. and
on weekends. Male Students only
please. (B-131-6t-p).
CLOSE TO CAMPUS. Large 2
bedroom furnished apartment.
Available April 25th. Reduced
rates for summer. 912 SW 6th
Ave. 378-2013. (B-131-3t-c).
1 BEDROOM Furnished. 1113
SW Ist Ave., University Realty,
2-4351. $65, water included. 2
blocks campus. (B-131-3t-c).
BEST DEAL IN Gainesville large
3 bedroom furnished house. Can
accommodate 3 to 5 people. SIOO
per month. Call 6-0306. 403 NE
Ist Ave. (B-131-3t-e).
AIR CONDITIONED Modern 1
bedroom furnished apartment. NW
Gainesville, 3blocks from campus.
Available now, S9O/month. Call 2-
2919, after 4 p.m. (B-131-3t-c).
COMFORTABLE 1 bedroom fur furnished
nished furnished apartment for rent.
Available April 26th. $65 per
month. 737 SE sth Ave. Call 372-
8983 after 5 p.m. (B-131-3t-c).
ONE SHARP NEW FURNISHED
2 bedroom apartment. Air-condi Air-conditioned,
tioned, Air-conditioned, each room 4125 per month.
Apt. #2, 39th Ave. A 6th Street,
N. W. (B-130-st-c).
ALL UNITS GROUND FLOOR, 2
rooms furnished, refrigerator.
Few air-conditioners. No kitchens.
2 blocks from main air-conditioned
Library, classes, food centers,
Post Office, Laundry, etc. Rates
s9osls entire semester. 6-
6494. (B-131-st-c).
3 BEDROOM Apartment suitable
tor 3 or 4 roommates. All for only
SBO a month. Available April 24th
Call Terry at 2-0852. (B (B---131-3t-c).
--131-3t-c). (B---131-3t-c).
AVAILABLE B-term, large one
bedroom apartment. Close to
campus. 915 SW 6th Ave. S9O per
month. Call 2-7683. (6-130-ts-c).
FURNISHED HOUSE 2-bedroom,
freshly redecorated. Convenient
walking distance from Univ.
and town. Ideally located. $l2O/
month. Call Layton 8-2671. (B (B---127-ts-c).
--127-ts-c). (B---127-ts-c).
SBO MONTHLY. 2 BEDROOM
Furnished house, 1 mile from
campus. Will sublet April 25
through Aug. 372-2861. (B-126-
ts-c).
2-BEDROOM FURNISHED
APARTMENT, available summer
trimester, 1 mile from campus.
$75/roo. tor two plus utilities. Call
8-2018. (B-126-st-c).

. , -! ..
For Rent
UNFURNISHED Apartment, 3 large
rooms. Kitchen furnished, tile bath
and 1/2. Large porch and yard.
Enjoy cool shady summer living.
SBS per month. 923 NW 3rd Ave.
376-9992. (B-123-ts-c).
"ii hi ' I
HOUSE AVAILABLE TO SUBLET
for summer. May keep after sum summer
mer summer if desired. 5 room air-con air-conditioned.
ditioned. air-conditioned. Suitable for 4 people,
can be seen by appointment. 4401
SW 13th Street. 378-1252. (B-127-
ts-c).
3A & B 3-bedroom, 2-bath,
furnished new house. 5 min. from
campus. $l2O per mo. Ideal for
family or group of students. Call
FR 2-8668 after 6. (B-125-ts-c).
FURNISHED APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE April 1 & May 1.
One bedroom modern, air-cond.
apts. near Univ. & Med. Center.
Adults only, no pets. Lease re required.
quired. required. S9O/mo. 372-3488 or 376-
4360. (B-125-ts-c).
FURNISHED 2-bedroom duplex
available Trimester 111-A or A
and B. Woman graduate student or
faculty member, or couple. Air Airconditioned.
conditioned. Airconditioned. Close to campus. slls
a month. Phone 372-5275 Wed.
p.m. or weekend. Extension 2321-
59 daytime. (B-130-3t-p).
AIR-CONDITIONED ROOMS FOR
BOYS. Double $35, Single SSO.
Kitchen privileges, linen and maid
service. Block from campus. 1319
NW 2nd Ave. (B-130-4t-p).
LIVE 2 WEEKS FREE, in air airconditioned,
conditioned, airconditioned, luxurious apartment.
Available April 15th. $9040 per
month. Call 6-1901 after 9 p.m.
weekdays. (B-130-St-p).
AIR -CONDITION ED APART APARTMENTS
MENTS APARTMENTS tor 3A and/or SB.Suitable
for 2 or 3 people S7O per mo.
plus electric. 1829 NW 2nd Ave.
Suitable tor 2 or 3 people at 1530
NW 4th Ave. $75-SBO plus electric.
Suitable tor 3 or 4 people at 1518
NW 4th Ave. S9O-SIOO with air airconditioning
conditioning airconditioning included. Also
renting tor faU at slightly higher
rates. Call 376-4353 evenings.
(B-132-st-c).
2-BEDROOM FURNISHED,
STUDENT, Apartments for rent.
Very close to campus. $75 per
month. Call Mrs. Jones, FR 6-
5636. (B-132-U-c).
AIR-CONDITIONED, FURNISHED
MODERN efficiency for 1 or 2,
to sublet May-August. $75/mo.
Near campus. Inquire 4-6 p.m.
Apt. 21, 303 NW 17th Street. (B (B---132-St-p).
--132-St-p). (B---132-St-p).
ksrccuuatNe
/%Js^2r f Veal Parmiqana j
fuJl Home-Made
Italian Sausaja
In Every Town: Or City, You
Will Find One Good Italian
Restaurant
THE E IT!
Dial 372-4690
2120 Hawthorne Rd.
Near Drive-In Theatre

For Rent
WILL SUB-LET My spacious
apartment for the complete sum summer.
mer. summer. $65 per month. Water
included. Occupancy 2 or 3. Call
372-7428. (B-132-st-c).
SUNNYSIDE APARTMENTS
available for May and Sept, rental.
Two bedroom, furnished kitchen
equipped. Half block east of Law
School. FR 6-0865. (B-132-3t-c).
1 ROOM WITH PRIVATE bath
and private entrance. 2 Rooms
which share a bath. 8-1278. (B (B---132-st-c).
--132-st-c). (B---132-st-c).
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT, 3
blocks from campus. Air-con Air-conditioned.
ditioned. Air-conditioned. Sub-lease May till Sept.
Married only. Furnished. S9O/mo.
1716 NW 3rd Ave. Apt. 10. Call
372-7032 evenings. (B-132-3t-c).
COOL, CONVENIENT AND
COMFORTABLE, 10x55 Mobile
Home for rent in Hickory Hill
Park. Close to campus and store.
S7B per mo. Available April 26.
6-6696. (B-132-st-c).
TRAILER, 38x8 with 16x8 Ca Cabana.
bana. Cabana. 1 mile from campus. Avail Available
able Available April 23 Aug. 31. SIOO/1
or $125/2 for entire summer.
Call Wayne 376-2797. (B-132-st (B-132-stc).
c). (B-132-stc).
Wanted
MALE ROOMMATE to share AIR AIRCONDITIONED
CONDITIONED AIRCONDITIONED 4 room apartment
during A" or entire summer.
S4O per month includes all utilities.
1132 S. Main St. 2-5463. (C-131-
2t-p).
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share new air-conditioned apart apartment
ment apartment near campus. Call FR 6-
0264. (C-131-3t-c).
FEMALE GRADUATE Student to
share 2 bedroom apartment with
working student and baby.l24o SW
14th Street. $32.50 per month plus
1/2 utilities. Call 378-1792
between 10 and 12 a.ro. (C-131-
st-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE FOR
SPRING TRIMESTER. Air-con Air-conditioned
ditioned Air-conditioned Colonial Manor Apart.
1/2 block from campus. Call
Sandra, 8-1588 after 3 any day.
(C-130-3t-p).
fflwMll
LAST TIMES
A FIRST AREA
LvgftJP SHOWING
{W SHOCKING!
Brain Surgery
ftuFT without Drugs Drugs)
) Drugs) I Fires of Puberty
/ Power of
. the Hues'
Color A weird Winner
"THE SKY ABOVE
AND MUD BELOW"
i 3nd Color Jungle Thriller
I Severe Pimloii? I*ple9*tt?d
"WALK INTO HELL"
STARTS BBu Blood
FRIDAY
rmt mm a>un

f *> i i
Wanted
1
ONE COED WANTED to share
house In NE. S4O per month,
utilities included. Move in May
Ist. Call Irene 6-1360. (C-129-
ts-c).
ROOMMATE TO SHARE 1 bedroom
apartment. Spring ** A or all sum summer.
mer. summer. Air-conditioned, 1 block from
campus. $55/mo. FR 2-1059. (C (C---129-st-p).
--129-st-p). (C---129-st-p).
ONE FEMALE ROOMMATE for
air-conditioned apartment. Three
blocks from campus. From June-
August. Call 6-1301 after 3:30.
(C-129-st-c).
Help Wanted
POSITION AVAILABLE WITH A
FUTURE for an ambitious young
man, who is willing to work. If,
you're leaving school, it will be
worth your time to investigate.
Robertson Jewelers, Gainesville,
Florida. (E-130-st-c).
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS as
National Bank Examiner, U. S.
Treasury Department in Atlanta,
Miami, Tampa, and Columbia,
S. C. Degree in Economics, Busi Business
ness Business Administration, Accounting
or Finance. Starting salary $6060,
6 months increase to $6450 and
rapid future advancement. Contact
D. B. Smith, 1103 Fulton National
Bank Bldg. Atlanta, or call 404-
526-6625. (E-129-ts-c).
For Sale
SEARS ALLSTATE COMPACT
Motor Scooter. Good condition.
Must sell before end of trimester.
Call Van. 372-2535. (A-132-st-c).
TINY TOY PODDLES. Excellent
quality. Platinum silver. AKC
Registered. Male and Female.
$125 S2OO. Call 376-0967.
(A-132-3t-c).
ANTIQUE ENGLISH TRANTER'S
Patent cal. 45 revolver, $25; 1903
A3 cal. 30-06 Springfield Rifle,
S2O; 1884 Cal. 45-70 Springfield
carbine, SSO. Call 376-7187 eve evenings
nings evenings after 7 p.m. (A-132-st-p).

P 1
M / '-£-
/*mm fir ;> ,-:.
SHIRLEY MacLAINE PETER USTINOV
RICHARD CRENNA Ea
R*L/ c Ki*6 F"h ?L F^or/pf>

For Sale
STUDY TABLE 3x6 Cast Iron
legs. Call 2-7166 after 4 p.m.
(A-132-2t-c).
WINCHESTER 94 LEVER-ACTION
30-30, case, cartridges. $65.
Westinghouse washing machine
$45. Slide rule sl2. Call FR 2-
0294. (A-132-st-c).
V-M STEREOPHONIC TAPE
Recorder. Excellent condition. Call
FR 6-1901 after 9 p.m. weekdays.
(A-130-3t-p).
MUST SELL OR RENT 10x46 2
bedroom air-conditioned trailer.
Open for offers to buy or will
rent for $75 per month. 2 miles
from campus. Call 372-1868. (A (A---131-st-c).
--131-st-c). (A---131-st-c).
3/4 HP G. E. ThinHne air-con air-conditioner.
ditioner. air-conditioner. SSO. Ron Highsmith, 242
Leigh Hall or at Shady Nook Trailer
Court after 5:00. (A-131-3t-c).
ODE BANJO Rosewood neck
with hand carved peghead & heel,
ebony finger board with mother motherof-pearl
of-pearl motherof-pearl inlay. S3OO or best otter.
John Pierson 372-8743. (A (A---127-ts-c).
--127-ts-c). (A---127-ts-c).
START YOUR OWN WAR! Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition M-l Gar and rifle.
S6O. Dr. Carney, Infirmary. (A (A---130-3t-c).
--130-3t-c). (A---130-3t-c).
HALF CARAT DIAMOND
SOLITAIRE, Tiffany setting in
white gold. Like new. Available
for local appraisal. S2OO. 372-
1783. (A-130-3t-p).
HOUSE FOR SALE.; 2-bedroom
frame, furnished, large screened
porch, play yard. 5 minutes from
Med. Center, off Archer Road.
SB,OOO take occupancy June 15th
Call 372-0752. (A-130-3t-c).
17 TV SET, 15 gallon aquarium,
3/4 ton air-conditioner, 9x12 rug,
night table. Reasonably priced.
Call between 5 & 8 p.m. FR 2-
7526. (A-131-ts-c).
I YAMAHA BMW
Motorcycles
For The Discriminating
CYCLE RAMA I
378-2811 21 SE 2nd Place I



CLASSIFIEDS

J Personal |
RIDE AVAILABLE to New York
and points in between. Leaving
April 22. Girls preferred. S2O.
Call Cheryl Childs 6-9261. (J (J---
-- (J---
LOCKED, BONDED STORAGE
AREA. $2.00 a month bicycles.
$3.00 a month motorcycles. 75?
a day auto storage. Call 2-0455.
Neighborhood Service Center, 637
NW 13th Street. (J-129-ts-c).
CALIFORNIA BOUND? Leaving
Gainesville around April 15, re returning
turning returning around May 2. $65 round
trip. Call Zal 2-1914. (J-128-
st-C>. :
Lost & Found
LOSE RING HAVING INITIALS J.
H. 8.? Found in Thomas-Sledd
Area. Contact T. Stahl, 376-1108.
(L-130-3t-c).
LOST Black kitten with bobbed
tail. 1600 block NW 7th Ave. Call
372-6152. (L-131-2t-c).
LOST Mans black folding um umbrella
brella umbrella in Fine Arts Bldg. $lO
reward. Loper FR6-8089.(L-131-
2t-p).
Services
RUBYS ALTERATIONS 1238 SW
3rd Ave. Phone 6-8506. (M-132-
lt-c).
Autos
53 MERCURY with radio. Best
offer takes it. Call 376-8714. (G (G---128-st-c).
--128-st-c). (G---128-st-c).
i
-X *.*
>:*: ms*^- r i p rfrti^7 7
ddwP* 4, ."l
iiwrtflHK PANTHER CARTOON
m

STARTS FRIDAY oiiuwtm Im. piivmn
HST AEA SHOWIWC UAIWKYILU THtATM
JEANETTE W Rfly Wo^
noun Runs Cold
[tf you give away the ending, may your blood run cold forever!]
Exclusive first Area Showing
starts GAINESVILLE J3L
TOMORROW! *!!!£. IF

l Autos |
62 MONZA COUPE maroon
with black interior, 4-speed, posi positraction,
traction, positraction, metalic brakes, radio,
heater, new tires and battery.
Phone FR 6-2875 before 9 p.m.
(G-132-2t-c).
MG-TD, 53, new paint, upholstery,
tires, etc., excellent. 376-1736,
1216 SW 2nd Ave., Apt. 105. (G (G---1961
--1961 VOLKSWAGEN, white wall
tires, absolutely perfect condition.
$995. Call 376-8863 after 5:30p.m.
(G-132-2t-c).
1960 FORD GALAXY, power
steering, cruise-o-matic, tinted
glass all around. Self adjusting
electric clock, electric windshield
wippers, padded dash, seat belts.
352 cubic inch T-Bird engine, WSW
tires, good rubber, looks sharp
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LBJ SPEECH
Continued from p. 1
lion.
The first step is for the coun countries
tries countries of Southeast Asis to assoc associate
iate associate themselves in a greatly ex expanded
panded expanded cooperative effort for de development,
velopment, development, the President said.
We would hope that North Viet
Nam will take its place in the
common effort just as soon as
peaceful cooperation is possible.
The United Nations is already
in development in this area.
For our part I will ask the
Congress to join in a billion dol dollar
lar dollar American investment in this
effort when it is underway.

REACTION
Continued from p. 1
Professor Walter A. Rosenbaum
agreed, and added, The proposal
formulates an alternative for the
aggressive nations. Where we have
a proposal for economic aid,
generally considered good, we have
elevated our image and created
new grounds for negotiation.
The speech however, said
Rosenbaum, assured the Soviet
Bloc that we are still determined
to fight in the same capacity as
before unless communist aggres aggression
sion aggression stops in South Vietnam.

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Thursday, Aon I 8, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Continued from p. 1
Carlton attacked the 20-day rule
primarily but said there mighty
be others he will oppose.
1 dont know what all is pro proposed,
posed, proposed, he said of the rules ham hammered
mered hammered out in closed meeting of the
rules committee and placed on the
desk of each senator. 1 want to
study them and see if they fur
there limit our working room.
Only opposition to the 20-day
rule, it was reported, was from
Sen. J. Emory Cross of Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville who favored 15 days.
Sen. E. W. Gautier of New Smyr Smyrna
na Smyrna Beach said letting the committee
set the calendar for 30 days would
save the state money by shortening

Spanier explained Americas
position. We are basically inter interested
ested interested in stopping progression of
communism south of the 17th par parallel-the
allel-the parallel-the border between North
and South Vietnam.
Our stepped-up war is to make
Hanoi realize that continued ag aggression
gression aggression may be too costly for
them in men and material, said
Spanier.
Looking deeper into the plan,
Rosenbaum said, It sounds like
the standard American answer to
discontent. Pour capital into a
country and the problems will
disappear.

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LEGISLAIU RE

the calendar which must be printed
daily and which often in the closing
days of a session is fatter than
a metropolitan telephone book. The
special order calendar of the rules
committee is generally no longer
than two pages.
The Senate gave unamimous ap approval
proval approval to only one rule change,
delaying consideration of others
until today. At the special re request
quest request of President James E. Con Connor,
nor, Connor, a rule was adopted raising the
number of senate committees to
44 and increasing the member membership
ship membership on a number of th-.n so more
senators could serve on commit committees
tees committees of thPtr choosing.

He added, 1 doubt if Congress
will appropriate that kind of
money. ($1 billion mentioned in
speech).
United Nations handling of the
proposal is a very clever move,
said Rosenbaum and Spanier.
Neutral countries might not
like the proposal if it were ad administered
ministered administered as policy of the United
States, said Spanier. It would
sound like an extention of American
containment.
The United Nations would be
very effective in administering the i
plan and, it would not look as if>
we were dictating the terms,
added Rosenbaum.

Page 7



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 8, 1965

Page 8

Baxley gets SEC scholar-athlete award

By ANDY MOOR
Sports Editor
Announcement of the selection
of Bruce Bennett and Lary Beck Beckman
man Beckman as captains of next years

SPORTS
i* x x : :-x'x-x*x*'^!-'-:v*.xj;*/!\;X;i;!;.vX;i>; vvtvXxix*:vx*>x|.jx|:*x*Xwtv>XxJ>>i*rv>>.*i*x*;%*X\*$*t*$**xv:
NO. 2 MAN GARDNER RETURNS VOLLEY
. . against FSU
Netmen bow to Seminoles;
Chase, Stone, Fick win

The Gator tennis team dropped
a heart breaker to FSU yesterday
by a 5-4 margin on the varsity
courts.
The loss lowered Coach Bill
Potters troops record to 9-8 with
but one match remaining against
Rollins away Saturday.
Riek Chace put on a sterling
performance and defeated FSUs
No. 1 player Paul De Zeew 2-6,
6-3, 6-3, after appealing over overmatched
matched overmatched in the first set.
Vic Stone and Ron Fick also
came through with wins in the sin singles.
gles. singles. Stone won his match over
Steve Guse 6-4, 6-3 while Fick
hung on after a marathon first
set to trounce Paul Burt 12-10,
6-3.
The Seminoles won the other
Frosh nine log
now stands 3-12
UFs freshman baseball team
lost a doubleheader to Gulf Coast
Junior College Tuesday, dropping
their season log to 3-12.
Gulf Coast used dependable
stickwork and numerous infield
errors to sweep the twin bill by
scores of 5-1 and 10-3.
Gulf got three runs in the second
inning of the first affair to off
loser Dan Dupree on a bases loaded
walk followed by a two run single.
Gulf's other two tallies came in
the fifth inning.
Nate Markham led the men from
West Florida with three hits in
the second affair. George Simmons
went most of the way and got the
win. Dick Alexander took the loss
for the Baby Gators.
Next game on the docket for
the frosh is a series with Brevard
Junior College Friday and
Saturday.

football team highlighted the fes festivities
tivities festivities at UFs annual All Sports
Banquet last night in the Hub.
Bennett was selected by his
teammates to captain the defense
while Beckman will head the of-

three singles matches as Paul Ben Bennet
net Bennet whipped Steve Gardner 8-6,
6-1 while Steve Bruner defeated
Bill Perin 6-2, 6-4. Terry Poore
defeated the Gators Bill Belote
6-1, 6-2. Thus the match was
even entering the doubles.
FSU managed victories in two of
the three doubles matches to ac accomvlish
comvlish accomvlish the victory. Bennet and
Randy Cameron stopped. Stone and
Gardner by a 6-4, 6-3 dount while
Bruner and Poore won out over
Fick and Belote 6-0, 6-4. UFers
Perrin and Chace took their dou doubles
bles doubles match to round out the play.

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fensive unit.
Captain of next years swim
squad will be breast-stroker Char Charlie
lie Charlie King. King was tapped in the
ceremony by retiring captain Ray
White house.
Master of Ceremonies for the
banquet was former Gator athlete
Red Mitchum while guest speaker
was Dr. Pierce Harris, Pastor
of the First Methodist Church
in Atlanta.
Tom Baxley was honored by
the Knoxville Basketball Club as
the outstanding basketball
player in the SEC in both athletics
and academics. It was the first
annual presentation of the award.
Taken into consideration for it
were basketball ability, grade
average and major field of study.
Hillsborough County Alumni As Association
sociation Association awarded the most valua valuable
ble valuable basketball player to Brooks
Henderson. Coach Norman Sloan
also announced that Henderson had
been named captain of the 1965
Gator squad in post-season ballot balloting.
ing. balloting.
Said Coach Sloan, At the end
of the season, Brooks Henderson
was the most complete and all allaround
around allaround basketball player in the
SEC.
All-America swimmer Tom
Dioguardi was presented the Tex
Oliver citation for most valuable
swimmer. Dioguardi finished fifth
nationally in the free style and
seventh in the butterfly on his
way to the award.
The Walter Matherly trophy for
outstanding student on the football
squad went to John Whatley. What Whatley,
ley, Whatley, a business administration ma major,
jor, major, was presented the trophy by
Tex Oliver of the business admin administration
istration administration faculty, whom the swim swimming
ming swimming award was named after.
As expected, the Fergie
Ferguson award for most valuable
football player went to All-Amer All-America
ica All-America Larry Dupree. The Ferguson
award is one of the most coveted
in the UF as it is given in memory
of a Gator footballer who died
on active duty in war.
Gator track coach Jim my Carnes
Sportsmens i
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SUZUKI I
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told of a new award which will
be presented next year for the
first time in the schools history.
The Percy Beard Award will go
to the outstanding boy on the track
squad.
Carnes also presented a 500
mile award to Dave Wilson and
Bob Halliday who ran that dis distance
tance distance earlier in the trimester.
In reference to the FSU meet
this weekend, Carnes promised,
Well beat them.
Coach Buster Bishop praised his
team which has won the Miami
and Florida Invitational in the past
two weeks and singled out Captain

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Laurie Hammer and Bob Murphy
who led the team through those
events.
Other coaches who tendered
speeches on their teams were
Bill Potter of the tennis team
and Walter Welsch of cross coun country.
try. country.