Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
j |Sl| THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

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PETITIONERS OUTSIDE TIGERT
..yesterday. Notice wagon at left.

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PETITION PRESENTED
...in smiling* embrace by leader Lucien Cross (left), and accepting
it UF Vice-Pres. Mautz (right). Notice Richer Get Out* sign in
background.

New harassments by Reds begun in Berlin

BERLIN (UPI) The Soviets
and East German Communists har harassed
assed harassed western ground, water and
air traffic to and from West Ber Berlin
lin Berlin yesterday in the biggest such
interference since the Berlin
blockade of 1948-49.
The Russians refused to pass

14 UF students suspended

The UF yesterday announced
suspension of 14 students in a
periodic report of disciplinary
offenses and actions covering
the past two months. Another
was placed on probation until
the end of the winter trimester.
Dean of Student Affairs Lester Hale handed
direct suspensions to five of the 15 students.
Three charges were for misconduct in dor dormitory
mitory dormitory areas, one was for armed robbery and
breaking and entering and the fifth for repeated
violations of Traffic and Safety Committee de decisions.
cisions. decisions. Action ranged from temporary dura duration
tion duration to January, 1968.

Vol. 57. No. 130

three U. S. military vehicles
through a checkpoint outside Berlin
they also tried to bar Western
Allied aircraft from flying below
6,000 feet in the three narrow air
corridors of West Berlin and sent
up jet fighters to inspect" air aircraft
craft aircraft that did.

Five of the 10 cases referred to the Faculty
Discipline Committee for action involved grand
larceny, four were disorderly conduct charges
and one was for participation in a theft.
The grand larceny incidents resulted in sus suspensions
pensions suspensions until August, 1966, for two of the
five students involved and until August, 1967,
for the other three.
Remaining decisions ranged from disciplinary
probation for the balance of the current trimester
to indefinite suspension until January, 1968,
with no consideration for readmission prior to
that date.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz approved all 10
recommendations from the Faculty Discipline
Committee.

University of Florida, Gainesville

'Save Richer'
petition presented

BY STEVE VAUGHN
Managing Editor
As a loud speaker
across Thirteenth
Street blared Dixie**
and a large group of
students on the side sidewalk
walk sidewalk in the background
chanted Richer must
go,** the Save
.icher** petition was
presented on the steps
of Tigert Hall yester yesterday.
day. yesterday.

A Western Allied spokesman said
a UJS. military transport flying
in the Hamburg-Berlin air corridor
was inspected" by a jet yester-'
day. The Communist jet flew close
to the American plane but did-.oot
buzz it. Tempelhof Airfield rad radioed
ioed radioed commercial aircraft in the

In a quick, concise
cermony, smiling Lu Lucian
cian Lucian Cross of Freedom
Forum handed the petition over to
smiling UF Vice-Pres. of
Academic Affairs Robert Mautz.
The petition, reportedly contain containing
ing containing 1,700 names, calls for rein reinstatement
statement reinstatement of the dismissed human humanities
ities humanities instructor Edward Richer to
the UF faculty for one year.
The petition was presented on
the steps by a group of about 75
singing Freedom Forum boosters
following a march from the Plaza
of the Americas, where they had
held an hour-long rally and peti petitionanny.
tionanny. petitionanny.
The entire incident, which began
with the noon rally and ended with
the petition presentation at 1:20
p.m., took on a carnival air.
The rally was highlighted by
folk songs and speeches over a
portable public address system
whose loudspeakers were toted on
a little red Red Flyer" wagon.
A 10-point student Bill of Rights"
was distributed at the Plaza pro proceedings.
ceedings. proceedings.
Even as the pro-Richerites
gathered on the Plaza, a group of
students with posters proclaiming
Richer Must Go" and Richer
Get Out" was forming. By the
time the marchers reached Tigert,
they were vastly outnumbered by
the Richer Must Go" group and
curiosity seekers.
The march was led by UF in instructor
structor instructor Marshall Jones, who spoke
earlier at the rally. Between the
Plaza and Tigert, marchers sang
Let it rain, let it pour, we're
gonna sit at Tigerts door," with
other selections called The Muz Muzzled
zled Muzzled Student Blues" and That
Free Student Spirit."
Richer himself trailed near the
end of the procession.
As the parade entered the Ti Tigert
gert Tigert front lawn, marchers were

corridors that unidentified"
planes had been sighted on radar
close to the airliners.
The Western Allies defied the
Russian attempt to limit air traffic
and dillvered a protest to the Berlin
air safety center.
The East German communists
blocked West German highway traf traffic
fic traffic to and from Berlin for hours
and limited barge traffic on canals
helping supply the city.
The large-scale harassment
coincided with the opening of bit
Soviet-East German military man-

Leg Council to meet tonight
There will be a meeting of the Legislative Council at 8:15 p.m.-
in Room 324 of the Florida Union tonight.
Progress Party will caucus at 7:45 in Room 324.
Action Party will caucus at 7:45 in Room 208.
Included in tonights agenda is the first reading of student
activity fee allocations.

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

greeted with strains of Dixie
from a loudspeaker in a fraternity
house across the street. Soon, a
group of sunbathers. began waving
a large confederate flag from the
roof of the house.
The Anti-Richerites, con considerably
siderably considerably larger than the petition
carryers, gathered on the sidewalk
in the background.
As Tigert secretaries and ad administrators
ministrators administrators peered curiously
from their windows, the marchers
climbed halfway up the steps and
commenced singing again. After
about 10 minutes of music, Mautz
stepped out onto the porch, and a
big cheer went up from the mar marchers
chers marchers gathered below.
Mautz, smiling, came down the
See PETITION on p. 2
I I m
PETITION MARCHES
ON TIGERT

euvers just outside of West Ber Berlin.
lin. Berlin.
The Communists cited the war
games as a pretext for their traf traffic
fic traffic interference. But it was clearly
aimed at trying to frustrate the
West German Parliaments plans to
hold a meeting in West Berlin.
In their bid to block the par parliament
liament parliament meeting, the Communists
Sunday prevented West Berlin May Mayor
or Mayor Willy Brandt from driving back
to his city and barred West Ger German
man German parliament members from
traveling by road or rail to West
Berlin.



Page 2

I, The Florida Aliigalor # Tuesday, April 6, 1965

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(Continued from Page 1)
steps, shook Cross* hand and ac accepted
cepted accepted the petition.
Mautz pulled a prepared state statement
ment statement from his pocket and read over
the rolling speaker system, The
University welcomes legitimate
expressions of interest and con concern
cern concern by students with respect to the
educational program, the faculty
and the students of the University
of Florida.
Included in the concept of
legitimate is the principle that
any educated man is informed as
to the facts of an undertaking to
which he lends his name.

Were trying to determine the
differences in the characteristics
of people who are stingy with
money for their local schools and
those who are not/ says Dr.
R. L. Johns, head of the UF
Department of Educational Ad Administration.
ministration. Administration.
Johns, assisted by Dr. Ralph
B. Kimbrough, is conducting a
research project financed by the
U. S. Office of Education to de determine,
termine, determine, among other things, how
the levels of education vary in
communities that lend strong
support to school systems and

Lanier named Religion-ln-Life head

Ron Lanier, a 2UC from miami,
has been chosen as the new Chair Chairman
man Chairman for the Religion-in-Life
Committee for the 1965-66 school
year. He is a member of Delta
Tau Delta Fraternity. He was a
member of this years Religion Religionin-Life
in-Life Religionin-Life Executive Committee and
In charge of publicity for this
years programs wiiich featured
Barbara Ward, Rev. William Sloan
Coffin, and others.

KISERS OFFICE EQUIPMENT
604 N. MAIN STREET
A NEW SHIPMENT
DESKS FROM $lO to S6O
16 NICE SEC'Y CHAIRS $lO up
80 CARD FILES \ CAQ/ ACC
40 DESK TRAYS j JwO Vll
Only at KISERS
do you find such bargains!

Education funds studied

jHsJpF 8F B'. m

This petition is received un under
der under the above philosophy.
The University will care carefully
fully carefully consider the various ques questions
tions questions raised by this petition. At Attention
tention Attention is again invited to the fact
that under the Constitution of the
University, Departments and Col Colleges
leges Colleges play an important initial role
in the formulation of decisions af affecting
fecting affecting faculty, he ended.
Thank you, said Cross, still
smiling. This is a fine gesture
on the part of the administration.
he said.
They shook hands and smiled
again, then Mautz, petition in hand,
hurried back inside.

those that dont.
The two UF educators are
studying ischool districts in
Florida, Georgia, Illinois, and Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky and are interested in such
aspects of the districts as the
political affiliation of the majority
of the population, whether it tends
to be conservative or liberal, how
the teachers hired there react to
the whims of the local community;
the functions, structure and power
of the governing elite in the
communities and the opinions of
both lay and specialized leaders in
the selected communities.

Lanier said, We are doing our
best to get Barbara Ward to come
back to the UF campus for a re return
turn return engagement. We intend to have
the really outstanding type of pro program
gram program which a campus the size of
ours deserves.
He was chosen to succeed Ver Vernon
non Vernon Swartzel, 4JM from Mount
Dora, who has served as chairman
for the past two years.

Final twilight
concert here
Wednesday night

The last in a series
of popular winter tri trimester
mester trimester twilight con concerts
certs concerts is scheduled
here Wednesday night
at 6:45.
The performance by
the University Concert
Band will begin at6:45
p.m. in the Plaza of
the Americas. Another
series is planned
during the spring tri trimester.
mester. trimester.
The bands baritone
section and drummer
Dave Alquist will be
featured. A special
concert march ar arrangement
rangement arrangement of The
World is Waiting for

Cross turned back onto his fol followers
lowers followers and said, This is a peace peaceful
ful peaceful demonstration. Lets disperse.
The marchers began to re retreat
treat retreat from the steps; the curious
in the background broke up; the
Confederate flag was taken inside
and Dixie turned off.
Near the Information desk in inside
side inside Tigert, Mautz was approached
by a UF student.
I signed that petition before I
realized what was going on, the
student said. I'd like to get my
name off if I could.
There are probably a lot of
people whose names are on here
like that, said Mautz.

A grant of $224,000 has been
received to cover the three year
project. Part of the money goes
towards the salaries of eight
graduate students, Johns said.
Johns explained the study is
compiling two scales, one to
determine the views of conser conservative
vative conservative liberal citizens on civic
problems and the other to see
what the educational beliefs of the
same type people are.
The project began last
September.
ouR Home-Baked
lASaSna:
THE Hit of The
oMolf CAHpus
tamattellas
706 West University Avenue

the Sunrise spot spotlights
lights spotlights the baritones
while Alquist solos in
a comedy number,
The Worried Drum Drummer,
mer, Drummer,
Music from the
sound tracks of How
the West Was Won
and Victory at Sea
is also on tap.
Six get
Wilson Grants
Six UF students have been award awarded
ed awarded Woodrow Wilson Fellowships
for the academic year 1965-66,
reports Dr. Robert A. Bryan, cam campus
pus campus representative for the Founda Foundation.
tion. Foundation.
/
The UF students to receive the
awards are: Eugene Clark(physics)
Miss Mary Lewis (psychology),
Thomas Muenzenberger (math (mathematics),
ematics), (mathematics), Miss JoAnnNotaris (pol (political
itical (political science), Kirby Smith (pol (political
itical (political science), and Miss Alice
Wolking (foreign languages).
Receiving Honorable mention
are: Charles Butler, Miss Kath Kathleen
leen Kathleen Lowry, Danny McElrath, David
McElwee, Miss Helen Neel, and i
Kenneth Seid.
Woodrow Wilson Fellowships are
awarded annually to recruit stu students
dents students into the teaching profession.
The Fellowshp carries a stipend
of SI,BOO plus SI,OOO for the first j
child and $250 for each additional j
child for one academic year. Tui Tuition
tion Tuition and fees are paid directly
to the Fellow's chosen graduate
school.

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At 5'5", with green eyes,&
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Chemistry courses to undergo changes

Students crossing over and
getting shot down has led the
General Chemistry Department to
make some changes in its course

Escambia solon aims for $967

TALLAHASSEE, FIa.(UPI)-Rep.
George Stone of Escambia said
yesterday he will call for a cau caucus
cus caucus of the House of Representa Representatives
tives Representatives sometime this week to nail
down the 1967 speakership.
Stone, a Walnut Hill high school
teacher when not serving in the
legislature, was speaker pro-tern pro-ternpore

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mm/
I love a man in Van Heusen 417
Im real keen on his lean swingy
physique and the spare, pared-down
flattery that V-Taper fit adds to
it. Cant get my eyes off the
great way he looks, either in a
traditional Button-Down or spiffy
Snap-Tab. And in those Van Heusen
spring weaves and colors ... those
short-cut sleeves, my mans
got it made!
*'- |
rml VAN HEUSEN
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van
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IN THE AUTHENTIC SNAP-TAB
It takes more than a snap to
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mg a Van Heusen, the real thing in
MM a Snap-Tab shirt. Everything
about it is authentic ... the neat,
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fabric and finish. Everyone gets the
message .. executive brass
gj and swingy lass!
V-Taper s*.oo
BELK-UNDSEY
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

structure.
Dr. Richard D. Dresdner, acting
head of the General Chemistry De Department
partment Department while Dr. John F. Baxter

pore pro-ternpore of the 1961 House.
The lawmaker hasnt made
public the number of votes pledged
to his support, but said there were
enough to guarantee him the job.
He was expected to make his
move for a caucus late in the week,
probably Friday.

is in Brazil, said, Weve changed
the order in which the material
is presented, but not the content
of the courses.

A popular legislator, Stone has
drawn occasional jibes during his
eight years in the house because
he gets his mail via an Alabama
rural route. He has often been
called the only member of the Flor Florida
ida Florida legislature from Alabama.
Early designation of the House
speaker is traditional. There has
been no set pattern in past years
of a time for the caucus, however.
The present speaker, E. C. Po Powell
well Powell of Stumter, called for the cau caucus
cus caucus on the second day of the 1963
session. Others have waited later
in the week.
The Senate has moved away from
naming its next president during a
legislative session, preferring to
designate its top man at a post postlegislative
legislative postlegislative caucus. Sen. G. T. Mel Melton
ton Melton of Lake City is considered the
top contender for the 1967 presi presidents
dents presidents job.
Designation of the new speaker
actually takes little time. Stone,
or a friend, will make a motion
that the House go into a Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic caucus. Since the Democrats
are in the majority, there will
be instant agreement and Stone
will be named to the post.
- There is rarely a battle because
candidates do not call for a cau caucus
cus caucus unless they have the necessary
votes in hand.
The Alligator I
for the I
announcement I
of our I
forthcoming I
move to a I
new location. I
Until then, I
come see us I
franklins
'EJoum a I
College fibef I
401 W. Univ. Ave. I

Tuesday, April 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Previously the schedule called
for beginning chemistry students to
take CY-215 if they had no prior
chemistry. They would then take
CY-217 and CY-218.
But, said Dresdner, guys
kept crossing over and getting shot
down because there were different
sections of 217 and 218 for people
who had taken 215, different from
those who hadnt.
One section of 217 would cover
the subject in a particular order,

campus news briefs

TAX CLINIC
Beta Alpha Psi accounting
honorary fraternity will help
students with income tax
problems. This service is
free and is offered this
afternoon from 1-3 p.m. in
Room 15, Matherly Hall.
PSYCHOLOGY WIVES
Mrs. Elizabeth Pittman will
speak on Decorating on a
Limited Budget at the
meeting of the Wives of Psy Psychology
chology Psychology Students tonight at
8 p.m. at the home of Mrs.
Fred King, 3666 N. W. 13th
Place.
OR CHE SIS
Slides from the Connecticut
College Summer School of
Dance will be shown at
tonights meeting of Orchesls
at 7 p.m. in the Womens
Gym. Public is invited.
SABRE TEAM
All freshmen Army R.O.
T.C. cadets interested in
joining the Sabre Team in
September will meet on the
afternoon they drill at 4:30
p.m. in MAR 202 classroom.
LOAN INTERVIEWS
National Defense Loan in interviews
terviews interviews continue this week
in Room 124, Tigert Hall,
according to first letter of
applicant's last name: today-
N, O, P, Q, Wednesday -R,
Thursday S, Monday, April
12-T,U,V, Tuesday, April 13-
W, X, Y, Z.

ll - ' u '
Its
Steak jglll
Larrys
Large Del Monico,
TUESDAYS Baked Potatoes
Tossed Salad-
STEAK NIGHT 5-9 P.M. Hot Buttered Ralls
$1.07
JUST 1/2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS
LARRY'S
RESTAURANT
1225 W. University Ave, j

anri the other section would cover
the same material in a different
order.
Dresdner said two new section
numbers have been put into effect
to prevent anyone from getting in
the wrong section. He emphasized
that these are not new courses, just
new section numbers.
The two new sections are CY CY-219
-219 CY-219 -and CY 220. Both are only
for students who have completed
CY-215.

SPELEOLOGICAL
The Florida
Society will hold an election
meeting tomorrow night at
7 p.m. at Room 116, Florida
Union.
LABOR OFFICE
The Student Government
Labor Office, Room 309,
Florida Union will be open
every afternoon this week at
3:30 p.m.
FINE ARTS DAMES
All wives of students and
married women students in
the College of Architecture
and Fine Arts are invited to
attend the meeting of the
Architecture and Fine Arts
Dames tonight at 9 p.m. at
the home of Mrs. D. L. Wllmot,
1232 NW 36th Drive. A metor metorcade
cade metorcade will meet at the
University Women's Club on
West Newberry Road at 7:30
p.m.
HUMANITIES CLUB
The Humanities Club will
show the film version of
Shakespeare's "Hamlet" to tonight
night tonight at 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
GEOLOGY SOCIETY
Sigma Gamma Epsilon geo geology
logy geology society will sponsor a
lecture on hydrogeology
Wednesday night at 7 p.m. in
the Physics Auditorium.
Speaker will be Nevin Hoy
of the U. S. Geological Sur Survey.
vey. Survey. Public is invited.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator. Tuesday. April 6, 1965

THE FLORIDA
HSfef) ALLIGATOR
\3Sf/ served By United Press International
ERNIE LITZ STEVE VAUGHN JOE CASTELLO
Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor Executive Editor
LOU FERRIS ANDY MOOR
Editorial Page Editor Sports Editor
In search of Maturity
(ED. NOTE: This editorial is reprinted from
The Tampa Tribune, March 31, 1965.)
College days would be devoid of restraint
and responsibility and students could forget
classes and occupy themselves with speeches
and picket signs, if a conference held last
weekend had its way.
Called Democracy on Campus, the meeting
brought together several hundred of the most
ardent fomenters of collegiate rebellion and
concluded with adoption of a loud manifesto.
Under this Student Bill of Rights, college
administrators would be relegated to main maintenance,
tenance, maintenance, clerical and safety functions--without
any say-so over the way their institutions
were run.
Who would have the real authority? Why,
the students and professors, of course.
Tuition fees would be eliminated, loyalty
oaths would be thrown out, campus law en enforcement
forcement enforcement would be under student-faculty
control, R.O.T.C. units would be abolished
and thered be complete freedom of speech.
The conference in Philadelphia included
students from the strife-ridden University of
California at Berkeley as well as a number
of Eastern schools. It was held at the
University of Pennsylvania.
Delegates representing a number of
so-called activist groups, including the
Marxist-line Duois Clubs neglected to say
that most of the changes they propose are
already in effect in a number of South American
countries. There, professional leftist students
cant be bothered oy studies, for theyre too
busy with demonstrations and political
movements year after year.
A Marxist tone was injected into the
Philadelphia manifesto, with reference to the
financial, industrial and military establish establishment
ment establishment which, the delegates maintain, is running
Americas academic life.
But the worst villains of all, according to
the groups draft document, are the
administrators who have found ingenious
theories to suppress student maturity and
thoughtful action.* True, true. Some presidents
and regents would even forbid students to
parade filthy words on campus placards; and
some of these unreasonable officials go to
the extreme of contending that universities
are places for disciplinea instruction rather
than for individual self-expression.
What these young loud-mouths really want is
not an education but a privileged form of
anarchy, subsidized by the taxpayers and
doting parents. They have been too much
tolerated; and like a spoiled child, they grow
nastier with indulgence.
Its time, we say, for colleges to stop
temporizing with these disruptive elements, as
the University of California has done to its
sorrow. Either let them abide by the reason reasonable
able reasonable regulations which every educational
institution must impose, or boot them out
placards, manifestoes, beards and all. There
are more than enough young men and women
seriously in search of maturity who will be
grateful to seize their abandoned opportunities.
EDITORIAL STAFF: Mark Freeman and Stan Kulp (cartoonists),
Sharon Kelley (Student Government Beat Chief), Lee Alexander,
Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles, Dan Taylor, Jay Foley, Sam
U 11man, Jane Young (Tigert Beat Chief), Woody Leonard, Nancy
Van Zile, Linda Cody, Bob Wilcox, and Drex Dobson.
REPORTERS: Carl Brown, Bob Wilcox, Dee Wright, Steve
Kanar, Judy Knight, Ann Carter, Thelma Moss man, Fran Snider,
Cynthia Tunstall, Karen Vitunac, Ami Saperstein, Bill Lockhart,
Drex Dobson, Eunice Tall, Kay Huffmaster, Jeffrey Denkewalter,
G. S. Corseri and Ken Simon.
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"THE NERVE OF THAT GUY, PICKETING US. .
,v.v v.v
v.v v.v
What do they like?

EDITOR:
HAVING READ YOUR article on
the sit-in last week with a great
deal of pleasure, Pd like to suggest
that you run an article soon giving
the definition of some of the words
the demonstrators use so often
without any apparent knowledge of
their meaning.
I THINK in their present use usefulness
fulness usefulness to society, this group has
expressed only one true talent, that
of acting as a paperweight..
THEY SHOULD also consider
themselves fortunate that they
didn't plop down on one of those
memo spikes you keep on your desk.

EDITOR:
PLEASE DO NOT print another
issue of The Florida Inquirigator
like you printed April U-No-What.
I have not learned a thing since I
read the paper. It was too much.
I went through the day in a daze.
I ALSO WENT through two plate
Glass doors while reading the paper.
(I'm sueing Windex for damages.)

EDITOR:
I AND OTHERS demand to know
why the Alligator has seemingly
refused to print any information
on the swimming team's recent trip
to the NCAA Swimming Champion Championships.
ships. Championships. You surely gave us enough
information about the meet before
it took place, especially in the
person of Tom Dioguardi. Could it
be that All Americas are so
common at the UF that they no
longer deserve recognition? Just
how often does the following happen:
the swim team finishes higher

EDITOR:
AFTER BEING out of the U. S.
for a two year period with the
Peace Corps, I find the new
freedom movements very
thought- provoking. The noise they
are making has led me to under understand
stand understand the old problem of what does
one-hand clapping sound like, for
I definitely hear a sound.
HOWEVER, I have not figured
out If it is the right or left hand
that is making the noise, or is it

It might be apropos to define
freedom of press, freedom of
choice, and the freedom of working
at your own desk.
TO SEE a freedom organization
tie up a newspaper office because
the editors refuse to allow free
advertising through a personal
opinion column is truly a farce.
PersonaUy I'd like to see the
organization purchase a mimeo mimeograph
graph mimeograph machine and quit flooding the
Alligator with their deluge of so
called "personal letters to the
editor.'*
OTHERWISE THE Alligator is
going to be a poop sheet of that
organization. Around the campus

Ha-ha-he-he-HAH

I thought I was going to die laughing,
and I almost did. I got choked on
an all-day sucker.
THE INQUIRIGATOR, Vol. 57,
No. 126, is at its best. It is filled
with satire, sarcaslsms, and down
right lies. What more can a UFer
ask for? Be sure that the New
Orange Peel and Pique receive a
copy of this edition. They could
learn a lot from it.

He demands to know

than any other Florida swim team
in history? (13th)
that the team beats every team
in the Championships it had lost
to in dual meets?
that the swim team has the first
person in the history of the Uni University
versity University to place in three events?
(Tom Dioguardi)
that the relay team puts in its
best time and finishes number
nine?
that the swim team beats FSU
in every event in which the two

Finds it refreshing

that It makes no difference?
IT IS REFRESHING to see the
new generation clamoring for
freedom and self-expression above
the mature, experienced voices of
administrators, educators, and
government officials, for these
dedicated workers must be despots,
out for self-gain and surely are
dedicated to oppress the will of
the masses.
WAKE UP Freedom fighters,
lets start first by keeping the
University a place of learning,

I can see nothing that group has
done in a constructive nature. They
don't like the Alligator, they don't
like the school administration, they
don't like the city, county, state or
national governmental policies.
SOMEHOW I GET the idea that
these bearded, unkempt wonders
just like to rebel and repeat to
you as they sit on your desk;
Remember we're a nonviolent
organization.''
YOU ALSO MIGHT try hanging
fly paper the next time they drop
by for a visit. Perhaps then theyll
be able to see the light.
CHARLES E. LEONARD, 2UC

AS A JOURNALISM major, my
professional advice, which isnt
worth a d m, is that this is a
great paper, the best issue you have
ever published, and more power to
you in future Issues if youre still
alive! Beautiful work.. .Beautiful!
NAME WITHHELD
(Constitutional privilege)
* I THINK

teams were entered?
The NCAA meet has been finished
tor almost a week now, yet the
Alligator, with its typical coverage,
has failed to let the student body
know how well its team has done.
I do not understand why it is tha
I must continue to buy a state
newspaper in order to find out wba
is happening on this campus! This
so-called newspaper owes every
one of the persons who went to
the NCAA meet an apology. ""
Disgusted
NAME WITHHELD

not a hot-bed of agitation. With t e
tremendous problems that face e
world today I would recommend a
two year term in the Peace Corps,
but remember, to solve problems,
pickets, boycotts, sod sod
technique will not work.
ANYWAY MO6T count ri
needing our help have
methods perfected. What they
we need is education and under understanding,
standing, understanding, not agitation.
ARTHUR B. UNGER, lAG



By JON DEMME
Columnist
TO ADD MY humble words of praise to
the raves already accorded Wild
Strawberries'* Bergman's masterpiece, by film
critics the world over would be to risk irate
charges of plagarism; surely every laudatory
adjective known to man has been used in
describing this remarkable film. The heart
and soul of man are the areas explored here
with poetic care. Strawberries*' will be at
the State through April 10th. It's a must-see.
THE BIGGEST PARTY of the year is going
full-tilt at stately Hollis House, but Charlotte
Hollis and her boyfriend John Mayhew are
nowhere to be seen. Ah ha! So here they are
spoonin' in the summer house. Huh? Wait a
minute Charlotte's in tears! John wants
to call the whole thing off!
THE CAD how could he? Bouquet in
hand, Char goes racing out, weeping bitterly.
Gone forever probably, but no! rustling noises

EDITOR:
WHAT IS THIS SGER? Who is
this man named Richer? Why
the utter lack of coherence in
protesting his unjust cause?
The Student Group for Equal
Rights (Freedom Forum) seems to
be a group of totally irresponsible
individuals who not only act the
part but dress it as well. Any of
us who have seen these outrageous
responsible individuals on
campus should certainly be able
to recognize them at a moments
glance.
Any group which condones the
dress of these individuals and
their dress, hair long enough to
set in pin curls, beards full enough
to substitute as nests, and clothes
which have been overlooked in last
month's wash, must certainly be
as irresponsible as it's members.
NOT ONLY DO they resent all
forms of authority, but act as
children when their demands are
not met. Surely gentlemen, a sit-in
at the Alligator office to protest
the absence of letter publications,
which in the opinions of the editors
are either of poor quality, mis misrepresentation,
representation, misrepresentation, or cannot be
printed because of a of space,
does not present your organization
favorably.
f ASHAWAY VANTAGE
For Tournament Pity
Approx. Stringing Colt
't-'-fASHAWAY PRO-FECTED^w
For Club Play
Approx. Stringing Colt
Tennis $7 1
Badminton s6^l
Vi; f ASHAWAY MULTI PLY
Fos Regular Pity 8
Approx. Stringing Cost |
Tennis... $5 I
. Badminton # .$4

Dont miss Strawberries or Sweet Charlotte

Freedom of the Press is perhaps
the one freedom which all
Americans have not been denied
and the fact that your protestation
made front page copy is proof
enough that the Alligator still holds
this freedom.
And what of your actions con condoning
doning condoning students who feel their
education comes second or last to
the march in Selma, Alabama?
What exactly was the grade standing
of these martyred members who
felt their actions would better the
cause of civilized man in un uncivilized
civilized uncivilized America? Why limit
their scope to America only?
If they are so concerned over
the welfare of man, in particular
the Negro, why don't they go to
the Harlem districts of New York,
Chicago, Boston, and other areas
of America in which the Negro
surely needs salvation? I'm sure
the Negro of Selma, if given the
chance to flee north to the ghettos
of his northern brethern, would
pass it up.

- mi 11 I i ..
r
it.
\ class pixt^
1 Now Available off-campus
j A college degree is an earned asset
| worthy of pride. Wear your achieve achievement
ment achievement proudly with the University of
I Florida class ring from Gainesville's
I leading jewelers.
[FOR those WHO CARE...]
Â¥ MEMBER AMERICAN.
# GEM SOCIETY
103 W. University Ave. Phone 376-2655

MOVIES ON REVIEW

outside tell us someone is about to enter -- it
must be Charlotte coming back to make up.
Whoa! Those aren't posies in hand that's a
meat cleaver! Watch out John! Whoops,
there goes a hand. Run John! THUD off
with his head.
SUCH A MESS. So starts Hush, Hush,Sweet
Charlotte,'* a blood chiller guaranteed to
generate galaxies of gooseflesh, almost two
and a half hours worth, in fact.
BETTE DAVIS, the unofficial Queen of the
Macabre, howls, claws, and shrieks her way
through Hush*' in fine style, with Agnes
Moorehead (her performance has earned her
an Oscar nomination), Mary Astor, and Olivia
de Haviland adding to the ghoulish goings on
at Hollis House. Story picks up thirty five
years after the unsolved murder of John, as
heinous happenings again fill the halls of the
now-delapidated mansion.

What is SGER?

And if not, why doesn't this SGER
work as hard in granting these
people their wish?
How sweet it is this concept
of Freedom. But why limit them themselves
selves themselves to American boundaries?
Why, if they are truly interested
in Freedom, don't they carry out
efforts in Cuba to overthrow
Castro?
Why don't they support the
actions of the .U. S. in securing
freedom for those in Foreign
countries such as Korea, Viet
Nam, Indonesia, Hungary, and all
other areas of the world which are
feeling the force of slavery? Isn't
the betterment of man the main
objective in their endless efforts to
create a better world?
Or do they realize how futile and
dangerous tor them to demonstrate
in these countries as they are
demonstrating in this home of ours,
the good old U.S.A.?
But gentlemen, their cause is
much too idealistic, because with
freedom comes responsibilitv. and

Tuesday, April 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

ROBERT ALDRICH'S spooky direction and
clever camera work make the black and white
photography more effective, the situations more
sinister, and the gore more realistic than
color photography ever could have achieved.
Although "Hush" lacks the compactness and
credibility that made "Psycho" a classic,
it is head and shoulders above the similar
horrors now flooding the screen; all-in-all
a good film and a proper thriller. (Seven
Oscar Nominations.) At the downtown Florida.
* *
FILMING ON THE newest James Bond
adventure, ** Th unde rb all" began last week in
the Bahamas. In addition to three new lovelies,
"Thunderball" will feature, "a giant hydrafoil
that skims across the ocean at 95 m.p.h.,
rocket-firing motor-bikes, huge underwater
sleds, and a land-to-air rescue device that
snatches a man aloft at 180 m.p.h. Estimated
cost: over five and a half million dollars.

this group, along with others of
their type throughout the U.S.A.,
are exhibiting a total lack of
responsibility of the grossest sort.
If it is the opinion of the Uni University
versity University administration that Edward
Richer is an unqualified teacher,
for reasons extremely personal
(which these reasons must be or
they would be known by now), then
I stand behind them 100%, It is
the prerequisite of this university
to assure the majority of students
an excellent teaching standard,
which is so vital to a University
of this size.
If it is their opinion that Richer
is unqualified to teach any longer,
and that far more better and more

BBS:
W 1
POINT
OF THE
LANCE
by Sargent
Shriver
16 pages of illustrations
At all bookstores.
Cloth, $4.95. Paper, $1.45

o")fffwiup*£ New York, N.Y. 10016 I

qualified persons are available,
then I applaud them for their
judgement.
And, if it is the decision of
the SGER to flaunt, mimic, mock
those officials who are in a better
and wiser position to know the
decisions which have been reached
are for the best, then I am totally
convinced of their total lack of
judgement. Their actions alone are
a mockery of all justice, and all
which justice stands for. And their
ideals seem to be exemplary of
another system in which they are
so now out of place.
Robert McDaniels, 2uc

A stirring book
> by tiie Director
I of the
I Peace Corps
I and the War
I on Poverty
This book combines the
vision and hardheaded,
practical touch of its author,
one of the ablest new figures
in public life of our genera generation.
tion. generation. It is a book to give
courage and hope to the
anxious and fearful, and to
confirm the faith of those
who see what a great future
lies before mankind. If
Sargent Shrivers ringing
words could be read by mil millions
lions millions as I hope it will be
it would advance the cause
of peace and tell Americans
more about their true selves
than any book I have seen
in many a year. It is a dis distinguished
tinguished distinguished and thoughtful
book by a shining person personality.
ality. personality.
- David E. Lildenthal
An extremely valuable re resource
source resource and contribution in
the War on Poverty around
the world and in our own
backyard. Professor
Patricia Sexton, New York
University

Page 5



Page 6

> The Florida Alligator, Tuesday. April 6, 1965

I GATOR CLASSIFIEDS!

For Sale
MUST SELL BEFORE EXAMS!
BEST OFFER BUYS 1959 MOBILE
HOME, 10x45, very good condition,
2 bedroom. Glynwood Park, on
Archer Road. Phone 378-1596
TODAY! (A-129-2t-p).
ODE BANJO Rosewood neck
with hand carved peghead & heel,
ebony finger board with mother motherof-pearl
of-pearl motherof-pearl inlay. S3OO or best offer.
John Pierson 372-8743. (A-127-
ts-c).
BOAT FOR SALE OR TRADE.
Have 16 foot Carter Craft with
30 h.p. Evenrude Motor and a Gator
Tilt Trailer with windshield,
canvas top, remote controls skis
and slalom. Will trade for car of
equal value. Call FR 2-3251 after
6 p.m. (A-127-st-c).
LIKE NEW: FM/AM BAND, 3-
speed 14 transistor, Portable
Stereo Radio-Phonograph, (works
on batteries). Plus AC adapter
$125.00. FR 2-9372. Ask for Cal Calvin.
vin. Calvin. (A-126-st-p).
1960 SABRE 50x10 MOBILE
HOME. Air-conditioned. Excellent
condition with 30x10 screened
alum, cabana. After 6, Lot 36
Hickory Hill.
4t-c).
MUST GO Boat-Motor & trailer
$250. Mechanics Motorcycle
in box S2O. Also table saw & motor
$30.00. FR 2-8101. (A-128-3t-p).
1964 250 cc ZUNDAPP Cycle
perfect condition. 30 day warranty.
Financing available at $24 per
month with a $25 down payment.
Price $425. Phone 376-4524 nights
376-1597. (A-129-3t-c).
LIKE NEW G.E.STOVE, automatic
defrost refrigerator and washer.
Call FR 2-6714 after 6 p.m. Must
be seen to appreciate. (A-129-2t-
P).
COMMODORE TRAILER 28x8 with
10x20 attached cabana at Town
and Country Trailer Park, pool,
godd buy, owner graduating. Call
372-7234. (A-129-2t-c).
fflnWHf
TONITE 3 c '
I M&k FIRST AREA
SHOWING
\ WM SHOCKING!
Brain Surgery
ftuF T without Drugs--
J*) Fires of Puberty
/ $ Power of
the Hexes!
acaste'% J>a
aw* I-Jj 1 -Jj
3nd Cater Award Xttmff
"THi SKY ABOVE
AND MUD BELOW"
and Calnr Jun*te TbriUcr
Savarr l?pl*krd
"WALK WTO HELL"
STARTS M v BlOOd
hupay JSmmWHA

For Sale
START YOUR OWN WAR! Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition M-l Garand rifle.
S6O. Dr. Carney, Infirmary. (A (A---130-3t-c).
--130-3t-c). (A---130-3t-c).
HALF-CARAT DIAMOND
SOUTAIRE, Tiffany setting in
white gold. Like New. Available
for local appraisal. $200.372-1783.
(A-130-3t-p).
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER.
Six 500 sheet boxes of Buff. Retail
for S2O per box. WiU sacrifice for
$lO per box. Call Ext. 2832 between
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. (A-130-ts-s).
HOUSE FOR SALE. 2-bedroom
frame, furnished, large screened
porch, play yard. 5 minutes from
Med. Center, off Archer Road.
SB,OOO take occupancy June 15th.
Call 372-0752. (A-130-3t-c).
V-M STEREOPHONIC TAPE
Recorder. Excellent condition. Call
FR 6-1901 after 9 p.m. weekdays.
(A-130-3t-p).
1956 GREAT LAKES HOUSE
TRAILER. 8x34 with 10x10 wooden
sealed cabana, air-conditioned,
deep freeze, 10x10 porch. Can
occupy 7/1/65. SISOO cash. See at
Town & Country Trailer Park.
Call Don Hall FR 2-4602. (A-130-
lt-c).
MUST SELL 1963 Horizon mobile
home, 45x10. Small equity plus
payments of $76.07 per month or
pay balance of $3,324. Call 378-
2854. (A-129-3t-c).
3 MINUTES FROM MED. CENTER
and NEW VA HOSPITAL. 3-bed 3-bedroom,
room, 3-bedroom, 1 bath (converted trailer)
home on oak shaded lot. Nicely
furnished. $5,500. Terms. Call
Mrs. Marcella, Pardi, W. M. Buck Buckhannon,
hannon, Buckhannon, Vernon Fullwood, Mrs. Ann
Hinson, John Merrill Agency, FR
2-1494. (A-129-3t-c).
... i
For Rent
AVAILABLE B-term, large one
bedroom apartment. Close to
campus. 915 SW 6th Ave. S9O per
month. Call 2-7683. (B-130-ts-c).
TRAILER FOR RENT. Private lot!
1965 55xlO* 2 or 3 bedroom.
Available April 22nd for summer
trimester only. Phone 372-0517.
(B-128-3t-p).
LARGE ROOMS with a fully equip equipped,
ped, equipped, upstairs, KITCHEN, available
to male students. Occupy
immediately. 104 SW Bth Street or
372-0243. (B-127-tf-nc).
AVAILABLE APRIL 25, large cool,
comfortable room in private tome.
Nice quiet surroundings. See at
202 NW 12th Terr. Call FR 6-5368
or FR 6-2100. (B-125-st-c).
Ann Award
IpgpH Cannes
James
Mason
PUMPKIN EATER

For Rent
LARGE 2-BEDROOM Furnished
apartment close to campus. Air Airconditioned,
conditioned, Airconditioned, wood paneled. Water
sewage free. 921 SW 6th Ave.
376-8032. (B-129-3t-c).
FURNISHED HOUSE 2-bedroom,
freshly redecorated. Convenient
walking distance from Univ.
and town. IdeaUy located. $l2O/
month. Call Layton 8-2671. (B (B---127-ts-c).
--127-ts-c). (B---127-ts-c).
KEEP COOL THIS SUMMER! New
Danish modern, one bedroom, air airconditioned
conditioned airconditioned apartment with plenty
of closet space. S9O a month (in (includes
cludes (includes water, sewage and garbage
collection). Available April 24th.
Call 372-0094 after 5:30. (B-126-
st-$.
2 BEDROOM FURNISHED HOUSE,
1 mile from campus. Will sublet
April 25 through Aug. $65 monthly.
372-2861. (B-126-ts-c).
AVAILABLE APRIL 24, furnished,
2-bedroom, kitchen, Reduced rate
for summer. 322-A NE 11th St.
378-1509. (B-126-st-c).
2-BEDROOM FURNISHED
APARTMENT, available summer
trimester, 1 mile from campus.
$75/mo. for two plus utilities. Call
8-2018. (B-126-st-c).
ALL UNITS GROUND FLOOR, 2
rooms furnished, refrigerator.
Few air-conditioners. No kitchens.
2 blocks from main air-conditioned
Library, classes, food centers,
Post Office, laundry etc. Rates
S9O sls entire semester.
6-6494. (B-126-st-c).
UNFURNISHED Apartment, 3 large
rooms. Kitchen furnished, tile bath
and 1/2. Large porch and yard.
Enjoy cool shady summer living.
SBS per month. 923 NW 3rd Ave.
376-9992. (B-123-ts-c).
HOUSE AVAILABLE TO SUBLET
for summer. May keep after sum summer
mer summer if desired. 5 room air-con air-conditioned.
ditioned. air-conditioned. Suitable for 4 people,
can be seen by appointment. 4401
SW 13th Street. 378-1252. (B-127-
ts-c).
3A & B 3-bedroom, 2-bath,
furnished new house. 5 min. from
campus. $l2O per mo. Ideal for
family or group of students. Call
FR 2-8668 after 6. (B-125-ts-c).
FURNISHED APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE April 1 & May 1.
One bedroom modern, air-cond.
apts. near Univ. & Med. Center.
Adults only, no pets. Lease re required.
quired. required. S9O/mo. 372-3488 or 376-
4360. (B-125-ts-c).
-
MODERN TRAILER. Ideal for
family or 2 or 3 students, com completely
pletely completely furnished washing
machine, swimming pool. SIOO/
month. Call 2-6869 after 6:00 p.m.
or all day weekends. (B-128-3t-c).
FLORIDA 7\cxt J
you shoul-D £££
Woubkl^
CHUtMf j
aNp segfAMl 1
HOORAY FOR FAWZ U.
JOHN 6QLPFARB

For Rent
FURNISHED 2-bedrooro duplex
available Trimester 111-A or A
and B. Woman graduate student
or faculty member, or couple. Air Airconditioned.
conditioned. Airconditioned. Close to campus. slls
a month. Phone 372-5275 Wed.
p.m. or weekend. Extension 2321-
59 daytime. (B-130-3t-p).
AIR-CONDITIONED ROOM FOR
BOYS. Double $35, Single SSO.
Kitchen privileges, linen and maid
service. Block from campus. 1319
NW 2nd Ave. (B-130-4t-p).
UVE 2 WEEKS FREE, in air airconditioned,
conditioned, airconditioned, luxurious apartment.
Available April 15th. $90.00 per
month. Call 6-1901 after 9 p.m.
weekdays. (B-130- 3t-p).
ONE SHARP NEW FURNISHED
2 bedroom apartment. Air-condi Air-conditioned,
tioned, Air-conditioned, each room. $125 per month.
Apt. #2, 39th Ave. & 6th St.,
N.W. (B-130-st-c).
LOW SUMMER RATES. 2 blocks
campus. One or two bedroom
apartment. Also large comfortable
rooms. Also garage. 1840 NW 2nd
Ave. 372-7767. (B-129-3t-c).
AIR-CONDITIONED, FURNISHED
APARTMENT. 2 blocks from
campus. Colonial Manor. Sublet
for summer. Call after 4:30, 378-
2253. (B-129-3t-p).
COMPLETELY FURNISHED
efficiency apartment to sublet for
summer. Available May Ist. Right
behind Cl. Call 6-0445 after 6.
Low summer rates. (B-129-3t-c).
2-BEDROOM FURNISHED Apart Apartment
ment Apartment for 1 month. Near Med.
Center. 1216 SW 3rd Ave. (B (B---129-3t-p).
--129-3t-p). (B---129-3t-p).
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT 2
blocks East of Norman Hall. Furn Furnished
ished Furnished to pot holder. Ample for four.
378-2175 between 5:30 & 7:30. (B (B---129-3t-c).
--129-3t-c). (B---129-3t-c).
Help Wanted
POSITION AVAILABLE WITH A
FUTURE for an ambitious young
man, who is willing to work. If,
youre leaving school, it will be
worth your time to investigate.
Robertson Jewelers, Gainesville,
Florida. (E-130-st-c).
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS as
National Bank Examiner, U. S.
Treasury Department in Atlanta,
Miami, Tampa, and Columbia,
S. C. Degree in Economics, Bus Business
iness Business Administration, Accounting
or Finance. Starting salary $6060,
6 months increase to $6450 and
rapid future advancement. Contact
D. B. Smith, 1103 Fulton National
Bank Bldg., Atlanta, or call 404-
526-6625. (E-129-ts-c).
GAINESVILLE REALTOR WANTS
an ambitious family man con considering
sidering considering full time employment as
a Real Estate Salesman. Must be
alert, energetic, and willing to
work 50 to 60 hours a week in
return for income commensurate
with ability. See Warner Weseman
at 1113 N. Main St. (E-127-4t-c).
(YAMAHA BMW W
f Motorcycles m
For The Discriminating I
CYCLERAMA I
378-2811 21 SE 2nd Place I

Wanted
2 RIDERS WANTED to Cocoa this
weekend. Leave Friday noon: re return
turn return Sunday. $3 round trip. Call
Steve Vaughn, 2-9307. (C-130-2t (C-130-2ts).
s). (C-130-2ts).
FEMALE ROOMMATE FOR
SPRING TRIMESTER. Air-cci Air-cciditioned
ditioned Air-cciditioned Colonial Manor Apart. 1/2
Block from campus. Call Sandra,
8-1588 after 3 any day. (C-130-
3t-p).
ONE MALE ROOMMATE. Immed Immediately
iately Immediately or for summer trimester.
Call Mike, 378-2289.(C-130-lt-c).
UF STAFF MEMBER desires
quarters as follows: Room with
private bath, private entrance,
access to kitchen (or at least
refrigerator) and once-a -week
maid service. If you can come
close, please call 376-3261, Ext.
2832, ask for Moorhead. (C-129-
ts-s).
ONE COED WANTED to share
house in NE. S4O per month,
utilities included. Move in May
Ist. Call Irene 6-1360. (C-129-
ts-c).
ROOMMATE TO SHARE 1 bedroom
apartment. Spring A or all sum summer.
mer. summer. Air-conditioned, 1 block from
campus. $55/mo. FR 2-1059. (C (C---129-st-p).
--129-st-p). (C---129-st-p).
ONE FEMALE ROOMMATE for
air-conditioned apartment. 3
blocks from campus. From June-
August. Call 6-1301 after 3:30.
(C-129-st-c).
Real Estate
TAKE UP PAYMENTS AND pay
closing costs on a repossessed
3-bedroom, 2-bath house. Central
heat, CCB and newly painted. Phone
372-3826. (I-120-ts-c).
Situations
NEED CREATIVE WRITER FOR
TV OR PRIVATE FILM? Maybe
you have facts but lack profes professional
sional professional script or you have film
already but no narration. Sales
messages, short subjects, docu documentaries,
mentaries, documentaries, written. 2-5220.
(F-126-st-c).
Persona}
LOCKED, BONDED STORAGE
AREA. $2.00 a month bicycles.
$3.00 a month motorcycles. 75?
a day auto storage. Call 2-0455.
Neighborhood Service Center, 637
NW 13th Street. (J-129-ts-c).
CALIFORNIA BOUND? Leavii*
Gainesville around April 15, re returning
turning returning around May 2. $65 round
trip. Call Zal 2-1914. (J-128-
st-c).
Services
*
CAP AND GOWN FOTO SPECIAL:
Portraits, copies, passport and
application picturesJSNEE RINGER
PHOTOGRAPHY 1013 l/2 W. Uni University
versity University Ave. Phone 378-1170. (M (M---129-3t-c).
--129-3t-c). (M---129-3t-c).



I CLASSIFIEDS
-a -*^***

Lost & Found
lose ring having initials j.
H. 8.? Found in Thomas-Sledd
Area. Contact T. Stahl, 376-1108.
(L-130-3t-c).
LOST: WALLET, Thursday, 117
Matherly keep money, but please
return wallet and papers. Contact
Doug McKeel, 6-9208 or mail to
8354 Murphree Area. (L-129-3t (L-129-3tc).
c). (L-129-3tc).
LOST: BELIEVED IN PEABODY,
Pair of dark frame glasses. Call
Ray, Pi Kappa Phi House. 2-9284.
(L-128-3t-c).
Autos
1957 VOLVO PV 444 Good con condition.
dition. condition. Complete engine overhaul.
28 miles per gallon gas. Great buy
$425.00. Will haggle. Call Bill,
378-2952. (G-127-st-p).
1958 VOLKSWAGEN. Good con condition.
dition. condition. Make offer. Call George
Hartwell 2-9307. (G-127-ts-c).
1957 M.G.A. COUPE. Vintage
condition, excellent interior, radio,
wire wheels, good tires, trailer
hitch, mechanically sound, must
sell immediately. $650. Call Jeff,
372-2056. (G-128-3t-p).
'53 MERCURY with radio. Best
offer takes it. Call 376-8714. (G (G---128-st-c).
--128-st-c). (G---128-st-c).

Coffee House Performers Wanted
Singles-Groups-Comedians
to supplement a professional bill.
Full week or week-end possibilities.
- The Jongleur
Send tapes or resumes, or apply P. O. Box 5705
for auditions to: Jacksonville, Florida
* Salaries vary with ability and experience.
Vacation
Reading Sale
20k OFF ALL
PAPERBACK STOCK
(25% WITH PURCHASE OF 10 OR MORE)
APRIL 5-9
BROWSE SHOP
Caapis Shop & Bookstore

i
Autos |
1958 AUSTIN HEALTY 100-6,
radio, heater, in excellent
condition, repainted and re-uphol re-upholstered.
stered. re-upholstered. Must sell to finance
summer vacation. Call Dick or
Kent after 3:00 p.m. 376-9198 or
see at 19 SW 13th St. (G-128-
st-c).
*52 MG TD. New paint and top,
radio. Very clean. Must sell. Call
Dick Sowrey, 372-9370, 185
Fletcher M. (G-130-ts-c).
1962 VALIANT, new paint and
tires, excellent interior, only
needs some motor work. Whole Wholesale
sale Wholesale SBIO. Our price $695. Call
FR 2-0961 from 8-5. (G-129-
2t-p).
*6l SIMCA Radio, Heater, white
wall tires, two-tone, good con condition,
dition, condition, low mileage. Must sell
now. S3OO, cash. Call Fred Lane,
378-1046. (G-129-st-p).
1955 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER
Deluxe. Terrible looking body but
runs well. $l5O or trade for a
good 2 wheel trailer. See at 1318
SW 13th Ave. (G-129-3t-p).
*62 IMPALA CONVERTIBLE,
power steering, automatic trans transmission,
mission, transmission, radio, heater and white
walls. Call 378-2319. (G-129-st-c).
*55 CHEVROLET BEL AIRE, 2-
door, hard-top. Radio, heater. Good
condition. New tires. Call 8-2018.
(G-127-st-c).

Spanish students
acting up
MADRID (UPI) The Spanish
government has bowed to student
demands for democratization** of
the official and compulsory student
union Sindicator Espanol Univer Universitario**
sitario** Universitario** S. E. U., high 1y placed
sources said yesterday.
The students have been demon demonstrating
strating demonstrating to underline their
demands.
Official sources confirmed that
the SJS.U.s government-appointed
national chief and national secre secretary
tary secretary Jose Miguel Orriz Bordas
and Manuel Canterero submitted
last Saturday their IRREVO IRREVOCABLE
CABLE IRREVOCABLE RESIGNATION** to Jose
Solis Ruiz, minister of the national
movement Generalissimo Fran Francisco
cisco Francisco Francos political organiza organization.
tion. organization.
The sources said the govern government
ment government went as far in its conces concessions
sions concessions as granting the students
the right to administer their own
funds.
The Spanish government an announced
nounced announced at the end of a cabinet
meeting last Saturday that a decree
giving SJS.U. a new structure**
would be soon published. The
decree was expected to be published
in the states Gazette this week
although it will not go in effect
until October.
Congress gets
farm bill
WASHINGTON (UPI) President
Johnson sent Congress an omnibus
farm bill yesterday that his ex experts
perts experts estimated would cost house housewives
wives housewives a penny more for a loaf
of bread and four cents more for
a pound of rice.
But the President claimed the
legislation would boost farm in income
come income and save the government
money in price supports that could
be plowed into anti-poverty pro projects
jects projects to help hard-pressed
farmers.
In a letter to House and Senate
leaders, the President said that
enormous advances in agricul agricultural
tural agricultural efficiency have left the farmer
working harder and enjoying it
less.**
At the same time, consumers
are paying less than $1 out of
every $5 in their paychecks for
food, and the cost is declining.
By getting the consumer to
absorb more of the cost of in increasing
creasing increasing farm income, he said,
we can turn more of our atten attention
tion attention and more of our tax dollars
to revitalizing rural life and root rooting
ing rooting out the poverty which is all
too prevalent in rural America.**
FBI arrests
spy suspects
WASHINGTON (UPI) Two men
including an Army corporal on
duty in Washington were arrested
by FBI agents yesterday and
charged with selling military se secrets
crets secrets to the Soviet Union for almost
11 years.
The FBI identified the two men
as CpL Robert Lee Johnson, 43,
who was seized in Washington,
and James Allen Mintkenbaugh,
a former Army sergeant, who was
arrested at Castro Valley, Calif.
They were charged with
furnishing classified Information
relating to military installations,
missile sites and intelligence ac activities
tivities activities of the United States govern government
ment government at both foreign and domestic
locations.**

Tuesday, April 6, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

PLAY REVIEW
'The Firebugs
called exciting,
near professional
BY CORBIN S. CARNELL
Assistant Professor of English
Hie Firebugs is exciting theater to eye, ear, and mind. Florida
Players, under the direction of Donald Borchardt, give a near-pro near-professional
fessional near-professional performance of Max Frisch's strange combination of comedy
and devastating reality. It is not the sort of reality many have cohie to
expect in the theater; it is older than Ibsen and Shaw (e.g. the chorus)
and newer than anything the Players have attempted (e.g., touches of
the Theater of the Absurd).
Frisch is a Swiss architect who is also a writer. The Firebugs,
produced as a radio play in 1953, was re-done for the stage in 1958.
It is subtitled A Learning Play Without a Lesson", but there is a
Duerranmatt sort of irony in that phrasing. Indeed Frisch and the
Duerranmatt of The Visit share a similar view of human nature.
The first action we see on the main stage is the lighting of a cigar
and that little flame has special significance, for the whole town lives
in fear of arson. The firemen have performed their mechanic
choreography of calisthentics, pole-descent, and instant mobilization.
The people, who no longer believe in God, but only in the fire depart department,
ment, department, know all precautions are bing taken against the firebugs. Yet
we see the arsonists accepted in a home, given storage for their
gasoline, a festive dinner, and even the matches for the fuse.
Herr Biedermann (which means respectable bourgeois, a man of
Philistine integrity, in German) sees the arsonists plotting destruction,
yet he does nothing. Why? Because he doesn't understand, doesn't
believe it possible, doesn't feel free enough of guilt himself to act?
Because he almost wants destruction in order to get things over with?
He doesn't believe in his work, he has trouble sleeping, his wife has
a heart condition. If he has values, they are primarily the marketable
ones.
In the climactic (aLso hilarious) dinner scene, he is called Everyman.
Superlatives mean less when everybody in the cast is good, but some something
thing something must be said about how very good the actors are.
John Lea as Biedermann sustains a demanding role to the end, with
just the right of sort of laugh for a Biedermann and an authoritative
presence; his speech to the firemen when they confront him in the street
is one of the finest things in the production.
Margaret Beistle as his wife is perhaps too pretty for a simple simpleminded
minded simpleminded bourgeois wife, but her wonderfully expressive face and voice
enrich the play strangely. Mrs. Biedermann's misplaced pity is as
responsible as her husband's blundering for the anihilation of the town.
And Margaret Beistle's stylized handling of the role reinforces the
"epic" qualities of the play.
The two arsonists, who are power-mad, and only secondarily
proletarian victims of the social order, are expertly played by Mike
Beistle and Jerry Rhodes.
Again we have unusually articulate faces ( the production should
be filmed for more close-ups ) and a sure gift for comedy. Beistle,
as a unique combination of winsome vulgarity, is intelligent per perception,
ception, perception, and is perfect in the role of the convict-wrestler and Rhodes
has some of the best lines of the play which he delivers with appro appropriate
priate appropriate breeziness and leering.
Fine supporting work is done by Miml Carr as the maid and Ride
Schuster as the Ph.D. who reads a statement on the firebugs when no
one can hear him any more because of the fire sirens.
The chorus led by veteran Players Bob Hefley, Alan Armstrong, and
Terry Daugherty are excellent and the two walk-on parts are well
done. Mary Stephenson's surrealistic costumes shrewdly suggest
various conflicts in the characters self-concept; in fact, the play would
have been a good deal less with a less gifted costumer. Henry Swanson's
ceiling-high semi-constructivist set exploits even Norman Hall Audi Auditorium
torium Auditorium to accommodate the half dozen or so acting areas.
The technical staff, who are unfortunately too numerous to name,
to a superb job, especially on lights and music.
For those who like to read plays before they see them, I should
warn that in translation at least The Firebugs does not read well and
needs to be seen, as plays should be,
There are no poetically beautiful lines, but there is provocative
comment on ends and means, the sanctity of private property, class classconsciousness,
consciousness, classconsciousness, thought and action, and nihilism in academia.
Hie play combines ritual elements with parodistic absurdities, yet
it is perfectly comprehensible (the Communist take-over of Czecho Czechoslavakia,
slavakia, Czechoslavakia, Hitler, the Bomb).
It is bizarre in a well-formed Aristotelian sort of way and the less
experienced play-goer should not be confused by the startling aspects
of the production.
Frisch has written a curiously satisfactory drama ."curiously"
because who wants to be told he is a fool? Yet somehow in facing the
holocaust of his ultimate folly, there may be tragic purgation too.
The hardest scene for the Players to do must have been the curtain
call.

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday. April 6, 1965

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PUD LYTAL SLIDES HOME SAFELY FOR SPE
AS BETA'S ED FROME DROPS BALL
'
l;s PORT s

Rollins rips
UF netmen
UFs tennis team now sports a
9-7 record following a split of
weekend road action and a loss to
Rollins yesterday at home.
The netmen walloped Auburn 9-0
in that city Friday but were
thumped for the second time this
year by Georgia at 5-1 (doubles
m atches were rained out). Rick
Chace was the sole UF winner in
the Georgia contest as he took the
Bulldogs No. 1 man Henry Field,
7-5, 6-3.
Rollins whipped the Gators 6-3
in a match that was curfewed on
account of darkness. All matches
in this one were close and all save
one went the three set limit. Gator
winners were Ron Fick and Bill
Perrin.
Omy two games remain on the net
schedule, Wednesday at home
against nemesis Florida State and
Friday with Rollins at Winter Park.
The Gators will be looking to
assure a winning season when they
take on the Seminoles who
conquered them in Tallahassee on
wood earlier in the year.
Three archers win
in state tourney
The University Arcueiy Club
fared well this weekend in the
Florida State Target Tournament,
copping three first place finishes.
Leading the UF winners was Jim
Martin who took the medal in the
mens amateur bare bow. John
Conlan placed first in the inter intermediate
mediate intermediate bare bow and Connie
Brown won in the Womens Class
C Free Stvle.
Myrna Mead won a second in
the womens amateur bare bow
while Janice Jenkins placed third
in that event.
The clubs four-man-team of
Dennis Brown, Don Bachman, Carl
Hoffman and Richard Walish placed
third, in that area of competition

.
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SPEs win Orange softball

An eight run outburst in the
fourth inning gave Sigma Phi Ep Epsilon
silon Epsilon the Orange League Softball
Championship yesterday over Beta
Theta Pi, 10-5.
Each man in the Sig Ep lineup
contributed a hit in the game.
Pud Lytal, the Sig Eps short
fielder, led the way with three
hits and four RBls. Joe Pethia
went all the way for the SPEs.
The Betas led the game until
the iourth as they leaped off to
a 2-0 lead in the first inning when
Pethia had trouble finding the plate.

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Nothing
can take the press out of Lee-Prest slacks
Not that it's on his mind right now. And it needn't he. Those Lee-
Prest Leesures can't help but stay crisp and neat. No matter what you
put them through. They have a new permanent press. So the crease stays
in. The wrinkles stay out. Permanently. And that's without ironing. No
touch-ups, either. They're made from Lee's special blend of 50% polyester
and 50% combed cotton. For wash and wear... with conviction.
Incidentally, that permanent press is the only change we've made
in Leesures. They still have that lean, honest 100 k... smart, tailored fit.
New Lee-Prest Leesures. Test their permanent press yourself. It isn't
necessary, but it's a great way to spend an evening. From $5.98 to $7.98.
Lee-PR6ST Leesuresr f-f
H. D. Lee Co., Inc., Knss City 41. Mo.

lambda chi cops blue

Another wild spree by Pethia in
the final inning produced the Betas
other three runs.
* *
Lambda Chi Alpha won the Blue
League Championship over Phi
Gamma Delta in a slugfest 11-9.
Fred Gonso led Lambda Chi with
SPORTSMENS I
CYCLE CENTER
617 N. Main St.
SUZUKI I
S I 3 o co

three hits in four trips and three
RBls. Ken Norfleet pitched in with
the only home run of the game
for LXA.
Jim Pfeffer went all the way
for the winners while John Wallick
had some sparkling defensive play
in the outfield.
LXAs biggest inning was the
fifth, where they scored five runs.
Lambda Chi had to defeat Delta
Upsilon, last years champs, in
the semi-final bracket play-off to
get to the finals. They won y that
one 4-2.
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