Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
THE FLORIDA alligator!

FREEDOM FORUM'
. .visitors
Police eater
Freedom Forum
In a signedaffadavit, a UF
student stated he saw two Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville policemen enter Freedom
House, 1639 N.W. First Ave., early
yesterday morning.
Ronald Harry Arons, 3AS, ob observed
served observed two policemen walking
around the house about 3:25 a.m.
At the time Arons said he was
taking a study break at the Gator
Groomer Laundry across the
street. He said he watched the two
policemen walk around to the rear
of the house.
Moments later, he said he saw
See FREEDOM on P. 9

1,500 students are
campus employees

More than 1,500 of the UFs
14,449 students are employed on
campus, according to a survey
released yesterday by the Office
of Student Affairs.
Os the 2,166 students who applied
for work, 1,540 have been placed
In positions throughout the Univer University
sity University system. The remainder are
not working for various reasons,
including academic status, non nonqualification
qualification nonqualification for jobs available,
schedule conflict with working
hours, other work being done off
campus or a desire for specific
duties not covered in University
offices.
The summary shows 1,168 men
and 372 women employed. There
are 10,040 men and 4,409 women
enrolled this trimester.
At this time in 1960, applica applications
tions applications had been received from 2,574
of the 11,353 students enrolled.
The University employed 1,252 of
them l,OOB men and 244 women
slightly over 11 per cent of
the student population.
The Housing Office has the most
student workers (199), followed by
the College of Arts and Sciences
with 170 and the College of Agri Agriculture
culture Agriculture with 128.
Other departments and their
number of students are listed be below:
low: below: College of Engineering, 116;
University libraries, 95; Board of
University Examiners, 88; College
of Architecture and Fine Arts,
79; College of Medicine, 79; School
of Journalism and Communications
and Radio Station WRUF, 73; J.
See WORKERS on P. 9

Vol. 57, No. 126

Profs paid less than average

UF professors are receiving an
average salary for the 1964-65
school year that is approximately
13 per cent less than the average

| Students admit
| grand larceny
;j UF students Reinaldo F.:
;j Gomez, 3AS, and Jose Sergio :
;[ Cadrecha, 3EG, pled guilty[
$ Thursday to charges of grand [
[: larcenty.
>: Judification of guilt was [
[; witheld until the court[
[receives results of a pre- [
[[ sentence investigation.
:[ University action has been :
[referred to the honor court, i
[said Frank T. Adams, dean :
[of men.
[ Gomez was arrested on two [
[: charges of grand larceny with
[bond set at $2,000. Cadrecha [
[was arrested on one charge
:of grand larceny with bond
:at SI,OOO.
[: Gomez admitted to campus
[police that he had taken cen cen[[trlfuged
[[trlfuged cen[[trlfuged valued at approxi approximately
mately approximately S2OO from McCarty
[[Hall, said S. J. Mahn, inves inves[tigator
[tigator inves[tigator for campus police at:
[the time of the arrests.
A search of Cadrecha's car i
: revealed stolen articles, said :
Mahn.

[Flavet residents
| watch as auto
runs away
For the second time in four
[ months Flavet three residents
[watched as a runaway auto auto[
[ auto[ mobile glided silently down
[ the street.
Little by little the runa runa;
; runa; way, which was rolling back back:
: back: ward, began to pick up speed.
Then it happen.
Suddenly the steering wheel
[ spun as if by some invisible
[ driver, and a muted crash
; was heard.
Mrs. Annette R. Martin,
who had been looking out her
apartment window, called to
her husband to witness the
events outside.
"A car just hit Claytons
car again,** she said.
Clayton M. Reid Jr. wasn't
the least excited.
A car had hit Reid's car
again, for the runaway auto
of four months ago had also
hit Reid's car.
Shortly before Christmas
another driverless auto
ploughed into Reid's car which
was parked less than 10 feet
from where the latest inci- [
dent took place.
"Its got so many dents al- :
ready I don't think one or two :
more will hurt," Reid said :
eyeing the newly-caved-in [
door.

University of Florida, Gainesville

salaries of professors of 17 major
colleges and universities.
According to a study made by
the Office of Academic Affairs,
the survey enlisted the average
salaries from schools such as Uni Universities
versities Universities of California, Minnesota,
Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin,
Purdue University and Ohio State
University.
In the 1964-65 school year, UF
professors averaged a salary based
on a ten-month year of $10,120
while the average for the 17 schools
surveyed was $11,673 or 13 per cent
higher.
For the coming year (1965-66)
the UF has recommended to the
Legislature salary increases which
would raise the average salary to
$11,548 an increase of 14 per
cen t over this year. However,
the Budget Commission has re recommended
commended recommended increases which would
raise the average salary to $lO,
626 or an increase of 5 per cent.
The projected average for the 17
selected schools is $12,257 an
increase of approximately 5 per
cent.
According to Robert B. Mautz,
vice-president of academic affairs,
the UF recommendations were de designed
signed designed to keep the salaries com competitive
petitive competitive with other universities and
colleges. **lt is essential to main maintaining
taining maintaining high quality professors,"
he stated.
In the 1966-67 school year, the
UF has recommended an increase
of approximately five per cent
which would raise the average
salary to $10,945 which is an
increase of three per cent from
$10,626. The average for the 17
schools again will jump five per
cent from $12,257 to $12,870.
At the present a full professor
averages a salary of $13,670. An
'Tke Firebigs'
IfltS tMHHTOW
ft IfJPB
Jm w
mm\ k m
jft j M
Kg' A M
< i'. SB H a
I mm u
Jk W WWm I
PRACTICE SCENE
"The Firebugs," a UF Players*
presentation, begins the first half
of a six-day run at Norman Hall
Auditorium tomorrow.
Directed by Donald A. 17;r 17;r-chardt,
chardt, 17;r-chardt, assistant professor of
music, the play was written by
Swiss author Max Frisch. John
Lea, Maggie Beistle, Mike Beistle,
Jerry Rhodes and Mimi Carr are
cast in the leading roles.
Thursday's performance begins
at 7:30 p.m. with curtain call set
for 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday.
The final three performances will
be April 8-10.
Tickets for the public are 80
cents each; University students
will be admitted free by show showing
ing showing their identification cards.

associate professor makes an
average of $8,568. The last rank
is the instructor who averages
$7,094.

Med prof
Markle Scholar!
*
Dr. Roger F. Palmer, as- ;
sistant professor of pharma- [
cology and medicine in the UF [
College of Medicine and the top [
honor student of its first gra- [
duating class has been named [
a Markle Scholar, it was an- :
nounced yesterday.
The distinction, among the :
highest in academic medicine
for young scientists, was
awarded by the John and Mary
R. Markle Foundation of New
York, along with $30,000 over
a five-year period.
The grant goes to the College
of Medicine at the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center to
support Dr. Palmer's teaching
and research.
Dr. Palmer is one of 25
outstanding medical scientists
in the United States and Canada
selected as a Markle Scholar
from 74 candidates submitted
by medical colleges this year.
He recently gained profes professional
sional professional recognition for
research on the effect of the

Brazilian Week
called big success

Viet Nam
i
blood bath
i
continues
i
I SAIGON (UPI) U.S.
land South Vietnamese war war:
: war: planes destroyed a North Viet Vietnamese
namese Vietnamese jet airbase Tuesday
[just hours after a Communist
[terror bomb squad shattered
[the UJS. Embassy here, killing
[ 17 persons and wounding over
150. The embassy attack was
denounced as an act of "Sav "Savagery."
agery." "Savagery."
Officials said the raid had
been planned before hand and
was not in direct retaliation
for the bloodiest attack on U.
S. citizens in the history of
the war. At least two Ameri Americansincluding
cansincluding Americansincluding a young wo woman
man woman secretary died in
the bombing and more than
50 were wounded.
In Washington, the State De Department
partment Department said its lates cas casualty
ualty casualty figures showed two
Americans and 11 Vietnamese
killed and 183 persons injured,
54 of them Americans. Forty Fortytwo
two Fortytwo of the injured were re reported
ported reported in serious condition,
among them seven Americans.
The State Department iden identified
tified identified the American woman
killed in the bombing as Bar Barbara
bara Barbara A. Robbins, 21, Denver,
Colo.

Wednesday, March 31, 1965

SHOULD THIS GIRL
BE SMOKING? See Pag 9
Narcotics agents
nab student
Harold M. Klein, 2UC, was
arrested Monday by UF police
and state narcotics agents after a
quick thinking laundry clerk tip tipped
ped tipped off authorities.
Klein, 19, from Miami Beach,
was released from Alachua County
jail on S2OO bond.
Agents stated that a local laun laundry
dry laundry clerk found what alpeared to
be a marijuana cigarette in the
shirt of a customer. It was a
pack of Winstons. The clerk said
his attention was attracted because
the filter had been torn.
Deputies turned the cigarette
over to state chemists who
determined it was marijuana.

Brazilian Week was a tremen tremendous
dous tremendous success, and I am personally
very pleased,**
Dr. Alfred Hower, general chair chairman
man chairman for Brazilian Week, March 17-
24, continued to say that he thought
it has accomplished its pur purposes.*
poses.* purposes.*
The main** purposes he listed
were to honor a great and friendly
nation and the founding of Rio de
Janeiro, and to call attention to
the University of Floridas interest
in Brazil and its strong progress
in Brazilian studies.**
Hower said that through this pro program
gram program the university tried to pre present
sent present various aspects of Brazilian
culture, and it included music,
art, literature, and films.**
According to Hower the UF has
received congratulations from the
Brazilian ambassador in Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, D.C., Juracy Magalhaes as
well as a telegram from the office
of the President of Brazil.
Hower said the events were well
attended, with over 400 people
attending the Brazilian film, The
Given Word* on Wednesday and
close to 100** attending the film
Friday, Brazil: The Take-off
Point.*
But according to Hower, the
highlights were the two lectures,
one by Dr. T. Lynn Smith and the
other by Mrs. Dora Alencar de
Vasco nsellos.
Hower said Brazilian Week gave
favorable publicity** to Brazil
and to the UF and its work, both
in the United States and in Brazil.



, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 31, 1965

Page 2

AIA
.
: The AIA will hold election
: of officers today from 10 am.
|i 5 p.m. in Room 96, Grove
Hall. A meeting will be held
: tonight at 8 p.m. at the new
:j lecture auditorium in the Ar Aril
il Aril chitecture and Fine Arts com com:j
:j com:j plex. Guest speaker will be
:| Mr. Gene Leedy.
jj ANNOUNCEMENTS
: Graduation Announcements
:| and Commencement Invita Invita:
: Invita: tions are now available at
the center counter of the Hub
: for 15 cents each. The Hub
: is open weekly 8 a.m. Bp.m.
i and Saturday 9 a.m. noon.

Debate Society
forum tonight

The first in a series of monthly
forum debates sponsored by
the Debate Society will be pre presented
sented presented this evening at 7:30 p.m.
Art Dept, to show
Summers prints
An exhibition o f twenty-eight
color prints by the American print printmaker
maker printmaker Carol Summers will have a
short showing in the Teaching
Gallery of the UF Department of
Art, April 1-9.
Summers was born in Kingston,
New York, in 1925, and now lives
in New York City. He holds
a Bachelor of Arts degree from
Bard College and has studied with
Stefen Hirch and Louis Schnaker.
He has received an Italian Go Government
vernment Government grant for travel in Italy,
as well as Tiffany and Guggenheim
fellowships. He also was awarded
one of the $250 prizes given for
outstanding work at the American
Prints Today Exhibition held in
the FaU of 1959 at sixteen of the
most prominent museums through throughout
out throughout the country.
Medical award
A UF College of Medicine re researcher
searcher researcher is recipient of a new
National Science Foundation grant
to study protein metabolism and
its genetic control.
Dr. Melvin Fried, associate pro professor
fessor professor of biochemistry, was awar awarded
ded awarded $27,900 for the study.

POP 1 JAZZ
SALE
$4.98 & $ 5.98 kg. Price
$2.22 *
Stereo
Nat (King) Cole Peggy Lee
George Shearing Judy Garland
MANY OTHERS
The RECORD BAR
123 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. PHONE 376- 1042
Open 9 to 6 Mondays and Fridays 9 to 9
CENTRAL CHARGE FREE PARKING IN REARa

m

BOOK SALE
Money and unclaimed books
are waiting for students who
participated in this trimes trimesters
ters trimesters Student Government Book
Sale. You may claim them in
HRoom 311, Florida Union, to today
day today and tomorrow from 3:30
5 p.m.
UF DAMES
The UF Dames invites all
members of all Dames group
to attend its annual Elections
and Awards Night tonight at
8 p.m. in the Medical Science
Auditorium of the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center Auditor Auditorium.
ium. Auditorium.
r

in 324 Florida Union.
Sam U 11man, 4AS from Pompano
Beach, will advocate the proposi proposition,
tion, proposition, Resolved: that UF student
organizations should have
complete freedom in selecting
speakers for the campus.* Russell
Smith, 2UC from Orlando, will
speak against the proposition.
Audience response will be
stressed by encouraging impromp impromptu
tu impromptu speeches for and against the
proposition in addition to questions
and general discussion. The winner
of the debate will be determined by
audience vote. Jeremy Gluckman,
president of the Debate Society,
will preside as chairman.
The UF Student Debate Forum
is non-partisan and is devoted to
the free exchange of ideas through
speech. Speakers were selected by
representatives of the Debate So Society
ciety Society from try-outs open to all
students. Neither speaker is a
member of the Debate Society.
Members of the debate group
selected the topic on the basis
of its significant current interest
to college students.
Mr. K.E. Wilkerson, Director
of Forensics, remarked that the
forum debate affords a needed
opportunity for students to voice
their opinions on topics of current
interest.
Both Dean Lester Hale and Stu Student
dent Student Body President, Bruce Cul Culpepper,
pepper, Culpepper, as well as other Student
Government officers have express expressed
ed expressed approval and interest in the
forum.

wampus news bnejsi

ALPHA EPSILON
DELTA
Alpha Epsilon Delta, pre premedical
medical premedical honorary,announces
new initiates: Richard
Aasness, Robert Ashley,
Bruce Buehler, Peter Facius,
Dennis Felder, Philip
Freiden, Douglas Hall, Bill
Koelne, A1 Marsico, and
Hampton Sessions. Sponsor
Dr. Paul Elliot was initiated
as an honorary member.
YOUNG REPUBLICANS
Young Republicans will hold
a meeting tomorrow at 6 p.m.
in Room 121, Florida Union.
Delegates for state convention
will be elected.

1 \/C*
Q '&^l
l]jj
Jp rr" g _zziiiM[z=~ i Ii
-
II | HI ml
W \ \, \ \ Tl Hi]
T"\ AM|i m. \ V M
i A \ %' -^4^ A %h
\dfiL.

CATHOLIC CENTER
The Catholic Student Center
will offer a special retreat for
all Spanish-speaking students,
staff, faculty members, and
their relatives. It will cover
two conferences by Father
Emilio Garcia followed by
Benediction of the Most
Blessed Sacrament. The re retreat
treat retreat will be held tomorrow and
Friday at 8:30 p.m. and a
Communion Mass will be held
Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
TOASTMASTERS
The University Toastmas Toastmasters
ters Toastmasters will meet tomorrow at
11:45 a.m. in theGardenoom
of the Faculty Club.

FLORIDA PLAYERS jj
Ticket reservations for the?
Florida Players presentation?
Tlie Firebugs may be made?
by calling Ext. 2671 or 2144?
from 11 a.m. 5 pan. K
g
GAMMA BETA PHI |
, Ji
Gamma Beta Phi will hold :
a meeting for elections and
payment of dues tonight at 8
p.m. in Room 15, Frazier Ro- ?
gers Hall.
VARIETY BAND jj
The Gator Variety Band, un- :j:
der the direction of Mr. Robert p
Foster, will present its annual !:
Jazz Concert tonight at 8:15 £
in University Auditorium. j:j



TURF & COUNTRY CLUB
Facilities available for all graduate
students and students 21 or over over'
' over' r
< * i
_' i
TUMBLEWEED RANCH Phone 466-3151
MICANOPY

Wednesday, March 31, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 31, 1965

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International
ERNIE.UTZ STEVE VAUGHN JOE CASTELLO
Editor-to-Chtof Managing Editor Executive Editor
LOU FERRIS ANDY MOOR
Editorial Page Editor Sports Editor
Y -GUEST LETTER t i
Social performer
EDITOR:
During the present controversy over the dismissal of Mr. Edward
Richer, he has been called everything from a troublemaker to an
anarchist. While from my long association with him I cannot confirm any
of these wild charges, I can say it without any hesitation that Mr. Richer
has led the fight for human dignity and freedom on this campus with
courage and determination.
In doing so, he often found himself speaking against the majority
view (or at least the one represented by the University Administration)
and challenging the conventional values and ideas.
This is not the role of a troublemaker but that of a social reformer
in the best tradition as first espoused by Socrates. Without this, there
will be no progress and society would degenerate to a shapeless heap
of mass conformity.
The suggestions that Mr. Richer was dismissed for his failure to
work towards a doctorate and not exhibiting scholarly creativity are
patently absurd when one considers the number of faculty members at
this University who are in the same position.
Scholars have for too long sat in their ivory towers advocating reforms
without ever involving themselves in activity. They have admirably
fitted George Shaw's classic dictum: Those who can, they do. Those
who cannot, they teach."
But here is Mr. Richer who not only says but does. What can be more
creative than this unity between thought and action?
The central issue in this debate is not Mr. Richer, He is merely
the symbol of a much greater problem.lt involves the issue of academic
freedom. It means the right of students to being exposed to differing
set of values. Without knowledge of clashing ideals, democracy can mean
only conformity and mass decay.
The outcome of Mr. Richers case may well decide the future of
academic freedom and quality education in Florida for the years to
come.
S.K. GARG, 7EG
ijijjj* '"* aw.v .vavaw.va
|He was not my creationl
*: Syfc
M EDITOR: M
~..
,vv v.v
M EDWARD RICHER is not Clyde Hope.
j&i A FEW MONTHS ago, I created for The Alligator a character g*
j called Clyde Hope. The column is now defunct, but rumors
persist that I merely went underground and changed Clyde Hope's
name to Edward Richer.
THIS IS A DIRTY smear and I resent it very much. It's an
*v. insult to my creativity. If Edward Richer was created by some ijijijlj
disruptive group such as CLYDE, then I have no knowledge of it. 'v#
Richer sounds more like a creation of Gary Corseri or one of
the other young writers who do very well but have not yet learned
the subtleties of making a character believable.
:$* IF YOU DO find out who dreamed up the idea of an Edward
Richer, please let me know. If there really is such a person as ijj;:::;
Edward Richer and I'm skeptical that there is then he has
my apology for assuming that he was created by an inexperienced
ivij: riter ::::
is| DON GROOMS $&
Assistant Professor of Journalism s:s
! ViV
EDITORIAL STAFF: Mark Freeman and Stan Ku!p\cartoonists),
Sharon Kelley (Student Government Beat Chief). Lee Alexander,
Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles. Dan Taylor, Jay Foley, Sam
Ullman and Jane Young (Tigert Beat Chief), Woody Leonard,
Nancy Van Zile, and Linda Cody.
REPORTERS: Carl Brown, Bob Wilcox, Dee Wright, Steve
Kanar, Judy Knight, Ann Carter, Thelma Mossman. Fran Snider,
Cynthia Tunstall, Karen Vitunac. Ami Saperstein, Bill Lockhart.
Drex Dobson, Eunice Tall, Kay Huffmaster. Jeffrey Deuxe waiter.
G. S. Corseri, Cheryl Kurit and Ken Simon.
. ==
Thm Florida Alligator rmrai tha ri*ht to rardata the typographical tout of all advartUamants and
to ravlaa or tan away copy vrtdch It eoaaldara obJocttooaUa.
MO PO6ITION B GUARANTEED, though feslrad poaltton will be (free whanavar poulbla.
Tha Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment tor any adeartiaamant involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion anlass notice la risen to ton Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will aot be responsible for more than one Incorrect lnaertkm at aa advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices tor correction mast bo given before neat Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR la the official student newspaper at the University of Florida and is
published five times weekly except doing May, June and July whan it is pttoUshed semi-weekly. Only
fSHaHri. represent the official opinions at their authors. The Alligator la entered aa second class
master at the United States Post Office at CalneevlUe.

FREEMAN I
A f>£l
M | r 111

EDITOR:
While discussing the Richer case
over coffee, a marvelous solution
gradually evolved. Obviously there
is no room for a man like this
in any of the established depart departments.
ments. departments. He is like an Art Instruc Instructor
tor Instructor teaching Engineering Graphics,
or a Department of Religion man
teaching Medicine, or an Architect
teaching Mechanical Engineering.
THESE COMBINATIONS of men
and departments obviously are not
acceptable, but not due to incom incompetence
petence incompetence on either side. They simply
are mismatched. The solution to
the Richer problem then becomes
obvious. Simply set up anew
department.
THE DEPARTMENT name is a
bit of a problem, but lacking better
suggestions we decided on De Department
partment Department of Extremist Views."
Seriously, I think the idea is excel excellent
lent excellent up to here, but unfortunately
the wags took over at that point

EDITOR:
I wonder why
never sign their names?
......Richer, Harmeling and
mob need the lure" of guitars
to advocate a worthy" cause?
......The Gator Raiders don't
have horses to go with their hats?
......Editors of new college
mags always state that the mags

By GjS. CORSERI
Columnist
SATURDAY NIGHT, March 27th,
Harolds Club Graham Area
diversion:
UPSTAIRS, gambling play
money. You loose.
500 dollars! 500 dollars!
Jo gives me consolation. Its
only play. Well get some more.
Whats wrong if its only play?
Dancing now. Band good beat.
Bongo rhythm. Skull resonating
with the drum. Thin, membranous!
No one knows Ive lost a half
a thousand dollars. Swaying to the
tempo. Bossa Nova
Tall and dark and tan and
10ve1y.... Bongo. Girl singing
lovely!
The dull mediocrity of the uni universe
verse universe now twisting, contorting
boose-soaked minds. Vodka hits
you fast. Take it straight and it
hits you fast.
Jo smoking the cigar. Smoke
curicules adumbrate her face. Dia Diaphonous
phonous Diaphonous realities intangible!

New major field

and suggested majors in
Extremism Left, (all courses odd
numbered) and Extremism Right.
MINORS WOULD ordinarily be
in Phys Ed, (Fifty-mile-hike 131)
or hurch-blasting
222). Graduate courses in the
foreign affairs area would include
Information library-burning
733," and Embassy-mobbing
735.
RESEARCH GRANTS could be
applied for from any number of
government and private agencies,
and faculty would be allowed to
consult' (participate) on a one
day per week basis, just like the
present University faculty. (Ten
days in jail would be counted as
ten weeks worth of consulting.)
QUARTERS FOR the department
are no problem; any street corner
with a soap box should serve.
Little opposition to the plan is
anticipated, as the only ones left
out are the middle-of-the-roaders
who Seldom Oppose anything

YOU wonder why?

don't need to be gross to be popular,
yet ?
......We haven't had the chance
to play dodge the sprinklers"
yet?
......Rah-Rah's are supposedly
in"?
They don't move the C.I.
across the street?
......Our girl, who never has

CORSERI CUT-OUTS*

Thoughts on Camelot

"As a matter of fact...." Im
lost here. No facts! No facts! "The
thing of it i 5...." We're getting
to close to substance. Abandon
ship! Embrace the sinking anchors!
I'll have a Saylor Sizzler.
"Martuni here." Huh? What's this?
Coke and Pepsi?
"Here, have another one; on
me, Jo."
"They burn my throad.
"I know. But it's good for you."
"Irritation?"
"Pain."
Now the toxic revolution! Vibrat Vibrating
ing Vibrating smoke, heavy, pulsing air
imprinted with the rhythm. "We'll
sing in the sunshine.... Laugh
every day." Good enough!
Excellent policy. Am totally out of
it now. Bodies quite prepared for
sacrifice. Behold the pure man,
"unaccomodated. .poor, bare,
forked..."
Naked! Still the smoke screen.
Fading now. Jo fading. Dancers
fading. Bongo! Bongo thump. Fin Fingers,
gers, Fingers, hands gone mad, incensed!
Spirit here. Spirit!

Letters

anyway, except change.
0
NAME WITHHEL
Inhuman
EDITOR:
BRUTALITY EXERCISED by
political factions to achieve de desired
sired desired ends can never be con condoned,
doned, condoned, as Selma clearly demon demonstrates.
strates. demonstrates. Five thousand years of
civilized humanity hasnt taught
us to live peacefully. The
situation seems hopeless.
BUT WHY SHOULD human
belligerency manifest itself in
cruelty to animals? What have
we got against them? The
squirrel incident that occured
near Broward Hall is more than
deplorable.
LETS NOT forget that human
rashness will not only destroy
us, but everything else that
HE has made.
Les H. Bernstein

anything to give, and no one U
give it to, has gone from when
she never was?
......Campus Cops are cool'
...<*.People like roe bring ig
the same trite topics time aftei
time after time after tim<
after . ?
STEVE OAK

"Snap oiit of it. Hey whats
wrong with you now?'*
"It's the cacophony!.. Did you
know he died?"
"Who? Who died?"
"Izzy....lMy is dead."
Do you mind if I dance witl
her?
Huh? No no go ahead. Bu
he's dead, I tell you.
Striking at the temple! Swirling
smiling, phantasmogoric inconsi
derates! Divide one million roe
by one million ideas. So? You v
got all men, and all ideas!
Darkness. Shadows. Lamen a
tions. Who's Number One if
now defunct? Issidore Baxter Ma
hone, uncelebrated friend of mar
1.8. M. departed, then who
making the decisions? Wha
analysis? How's choice?
Forget it. Fade oblivious.
Bade already?
Thank y0u.... No, I don't wai
any more. They burn my throa
But it's good tor you.
All right. But not n0w.... So* l
other time....



EDITOR:
BRAVO TO THE Alligator for
printing the Fox-Toynbee exchange
on the most important question fac facing
ing facing us how to survive in the
nuclear age.
HOWEVER, exception must be
taken to Professor Toynbee's im implication
plication implication that our choice may be
that of being red or dead. This
choice can never exist, I believe.
ALTHOUGH THE PROBABI PROBABILITY
LITY PROBABILITY of war for our present be behavior
havior behavior is alarmingly (and I believe
unnecessarily) high, war would be
almost a certainty if we were uni unilaterally
laterally unilaterally to announce ourselves as
being against war, whatever the

EDITOR:
I have been at this school two
trimesters and I have become
immune to the farcical activities
on and off campus or at least
I thought so until Saturday nights
hurting performance at University
Auditorium. I refer to Gator
Gras.
I BOUGHT TICKETS for the 9
oclock show. There was no 9
o clock show. It v/as cancelled be because
cause because the 7:30 show got started
late. I and my date, operating
under the assumption that there
would be a second show, arrived
at the Auditorium from the State
Theater promptly at 9 p.m. and
caught the last two acts of the
7:30 show.
THEY WERE good, but I paid to
see an entire show and did not see
it. After the performance I
protested and was told the
chairman would take care of it. I
could not find the chairman either

Wants more sports

EDITOR:
HURRAH FOR JOHN Clendenon.
Its about time somebody said
something about the worse than
lousy sports coverage in Hie Alli Alligator
gator Alligator this trimester.
JUST A COUPLE of examples
in the last two issues:
THURSDAY OUR TENTH ranked
Gators (found this out in an out
of town paper) played a strong
Michigan State team. Surely this
game should have been covered in
Friday's Alligator. But no, I had
to buy an Orlando Sentinel to get
the score.

Defends beauty
of UF coeds
EDITOR:
Subject: A reply to a letter from Mr. Ray King which appeared in
The Alligator (Mar. 25) under the heading Grossed Out.
ALTHOUGH MY THREE roommates and I do not normally feel the
need to make our opinions public, we feel we must now speak out
in behalf of the ladies at the UF. This is in reply to a note (in the
Mar. 25 Alligator) from Mr. Ray King.
FIRST, LET me say that although we disagree strongly with Mr.
King's views that the UF has the worst looking girls in the south,
we would not deny him the right to think as he does.
I MUST SAY, however, that my roommates and I deplor the ungentle ungentlemanly
manly ungentlemanly conduct displayed by Mr. King in referring to the UF coeds in
such unchivalrous terms. It is our opinion that Mr. King's remarks
were in very poor taste. The generalization presented by Mr. King has
been interpreted in this quarter as a crude insult to the ladies who
attend the UF.
THE FACT THAT Mr. King has drawn such a conclusion does not
unduly distress us. We do find it extremely distasteful that he has
chosen to present his opinion publicly in terms that, to us, reflect an
unfortunate lack of sophistication and maturity.
IN THE OLD south, such a verbal attack could easily result in a
passage of arms under some oak tree at dawn. Then, as now, my friends
and I would have felt privileged to act in the ladies* behalf. Our com compliments
pliments compliments to the coeds. There are still some gentlemen left.
TED BURROWS, 3JM

Hes hurtin

1 e T TeR 2 ~*~

Would rather not make choice

consequences, and thus submit
to the will of our enemies.
FOR THE WORLDS existing
delicate and complex balances of
power, nothing would more encour encourage
age encourage war than the disruptive shifts
of power and the accompanying
intolerable squeezing of socio socioeconomic
economic socioeconomic sectors which would be
early consequences o f this
announcement.
FUTHERMORE, before facing
the ultimate consequence,
extinction, a man usually changes
his mind, and, although no
historian, Ill venture to say that
nations always do. The Third Punic
War started because the peace- at atany-price
any-price atany-price Carthaginians, after de-

in the auditorium or at the Florida
Union, where I was told he would
be.
I WANT MY MONEY back. What
I cannot get back is a near
ruined evening. Gainesville and the
UF in particular HURT.
ROSS ASHLEY, lUC

Mickey
Mouse
EDITOR:
I STRONGLY SUPPORT the
stand you took concerning the
sit-in group who honored your
office with their presence last
Friday.
SIT-INS ARE justified in many
cases, but just because the ball
doesnt bounce right into the
mouse-cateers hands doesnt
justify a temper tantrum.

UNLESS I AM mistaken, the
NCAA swim meet was lost last
weekend. We had a couple of fine
swimmers entered. How did they
do? Well never know if we depend
on The Alligator.
PERHAPS THE ALLIGATOR
only sees fit to cover our winning
efforts. This...would explain why.
the baseball game and perhaps the
swim efforts were left out.
ONE MORE THING. .Any good
sports section prints some statis statistics
tics statistics occassionally. Oh well, theres
always next year.
LAWRENCE PIVEC, 2UC

livering hostages and then their
armaments at Romes demand,
finally balked at giving up their
city and thus their livelihoods and
lives.
IRONICALLY, the outcome was a
war, massacre, and destruction as
total as could be wrought by nuclear
weapons. The universitys ivory
tower is necessarily unreal, since
its final arbiter is (or should be)
truth. In the real world the final
arbiter is power, of which truth
is but one component, usually very
important. Unless desperate, men
are peaceful only when their con concepts
cepts concepts of the power structure are
not too divergent.
THE HUMAN DILEMMA is that

THE OVERALL opinion is that
groups such as this have presented
themselves when and where needed
in the past, but this time they
appear to have lost their compo composure
sure composure and went slightly Micky
Mouse.
SONNY McRAE, 3ED
Notice
We would ask that those
who write letters to the editor
please limit them to 200 words
at most.
Due to a heavy backlog of
letters to the editor, we will
not have space to run all of
them. We will try to print
those which are most fairly
representative of the group of
similar letters.
The Alligator
for the
announcement
of our
forthcoming
move to a
V
new location.
Until then,
come see us
as always alwaysfranklins
franklins alwaysfranklins
'gjoum
College Shop*
401 W. Univ. Ave.

Wednesday/ March 31, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

more terrible weapons do
not change these facts, much as
we might wish them to.
OUR ULTIMATE objective must
be the development of a supra supranational
national supranational power, a long and difficult
task not made easier by red-or red-ordead
dead red-ordead thinking. In the meantime, we
can have a precarious peace if

Max Shulman
for Kellogg's
v (By the author of Dobie Gillis
Bally liound the Flag Boys, etc.)

HOW TO SEE EUROPE FOR ONLY SSOO A DAY

Naturally you are all going to
Kurope this summer, and nat naturally
urally naturally you are all asking the same
question: what countries should
you visit? Well sir, it depends on
now much time you've got. If
youre going to he there a whole
week, of course you'll see all of
Kurope. But if,like most of us,
you only have three days, it
would he wise to restrict your
trip to just 12 or 15 of the most
interesting countries.
First on your list should he
Italy. Dont miss it! Its a Jun
country! Moreover, you dont
even need to know the language
to have a marvelous time. The
Italians area friendly, jolly people
who make it easy to communicate.
Youll get along splendidly if
youll learn just three simple
phrases: "Ruoii giorno which
means "Good morning, Grazie"
which means "Thank you ami
"Cosi fan latte which means
"Your Fiat is on mv foot.
In order to help you enjoy the
fahled land ol Italy, it is necessary
lor me to supply a hit of historical
background. (It is also necessary
for me to say a few words about
Kellogg's Sugar Frosted Flakes
l>ecause the makers of Kellogg's
Sugar Frosted Flakes pay me to
write this column, and thev are
inclined to brood if I neglect to
mention their product. Os course
they don't stay gloomy for long,
the makers of Kellogg's Sugar
Frosted Flakes, for they are
kindly, cheery folk, fond of
Morris-dancing, quilting lees and
furry animalsfine, decent men.
just as good down-deep as the
flakes they make. And there,
friends, is the secret of Sugar
frosted Flakes doun-deep good goodness.
ness. goodness. The makers dont just put
the Sugar Frosting on; they put it
in. Look for Kelloggs Sugar
Frosted Flakes at your grocers.
They come to you in the box with
the picture of the amiable tiger
on it and are made only by the
makers of Kellogg's Sugar Frosted
Flakes.)
But I digress. We were talking
about Italian history. In the
beginning, of course, was the
Roman Kmpire which endured
for a thousand vears before it

nations wisely exercise less power
than they think they have, provided
their discounts are not too
different. Also, the insurance of
a much more effective civil de defense,
fense, defense, which is technically and
economically feasible, is vital.
HERBERT A. SAWYER, JR.

finally fell lo the Goths, the Visi Visigoths,
goths, Visigoths, and the Green Bay Packers.
After the fall of Rome, Italy
just laid around waiting for the
Renaissance. Then, believe you
me. the (at was in the fire!
Painters sprang up like dande dandelions!
lions! dandelions! In Florence alone there
was Michaelangclo. Della Robbia.
Tintoretto, and AI fre lo Searpitla.
(Ironically. Mr. Searpitla, the
least famous of the Florentines,
was the most important, for Mr.
Searpitla discovered canvas. Un Until
til Until his discovery, all painting had
been done on the sides of burros.
Who knows how many master masterpieces
pieces masterpieces were lost to the world,
alas, during the moulting
season?)
The surge in painting stimu stimulated
lated stimulated all t he other artsesjiccially
opera. First came Puccini, then
Rossini, and then I lie greatest of
them all. Verdi, who composed
such immortal works as II Trout Trouttore
tore Trouttore ("The Dental Technician),
La Traviala ("The Lung), and
La Forza del Dextino ("Why
Johnny Read).
In all the major cities of Italy
you will find many peppy
museums and opera bouses. But
you must not, like too many
tourists, confine your travelling
to just the major cities. The
Italian countryside is filled with
fascinating byways, if you will
hut look. For* instance, in the
little-know n village of Formaggio,
overlooking the Dolomites, there
is a burro-beating contest on the
second Tuesddy of each month.
In Ossabucco, a charmingly un unspoiled
spoiled unspoiled hamlet on the Ligurian
coast, the worlds largest sprat is
on exhibit every Wednesday and
Friday. In the junior high school
of Malocchio, a quaint settlement
tie*tied high in the Apennines
you can see Garibaldi's penman penmanship
ship penmanship diploma from three to five
p.m. daily.
Get ofr the beaten track! Kx Kxplore
plore Kxplore the hidden nooks, the for forgotten
gotten forgotten crannies! Here is the real
Italy. Here you will meet open,
honest, hearty folk, brimming
over with friendliness, who will
be glad to show you their customs
and teach you their language.
Ill wager when you leave Italy
youll know far more Italian than
the three basic phrases. Youll
also know Arrivederci which
means "See you later, "Per
favore" which means "Please,
and La donna c mobile" which
means, "Your burro is in my
Fiat.
O IMS Mu Shulman
* *

P.S. A note as to how
vou like (or dislike)
these columns will
help determine our
plans for them. Write
Kellogg Company,
Dept. TET, Battle
Creek, Michigan.
omsty * Cm i

Page 5



Page 6

£. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 31, 1965

Brand-new
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secession. Tshombe s vs. Lumbumbc; mercenaries
missionaries, tribal chiefs and "Onusians" (UN
forcesi; the real significance of the explosive events
that ore still unfolding today. Illus. $5.95.._5a!e .99
35. MAN AND THI CONQUEST Os THE POLES.
By Poul-Emile Victor. A complete, informative and
foscmating account of mon's explorations to the far
ends of the earth, beginning with the great Greek
explorer Pytheos in the 4th century B C., and ending
with the voyoges of the Amencon nuclear subma submarines
rines submarines underneath the polar ice cap. Record of great
heroism and stark tragedy ond of mon's unrelenting
search for the mysteries of the unknown. Profusely
illustrated. Pub. at $6.95 _Sale 2.98
A* SAVE $9.52 *******
187. THE VISUAL CRAFT OF WILLIAM GOLDIN.
A retrospective volume devoted to the brilliont CBS CBSTV
TV CBSTV ort director who, before his untimely death in
1959, created some of the most exciting advertising
and promotional material ever seen in America
With essoys by Ben Shahn ond others, and 137 poges
of examples of his work. I lx'A'.
Pub. at $12.50 Sale 2.98
******************x*********
37. POEMS OF PRAYER. Ed. by Ralph L. Woods.
.This magnificent anthology of nearly 400 heart-felt
ond soul-stirring poems of praise, love, penitence,
supplication and intercession by John Donne, Saint
Augustine, John Henry Newman, Saint Francis, hun hundreds
dreds hundreds more, provides a reservoir of inspiration for
every mood and need. Pub. at $5.00 Sole 1.98
B
259. RAPHAEL. By Oskar Fischcl. Monumental
study of the Renaissance genius, lavishly illustrated
with over 300 beoutifully reproduced drawings ond
paintings from the world's leading art collections.
Every phase of Raphael's brief, but incredibly pro productive
ductive productive life his apprenticeship with Pcrugmo, the
Florentine period, ond the final Roman period. Dis Discusses
cusses Discusses and illustrates every facet of his art draw drawing,
ing, drawing, painting, architecture. Special Import 6.95
SO. GREEK MYTHOLOGY. By Felix Gutrand. Gor Gorgeously-illustrated
geously-illustrated Gorgeously-illustrated volume with over 220 reproduc reproductions
tions reproductions of Greek vase paintings, classical sculpture,
etc., 24 in rich color. The text is by cne of the fore foremost
most foremost experts on Greek mytnology of our time end
not only explains the myths but dynamically relates
them to the spirit and aspirations of Greek civiliza civilization.
tion. civilization. B', i'x II".. Special 2.98
86. OUTDOOR REFERENCE GUIDE. By A. R. Long
Encyclopedia of names ond knowledge whh should
be a port of the vocabulary of every lover of the
great outdoors. Hundreds of entries cover mam mammals,
mals, mammals, birds, fishes, omphtbians, crustaceans, trees,
flowers, mosses, rocks, minerals, natural and pre prehistoric
historic prehistoric wonders. Includes terms relating to hunt hunting,
ing, hunting, fishing, boating, archery and other outdoor
sports. Delightful for browsing, essential for quick
reference. Pub, ot $7 SO Sale 2.98
869. Fodor's GUIDE TO THE CARIBBEAN, Bahamas
and Bermuda. Ed. by Eugene Fodor. With 25 poges
of maps, 12 city plans, 56 color and block-ond-white
large orea mop in full color. Complete
aoto on transportation, historical and scenic attrac attractions,
tions, attractions, shopping, restaurants, hotels ond native cus customs.
toms. customs. 1963 ed. Pub. ot $5.95 Sole 1.77
, A HISTORY OF WOOD ENGRAVING. By
Lteuglos Percy Bliss. Rare and engrossing study of
Tne development and revival of a time-honored
croft featuring 120 exqu.sitely detailed reproduc reproductions
tions reproductions from the works of Hclbe n, Durcr, Burgkmoir,
Bewick, Blake, Morris, Gill, many others. Special
sections on such landmarks as the Book of Hours,
Danse Macabre, the Hcrbals, etc. A welcome re reissue
issue reissue ot o work long recognized as a classic in its
f,cld .Special Import On'v 3.98
The International Guide ta STAMPS tr STAM
COLLECTING. By Douglas Cr Mary Patrick. Evcr>
m.ng tnc stamp collector needs to know arronged i
qucstion-and-answcr form for conciseness und co'.
reference. Over 400 pages crommcd with intormc
lien obout stamps ot m c U. S.. Great Britain, th
commonwealth, and other countries of the work
JV", s f Paper, cancellations, stomp tcrminologt
postmarks, etc.; the celebrated rarities, curiosific
errors. Itlus. Pub. of $6.75 Sole 2.9
ill*. Ri "ha6 MY POOR ARTHUR. By Elisobct
rtanson. Outstanding, completely frank biogroph
ft# I*! 0 cn on terrible ot French poetry ond pionce
or tnc symbolist movement. Fully treats his rcla
w,, h Verlaine, which caused a notionc
-condoi, and his strange career in Africa.
Pub- ot $5.75 Sale 1.9
******* SAVE $4.07 *******
ART. 115 large, full poge pho
ft??. 4 ond 43 color plates of beautiful sculptur*
ona pointings from the rich collection of the Coir Coirmuseum.
museum. Coirmuseum. Here ore some of the finest cxomplcs c
rft.ftV 0n o, .t* i ponnin 9 almost 2000 years and rep
c phOMf of '* development. Photo
Forman, ond the enlightening dcscrip
Vf* te*t by Milado Vilimkova. 9',-j"xl 1 Vi", m
ported. Pup. Q f $51.95._ ___.solc S.Bi
A**************************,



I o VAN GOGH: Th Men end His Week. By Pierre
Cobonne. A hounting portrait of the tormented,
colorful supremely dcdicotcd ortist, illustrated with
127 magnificently reproduced examples of his best
nointings, sketches, ond drowmgs, 67 in full color.
From new research and Von Gogh's letters, the peas peasants
ants peasants of Brabant the miners of Borinage, brother
Theo Gauguin, the prostitute Sicn f ond mony others
important in his life come dramatically alive.
Pub. at $6.95 Sole i. 98
75 THE teaching of human relations by
/THt CASE DEMONSTRATION METHOO. By F. Alex Alexander
ander Alexander Mogoun. How to learn ond how to help others
Icorn from the lessons of experience the unique
ond dynomic method developed by the renowned
M.I.T. professor. Pub. of $4.50 Sale .99
76 THE ULTIMATE DECISION: The President ns
Commander in Chief. Ed. by Ernest R. May. Six
outstanding histonons provide the essential back background
ground background on the most potcntally dangerous power in
the Constitution. How it hos been used by seven
worftme Presidents, from the Wor of 1812 to the
U-2 incident. Pub. ot $6.00 Sale 1.98
100. VESALIUS The Anatomy ItWstreted. Ed.
by J. B. Sounders and Charles B. OMolley. A beau beautiful
tiful beautiful modern edition of one of the most remarkable
works in the whole history of science, art and print printing.
ing. printing. Included ore 96 fufl-poge focsimihes ot Vcsal Vcsalius'
ius' Vcsalius' powerful and dramatic woodcuts of the human
figure, with annotations, a discussion of the plates
and a biographical sketch of the great 16th century
physician-artist. "A great classic, a scholarly work
ond a beoutiful one. N. Y. Times.
Pub. ot SIO.OO Sole 6.95
101. INTELLIGENT LAYMAN'S MEDICAL DIC DICTIONARY.
TIONARY. DICTIONARY. By Harry Swartz. Authoritative clear
explanations of key terms in various branches of
medicineanatomical, surgical, psychatric. Plates,
tobies, cross reference guide. invaluoble reference
for lawyers, hospital workers, doctors' secretaries,
students. Pub. ot $6.00 ....... Sole 2.98
*** A* ** * **
229. CHRIST'S IMAGE. By Marcello Auclair. 136
reproductions, 36 mounted full-color plotcs. The
story of Jesus Christ reverently told by one of the
greot religious writers of our time ond brought to
brilliant life m reproductions of the greotest paint paintings,
ings, paintings, drowmgs, tapestries, sculpture and other im images
ages images portroymg His life from fhc Annunciation to
the Resurrection. Represented arc all the great
masters of all periods and all countries.
Pub. ot $6.95 Sale 3.98
A**************************
47. THE WINES AND VINEYARDS OF FRANCE.
Jocquclm & R. Poulam, with 76 photos and 17
mops. Hailed m France os "a true encycloped.a of
everything one needs to know about French wines,"
this handsome and voluminous work lists over five
theusond individual vineyards, details of Site, soil
and cl mate, grape varieties, yields, official classifi classifications
cations classifications of quality, etc. Sparkling chapters on wine
measures and labels, storage ond serving, the bar barmen.
men. barmen. ous choice of wine ond food, and o wine vocab vocabulary.
ulary. vocabulary. Pub. at $9.95 Sole 5.95
19. THE WORLDITREASURY OF GRAND OPERA.
4d. by George R. Marek. A one-volume library of
the finest writing obout opera, covering every aspect
of the art history, performance, foct, fiction, criti criticism
cism criticism and controversy; its triumphs, trials and great
personalities. Nearly 700 pages of endless fascina fascination,
tion, fascination, with contributors ranging from Shaw, Tovey
and Newman to Lottie Lehman, Enrico Caruso and
Richard Strauss. Pub. at $7.50 Sole 3.98
41. Alexander Dumas' DICTIONARY OF CUISINE.
Ed. by Louis Colman. From Anchovy butter tand
how to moke itl to Zest (ond how to save it) this
cookery classic makes for wonderful reading ond
eating. There are hundreds of epicureon recipes, to
be sure, but most fascinating ore the tidbits of cul culinory
inory culinory legend gossip ond anecdote from the most il illustrious
lustrious illustrious tobies of 19th century ParisSpecial 1.98
54. THE ROCK PAINTINGS OF TASSILI. By Jaon-
Dommique Lojoux. Over 130 reproductions, 23 in
full color. A mognificent picture and text study of
this strange Saharan civilization which existed sev several
eral several thousand years before Christ. Provides on in invaluable
valuable invaluable study of the magico-religious background
bf a vanished people whose multi-hued pointings
ond engravings of mosked figures, bowmen, bovias
ond mystical symbols remain a challenging link in
the evolution of man and the history of ort. 9"x
II Vi'. Pub. at $15.00 Sole T.9J
64. WILD IN THE KITCHEN: A Cookbook. By Will
'Jones. Fabulous lifetime collection of unusual yet
easy-to-prepore tosfe-treat recipes to odd variety
ond spice to every meal. From Wild Williom.Greer's
Barbecued Chuck to Eiffel Tower Hot Dog, Italian
Christmas Turkey and Jackie Kennedy Casserole.
Pub. at $4.95 Sale 1.98
66. THE ORDEAL OF CAPTAIN BOEDER Nape-
Icon's Retreat from Moscow. Ed. by Helen Roeaer.
A Hessian officer's eye-witness, day-by-day record
of the almost unparalleled horror that accompanied
Nopoleon's troops during their nightmare retreat
during the winter of 1812. Illus. $5.00 Sole 1.77
68. LIFE AMONG VhE SURREALISTS. By Matthew
Joseph son. The intellectual ferment of Paris. 1920'5,
recoptured: the myth of the "lost generation" ex exploded.
ploded. exploded. Dadaism, the cult of Tzaro, Stein, Heming Hemingway,
way, Hemingway, Cummings, etol, the movements ond mani manifestoes
festoes manifestoes revivified in this sparkling and worm mem memoir.
oir. memoir. "A highly entertaining chronicle" Von Wyek
Brooks. Photos. Pub. ot s6.oo__ Sale 2.98
******* SAYE $9.12 *******
59. GOD'S WILDERNESS: Discoveries Im SineL By
Beno Rothenberg. With 90 superb photogravure if ifustrotions,
ustrotions, ifustrotions, 16 mops and plans. A mognificent vol volume
ume volume for anyone interested in the romance of ontiq- i
uity the complete story of the 1956-57 archaeo archaeological
logical archaeological exploration of the Sinai Peninsulo by Israeli
scholars. Here is a fascinating journey to sites steep steeped
ed steeped in Biblical drama, uncovering relics of ancient
cults ond kingdoms ond traces of early Christian
pilgrims. Pub. at $15.00 Sale CAR
****************************
410. THE ARMY ALMANAC. Ed. by Brig. Gen.
G. R. Young. 600 poges of oufhontativc focts cov covering
ering covering every aspect of the United Stotcs Army's mili military,
tary, military, administrative ond tcchmcol organization, in including
cluding including history of each corps ond service, oil maior
ond minor wars ond compoigns up to 1959, etc.,
etc. Essential for every editor, commentator, li library.
brary. library. pub. ot $8.95 Sole 1.77
112. PARADE'S END. By Ford Maddox Ford. First
single-volume edition of Ford's great four-port novel
of World Wor I, now recognized as one of the major
works of 20th century fiction. This monumcntol, en enveloping
veloping enveloping tragedy ot "the lost English Tory" brilliont brilliontty
ty brilliontty elaborates upon on incident m the wor to depict
the decline of Western civilization itself. ''No novel novelist
ist novelist of this century is more likely to live than Ford
Maddox Ford" Graham Greene. 836 pages.
Pub. ot $7.50 Sole 2.98
113. World Wor II Invosions THE WATERY
MAZE. By Bernard Fergusson. Superbly narrated
work on British Amphibious Operations in France,
North Africa ond the Mediterranean; the roles piay piay*d
*d piay*d by Eisenhower, Churchill, Mountbottcn, ct al.;
raomentous bottles from Dieppe to D-Day. Photos,
mops. Pub. ot $7.50 Sole 1.98
114. COLLECTOR'S GUIDE TO AMERICAN CAR CARTRIDGE
TRIDGE CARTRIDGE HANDGUNS. By De Witt E. Sell. A must
for serious collectors ond avid hobbyists pictures,
identifying characteristics ond comprehensive infor information
mation information on virtually every known American cartridge
hondgun. Invaluoble tips on where ond how to buy,
including cosh values of over 350 different models.
Biblio. Photo*. Pub. ot $6.95 Sola 3.9*
115. Ivor Lissner's MAN, GOO ft MAGIC. World Worldrenowned
renowned Worldrenowned scholar, outhor ot "The Living Post," pre presents
sents presents an exciting account of the culture, religious
beliefs ond practices of prehistoric mon the
scorch for God os expressed in nature worship, soc socrificial
rificial socrificial ceremonies, shamanism ond the like. 117
illustrations. Pub. ot $5.95 Sal*J2.9B

Drastic Reductions on Hundreds
of Fine Volumes!
Save 50 0/o *7O

****************************
THt MADONNA. By Jeon Guitton. 90 ort
reproductions, 40 tip-ons in full color. A mognifi mognificent,
cent, mognificent, moving ond meonmgful retelling of the story
of Mory, m pointings, sculpture, mosaic ond stained stained-9
-9 stained-9 oss by such great ortisfs os Giotto, Leonardo, El
u'cco Rembrandt and Gauguin. A great scholar
contributes the informative, reverent text ond pro provides
vides provides a running criticol commentary on the ort mas masterpieces
terpieces masterpieces which picture such episodes in the life of
the Modonno os the Annunciation, the Pieti. the
Flight into Egypt, ond the Assumption.
Pub. ot $6.95 _ Sole 1.98

CLASSICAL RECORDS
SALE!!
SELECT FROM HUNDREDS OF TITLES
AT HUGE SAVINGS FACTORY FRESH
WESTMINSTER s]9B
URANIA $4.98 SCHWANN LIST
(Collector's Series)
VOX (MONO & 4 069
is A nn STEREO) 14.98 M Ml\
l\ Ml\ f|r SCHWANN LIST
i/n y 2 Record s 88
W Sets Schwann List
(MONO & STEREO)
VOX BOXES *5 99
(Mono & Stereo) $9.96
SCHWANN LIST
COME EARLY Titles Limited

(jmpueS/iop
located In the Hub

Wednesday, March 31, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

1404. THE BOOK OF THE UNIVERSE. 8y Chorles
Hatcher. 32 full color plates, many photos. The
ewe-mspinng fascination of cosmic events from
rxplosion of sfors to collision of galaxies. With com complete
plete complete planet charts and stor mops for osfronomical
gazing BVi"x 11 Speciol .99
1420. PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS COOKBOOK. By
Marguerite Patten. Over 600 tempting, tasty "grand
f.noic" recipes to make any mcol a feast mousses,
scuttles, pies and cakes, steamed ond baked pud pudd.ngs,
d.ngs, pudd.ngs, pastries, fruit sweets, cold desserts some
familior, some excitingly new. 29 color plates, over
200 photos. 8xll". Special edition Sole .99

2)7. COMMON SENS! IN POKER. By lvin Sfeig.
Ulus 'by Willtom Sfeig. Mostcr the methods and
' rokc in the chips with this eosy to understand hitor hitoriously
iously hitoriously written explanation of all the populor varia variation*
tion* variation* of the gome. Shows you how to figure the
odds, play the cords (and the players), much more.
Pub. ot V 1.95 LSole .99
2ES. THE DRAWINGS OP JEAN DUBUFFET. By
Daniel Cordier, with 100 reproductions in gravure,
plus 13 drawings and endpapers especially designed
oy the artist tor this book. A stunning sampling
of Dubuffet's impotable ectoplasms, dennum and
fantasy, texturologies and psychological confessions
in line and spoce pencil mogic, prints ond litho lithographs
graphs lithographs from 1921 to 1959 thot show why critics con consider
sider consider Dubuffet the greatest artist olive. 12 ,VxlO r #
printed ond bound m France. sls 00 ~. Sol* 7oc
104. LYOF TOLSTOY: A Anthetegy. E<£ by Chorles
< R. Joy. Gold nuggets from the entire corpus of Tol Tolstoy's
stoy's Tolstoy's writings, including "War and Peoce," short
stones, dtones, notes, articles, etc. Arranged by
categories, they offer o key to his thoughts an
everything from ort ond love to the social order and
God. Pub. ot J 4.95 Sale 1.98
******* SAVE 51.52 *******
lit. Patterns in Nature PLANT MARVELS IN
MINIATURE. Text ond photos by C. Postmo. Fwd.
by Edwin Way Teole. 77 masterpieces of photo photo-rmoovcopy
-rmoovcopy photo-rmoovcopy on the sub-visible world ot plant life,
printed on individual KVxl3* pages with ostonidsino
sharpness ond clarity ot detail. The fundamental
structures and life cycles of seeds, stolks. roots,
grosses, flowers ond wood ore explained in simple
language ond demonstrated by magnifications up to
3,OUJ times. Pub. at 512.50 Saiel.9B
****************************
500. BAUDELAIRE. By Enid Storkie. A new re rek
k rek written version of this famous and classic study of
the great French poet, toys bare his twisted ond tor tormented
mented tormented life, his sensuous ond demonic imagery as
i expressed in such works as "The Flowers of Evil,"
1 ond the background ond personalities of the great greatest
est greatest artistic controversies of his century.
Pub. ot SIO.OO Sale 2.98
503. HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHICAL SYSTEMS. Ed.
by Vergilius Ferm. From Plato ond Aristotle to mod modern
ern modern Existentialism; 41 eminent authorities present
informative, stimulating summaries of all the major
schools of thought, including the contributions ot
the world's great religions. 007 absorbing poges.
Pub. at $6.00 .Sole 1.91
Sl2. THE ENGINEER'S ILLUSTRATED THESAURUS.
By Herbert Herkimer. Over 8.000 illustrations of
mecnorucol movements, devices, contrivances and
details arranged and classified for easy reference.
This labor-saving, money-saving, time-saving book
belongs on the desk or m the shop of anyone who
designs, constructs or works with machinery of any
kind. Pub. at $6.00 Sale 1.98
i 44. THE STATE AND SOCIETY IN OUR TIMES.
y Theodor Schieder. A collection ot essays by the
editor of the Historische Zeitschrift, leading Ger German
man German scholarly review. Central theme is the altered
meaning of such terms as state, society, party, re revolution
volution revolution in the light of new concepts and modern
politicol philosophers. Pub. at $4,50. -Sale 1.91
S6S. DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN SPORTS. Ed.
by John S. Solok. Over 80 motor, organized gomes
on the college and professional level are covered by
more than 6,000 authoritative definitions, including
slang. Modern, up-to-date, entertaining reference
tor ton and expert alike. Pub. at $6.00 Sale 1.98
485. History es Science HENRY CAVENDISH.
yA. J. Berry. Long-overdue study of the life end
work (1731*18301 of one of the greatest scientific
minds of oil time. An eccentric English recluse much
pdmired by Davy, Cuvier and Young, his achieve achievements
ments achievements included the discovery of the composition of
woter ond the properties of hydrogen, ond the per perfection
fection perfection of experimental techniques of far-reocning
consequences. Pub. at s7.oo.__________ Sale 1.77
******* SAVE 519.12 *******
424. THE CHECKERED FLAG Reed Redng In
Amerlce. Written ond illustrated by Peter Helck,
dcon of American outo artists ond historians. Rip Riproaring
roaring Riproaring saga of the first years of motor cor racing
in turope ond America# packed with focts, anec anecdotes,
dotes, anecdotes, "you ore there" descriptions of oil the Grand
Prix and other races from 1895 to 1916. 120 large
beautiful plotcs, many in color. A "must" for afi aficionados
cionados aficionados of vmtogo cors ond racing history. I0"x
l3'/ 2 format. Pub. at S2S OO Z.u j,n
****************************
640. AN ANTHROPOLOGIST AT WORK: Writings
es Ruth Benedict. By Margaret Mead. To the
heretofore unpublished workbooks ond journals of
this century's most original anthropologist. Miss
Mead has added her own thoughts and recollec recollections.
tions. recollections. From this brilliant contrapuntal performonci
emerges the first totol appreciation of Miss Benedict
as both humanistic scholar and womon.
Pub. ot $6.00 Sole 8.98
******* SAVE 55.12 *******
525- THE MOON AND THE PLANETS. By J. SodH
na L. Pesck. With 40 huge, double-poge and three threepanel
panel threepanel plates, 27 in full color. An imagination-stag imagination-staggering
gering imagination-staggering journey through the solar system featuring
spectaculor paintings of the surface of the moon.
Mors, Venus, Saturn's rings, etc., os modern science
now conceives them. Accompanying the pointings
is o love ino ting text on how our knowledge of the
solor system groduolly developed over centuries from
the first telescopes to the most recent space probes.'
9Vxl3'/T. Pub. ots 10.00 -LsaleTJl
THE MICROSCOPE ITS USE. By F. J. Munoz.
& H. A. Charipper. Comprehensive, profusely-illus profusely-illustrated
trated profusely-illustrated text-monuol on the use including prepara preparation
tion preparation of materials ond core r.f all types of micro microscopes.
scopes. microscopes. Clear, non-technicc guoge.
Pub. ot $5.00 Sole 1.77
AU GARDENING THE EASt WAV. By E. P. Stef Steffek.
fek. Steffek. An essential reference poviding detailed in instructions
structions instructions on plonning, plonting ana maintaining
>flowee, lawns, shrubs, trees, vegetables, etc., plus
chopters on summer-home gardens in the mountains
and ot the seashore. Pub. at s3.9s~___LSole .99

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 31,1965

I GATOR CLASSIFIEDS I

Autos
1953 M.G. T.D. Good condition,
need interior work. Must sell im immediately.
mediately. immediately. Very reasonably
priced. Call Jay Foley 372-9307.
(G-125-2t-c).
RARE! 1960 Simca Sports Coupe,
white with red leather interior.
Immaculate & good tires. Excel Excellent
lent Excellent condition. $750. Call Rick.
378-2246. (G-126-lt-c).
56 PLYMOUTH, runs excellent but
body quite rusted. Almost new
tires, battery, generator, voltage
regulator. $125 cash. Call 8-1400
after 6;00. (G-126-2t-p).
1955 DODGE, 2-door hardtop, new
motor, trans, batt, seat covers.
A-l condition. s2so.(Terms avail available).
able). available). FR 2-2939 after 5 p.m.
(G-125-4t-c).
1959 4Q3 PEUGOT, Runs perfect perfectrecent
recent perfectrecent valve job, good tires tiresinterior
interior tiresinterior extra clean, must sell to
continue through spring trimester.
Price $295'. Joe Reda 1614 NW
3PI. If not home leave phone no.
or address. (G-125-2t-c).
Help Wanted j
PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT, Degree in Personnel,
knowledge of Engineering. Desir Desirable
able Desirable start $6,000/ year. Chemistry
or science majors to $6,000/ year.
Chemical & mechanical & Mechan Mechanical
ical Mechanical Engineers S7OO/mo. Geologist
MS Degree S7OO/mo. Contact: Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia OQuin, Consultant in Per Personnel,
sonnel, Personnel, P.O. Box 2263, Lakeland
Florida. Phone 682-8161. (E-125-
3t-c).
2 NEWS CARRIERS needed for
routes in Flavet in nad Corry
Village. Age 12 to 16. Call
Gainesville Sun, Circulation
Department, 378-1411.(E-121-
st-c).
Watch For
"JOHN GOLPFARB"
f
fir Mw
Mm M
HUSH- ts
HUSH, i
SWEET H I
CHARLOTTE

Personal.
CHARLATAN has gone Nationwide!
Now covers frc.r Okla., LSU, to
Fla., and Harvard. 20 Universities
in all. Needs Feature girls from
U. of F. Contact Rick Brown 6-
0768. (J-126-3t-^).
i
Real Estate
TAKE UP PAYMENTS AND pay
closing costs on a repossessed
3-bedroom, 2 bath house. Central
heat, CCB and newly painted. Phone
372-3826. (I-120-ts-c).
Wanted
i
ONE FEMALE ROOMMATE 3A
term. Air-conditioned apartment.
4 blocks from campus. Call Sally
376-9778 after 6 p.m. (C-126-
2t-c).
WANTED MALE ROOMMATE to
share 2-bedroom apartment, air airconditioned,
conditioned, airconditioned, swimming pool, A&B
or B term. 8-2682. (C-126-lt-c).
WANTED: USED CLASSICAL gui guitar.
tar. guitar. Reasonably priced. Phone 372-
8745. (C-126-2t-p).
A few hundred more students to
enjoy SPUDNUTS DONUT SHOP,
1017 W. University. Open to mid midnight
night midnight every night. (C-126-3t-c).
Lost & Found
ENGAGEMENT RING LOST on
main part of campus or vicinity
of SW 2nd. Court and Ist. way.
Reward. Contact Diane Rm. 91.
FR 2-9445. (L-125-2t-c).
LOST: A PAIR of black eye glasses
in a brown leather case3ob Boden.
164 Fletcher L. FR 2-9219.
(L-125-3t-p).
LOST: LARGE, BROWN University
of Florida notebook containing en entire
tire entire trimesters notes for EH-136,
C-21, Bly-181, C-12, and Glee
Club. IMPORTANT! Reward. Con Contact
tact Contact Judi, Rm. 2094 FR 2-9183.
(L-126-lt-p).
TONITE! 3 GREAT HITS!
FIRST AREA RUN 9
uSTOE -Lit u m
Mdueen Remick Murray
mm! m / /
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For Sale
SPECIAL THIS WEEK 1,000 name
and address labels SI.OO post paid.
Tom Baugh Box 14037, Uni University
versity University Station, Gainesville,
Florida. (A-124-st-c).
GUITAR AMPLIFIER l2 inch
speaker, tremolo, 15 watt output
LIKE NEW. $65. Call Earl Guidry,
372-9616. (A-122-st-p).
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER.
Three 500 sheet boxes of Buff.
Retail for S2O per box. Will sac sacrifice
rifice sacrifice for $lO per box. Call Ext.
2832 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
(A-110-tf-nc).
3 MINUTES FROM MED. CEN CENTER
TER CENTER & NEW VA HOSPITAL. 3-
bedroom, 1 bath home on oak
shaded lot. Nicely furnished.
$5,500 Terms. Call Mrs. Ann
Hinson, John Merrill Agency, FR
2- (A-126-st-c).
KELVIN A TOR REFRIGERATOR in
very good working condition. Has
large cross top freezer. S6O cash.
1102 NW 3 Ave. Phone 37,2-8048.
(A-126-3t-c).
HOUSE FOR SALE. 2-bedroom
frame, furnished, large screened
porch, play yard. 5 minutes from
Med Center, off Archer road.
SB,OOO. Take occupancy June 15th.
Call 372-0752. (A-126-3t-c).
LE FT HANDED GOLF CLUBS, with
bag. Used a dozen times.
Registered brand. 3- 5-7-9 & put putter,
ter, putter, 1 & 3 woods. $55. Call Rick
378-2246. (A-l 26-1 t-c).
- ~ ---
harley davidson 165 cc motorcycle.
Excellent shape: new piston, bear bearings,
ings, bearings, battery, rings, brakes, paint,
plates. $125. Hedberg, 219 NW 3
Ave. (A-126-3t-c).
LIKE NEW: FM/AM BAND, 3-
speed 14 transistor, Portable
stereo Radio-phonograph, (works
on batteries). Plus AC adapter
$125.00. FR 2-9372. Ask for Cal Calvin.
vin. Calvin. (A-126-st-p).
MUST SELL! 1959 Ranchero
TRAILER, 10x45, very good con condition,
dition, condition, furnished, 2 bedrooms,
fenced in yard, close to campus.
Glynn wood Park, Lot 2, on Archer
Road. Phone: 378-1596. (A-126-
st-p).
ATTRACTIVE CONTEMPORARY
3- bedroom, 2-bath near med. cen center
ter center and VAwood floors, Cypress
paneling. Must sell. 2-0328 alter
5 p.m. (A-125-st-c).
1960 SABRE 50x10 MOBILE
HOME. Air-conditioned. Excellent
condition with 30x10 screened
alum, cabana. After 6, Lot 36
Hickory Hill. 372-7955^A- 125-4t 125-4tc).
c). 125-4tc).

Regular Admission gfijSjjJg
. Academy A ward Winner f
BEST ACTOR! f UgSgagfl
Maximilian Sehall I
BEST fl AT Features at j
ag r l WUREMBERB |
Exclusive Specie! Engagement I 9:00
NO RESERVED SEATS! 3 PERFORMANCES DAILY!
CHECK ON THE STATE THEATRE JAZZ HOUR
Each Sunday at Midnite Guy Graham

For Sale
HARLEY DAVIDSON 125 motor
cycle. Excellent condition. $125.
Also a West Bend Go-Kart. See at
1036 NE 4 Street or call 372-
1902. (A-125-3t-c).
1963 MO-PED motor bike. Great
condition for campus use. SBO.
Call Gary, 115 East Hall. 2-9128.
(A-125-3t-c).
MOBILE HOME for sale 3oxB,
1958, air conditioned, good con condition,
dition, condition, ideal for couple. Hill Crest
Trailer Park, 378-2621 Ext. 32
day 372-7834 after 5 p.m. (A-125-
4t-c),
For Rent
AIR-CONDITIONED, Split level,
modern apartment for two, three
blocks from campus. Reduced
to SBS a month. Call 378-2358.
,(B-126-2t-p).
KEEP COOL THIS SUMMER! New
Danish modern, one bedroom, air airconditioned
conditioned airconditioned apartment with plenty
of closet space. S9O a month (in (in,
, (in, eludes water, sewage and garbage
collection). Available April 24th.
Call 372-0094 after 5:30 (B-126-
st-c).
2-BEDROOM FURNISHED HOUSE,
1 mile from campus. Will sublet
April 25 through Aug. $65 month monthly.
ly. monthly. 372-2861. (B-126-ts-c).
AVAILABLE APRIL 24, furnished,
2-bedroom, kitchen. Reduced rate
for summer. 322-A NE 11 St.
378-1509. (B-126-st-c).
2 -BEDROOM FURNISHED
APARTMENT, available summer
trimester, 1 mile from campus.
$75/mo. for two plus utilities call
8-2081. (B-126-st-c).
ALL UNITS GROUND FLOOR, 2
rooms furnished, refrigerator.
Few air-conditioners. No kitchens.
2 blocks from main air-conditioned
Library, classes, food centers,
Post Office, laundry etc. Rates
s9osls entire semester.
6-6494. (B-126-st-c).
SMALL FURNISHED, 1-BEDROOM
apt. Available May 1. Less than
2 blocks from campus. 1016-1/2
SW 4th Ave. (lower). S6O/month.
(B-126-3t-p l.
Situations
NEED CREATIVE WRITER FOR
TV OR PRIVATE FILM? Maybe
you have facts but lack profes professional
sional professional script or you have film
already but no narration. Sales
messages, short subjects, docu documentaries,
mentaries, documentaries, written. 2-5220.
(F-126-st-c).

For Rent
AVAILABLE APRIL Ist., APART APARTMENTS,
MENTS, APARTMENTS, completely furnished. One
bedroom, swimming pool, all elec electric
tric electric kitchen, central heat, air airconditioning.
conditioning. airconditioning. S9O per month. 372-
3826. (B-120-ts-c).
AIR CONDITIONED Apartments
for 3A and/or 38. Suitable for 2
or 3 people S7O per mo. plus elec electric.
tric. electric. 1829 N.W. 2nd Ave. Suitable
for 3 or 4 people at 1518 NW 4th
Ave. S9O-SIOO with air-condition air-conditioning
ing air-conditioning included. Also renting for fall
at slightly higher rates. Call 376-
4353. (B-llltf-c).
UNFURNISHED Apartment, 3 large
rooms. Kitchen furnished, tile bath
and 1/2. Large proch and yard.
Enjoy cool shady summer living.
SBS per month. 923 NE 3rd Ave.
376-9992. (B-123-ts-c).
cis HOUSE, 3 bedroom, 2-bath,
air conditioned, fully furnished.
SIOO per mo. Phone 376-8195 after
6. (B-125-ts-c).
AVAILABLE FOR SUMMER term
at reduced rate: 1 unbelievable unbelievableuntil
until unbelievableuntil seen completely furnished,
SSO/mo. apt. See after 2 p.m.
. 218 NW 3 Ave. (B-125-et-p).
3A&B 3-bedroom, 2-bat h, fur furnished
nished furnished new house. 5 min. from
campus. $l2O per mo. Ideal for
family or group of students. Call
FR 2-8668 after 6. (B-125-ts-c).
AIR-CONDITIONED SINGLE. Re Refrigerator,
frigerator, Refrigerator, linen and maid service.
Two blocks from Matherly. Quiet.
$12.50 per week for summer. Phone
Ed. 6-9247. (B-125-2t-p).
MODERN 1-BEDROOM, furnished
apartment. Air-conditioned with
plenty of room outdoors. Call
2-2306 after 5. (B-125-st-c).
2-BEDROOM APARTMENT. Ideal
for 3 students. Low summer rates.
Downtown location. 372-0481. (B (B---1
--1- (B---1
1 FURNISHED ROOM, efficiencys,
one, 2-bedroom apartment, uti utilities
lities utilities furnished except gas. Low
summer Trimester rates. Off
street parking down town location.
372-0481. (B-125-st-c).
ROOMMATE DRAFTED. Must
move. Reduced rates for summer.
Modern split level, air-conditioned
apartment 2 blocks from campus.
CaU 2-4371 from 12:00 to 5 p.m.
or 2-3329 from 6-9 p.m. (B-126-
3t-c),
FURNISHED APARTMENTS A-
V AIL ABLE April 1 & May 1. One
bedroom modern, air-cond. apts.
near Univ & Med. Center. Adults
only no pets. Lease required. S9O/
mo. 372-3488 or 376-4360.(8-125-
NEW 1 BEDROOM Furnished
apartments. Air-condittoned, all
electric. Available April lOUwCall
Fr 2- 2436. (B-122-ts-c).
Services
PROFESSIONAL TYPING done in
my home. Call anytime Monday
through Saturday Carol Parker at
2-6353. (M-121-lt-c).
GARNER DRAFTING SERVICE.
Leroy lettering, charts, graphical
delineation, & preperation of data
for Oxalid reproduction for thesis
and dissertations. 372-8008. (M (M---1
--1- (M---1
TYPING, THESIS, TERKrPXPEIS,
& reports. Fast, accurate, rea reasonable.
sonable. reasonable. Electric typewriter with
elite type. Mrs. Betty Ogletree,
4105 NW 13 Place, Phone 6-0995.
(M-126-3t-c).
EXPERT TYPING done in my home.
Will pick and deliver. 376-
8586 before 7:30 a.m. or after
5 pan. (M-126-lt-p).



People want warnings on cigarettes

By CHERYL KURIT
Staff Writer
According to Surgeon General
Luther Terry, the American peo people
ple people want cigarette packages to
carry a health warning label
The final figures on a public
opinion survey conducted last year
showed that 77.7 per cent of the
American people agreed that Cig Cigarette
arette Cigarette smoking is enough of a
health hazard for somethicg to
be done about it, said Terry.
Most of these people said that
manufactures should be required
to place a warning on cigarette
packages such as cigarette smo smoking
king smoking is dangerous to health, said
Terry.
Dr. Everette E. Hall, psycholo psychologist
gist psychologist at the UF Infirmary, said
that the health warnings might
Do your laundry
you shop
hjfc* ill
' Every 10th Load FR !c
KOIN KLEEN
704 W. Univ. Ave.

For 'PLUS VALUE
INSURANCE ASK
R.E. POLAND
About Gulf Lifes
ADAPT-A-PLAN
wiSSTIs Gulf Life IT)
376-2404 INSURANCE COMPANY
FOR YOUR FRATERNITY
*AND SORORITY SUPPLIES
BILL BOSTAIN
District Representative
376-6081 9AM -5 PM
jewelry s finest crartsmfn
' WEDNESDAY fa
NIGHT SPECIAL
Filet Mignon Dinner $1.49
Tossed Salad Hot Buttered Rolls
French Fries Tea or Coffee
Child's Plate 89$
FROM 5 TIL' 9
STUDENTS WELCOME
"Mono*
adj: Moitl
our specialty Ribs and
Charcoal Broiled Steaks
14.5. BUM NosMi CjoiHt&oiU*, fyla.
Across From J.M, Fields-

NATIONAL SURVEY SHOWS

eventually get to the smoker
since it would appear on the pack
each time it was opened.
Forty per cent of the med medical
ical medical students polled in a recent
survey have stopped smoking. This
might prove a relationship between
the exposure to health information

Voting may be at 18
for Florida residents

By 808 WILCOX
Staff Writer
UF students under 21, along
with other underaged state res residents
idents residents may be able to vote at
18 if a proposed amendment to
the Florida Constitution is passed
by the House and Senate, and
approved by popular vote.
A joint resolution proposing an
amendment to sections 1 and 3 of
Article VI of the state Constitu Constitution
tion Constitution will be introduced to the Flori Flori[
[ Flori[ YAMAHA BMW S
Motorcycles
For The Discriminating I
CYCLERAMA I
78-2811 21 SE 2nd Place

and non-smokers, Hall com commented.
mented. commented.
Congress has opened hearings on
two bills that would require such
labels on the packs.
I dont believe that the war warning
ning warning labels on the packs will really
make that much difference. There

da Legislature by Senator Harold
O. Stratton and Representative
Claude E. Wingate in April.
Section 1 of the resolution terms
electors as every person of the
age of eighteen years...a citizen
of the United States...residing in
Florida for one year, and in the
county for six months.
A permanent residence in the
county must be established.
Section 3 provides an Oath of
electors that must be taken be before
fore before voting.
If the resolution passes both
the House and Senate, it will be
presented on a ballot for ap approval
proval approval by Florida voters.
State Senator J. Emory Cross
of Gainesville favored the pro proposal.
posal. proposal. It stands a pretty good
chance. The young people of to today
day today are more mature, more cap capable,
able, capable, and keep up with politics.
State Representative Ralph Tur Turlington,
lington, Turlington, although favoring the res resolution,
olution, resolution, was less optimistic. It
comes up every year and I
support it, he said. Itmaypass,
but the chances are doubtful.
Expressing hope for passage of
the proposal, Bruce Culpepper, SG
president, said, Much of our
society revolves around young peo people
ple people and their attitudes. I see no
reason why they are not mature
enough to assume the responsi responsibility
bility responsibility of voting at 18.
The Gallup Poll gives an in indication
dication indication of American trends on the
matter. Omitting the no opinion
percentage, Gallop found in 1939,
17 per cent for an 18 year old
voting age, and 79 per cent op opposed.
posed. opposed.
In 1947, the poll showed 35 per percent
cent percent for and 60 per cent against.
The most redent poll, taken in
1955, recorded 63 per cent in favor
of lowering the voting age, and
31 per cent opposed.
(Continued From Page 1)
Hillis Miller Health Center, 72;
Registrar's Office, 52; off cam campus,
pus, campus, 46; Florida Union, 42; Book Bookstore,
store, Bookstore, 29; Athletic Department,
28; College of Physical Education
and Health, 27; College of Law,
26; College of Education, 25; Col College
lege College of Pharmacy, 24; College of
Business Administration, 22; Bus Business
iness Business Office, 21; University Col College,
lege, College, 17; Physical Plant, 14; School
of Forestry, 10; Food Service,
10; Student Affairs Office, 8;
College of Nursing, 7, and miscel miscellaneous
laneous miscellaneous jobs, 33.
Peking sabotaging
Soviet arms aid
MOSCOW (UPI) The Peking
regime is sabotaging Soviet efforts
to deliver arms aid to North Viet
Nam by laying down unacceptable
conditions for shipments via Com Communist
munist Communist China while criticizing
Moscow for the delay, informed
l sources said yesterday.

Wednesday, March 31, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

is so much writing on the pack
now that it would take five inch
letters for it to be seen, said
Davis M. Hendon, office manager
for Eli Witt Cigar and Candy
Division of Hava Tampa Cigar
Corp.
Radio and television advertising
stressing the warning on the packs
might have some effect, said Hen Hendon.
don. Hendon.
As for the warning having a
great effect on our business, I
don't see any great danger at this
point, concluded Hendon.
Gator Guard uait
to drill Saturday
in Sarasota
The Gator Guard, topnotch pre precision
cision precision marching unit from the
Army Reserve Officer Training
Corps at the University of Florida,
will perform in the King Neptune
Parade at Sarasota April 3.
The group recently was named
the outstanding drill team among
33 participating in the Crew of
Venus Parade during Mardi Gras
Festival activities in New Orleans,
La.
The Gator Guard not only suc successfully
cessfully successfully defended its best in
class" distinction in the Venus
competition, but also captured the
Mardi Gras Sweepstakes Trophy
as the best of 75 marching units
attending the gala program.
The Sarasota parade caps a
week-long series of events and
pageantry tagged King Neptune's
Frolic" and will be viewed by
100,000 spectators, based on pre previous
vious previous attendance. More than 100
units participated in the 1964 pa parade.
rade. parade.
Capt. Bill Wood, Army ROTC
advisor to the Gator Guard, said
the group will conclude its winter
trimester commitments April 10
with a program at the Gainesville
Boys' Club.
(Continued From Page 1)
drugs reserpine and trimeth trimethapan
apan trimethapan on the heart. His work
led to the possibility of suc successful
cessful successful pharmacological
treatment of patients suffering
from dissecting aneurysms (a
ballooning of the weakened
major artery of the body).
Until this recent research,
surgery was the only accepted
procedure for such conditions.
Dr. Palmer, a native of
Albany, N.Y., was graduated
with honors in the College
of Medicine's Class of 1960.
He served his internship and
residency in medicine at the
Johns Hopkins Hospital, re returning
turning returning to his alma mater
in 1962 as a faculty member
in the Department of Pharma Pharmacology
cology Pharmacology and Therapeutics. He
was named assistant professor
last year.
KKK Replies
TUSCALOOSA, Ala (UPl)Ro (UPl)Robert
bert (UPl)Robert Shelton, imperial wizard of
the Klu Klux Klan, United Klans
of America, said yesterday he wel welcomed
comed welcomed an investigation of his or organization
ganization organization by the House Un-Ameri Un-American
can Un-American Activities Committee, but ob objected
jected objected to Rep. Charles Weltner,
D-Ga., participating in the probe.
It would be useless to have
a liberal to interrogate the Klan
as evidence has shown him in bed
with a Communist follower," Shel Shelton
ton Shelton said.

EX-4; Jw
*
i Haviser is i
I Council
iChairman 1
s $
:* Skip Haviser, mayor of Fla- ji
vet 11, has been elected chair chairs:
s: chairs: main of the UF Mayor's Coun Coun|ciL
|ciL Coun|ciL g
Haviser, 4JM, succeeds :j:
outgoing chairman Floyd £
::* Price, 3LW. In other offices, -i;
£| Carol Frei, mayor of Schucht £
Village, was elected Executive £
g Secretary and Hugh Pippin,
4AS, was elected Council Tre- |:j:
>: asurer. Both Frei and Pippin X
£ succeeded themselves. >:
The Mayor's Council is £:
composed of mayors and stu- £:
£: dent government representa representas
s representas tives from the five university
£: married housing areas. Hou Housing
sing Housing areas included are Fla- £
X; vets l t 11, 111, Corry and :£
iij: Schucht Villages. ;£
x Haviser has been active in
x both village and campus gov- £
£ ernment for some time and is £:
currently serving his second jx
term in the Legislative Coun Coun:s
:s Coun:s cil. He is a former reporter
£ and City Editor of the Alii- g
:j:j gator ami is presently the
:*: Managing Editor of the Florida £
Conservative and a news re reporter
porter reporter for the Tampa Tribune.
He is past vice-president of
£: Sigma Delta Chi Professional
£: Journalistic Society, £
:£ Recipient of three Ruge |
£ Memorial scholarships and a;X
Grantland Rice scholarship, £:
£ Haviser is a member of
£ Kappa Tau Alpha journalistic £
£; honorary and Phi Kappa Phi :>
scholastic honorary societies.
(Continued From Page 1)
two lights moving around inside
the house. Arons said they stayed
in the house approximately five
minutes. When they left one of
the policeman was carrying a small
white bundle, he said.
When the officers left, they drove
over the the laundro-mat and ques questioned
tioned questioned Arons. Arons offered his
student I.D. and one of the police policemen
men policemen recorded his name and ad address.
dress. address. One of the policeman also
questioned another person who was
present at the time.
All of the information from Arons
came from a notarized statement.
When WJ3. Joiner, chief of the
Gainesville Police Department was
questioned concerning the Incident,
he would only say "We are conduct conducting
ing conducting an investigation."
Freedom Forum's Jim Harmel Harmeling
ing Harmeling said that nothing could be
found missing and he could not
imagine what the white bundle could
have been.
Harmeling said the back door
had been left open so that students
could study there. He added that
the front door had been locked and
had been found locked Tuesday
morning.

Page 9



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 31, 1965

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Tonight at 8:15 p.m. in the University Auditorium the Gator Variety
Band presents their 15th annual Jazz Concert. Under the direction of
Robert Foster, the Variety Dance Band will play selections ranging
from standard jazz to current popular features. The Variety Band
is co-sponsored by the Department of Music and Student Government.

Washington correspondent to speak here

Jack Bell, Associated Press Washington corres correspondent,
pondent, correspondent, will deliver the 36th annual Don R. Mellett
Memorial Lecture at the UF April 13.
Bell will speak on The President and the Press
in University Auditorium at 8 p.m.
The Universitys School of Journalism and Com Communications
munications Communications was chosen to sponsor this years
memorial lecture, sponsored annually by one of the
nation* s journalism schools. The Mellett Lecture is
in tribute to the late editor of the Canton (Ohio)
Daily News, who was murdered in 1926 at the height of
his editorial campaign against crime and vice.
Bell is chief political writer for the AP and heads
the U.S. Senate reportorial staff. One of the most

Navy team to visit Florida Union New York trip
UF this week set for August 16-24

The Officer Programs Team
from the UJS. Navy Recruiting
Station, Jacksonville, is visiting
the UF this week to accept ap applications
plications applications from senior male stu students
dents students and junior and senior women
student to attend the Officer Can Candidate
didate Candidate School at Newport, Rhode
Island.
The Male Officer Candidate
School is a 16 week course of in indoctrination
doctrination indoctrination in naval subjects lead leading
ing leading to a commission as Engisn,
USNR in one of several line or
staff corps.

UF hospital accredited again
The UF Hospital and Clinics, which opened its doors in 1958, again
has been accredited for a full three-year term by the Joint Commission
on Accreditation of Hospitals.
The Commission, sponsored by the American Medical Association,
the American Hospital Association, the American College of Physicians
and the American College of Surgeons, is the only official hospital hospitalaccrediting
accrediting hospitalaccrediting body in the United States.
The accreditation followed an intensive evaluation survey of patient
services by a field representative of the Commission.
In making the announcement, Dr. Denver M. Vickers, acting director
of the Commission, commended University Hospital officials for
maintaining standards deserving of accreditation and for your constant
effort to improve the quality of patient care/*
Chemistry professor receives grant

Dr. William M. Jones, assoc associate
iate associate professor of chemistry at the
UF is among 91 young scientists
named by the Alfred P. Sloan
Foundation of New York to re receive
ceive receive unrestricted grants for basic
research totaling nearly $1.4 mil million.
lion. million.
The grants are effective next
September for fundamental re research
search research in chemistry, mathematics,
physics and inter disciplinary
fields, such as geochemistry and
astrophysics. They are generally
for a two-year period.
Forty-two of the 91 grants went
to chemists, 30 to faculty mem members
bers members in physics, 16 to mathematics
specialists and three in theareas
of astronomy and geochemistry.
Dr. Jones' grant was one of
five In the South. Other receipl receiplents
ents receiplents were from Florida State Uni University,
versity, University, Georgia Tech, the Univer University
sity University of Virginia and the Univer University
sity University of North Carolina. Fifty-two
universities and colleges were re represented

The Florida Unions Special Pro Projects
jects Projects Committee has announced
plans for its third special pack package
age package plan trip to the New York
Worlds Fair for UF students,
faculty, staff and local residents,
uled Aug. 16 with the group re returning
turning returning Aug. 24.
The $lO9 price includes round
trip fare by train, hotel room for
six nights, a four-hour sightseeing
trip in New York, four tickets to
the Worlds Fair and a ticket
to a Broadway musical.

presented represented by the Sloan Founda Foundation
tion Foundation nominees.
Dr. Jones plans to continue re research
search research started through his 1963
grant from the Foundation in the
area of structure and geometry of
organic molecules and the mech mechanisms
anisms mechanisms of organic reactions.
Pi Lambda Theta
initiates six
Pi Lambda Theta, national honor
and professional association for
women in education orrelated
fields, has initiated six UF stu students
dents students into membership.
Three undergraduates Yvonne
Rice of Eustis, Gloria Boddie of
Jacksonville and Mary Amstutz
Altman of Columbus, Ohio were
tapped, along with graduates stu students
dents students Lenore Blerbauro of St.
Louis, Mo., Lora Friedman of
Bronx, N.Y., and Carol Weber of
Gainesville.

renowned and experienced political reporters in the
country, he has covered virtually all phases of
governmental activity in Washington since joining the
AP in 1937.
A 1925 graduate of the University of Oklahoma,
Bell formerly was reporter, city editor and Washington
correspondent for the Oklahoma City Times.
Also renowned as an author, Bell has written
three books, The Splendid Misery, a profile of the
presidency, and Mr. Conservative, Barry
Goldwater. His latest book, The Johnson
Treatment, goes on sale in May, dealing with
President Johnsons takeover from the late President
Kennedy.

Deposits of S3O are payable
by July 19 in Room 315 of the
Union. The group will be limited
to 70 persons. The Special Pro Projects
jects Projects Committee arranged two sim similar
ilar similar journeys to the Worlds Fair
in June and August last year. This
years tour starts immediately af after
ter after the end of the spring tri trimester,
mester, trimester, avoiding any conflict with
examinations or classes.

HHHHHHHHE33ESSS 3RTWI
etMCS tMtAKGID
For 20th Century Individualists!
new Carved
DIAMOND ICINGS
For love's sake any girl would accept even an ordinary
engagement ring squat-looking, uninspiring. But, in tier
heart, she hopes for an extraordinary ring which will
compel the admiration of all.
Art Carved Dream Diamond Rings are extraordinary. Shun Shunning
ning Shunning the excessive metal and gingerbread of ordinary rings
they delight the modern eye. Pure in form, elegantly sculp sculptured,
tured, sculptured, they express the taste of our time.
Keep this ad for comparison! See our new styles at your
Art Carved jeweler before you decide. Each from $l5O. For
free illustrated folder write to Art Carved, Dept. C, 216 East
45th Street, New York, N. Y. 10017.

Peace Corps recruits
at UF next week

Peace Corps recruiters will
spend the week of Apr. 5-10 on
the UF campus.
Their job is primarily to answer
any questions students may have
about Peace Corps service. A
Peace Corps Information Center
will be open from 8:30 a.m. to
9 p.m. daily.
The x recruiters will give the
Peace Corps Placement Test sev several
eral several times daily. The hour-long
exam is not passed or failed, but
simply indicates where an appli applicants
cants applicants greatest potential lies. The
Peace Corps Questionnaire, which
UF Law College
plans tax coarse
The UF College of Law will
sponsor a two week Tax Course
for practicing lawyers April 19
through April 20.
The course is primarily planned
to afford the practitioners with
information to plan and draft
trusts, wills, and administer es estates.
tates. estates. The session will also deal
with the discussion and study,
of problems a practitioner may en encounter.
counter. encounter.
Supervising the instruction of the
course are Charles L.B. Lowndes,
visiting prof, of law for Duke
University, and Richard B. Ste Stephens,
phens, Stephens, UF Professor of Law.
The course will include 40 class
hours with sessions in the morn morning,
ing, morning, afternoon, and two or three
evening sessions with outside
speakers.
The course will not offer credit
hours and registration fee is $l5O.
[SPORTSMENS
CYCLE CENTER
617 N. Main St,
SUZUKI

must be filled out and brought to
the exam unless previously sub submitted,
mitted, submitted, tells what an applicant
has done in the past. But the place placement
ment placement test is aimed at showing
what he or she can do in the
future. Applicants do not have to
register for the test ahead of
time.
There are two parts to the Peace
Corps Placement Test: a general
aptitude test and a modern lan language
guage language aptitude test ( for which
knowledge of a foreign language is
not necessary). Applicants should
plan on about one and a half
hours at the testing* center, un unless
less unless they wish to take the Span Spanish
ish Spanish or French language achieve achievement
ment achievement test, which requires an ad additional
ditional additional hour.
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| CLINCH KNOT (
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j I
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tiFOR JOINING LINES) IF
1
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376-2696
ATHWBOW
to ctmt'OM omu
'MNBNf wHHMHHBNI BIBRHNHHMI
2310 SW 13th St.

See Dream Diamond Rings only at
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Coral Gables-Carroll's Jewelers
Daytona Beach Tom Cook Jeweler
Daytona Beach Heil's Jewelers
Fort Lauderdale Carroll's Jewelers
Gainesville-Rutherford's Inc.
Jacksonville-Underwood Jewelers
Key West Beachcomber's Jewelers
Miami Little River Jewelry Co.
Panama City Armstrong Jewelry Co.
Plantation Jackson's-Byrons
Pompany Beach Jackson's-Byrons
St. Augustine Phinney Jewelry
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Tampa Beckwith-Range Jewelry Co.
Vero Beach Duose Jewelry Co., Inc.
Wauchula-R.il. Herr Jewelers
West Palm Beach Krauss Jewelry



Not enough CD shelters here

By 808 WILCOX
Staff Writer
The chances of a nuclear war
are considerably lessened if civil
defense precautions and programs
are carried out, said Dr. Eu Eugene
gene Eugene Wigner, Nobel laureate in
physics, during his stay on the
UF campus.
Speaking at a press conference
with Dr. E. P. Blizard, director
of nuclear physics at Oak Ridge,
Tenn., Wigner stated capable
civil defense program leads to
sounder disarmaments negotia negotiations.
tions. negotiations.
Blizard explained, If disarma disarmament

Spanish loot draws crowds

Treasure seekers visiting tfte
Florida State Museum to view the
$1.6 million worth of loot sal salvaged
vaged salvaged from sunken Spanish galleons
have brought museum attendance to

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JOIN ME WASH PARTY
SAVE 50% ON YOUR LAUNDRY
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Gator Groonor Cola Laundry
Adjoining University Post Office
HI
I H Bbhmb M M H I mag/m
I At the Gainesville Livestock Maiket

ment disarmament takes place we still have
civil defense as a saftey measure
against the possibility that the
enemy has not completely dis disarmed.
armed. disarmed.
In Gainesville, said Blizard,
there probably arent enough
shelters. Attention should be given
to the organization of rescue
teams, and the matter of who would
take charge if an attack occurred
in the area.
Although not too familiar with
the campus, Blizard and Wigner
agreed that the law library and
lower floors of J. Hillis Miller
medical center were examples of

AT FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM
_ rm eaHMBBI

an all-time high, Museum Director
J.C. Dickinson said yesterday.
Attendance has jumped from
about 125 visitors a day to more
than 400 a day. Sunday visitors
counted 1,048 bringing the total
number to over 4,000 since the
exhibit opened last Monday he said.
The exhibit, now being circulated
by the National Georgraphic So Society,
ciety, Society, also doubled attendance at
the Explorers Hall in the National
Geographic Society headquarters in
Washington, D.C.

SAYS NUCLEAR PHYSICIST

adequate shelter.
Asked about the possibility of
attack near Gainesville, Glizard
said,lt is not very probably that
an attack would come to this city,
but Jacksonville would be a tar target
get target in any major attack.
If Jacksonville were attacked,
Gainesville would probably receive
a blast effect. The prevailing winds
would determine what effect fall fallout
out fallout would have in Gainesville,
he said.
Wigner gave a positive reason
for a stepped-up civil defense
program. It eliminates nuclear
blackmail. Russias civil defense

The Pieces of Eight! exhibit
includes silver pieces of K gold coins, rings, charts, maps,
a 10-foot anchor from a Spanish
galleon and an 11-foot gold neck necklace
lace necklace valued at $55,000.
The treasure was salvaged from
sunken Spanish vessels which went
down off the coast of Sebastian
Inlet in a hurricane 250 years
ago.
The Museum is open from 9:30
to 5 p.m. weekdays and Saturdays,
and from 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays.
Phi Eta Sigma,
frosh honorary,
gives scholarships
Three tuition scholarships will
be given next year by Phi Eta
Sigma (PES), freshman honorary
society, according to newly-elect newly-elected
ed newly-elected PES President Alan M. Bruns Brunswick.
wick. Brunswick.
Brunswick, elected by accla acclamation
mation acclamation at Monday's PES meeting,
said the application of the schol scholarships
arships scholarships would be decided by the
PES officers and their advisor,
Dean of Men Frank T. Adams.
Phi Eta Elgma is an organi organization
zation organization for freshman men who have
attained a 3.5 minimum academic
average. Elected along with Bruns Brunswick
wick Brunswick at the first meeting of the
organizations sixty new initiates
were Robert K. Imholte-Vice
President, John J. Bartholdi 111-
Secretary, and Jay V. Rader-
Treasurer.
The scholarships are only a
portion of our program to let the
student body know about the pur purposes
poses purposes of Phi Eta Sigma, accord according
ing according to Brunswick. We hope to
be able to speak with the new
Freshmen men in the fall, and
we are looking forward to help helping
ing helping out at the Scholarship Convo Convocation
cation Convocation and with the 'Dollars for
Scholars program.
With sixty good men we have
a lot of potential in Phi Eta Sig Sigma,
ma, Sigma, said Brunswick, and we
hope to use this potential for the
benefit of the entire university.
,
sagna Raviola
lal Parmigano
Home-Made
ltfllian Sausa9f
In Every Town Or City, Yod
Will Find One Good Itallanj
Restaurant
THIS IS IT!
Dial 372-4690
2120 Hawthorne Rd.
Near Drive-In Theatre

Wednesday, March 31, 1965, The Florida Alligator/

program is moveing very rapidly,
he said.
If the pace continues, they
could threaten us with a war sim simply
ply simply because almost all of their
population would be protected,
while ours would receive a cru crucial
cial crucial blow in attack."
Wigner estimated with adequate
civil defense America could hold
casualties down to 20 per cent
in attack."
Without adequate facilities an
attack would be devastating." Al Almost
most Almost 50 per cent would be
killed."
Wigner was asked how civil de defense
fense defense in Russia stood up to Amer American
ican American civil defense.
We know there is one shelter
in Moscow which could accomodate
one third of the citys population."
Last week the Soviets initiated
a vast new program which was lis listed
ted listed in Pravda as encompasing
all enterprises, industrial cen centers,
ters, centers, towns and villages," said
Wigner.
It appears that in civil defense
training the people of Russia are
ahead of us," he said.
On Russia attacking the U.S.
right now, Wigner said, We have
800 missies in cyloes, they have
200. You dont put the eye of a
giant out unless you are sure hes
a cyclopse.
Blizzard added, The chance of
accidental war is not insignificant.
We assume that the 200 missies in

AAUP names new officers
Six UF faculty members have been elected officers of the schools
chapter of the American Association of University Professors.
Fletcher Baldwin, assistant professor of law, was named vice
president for a two-year term and Dr. Corbin Carnell, assistant
professor of English, will be the AAUP chapters secretary for the
next two years.
One-year terms on the executive committee went to Dr. Irving Goff Goff-111
-111 Goff-111 an, associate professor of economics; Dr. Walter Probert, professor
of law; Dr. Donald E. Williams, assistant professor of speech, and
Dr. Clifton Yearley, associate professor of history.
Current AAUP President Cecil Smith, professor of agricultural
economics, Treasurer Margaret Goggln, assistant director of libraries,
and Dr. Seymlur Block, associate research professor of chemical
engineering, have one-year remaining in office. Dr. Block is on the
executive committee as immediate past president of the chapter.
The new officers will take their positions Thursday.
Latin government literature

UF Libraries now have more
access to official Latin American
governmental publications thanks
to a $40,000 grant made by the
Ford Foundation last December,
according to Stanley L. West, head
of the Department of Library Sci Science.
ence. Science.
For 15 or 20 years libraries
in the United States have been
exchanging government documents
with Latin American govern governments,"
ments," governments," West said.
The UF wasnt a part of this
program until a year and a half
ago when, according to West, we
began working on it with our own
money.'*
With the Ford grant the UF
TrtoOepn I
Shoe Repair Shop!
HEELS ATTACHED I
5 Mins. I
SOLES ATTACHED I
15 Mins. I
At Two Locations!
CAROLYN PLAZA 1
FR 6-0315
And
101 N. Mom St.
Opp, Ist Not'l Bank

WIGNER
Russia are under responsible
hands.
But, he added, those hands could
change. Look at the speed of
the recent change in the Soviet
government a few months ago."
Blizard said that in an attack
water would be plentiful. Fallout
generally is not soluable in water.
It settles to ti reason ships would be one of the
safest places after an attack."
Wigner is listed as one of
the foremost nuclear physicists in
the country. He is a professor
of physics at Princeton Univer University.
sity. University.
He is currently head of the
Harbor Project, a U.S. gov government
ernment government study on the feasibility
of civilian defense."

can continue the project this spring.
The acquisition project is handled
through the Library Document De Department
partment Department that does the actual cor correspondence
respondence correspondence with Latin American
governmental agencies.
After compiling a list of docu documents
ments documents now available in UJ3. li libraries,
braries, libraries, UF personnel hope to
begin acquiring publications not
now available in the U.S. either
in the original or on microfilm.
West said it may be necessary
to send personnel to the countries
concerned and search archives for
copies of the desired documents.
He said Brazil, Columbia and
Venezuela lead other nations in
the exchange of documents.
Pharmacy gets grant
The Lydia A. Foote Memorial
Loan Fund for women students in
the UFs College of Pharmacy re received
ceived received a boost this week with pre presentation
sentation presentation of a $2,500 check from
members of the funds advisory
board. The fund, created in 1964
to honor the memory of the late
Mrs. Foote by College of Phar Pharmacy
macy Pharmacy alumni and friends, is avail available
able available for loans to full-time women
pharmacy students .who are Florida
residents in good academic
standing and need financial assis assistance.
tance. assistance.

Page 11



Page 12

?, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 31, 1965

Chaparral drags bottom to victory

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WINNING CHAPARRAL DRIVEN BY HAP SHARP
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PORSCHES LIKE THIS ONE HAD A FINE DAY

By STEVE KANAR
Sports Writer
This year's 12 hour race at
Sebring began with a Corvette
Grand Sport rounding the first
corner followed by fifty-odd rac racing
ing racing machines from all over the
world.
Tragedy touched a few at the
very beginning. At the starting
point, four cars failed to start,
among them the fastest qualifing
Cobra, due to fire in the carbure carburetors.
tors. carburetors.
The Corvette led for about half
the first lap before it was passed
by the Ford GT of Richie Guenther.

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CROWD ENX)YING THE RACE?

The Ford, however, had to come
into the pits at the end of the first
lap and have a rock removed from
the right rear suspension member.
This proved the downfall of the
Ford in question because it was
forced to retire later when it was
found that the suspension had been
badly damaged.
Dan Gurney in a Lotus-Ford took
the lead at this point and kept it
until he too was forced to retire.
Here the Chaparral of Jim Hall
and Hap Sharp moved into the lead
never to be challenged for the rest
of the race. Their car, which was
not expected to finish, set lap
record after lap record.
Tbe Chaparral is a sports modi-

Winkler leads track team
over Furman, Richmond

Harry Winkler scored 34 points
on his own to lead UF*s track
charges to double wins over Fur Furman
man Furman and Richmond yesterday.
The Gators won the Furman meet
by a 96-49 score and took the
competition which Richmond 125-
19.
Richmond was shut out com completely
pletely completely by Coach Jimmy Carnes
troops, copping not a single first
while Furman won but six of the
Weight room
open to all
The new weight training room
in the Florida Gymnasium is now
open.
The room is a decorative con concrete
crete concrete block enclosed portion of the
recreation room located in the
basement of the gym. It measures
nine by eighteen feet and is one
of the nation's finest according to
Spurgeon Cherry, Assistant Dean
of the College of Physical Educa Education.
tion. Education. Equipment included will be
barbells, leg presses, bench
presses, and various body condi conditioning
tioning conditioning equipment, in addition to
a free lifting area and an Olym Olympic
pic Olympic lifting space for competitions
will be available.
All UF students are welcome
to use the room, asserted Cherry.
Members of the Weight Lifting Club
number 700-750 boys alone, he
said.
Approximately 75 to 80 boys can
work out at the same time, ex explained
plained explained the dean. There are five
equipped stations within the room,
and 15 boys can work at each sta station.
tion. station.

fled special powered by a Chevro Chevrolet
let Chevrolet 327 cu. in. engine which is
connected to an automatic trans transmission,
mission, transmission, a new innovation in sports
car racing. The car is very last
(as even the dyed-in-the-wool en enthusiasts
thusiasts enthusiasts will admit) and seemed
like it could run for a week at
the pace. This is the car that
caused all the trouble between
Enzo Ferrari and the organizers
at Sebring and resulted in his
withdrawing his factory team.
One of the most impressive
things at the race wjs the speed
of the Porsches. They were able
to outrun every car in the race
except one Chaparral, one Ford
GT, one Ferrari and one Cobra.
At 5:25 the rain came, 2 1/2
in. in two hours. There was water
everywhere and where there was
water there was MUD. When a
car left the road, and quite a few
dfd, they got stuck. The Chaparral,
because of its design, filled up
with water like a bathtub and was
so heavy that the bottom was dragg dragging
ing dragging the ground. Where it had been
making laps at around three
minutes it now made three laps
in an hour.
All the cars were going so slow
that the time the Chaparral lost
did not really hurt it. Most
of the cars continued to run
slowly until the track was dried
out and then they were off again.
For the two hours, it seemed more
like a motorboat race than a sports
car race.
Finally it was 10:00 and the
Chaparral was ahead. For the
first time in over ten years an
American car with an American
driver had won Sebring. Four years
of Ferrari dominance was over.

sixteen events in the competition.
Winkler won five first all told
along with three seconds. He took
the prize in the shot put and dis discus
cus discus in each meet and won the
broad jump in Richmond annihi annihilation.
lation. annihilation.
Other Gators who had big after afternoons
noons afternoons were John Anderson and Jim
Brown with 25 points each.
In competition between the other
schools, Furman topped Richmond
by a 74-61 score.
Finish of the Furman meet:
Florida vs. Furman: 440 relay:
Florida 44.2; high jump: Saier,
FUR 6*4 1/4", Westerman, F,
shot put: Winkler, F, 49 6 1/2",
Leach, F, Giannlani, FUR: 440 yard
run: Brown, F, 48.9, Mahoney,
F, Anderson, FUR; 100 yard dash:
Anderson, F, 9.7, Dawson, FUR,
Johnson, FUR, 120 yard high hur hurdles:
dles: hurdles: Dawson, FUR, 14.6, Hager,
F, Barrs, FUR, 880 yard run:
Brown, F, 48.9, Gebhardt, F,
Wales, FUR; javelin: Skafte, F,
2U3, Winkler, F, Jahnigan, F;
broad jump: Dawson FUR, 21*
5 1/2", Winkler, F, Jahnigan, F;
220 yard dash; Anderson, F, 21.8,
Johnson, FUR, Richardson; F; pole
valut: Hager, F, 13*, waiters, FUR,
Chira, Vehling, F (tie): 330 yard
intermediate hurdles: Dawson,
FUR, 37.8, Hager, F, Rittgers,
F; discus: Winkler, F, 150* 101/2",
Bascelli, F, Bergman, F; two mile:
Hollifield, FUR, 9:36.4, Wilson,
F, Sayer, FUR, triple jump: Dosch,
F, 43* 8 1/4 , Jahnigan, F,
Merritt, FUR; mile relay: Florida
3:18.0.
The pair of wins upped the teams
record to 4-0. Their next encounter
is with Georgia Tech this week weekend
end weekend in Atlanta.