Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Florida
Gus and Jack: SKh£&

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HOW THE UF. .
. .watched the Gemini flight yesterday in the
TV room of the Florida Union.
Tutor program set

Building hope and attacking
poverty are the twin goals of the
Student Government sponsored tu tutorial
torial tutorial program (STP) which plans
to provide tutors for culturally
deprived children of this area.
Hie program will be operational
the third week of the Spring
trimester.
Student Government (SG)
entered this battle because cul culturally
turally culturally deprived primary and
secondary school students in
the Alachua area need direction.
Many students on this campus are
willing to satisfy this need/ stated
Secretary of Interior Mike
Malaghan.
During the first two weeks,
according to Malaghan, the tutors
will participate in a rigorous
training program under the
leadership of Jim Harmeling,
director of the tutorial service,
before they are qualified to go
into the field.
Isabel Barten, assistant
director, explained how the pro program
gram program will function. We (SG)
contact the Alachua County schools
to find out which students are
having difficulty in the classroom
and would want assistance. While
we are doing this, we are also
accepting and soliciting
applications from UF students who
will do the actual tutoring.
Students will be tutored from one
to three hours a week. They will
be trained in the use of reference
materials, assisted in the develop development

ment development of speaking and reading
skills, aided in their present
classroom work, and introduced
to cultural activities. The primary
See TUTORS on p. 11
Regents coming up
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI)
Gov. Haydon Burns said yesterday
he definitely would name new state
University Board of Regents today.
The new board would replace
the nine-member board named by
former Gov. Farris Bryant In the
final days of his administration
over strong objections of Burns
who wanted a hand in the appoint appointments.
ments. appointments. After the Supreme Court
ruled Burns could replace the Bry Bryant
ant Bryant board in June, the members
tendered their resignations saying
their usefulness was limited in
view of the shortness of their ten tenure.
ure. tenure.
They were chairman Baya Har Harrison
rison Harrison of St. Petersburg, John Pace
of Pensacola, Wayne McCall of
Ocala and Gert Schmidt of Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, carryovers from the old
board of control and one or two
of whom will be on the Burns'
board; and Sam Dell, Gainesville,
Robert Rush of Orlando and Mar Marshall
shall Marshall Crlser of Palm Beach.
Burns, in addition to saying he
would name one or two of the board
in order to give continuity, also
indicated he would appoint a Negro,
a woman, a medical doctor, a far farmer,
mer, farmer, and an educator.

up 'n back
CAPE KENNEDY (UPI) Space twins Virgil I. Grissom and
John W. Young circled the earth three times Tuesday and returned
safely after historic maneuvers that were aimed toward a moon
Journey.
Flying America's first two-man spacecraft, the duo shot into the
sky aboard Gemini 3 at 9:24 a.m. EST. They spashed into the waters
of the British West Indies at 2:18 p.m. EST and were removed by
helicopter.
Grissom and Young arrived on a red carpet spread across the deck
of the Navy carrier Intrepid at 3:30 EST following a 22-minute 'copter
ride from their capsule, which remained in the sea temporarily.
A splendid three-orbit mission, said a NASA spokesman.
President Johnson spoke to the astronauts by telephone after they
reached the carrier. I'm very proud of you, he told them.
Grissom, wearing a big smile, waved to a crowd of sailors in
dress whites as he stepped out of the whirlybird.
The descent was about 58 miles west-northwest of the Intrepid,
the chief recovery ship. But para-rescue swimmers were dropped
from hovering 'copters and attached a floating collar to the space spacecraft
craft spacecraft known as Molly Brown, the unsinkable.
The astronauts reported by radio they were in good condition but
removed their space suits for comfort and more freedom of action.
They reversed an earlier decision to remain with their ship, however,
by flying to the carrier's deck.
Coincidently, the launch came shortly after 100,000 Russians
jammed Moscow's Red Square to honor Soviet cosmonauts Alexei
Leonov the first spacewalker and Col. Pavel Belyayev.
GEMINI AT A GLANCE
(UPI)-The Gemini shot at a Gl- vehicleGemini-3 space
ance: The men: Virgil I. Gris- capsule. Weight: 7,000 pounds,
som, 34, pilot; John W. Young, 34, Fli ht time4 hours 54 minutes,
copilot. Launched from Cape Kennedy, Fla.
The missionAmerica's first at 95 24 a m EST. Landed in the
two man space flight Atlantic Ocean at 2:18 p.m. EST.
(s££i WESTERN UNION i@.
TELEGRAM -<> LT .!~-
S. / W. ASMtMU. NIH.WW V__J
TWtt*gilw r , sec * 687 a&Wt>
R WAWPD-TLX WASHINGTON DC 16 £IOP EST- "AR171965 wr*
DR J HAVRE REITZ, PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA FLORIDAGAINESVILLE
GAINESVILLE FLORIDAGAINESVILLE FLO FLOON
ON FLOON THE OCCASION OF THE BRAZILIAN WEEK, PROMOTED BY THE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, I AM PLEASED TO CONGRATULATE YOU
j FOR SUCH AN INITIATIVE, WHICH REFLECTS A VERY SPECIAL
INTEREST IN BRAZIL. PLEASE TRANSMIT MY CONGRATULATIONS
j AND BEST VISH ES ON THE SUCCESS OF THIS EVERT TO DR LYLE
MCALISTER, DR JOHN SAUNDERS, MR WAYNE SELCHER, DR ALFRED
|hOER AND DR HELCIO MARTINS. WITH WARMEST REGARDS REGARDS[
[ REGARDS[ JURACY MAGALHAES*
| TELEGRAM. .
| . .received by UF President J. Wayne
| Reitz from Brazilian Ambassador con $
| gratulating UF on Brazilian Week |
Brazilian film tonight
jij: Subscribers to the Film Classics Series and all faculty members, :£
:£ staff, and students interested in Latin America are invited to :£
:£ attend the free showing of the award-winning Brazilian film,
| THE GIVEN WORK, on Wednesday, March 24, at 8:30 p.m., in g:
the Medical Center Auditorium. v
This dramatic film (with Portuguese dialogue and English £
subtitles) is based on the play O Pagador de Promessas by x
iv the Brazilian playwright, Dias Gomes. It won the Golden Palm x
>: Award at the Cannes International Film Festival and the Best :£
I:-'. Film Award at the San Francisco International Film Festival.

i.
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Page 2

, The Florida Alligator/ Wednesday, March 24, 1965

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ft
UFS LETHARGIC GATOR. .
. .showing ravages of FSU treachery last fall, should be pleased
to discover that he is now an economic resource and not a
sporting game animal.

Open forum slated

Whether student organizations
should have complete freedom in
selecting speakers for the campus
will be the topic debated at the
UF Student Debate Forum meeting
to be held March 31 in the Florida
Union.
The debate is open to all
students. None of the Debating
Forum will participate.
Prof. A.E. Wilkerson, director
of forensics, said, This is a
chance for all students to voice
their opinions to a live audience.
The debate will be an initial step
in instituting monthly forums for
duscussion on current topics.
The forum will stress audience
participation. Listeners will sit in
the section they support. Those
changing their positions during the
debate should switch to the opposite
section in the audience.
The winner will be decided by a
count of persons in the respective
sides.
Each side will be given seven
minutes to speak. This will be
followed by a 30 minute audience

I ME US EMI
MW " kjr design
the button-down from the Van Heusen
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BB its the back hanger loop that really gets BB
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I GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

Albert-an economic resource

discussion and a three minute sum summary
mary summary by each speaker.
Topcis for future meetings will
be announced several weeks prior
to scheduled debates.
Wilkerson urged those
interested in debating to contact
him at his office phone, 2496.
x*
I Concert |
( tonight |
Tonight at 6:45 &
Sin the Plaza of the &
5 Americas, Richard g
6 W. Bowles will con con|ij:
|ij: con|ij: duct the Gator $
$: Symphonic Band in $
$ a Twilight Con- g
S-cert. A balanced g
8 program of classi- $
Seal, modern, and $
S popular music will g
%be presented. 8

Win a Honda
just for being bom
r
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Your own birth date may have already won you a
Honda in Parker Pens Birthday Sweepstakes!
:rr7,' e ' f V L Ur I d3te is P ec mber ls( 1942, your entry is 12-1-42. Just fill in the
coupon below-take it to your Parker Dealer for his signature-and then send it to us. And you
might as well know this: you winners have your choice of m w mm
Hondas ... the powerful C-110, or the deluxe CA-102. TrAK Kh K
Congratulations! B "
- Maker of the world's most wanted pens
Now Compact Jottor. First girl-size ball pen made i 1
for girl-size hands. Uses the big 80,000-word Jotter | Take th,s coupon to your Parker Pen Dealer
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<:g^^^BwS"* Name
Address. J
T-Ball Jotter. The worlds first bait pen with stairv
less steel-writes a clean, clear line up to 80,000 j City state
words. $1.98. I S-wrPwWDMI^!, ft, |
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with handy reserve ink cartridges, or from an ink | c,om April ao, i65. 09 ww cow,rt
bottle. Standard model-$5.00. J jjgto "' rtr Sweepstakes, f. 0. Box 4909, Chlcato, 111. j
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Pity the poor gator, since he is
probably the victim of more
imagination and less real
knowledge than any other member
of Florida's wild kingdom. People
either like or dislike the alligator,
and an indifferent attitude is rare
among those who come in contact
with the leviathan.
F. K. JONES and other biologists
of the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission who have been
gathering data on alligators for
many years incidental to their
work with game and fish, report
that the ancestor of the present
day alligator first appeared on
earth approximately 30 million
years ago. His appearance and
habits have remained almost un unchanged
changed unchanged over the years.
The biologists have come to
the conclusion that while the
alligator is unusual, it should be
managed as any other species of
wildlife. The alligator, however,
should be considered as an
economic resource and not as a
sporting game animal.
ACCORDING TO Jones, the alli alligator
gator alligator is a valuable natural
resource in many ways. The
alligator is a prime tourist
attraction, an important ecological

factor In maintaining the balance
of nature in Floridas wilderness
and once an important source of
revenue to the state. In 1959-60
the last open alligator hunting
season, reports indicate that
18,735 alligators over six feet in
length found their way to the states
hide dealers.
The present wildlife research
program is designed to determine
the movement and growth rate of
the alligator, the size at sexual
maturity, survival rate of the
young, the effects of nature on the
alligator and its effect on nature,
and how to manage the reptile
effectively.
IT IS essential that we know
if a dry or wet season will alter
the reproduction of the species or
the survival rate of the young. If
the advance of civilization is a
serious threat to the survival of
the species or if a controlled
limited harvest would endanger
the alligator, said Jones.
When the biologists capture an
alligator they weigh and take a
total of fifteen measurements of
the captive. The alligator is tagged
and then released, and the
biologists hope for a later
recapture.



1 SIGMA DELTA CHI
I
#
$: Sigma Delta Chi will hold a
Ssmoker 7:30 p.m. March 25 in
:*Johnson Lounge in the Florida
xjUnion.
I
SAILING CLUB
The Gator Sailing Club announ announces
ces announces new officers: Dennis Mc Mcx-Cardell,
x-Cardell, Mcx-Cardell, commodore; Pete Nelson,
:*vice commodore; Terry Losonsky,
g fleet and team captain; Linda Joel,
:j:secretary; Jeff Davis, treasurer;
j.jlDave House, publicity.
I
S SCHOLARSHIP
1
&: A scholarship for the American
gYouth Foundation Leadership
xjTraining Camp at Stony Lake,
is offered for a fresh freshgman
gman freshgman in Agriculture August 16-29
gand a senior in Agriculture
-29. Applications are
vbeing received for this award now.
students may apply at
>£Room 102, Dairy Science.
jnii l5:
your laundry
U v you shop ij|
ani i
v ****' \\\ \ l &
Every 10th Load FREE S
KOIN KLEEN
704 W. Univ. Ave \%

NOTICE
Applications are still being accepted by the Board of Student
Publications for the following positions:
INTERVIEW DATE POSITIONS OPEN
Aliri I 1 New Orange Peel Editor and
four section editors, 1965-
66 School Year. Applications
Deadline: 5 P.M., MARCH3O
Applications may be obtained in Room 9, Florida Union, and must
be returned no later than deadline times listed above.
Board of Student Publications
Make the Varsity!
DONT SETTLE FOR 2ND BEST!
Take-Out Window Specials / Our
hamburger NLV shakes /Dining
19d 19 */5£
W Strip Steak
Best in Town Thick and * London Broih
oesr in town r>_|* li HOURS: 11 a.nr. to 8:30 p MeiICIOUS 7:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m.
The Varsity Restaurant
209 NW 13th Street

GATOR GRAS
Tickets for Gator Gras Variety
Show are on sale today through
Friday at the Information Booth
across from the Hub from 10 a.m.
4 p.m.
EUROPEAN CLUB
The European Studies Club will
hold an organizational meeting
March 26 at 8 p.m. in Room 208,
Florida Union.
QUAKER WEEKEND
Put your beliefs into action.
Work in slum housing; eat, sing,
talk at the Quaker Weekend Work
Camp March 26 and 27 sponsored
by the Gainesville Friends
Meeting. Contact Richard Hiers,
Ext. 2219.
S.O.TA.
New officers of the Student Oc Occupational
cupational Occupational Therapy Assocation
are: Randy McDaniels, president;
Clyde Bell, vice-president;
Georgia Potter, secretary; Jean
Fisher, treasurer; Dottie Rosen Rosenhein
hein Rosenhein outstanding member.
SPELEOLOGICAL
The Florida Speleological So Society
ciety Society will meet tonight at 7 p.m.
in Room 116, Florida Union.

campus news briefs

GAMMA BETA PHI
An organizational meeting of
Gamma Beta Phi Society will be
held tonight at 8 p.m. in room 15,
Frazier Rodgers Hall. The Society
is open to all former high school
Beta Club members.
ANNO UN CEMENTS
Graduation Announcements and
Commencement Invitations are
now available in unlimited quan quantities
tities quantities in the center counter of the
Hub. The cost is 15 cents each
and the Hub is open week days
from 8 a.m. 8 p.m.and 912
a.m. Saturday.
TOASTMASTERS
The University Toastmasters
will meet March 25 at 11:45 a.m.
in the Garden Room of the Faculty
Club.
LOST AND FOUND
These articles are at the Lost
and Found at the Hub: Faber Castell
slide rule, Pickett slide rules (3),
white Florida parka, men's sports
coats, glasses, umbrellas, text
books.
GATOR GRAS
The Gator Gras Committee will
hold its Variety Show rehearsel
tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the Univer University
sity University Auditorium.

Wednesday, March 24, 1965, The Florida Alligator, I

COUNCIL MEETING

The Council for Exceptional
Children will meet March 25 at
5 p.m. in the private dining room
of the Florida Room, Norman Hall,
Dr. Goldman will speak on Emo Emotionally
tionally Emotionally Disturbed Children di directly
rectly directly after a short business meet meeting
ing meeting and election of officers.
FORESTRY CLUB
The Forestry Club will hold a
banquet March 26 at 7 p.m. at
the Holiday Inn. Sepaker will be
Mr. Jon Walker, Public Relations
Director of the International Paper
Company.
FRUIT CROPS CLUB
The Fruit Crops Club will meet
March 25 at 7 p.m. in Room 105
McCarty Hall. Dr. Popenoe, Di Director
rector Director of the new Tropical
Research Station, will speak and
show slides. All interested
students are invited.
FREEDOM FORUM
The Freedom Forum will meet
tonight at 7:30 p.m. at the Wesley
Foundation, 1320 West University
Avenue. Steve Weissman of the
Free Speech Movement at Berkeley
will be the guest speaker. All in interested
terested interested students are invited.

| UPI

DAVIS SINGS
ATLANTA (UPI)-Sam my Davis
Jr., will close his hit Broadway
musical Golden Boy/* Wednesday
night to join Harry Belafonte and
numerous other stars in entertain entertaining
ing entertaining the Alabama freedom mar marchers."
chers." marchers."
The Southern Christian Leader Leadership
ship Leadership Conference said Tuesday the
entertainers will appear at a rally
in an open field near the city of
St. Joe on the outskirts of Mont Montgomery
gomery Montgomery at 8 p.m. Wedr *\a *.
COSMONAUS
MOSCOW (UPI) Russia's space
team came home Tuesday to
a triumphant and tumultuous he heroes*
roes* heroes* welcome. The cosmonauts
told wildly cheering crowds that
man is on the verge of going to
the moon and beyond.
Lt. Col. Alexei Leonov, first
man to walk** in space, and
pilot CoL Pavel Belyayev were
greeted with bouquets from child children,
ren, children, kiddes and bearhugs from
their Communist leaders and a
hearty handshake from American
Ambassador Foy D. Kohler.
Leonov told a crowd of possibly
100,000 persons in Red Square
the time is drawing closer when
people will go to the moon, Mars,
Venus, and perhaps to other plan planets
ets planets of the solar system."
Landed Manually
Belyayev, a World War D Navy
pilot, said, the Voskhod n, a
more perfect multl-seater ship,
was the first time, landed by means
of manual control system.**
In heaping praise on the So Soviet
viet Soviet spaceship, Belyayev said it
"constitutes an intricate piloted
flying maching, excellently reacts
to actions of the pilot-cosmonaut
and is absolutely subservient to his
will.**

HAY DANCE
V
V
S
Tolbert Hall will sponsor a Hay>:;:
Dance March 26 from 8 midnight*:*:
at the South Hall Recreation Room*:*:
in Tolbert Area. A hay wagon will:!!
circulate around the campus for:-:
transportation from the girls* ::
dorms to the dance. Tolbert Are ax
card holders and girls admitted!;:
free; all others charged 50 cents, x
V

$
BRAZILIAN WEEK %
v.
X;
The award- winning Brazilian:*:*:
movie The Given Word (with:-:-:
Portugese dialogue and English!::*:
subtitles) will be shown as the final-:!
event of Brazilian Week, 8:30 p.m.:;::
tonight in J. HiUis Miller
Center Auditorium. Admission isx
free. ;£
CONCERT 1
%
The UF Gator sympttonic Band:*
will present a Twilight Concert** £:
on the Plaza of the Americas to tonight
night tonight at 6:45 p.m. The Twilight:*:
Concert** series provides an in-:**:
formal outdoor atmosphere, and*:*:
the audience is encouraged to bring*:
lawn chairs and blankets for an*:*:
evening of enjoyable music.
_ 1
Jim Harmeling and Jack Zucker§!
will lead a discussion on The#
Liberal Stand on the United:;:!
Nations** at the meeting of the:*:*
Collegiate Council for the United*:*::
Nations tonight at 7 p.m. in Room ':*!
324, Florida Union. $

U.S. TAKES GAS
LONDON (UPI) British Prime
Minister Harold Wilson told the
House of Commons Tuesday he had
no advance knowledge of UJS. plans
to use napalm or gas in the Viet
Nam war. Soviet and British news newspapers
papers newspapers took the lead in condemn condemning
ing condemning the use of gas.
Wilson rejected pressure from
the left wing of his own Labor
party urging him to abandom
support of U.S. policy in South Southeast
east Southeast Asia.
NEWS STOPPED
WASHINGTON (UPI) The U.S.
Department reported Tuesday that
UJS. newsmen in Indonesia
apparently were unable at present
to file dispatches out of the country.
MOON ON TV
PASADENA, Calif. (UPI) The
Ranger 9 spacecraft will be used
Wednesday to send pictures of the
moon*s surface live** to living
room television sets for the first
time, lt was announced Tuesday.
If all goes well, the three tel television
evision television networks will pick up the
pictures of the moon just before
Ranger crashes on its surface and
relay them to viewers about 9 a*m.
EST Wednesday.
Pictures may give more clues
as to the nature of the moons ter terrain
rain terrain and help scientists decide
where the best spot would be for a
landing of astronauts.
The home television pictures
will be still photographs but will
appear on screens in quick suc succession
cession succession like old flicker" movies,
a JPL spokesman said.
This phase of the mission will
not interfere with the taking of
thousands of feet of motion pic picture
ture picture films on other cameras just
before Ranger 9 smashes into
the lunar surface.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 24, 1965

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International
ERNIE LI TZ STEVE VAUGHN JOE CASTE LLO
BdMor-l*Chtef Managing Editor Executive Editor
LOU FERRIS ANDY MOOR
Edttorlai Pace Editor Sports Editor
| ~ Guest F.riitorial
Thoughts on Berkeley
By PAUL GOODMAN
(Reprinted from The New York Review of Books)
The function of administration is to expedite the essential academic
business of teaching and learning, e. g., as secretary and janitor;
and protectively to represent the academic community in its external
relations, e. g., in court or as fund-raiser.
When administration becomes the dominant force in the community,
however, it is a sign that extra-mural powers are in control State,
Church, or Economy and the Administration is their agent. Notoriously,
image-burnishing and fund-raising disregard or even prevent teaching
and learning.
At Berkeley, the students griped that the University of California
has become a factory, disregarding faculty and students,'* a factory
to process professional licenses and apprentices for technological
corporations, and to do extra-mural contracted research. The
particular bone of contention, the Free Speech ban, seems also to
have been extra-murally instigated, by back-lash elements, persons
like Senator Knowland, etc. The administration certainly acted with
panic, under outside pressure and out of touch with its own community.
At present in the United States, students middle-class youth
are the major exploited class. (Negroes, small farmers, thd aged
are rather out-caste groups; their labor is not needed and they are not
wanted.) The labor of intelligent youth is needed and they are
accordingly subjected to tight scheduling, speedup, and other factory
methods. Then it is not surprising if they organize their CIO. It
is frivolous to tell them to go elsewhere if they don't like the rules,
for they have no choice but to go to college, and one factory is like
another.
Thus far in the Berkeley revolt, two new factors have emerged:

(1) The students want to extend the concept of Academic Freedom
from Lehrfreiheit (freedom of professors to teach according to their
lights) to include Lernfreiheit (freedom of students to ask for what
they need to be taught, and if necessary to invite teachers, including
advocates of causes.) I shall return to this later.
(2) The Faculty energized by the students, wants to resume
prerogatives that it had given up to the administration, 'e. g., discipline.
This is probably the more important issue; but in my opinion the
administration can not agree (and the Regents have so voted) to the
Faculty resumption of perogatives, because this could go very far
and entirely unmake the academic-factory; e.g., the Faculty might
hire or teach in disregard of Image, Endowments, or Research grants;
they might resist huge classes or abolish grading. The question,
then, will be whether there are enough professors who are concerned
for the academic community to fight it out, rather than pursuing
their grants and Independent research.
EDITORIAL STAFF: Mark Freeman and Stan Kulp (cartoonists),
Sharon Kelley (Student Government Beat Chief), Lee Alexander,
Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles, Dan Taylor, Jay Foley, Sam
UUman and Jane Young (Tigert Beat Chief), Woody Leonard,
Nancy Van Zile, and Linda Cody.
REPORTERS: Carl Brown, Bob Wilcox, Dee Wright, Steve
Kanar, Judy Knight, Ann Carter, Thelma Mossman, Fran Snider,
Cynthia Tunstall, Karen Vitunac, Ami Saperstein, Bill Lockhart,
Drex Dobson, Eunice Tall, Kay Huffmaster, Jeffrey Denkewalter,
G. S. Corseri and Ken Simon.
TIM Florida Alligator rworaai tha right to rvgvlato tha typographical tone of all aftrarttaamants and
to rwvto# or tars away copy which It coaaidara objectionable.
NO POSITION B GUARANTEED, though daalrad position will ho glvoa whanawar poaalbla.
Tha Florida Alligator will not coaaMar adjuatmsnts of pajmaat lor any advartlaamant involving typ typographical
ographical typographical arrora or arronaoaa inaarttoa unlaas matte* to give* to tha Advertising Manager within
(1) one day aftar advertisement appears.
Tha Florida Alligator will not be responsible tor non than oaa incorrect Inaarttoa of an advertisement
scheduled to ran several times. Notices tor correction meat be given before neat Inaarttoa.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR to the official student newspaper of tbe University of Florida xnd to
published five times weekly except doing May, June and July whan it to published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator to entered as second class
matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

~ - freeman

EDITOR:
IF PLATO IS to be believed,
long ago in Athens the leadership
community decided to rub-out a
cat named Socrates. Ol' Soc was a
cool head, so cool in fact he kept
thinking up pertinent questions
about the value-system his peers
were blindly following.
NOW NOBODY likes to think,
and everybody hates to have some somebody
body somebody else think about what they
are doing. This is especially true
if the thought might lead to the
discovery that there's more to the
world than simple alternatives.

What to take abroa<

By JIM MOORHEAD
Columnist
Things a columnist wouldn't
know without opening his mail"
is the way syndicated columnist
Hal Boyle frequently leads into
his daily column. What follows is
often curious, sometimes
eye-opening and not infrequently
useless. But it's usually
interesting.
This columnist recently
received some information which
might well meet the above
definitions. It's passed along today
to you for what it's worth, which
probably isn't much, but it
certainly is something I never
would've known without opening
my mail.
The first bit
of information
comes from a
assignment in
Germany. It was
22 and one-half
inches long, ar *ri MOORHEAD
reads as follows:
Just to prove my point that
English toilet paper should be
used for writing paper and English
writing paper should be used for
toilet paper, I'm sending this along.
I copped it from the men's room
at London Airport.
I don't know why they put
'Government Property* on it. Per Perhaps
haps Perhaps some masochist would want

Le T TeR 2

Applies acid test

And nobody likes to have it sug suggested
gested suggested that there is a better way
to do society's immediate business
while at the same time remaining
in the best possible position to meet
future contingencies. But that cat
Socrates was such a cool head he
just couldn't dig the masses. So
they denounced him to the Public,
and gave him a tall, cool one for
the road.
LET ME KNOW when they bring
you the hemlock, Mr. Ferris.
YOU SEE, Messrs. Rozman, O*
Donovan, and Nugent, if you really
knew your history, you might
realize that you are the victims
of a tyranny just as real as that

THINKING OUT LOUD

to steal it. Believe it or not, this
is one of the better grades. Some
of the heavier stock would qualify
as cover material for Ladies Home
Companion.
Now comes the really incon inconceivable
ceivable inconceivable part: In Germany its
worse. Remember the goose step?
Now I understand. Their toilet
paper is the approximate
equivalent of an ironing board
cover that has stiffened with age.
I would have sent you a sample,
but 1 couldnt fold it to get it
into the envelope.
To further add to your comfort
in the comfort station, neither the
British nor the Germans heat their
bathrooms. These Europeans are
certainly hardy folk. Painfully
yours...
The above is passed along
particularly to those of you who
might be planning a trip to Europe
in the near future. You may map
your tour, or pack your bags,
accordingly.
The other letter comes from a
Peace Corps couple in Nigeria.
Excerpts follow:
This is such a great, strange
and confusing country. Feature
seeing a Tarzan movie in a Lagos
bar. This was followed later by
something like a Black Sambo
cartoon. It seems our most ludi ludicrous
crous ludicrous portraits of Africa are
enjoyed by the Africans, for some
strange reason.
One local sage talked to Carol
and me a few minutes yesterday
about the need for reform in the
Catholic Church and why
traditional institutions are so
difficult to change. Then he pointed

of Alabama. Hie index of how
tyranous your beliefs are is to be
found in the strength of your
emotional response when the acid
of reason is applied.
THE ONLy difference between
yourselves and the rednecks" in
this request is that your cause is
more moral** by our provincial
standards than is theirs. The dif difference
ference difference is significant, but it lays
upon you a burden you have not
yet taken up: asking the uncom uncomfortable
fortable uncomfortable questions which can keep
your cause from becoming as ugly
a tyranny as that which you assail.
PAUL E. HOFFMAN, 7AS

to my motorcycle and asked me
if that was my helicopter. Yes, its
a wonderful place!
0n the way back from Agbar,
I got a free ride with the District
Adviser (a native Nigerian) of our
division. He started telling me how
great President Kennedy was. Then
he began praising the Peace Corps
and told me he was leaning toward
communism until the Peace Corps
came to Nigeria. Dont know
whether we are that influential as
a group or not, but we hear this
flattery all the time.
I cant tell you what its like
aere. You have to see it to believe
it. We went to a highlife (?) bar
the other night and some of the
women had on native wrap-around
skirts and Ran-lnn shirts. The
favorite song of the nation seems
to be Lollypop. Everytime I ge*
on the ferry to cross the Niger,
someone tries to sell me a book
on nuclear physics. And the only
people who wear pith helmets are
Nigerians.**
He didnt mention the nature of
Nigerian toilet paper.
Nonetheless, I feel a good deal
more cosmopolitan since receiving
those two gems of information.
They have also posed an interesting
supposition: Suppose i nownad the
choice of visiting my two friends.
Where would I go? One letter re reflects
flects reflects mock pessimism, fro lll a
great and modern civilization; the
other, unrestrained enthusiasm
from a relatively backward land.
The choice would be difficult.
In either case, I think 1 would
visit my nearest Delsey counter
first.



------ M *.* %*-*T T*-V_f l ?_*-*T*-*-l*-*-*-*-*-*- *-*-*-
Defend administration

EDITOR:
WE HAVE TO agree with and
feel compelled to defend, the de decision
cision decision of the university not to give
Ed Richer tenure.
WE ARE SURE Richer is a good
teacher. The fact remains that he
is a troublemaker.* There are
plenty of good teachers around
who are not troublemakers;
people who can stimulate the
academic mind without
embarassing the UF. Since the
UF has the right to determine
tenure, it is entirely justified in
exercising that right by not
permanently hiring a man who
uses a university-connected group
to agitate publicly.
ANY PRIVATE corporation
would fire a man who embarassed
it publicly. Why cant the State?
Under the current administrative
system,, the universities must
submit to outside pressure in order
to survive. Until the system

Not very clean

EDITOR:
WE RESIDENTS of the Tolbert
Area, as do many residents of the
area, find the location of the
Tolbert Snack Bar convenient for
obtaining quick meals and snacks.
Although most of us do not eat
all our meals there, during
inclement weather we find it even
more necessary.
THE MORE FREQUENTLY one
eats there, the more cognizant he
becomes of the gross disregard
for the bare minimum of sanitary
standards. Every day occurrences
include such pleasant sights as
continually dirty and cluttered
tables, which never seem to be
cleaned. Finding clean silverware
has become a game with many of
the regular customers, and most of
us lose. It is even more fun
guessing whether the residue on
your fork is chili, egg yoke, or just
plain grease. We have become
accustomed to searching through
the coffee cups, trying to find a
clean one; the trouble comes when
all the cups are dirty and we must
drink between the stains.
ALTHOUGH every flddr will get

By FRAN SNIDER
Staff Writer
The theme of the United Nations last year was
a huge mushroom cloud with the words 14 This is an
alternative to the United Nations,* 4 printed under underneath.
neath. underneath.
And they call the John Birch Society hate mongers/*
G. Edward Griffin said as a conclusion to the state statement
ment statement that the United Nations is actually the hate
mongers.
GRIFFIN, a member of the John Birch Society
Speakers* Bureau, spoke to about 250 people in the
University Auditorium Monday night.
At the beginning of the speech, Griffin asked
members of the John Birch Society to stand. Several
men rose and Griffin appeared suprised. He said that
was the first time anyone had stood up and indicated
that he had meant to make a Joke when asking people to
sit down.
Griffins speech was well documented with readings
from senate committees, communist magazines, and
John Birch Society material. He spoke about the John
Birch Society and about the United Nations as a
communist infiltrated** group. One of the major
objectives of the John Birch Society, according to
Griffin, is to abolish the United Nations.
HE ATTEMPTED to clarify ideas about the John
Birch Society and he referred to an anti-Birch book
by Michael Nubarry called The Fascist Revival,**
which be claimed was published by a Communist
front group.
He accused Nubarry of being a Communist Party
worker specialist in unbridled smearing.**
GRIFFIN said that the John Birch Society is against
collectivism and am morality.** He defined collecti collectivism
vism collectivism as a 25-cent word tor total world government.**
Amroorality is the lack of morality,*' Griffin said
and asked the audience to pick the roost tyrannical
figure in history and they would see he was am moral.

Griffin hits communism

changes, we must be in sympathy
with it. And since the current
drive in behalf of Richer is not
aimed at changing the system, we
cannot be in sympathy with that
drive. Deans allocate resources
from paper clips to teachers.
IT IS NATURAL and right that
they should look for teachers who
can not only teach, but also do
not make life uncomfortable for
them.
WE URGE students to support
their university. We are not
Berkeley or Yale, and we urge
the administration not to submit
to the internal pressures trying
to push it around.
UNIVERSITIES are places for
experimentation, not agitation. We
are 100% behind the administration
on this matter.
JERRY GATES, 2UC
ROBERT PALMER, lUC
MIL WILLIS, 2UC
RICHARD SCHUSTER, 4AS
CHARLES HARPER, 4AS

dirty during the course of the day,
it is not impossible to sweep it
once or twice. As food is often
spilled on the floor, it is only
reasonable to expect it to be
cleaned. Most eating establish establishments
ments establishments do this without exception;
this however, is not the case at
the Tolbert Snack Bar. One vivid
recollection was the night students
were left to grind a fallen apple
pie into the floor rather than waste
the time of the personnel, who were
on their break. While this may
appear to be an isolated incident,
food is regularly found on the
floor and regularly left there.
OTHER CAFETERIAS on
campus are, at least, clean; why
cant the Tolbert Snack Bar be
clean? While parts of this letter
may seem crude, they realistically
describe the situation. As this is
a modern university, it is not
unreasonable to expect that food
service and handling would be
sanitary.
RICHARD C. GRANT, 4AS
JOHN COLE, 2UC
WILLIAM S. SLOTTO, lUC
HARVEY FLEMING, 4BA
CHARLES M. LASHER, 2UC

sCOMPLAINT DEPT.

Griffin claimed the United States is building collecti collectivism
vism collectivism and allowing am morality to grow.
IF I LOSE my children and I have to live under a
despotic regime I couldn't care less whether the
despot issued his orders from Moscow or from
Washington, D.C.,*' Griffin said.
Griffin said the battlelines on the subject of the
United Nations are clearly drawn.
He said that the Communist countries were not
against the United Nations and said that most
Americans think this because the Russians refuse to
pay their dues for the defense of the Congo.
I CONTEND that the United Nations was first
conceived by the Communists, created by the Com Communists,
munists, Communists, controlled by the Communists, furthered by
the Communists and that this situation is rapidly
reaching the point of no return,'* Griffin said.
He offered as evidence for his first point a Com
munlst publication theoretical organ,'* Political
Affairs.**
The April, 1945, edition,which coincides with the
creation of the United Nations, said that the major
question is to insure the adherence of the United
States to the world security organization. Building
up vast popular support is the best method so that
the opposition can be rendered impotent,'* Griffin
quoted.
HE WARNED that the United Nation's secretariat
controls all the real power and that this office is
controlled by Communists.
Griffin claimed that the Communists are so sure of
control over the American mind that they have open
Communist control of the Undersecretary General
for Political and Security Council affiars of the United
Nations. This office, if disarmament took place, would
be quite powerful.
There would be a little man, who in the palm of
his hands would wield the absolute power/* Griffin
said.

How can we trust in God,
How can we trust in Almighty;
Taking birth in the lap of human,
Could not trust in humanity.
Plight of
the student
EDITOR:
WHILE THE PLIGHT of the
Negro in Alabama is being
nationally aired, there is another
group of people who may not have
as glreat a problem, but to them
it is very important.
THIS GROUP OF which I speak
is the graduating class of 1965.
It seems that someone thought
up the extremely delightful idea
that students should be made to
suffer, once again, before they
receive the sacred sheepskin.
THIS IDEA IS to have graduation
exercises on Monday, April 26th
instead of Sunday, April 25th. This
way the students parents must
take off work (who needs money)
to have the privilege of seeing
their sons and daughters reach a
goal for which the parents and
children alike have labored for
years.
AS A SECOND thought, it was
decided to hold the affair in the
gym, and make the graduate-to-be
sweat for what is rightfully theirs..
Due to the crowded conditions there
must be a limit of four persons
that a student can Invite. (Os
course no student knows more
than four people).
IF THERE IS a logical reason
for this farce, then I stand ready
to apologize.
BUT I DONT think there is
one and if the student government
of this university is anything more
chan the wagging tail of an un unconcerned
concerned unconcerned administration, this
situation will be changed.
I ASK THAT all concerned
parties voice their opinions.
WAYNE PADGETT, 4BA
P. S. WOULD a football game
be held on Monday?????

Wednesday, March 24, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Selma, Shame or Sickness

As you are a human being,
Get up and love the hum an being;
Bring on earth the current of
love,
From the mountain high above.

Max Shulman
WW Kelloggs
(By the Author of Dobie Gill is.
Rally Hound the Flag. Bovs, etc.)

THREE TRUE AND TRAUMATIZING TALES
11 : r ~~

Only one problem remains to he
solved before America enters the
Golden Age. I refer, of course, to
the problem of what to eat for
breakfast.
Youd think with the nulen nulennium
nium nulennium so close at hand Americans
would learn to eat a proper break breakfast.
fast. breakfast. But no; two out of three
citizens persist in eating wrong.
Consider the following typical
cases:
1. Hester, a Bad Eater
Hester Glebe was
a sophomore at a
ft prominent Western
)/ girls college (Vas (Vas/(
/( (Vas/( sar). Hester, a
ZcjA comely lass of 19,
majoring in flatware
and madrigals, was
\\|L so excited on the
morning of Vassars
IV annual Field Day
4 \ that she forgot to
1 eat anv breakfast at
(/ all. Eagerly she
slang herself into
the'day's many jolly
events- sprinting, leaping, pull pulling.
ing. pulling. hauling, hurdling, hop-skip hop-skipand-jumping.
and-jumping. hop-skipand-jumping. But. alas, because
the poor girl had not eaten a
proper breakfast, her energy
soon deserted her. In fact, it
deserted her right smuck in the
middle of a hammer throw!
She was able to get the ham hammer
mer hammer flying all right: what she was
not able to do was let go of the
handle. Over the Yassar fence
soured the hummer und into the
streets of nearby Poughkeepsie Poughkeepsiewith
with Poughkeepsiewith limp Hester, alas, trailing
helplessly behind.
Well sir, naturally she was ex expelled
pelled expelled from college for leaving
the grounds without a pass. To Today,
day, Today, a broken woman, she earnij
a Dare subsistence as u pennant
in Newark.
2. Basil. Another Bad Eater
Basil Metabo-
W I ism was a private
/y\ in the United States
AyA Army. Basil, a ro ro/
/ ro/ iV bust lad of 20, did
I I II i| not make poor
11 Hester's mistake of
facing a strenuous
day without an ade adequate
quate adequate breakfast. He,
U K rU alas, erred in the
'e '* opposite direction.
On the rporning of the big in inspection
spection inspection by the Commanding
General, Basil decided he had
better store up all the energy he
could get, so he breakfasted on
the following: a flitch of bacon,
a clutch of eggs, a batch of bagels,
a notch of ham. a bunch of Gut Gutter,
ter, Gutter, a swatch of grits, a butch of
honey, a patch of jelly, a thatch
of jam, a twitch of pepper, and a
pitch of salt.
From breakfast he went to the
barracks and sat down on his foot
locker to await the arrival of the
Commanding General. "Atten "Attention!
tion! "Attention! cried a voice as the Gen General
eral General entered the barracks, and all
the soldiers sprang to their feet feetall
all feetall the soldiers, that is, but

For what are these big churches,
For what are these big preaches;
Put them in your real practice,
And love the human bring the
peace.
R. SON THALIA

bloated, bulging, torpid Basil who
could not budge his stuffed self
from the foot locker.
Well sir. naturally lie was
court-martialled and placed be before
fore before a firing squad. Today, a per perforated
forated perforated man. lie earns a meagre
living as a colander in Cleveland.
H. E. Pluribns, A Gixhl Eater
K. Pluribus Kw Kwbank
bank Kwbank was a claims
Jv adjuster in a large
insurance agency in
V Blue Earth, Minn.
V JjT K. Pluribus, a saucy
lad of 27, awoke
JJ\ one morning anil
& / knew it was the
ySX* most important
\\ morning of his life,
f r 0,1 tn rn **lg
** he would propose
marriage to the fair fairest
est fairest secretary in the
entire insurance agency, the beau beauteous
teous beauteous Clarissa Menhaden, whose
cheeks were double damask and
whose eyeballs made men slaves.
At breakfast E. Pluribus pre prepared
pared prepared himself well. He had a bit
of juice, a bit of toast, u bit of
coffee, and a heaping bowl of
Kellogg's Corn Flakes. Not that
it is vital to our story, for all
Kellogg's cereals taste wonderful.
But, more important, each gold golden
en golden spoonful of each Kellogg's
cereal is pure nourishment, pure
energy, pure power to unflab the
muscles and unclog the blood, to
joggle the cells and jiggle the
psyche. Morning is the time of
day when you most need a quick
pick-upsomething that starts
your motor without stripping your
transmission, that tones the Dody
without tasting like a tonic, thats
quick and crisp and bright and
ready and loyal and true and
obedient. In short, you need
Kelloggs!
So E. Pluribus finished his
brimming bowl of Kelloggs and
off he wentstrong and confi confident,
dent, confident, bright-eyed and jut-jawed,
springy-legged and gleamy gleamyscalpedami
scalpedami gleamyscalpedami made a proposal of
marriage so eloquent, so fervent,
so loan, that the beauteous Clar Clarissa
issa Clarissa could not say him nay. To Today
day Today they are married and own
their very own insurance agency.
They have three lovely children
a Doy named Fire & Theft, and
two girls named Public Liability
and Personal Property Floater.
It is the happiest of families familiesespecially
especially familiesespecially in the spring of the
year when E. Pluribus, with
many a laugh and cheer, drives
them all to Hartford to see the
actuaries in bloom.
O IMS Max Shaimao
* *

P.S. A note m to how
you like (or dislike)
these columns will
help determine our
plans for them. Write
Kellogg Company.
Dept. TET, Battle
Creek, Michigan,
o ISM by KaNaca Caapaay

Page 5

Aihihii Wm+Jm
CORN rig
FLAKES yl



Page 6

>z The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 24, 1965

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University City Bank

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Cyclerama
A BMW motorcycle,
the perfect way to get
to a picnic spot. Or
anywhere else for that
matter. BMWs can be
seen in Gainesville at
Cyclerama, 21 N. E.
2nd Place.

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£.'s? / 2. r*' r *"'rj'£'

Are you tired of
counting your pennies?
The simple solution is
to deposit them in
University City Bank
and have it done for
you. A University City
employee snows
customer, Lisa Stein Steinberg,
berg, Steinberg, the penny
counting machine.
University City Bank,
located just two blocks
off campus is a
favorite with students.

iSV.V.%%V.VAV/.V#V.V/.V.V.%V.V.y.V.V
Domgans
Jim Valentine looks at
handsome leather belts
at Donigans. Donigans
carries the finest in
accessories to provide
the distinguished fin finishing
ishing finishing touch to your
dress. Naturally sar sartorial
torial sartorial advice is
provided too by the
friendly people at
Donigans.

TWO GREAT C
ORANGE and BLUE

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Fremacs offers you the fir
5$ shoes to sports coats. Fron
$* suits. Fremacs is tailor-ms
:$: fastidious about their persons
iijiji are trained to help you get
i-S reason why Fremacs has b
$$ dressed Florida men. Loca
Si: Ave.
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pMBINATIONS
, GAINESVILLE and YOU
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jst in mens clothing. From Sg
bermuda shorts to bathing 3$
ie for Florida men who are
appearance. Their salesmen
ie best fit possible. Another $£
come a favorite with well- < :j:s
ed at 112 West University v ~ r $%::
4ACS |
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IMplh' fjp
Campus Federal
*
Deck or portable, music or study aids; a
tape recorder can give you long hours o
enjoyment. Campus Federal Credit Union
will help you finance those hours. Call
University ext. 5107 or 2973. For the day or
night Dial-a-Loan service call 376-2250.

KiISZnHI *m
Sir c*mi
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I # y^r
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B*.- jflt.
*. & fe; \ i.J^B
WK *:?v**%N *si 3||L **-'' t^f 4 O *V v I Hr Jr
4-.ft%i/.; j
f /'£ &' '' A 'C : -Ats ?
Ejv r
\
Hr F J| Ea
F
Gainesule Ccoa-Cola Boftfing Co.
1 Now that cold weather has gone
>i: Coke breaks come more and more frequently.
:$ A cute Kappa Delta and her date relax with
S£ a Coke --the campus favorite.
x-x

Wednesday, March 24, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

The Florida,Alligator, Wednesday / March 24 / 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

For Sale
1965 MAGNAVOX STEREO Con Console
sole Console with AM-FM Stereo tuner.
Excellent condition. 378-1031. (A (A--121-3
-121-3 (A--121-3 t-c).
AIR CONDITIONER AND HEAT
PUMP. RCA Whirlpool, 33,000
BTU. Excellent working condition.
4 yrs. old. Original price $436.00.
Selling price $125.00. Call 372-
3621, Rm. 1025. (A-121-lt-p).
TEAK WOOD BAR with black
formica top. SSO. Phone 2-5940
after 6 p.m. (A-121-3t-c).
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER.
Four 500 sheet boxes of Buff.
Retail for S2O per box. Will sacri sacrifice
fice sacrifice for $lO per box. Call Ext.
2832 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
(A-110-tf-nc).
PRICED TO SELL 1959 Air-con Air-conditioned,
ditioned, Air-conditioned, 2-bedroom, house trailer
10x46. Built-in washer and 10x20
open cabana on large fenced lot
in Archer Road Village. 372-
1868. (A-120-4t-c).
GRAND PIANO, A Hotpoint electric
iron, Stauffer exercising machine,
Polaroid Land Camera, Zenith
Wofld Wide Radio, outdoor grill.
For information call 376-6316.
(A-119-st-c).
OPENING SOON
THE B|m.
GAME LL 'AR D<;
ROOM 5
CLEAN MODERN
FUN FOR ALL
110 SW 34th St.
Westside Shopping

wimihVm
Was she still waiting for
BUS RILEY to return?
He tvn away from her once,
but could he itoy away? MAPLE
GROVE remembered how he ex exposed
posed exposed their emotions, as in
PEYTON PLACE, and knew that
something wild and scandalous
would surely happen!
Bus Riypys, w
Back \h Town J 'A
h COLOR 's
flf Ann- Margret sJjju
she wan ec him b ac i
"''A Michael Parks Jli
you'll remember him! V-B


Help Wanted
fc- .1.1 , ;
PART TIME DELIVERY BOY.
Must have car and know campus.
$1.25 per hour. Apply after 4
p.m. Louis Seafare, 309 NW 13th
Street. (E-121-lt-c).
2 NEWS CARRIERS needed for
routes in Flavet m and Corry
Village. Age 12 to 16. Call
Gainesville Sun, Circulation
Department, 378-1411. (E-121-st (E-121-stc).
c). (E-121-stc).
-
GIRLS ONLY! VACATION WHILE
YOU WORK. Spend an exotic
vacation in the Bahamas and earn
money for next trimester. Apply
now and spend your Easter
Vacation on the island, expenses
paid. Contact Mr. Baldwin
Johnson, Same Ole Place Res Restaurant,
taurant, Restaurant, Governor's Harbor,
Eleuthera Island, Bahamas. (E (E---117-st-c).
--117-st-c). (E---117-st-c).
:
Real Estate j
3-BEDROOM HOUSE, CCB,
screened sun room. Low down
payment assume loan. Pay Payments
ments Payments $88.37. 2519 NE 10th Terr.
Phone 372-7946. Air-conditioned
if desired. (I-121-st-c).
TAKE UP PAYMENTS AND pay
closing costs on a repossessed
3-bedroom, 2 bath house. Central
heat, CCB and newly painted. Phone
372-3826. (I-120-ts-c).
I YAMAHABMWI
Motorcycles
For The Discriminating
CYCLE RAMA I
378-2811 21 SE 2nd Place

>
Personal
B FROM S: There is nS place
like home (except Daytona Beach.)
(J-121-lt-nc).
PAULETTE I can't go to Gator
Gras with you this weekend. Am
going to Selma to help start a riot.
Will see you when I get back
OTTO. (J-121-lt-c).
Lost & Found J
FOUND: KRIESLER LIGHTER in
Hub, engraved SLS-808. Call Dick
372-4644. (L-121-lt-c).
LOST: FEMALE CAT 6 months
old. Brown, black and white. If
found, call 378-2064. Reward. (L (L---119-3t-c).
--119-3t-c). (L---119-3t-c).
-
Services
EXPERT TYPING done in my
home. Will pick up and deliver.
376-8586 before 7:30 a.m. or after
5 p.m. (M-121-lt-p).
GARNER DRAFTING SERVICE.
Leroy lettering, charts, graphical
delineation and preparation of data
for Ozalid reproduction for thesis
and dissertations. 372-8008. (M (M---121-lt-c).
--121-lt-c). (M---121-lt-c).
PROFESSIONAL TYPING done in
my home. Call anytime Monday
through Saturday, Carol Parker
at It-c).^

For 'PLUS VALUE
INSURANCE ASK
R.E. POLAND
About Gulf Lifes
ADAPT-A-PLAN
Gulf Life 11
376-2404 INSURANCE COMPANY l

4k *As tough and Rewarding*
j| a screen challenge as the
H movie goer has had to face
1 N. Y. TIMES
fl Wholly Extraordinary
B N. Y. POST
IA vigorous mental
I stimulus
M DAILY NEWS
fl * A richly rewarding ex exfl
fl exfl perience **
I CUF
| TKj j
I ends sat 'sajafimz!
I 1 s'* 5
7*9
I LIVE NO LONGER
l§. Until you hear our jazz hour
II Sundays at roldnite on WGGG
with Guy Graham

[ Wanted [
WANTED MATURE GIRL graduate
student to share a house, com completely
pletely completely furnished. Comfortable
living in the Country. Pets
welcome. 10 minutes from campus
with little traffic. S4O/mo. 372-
2795. (C-121-3t-c).
RESPONSIBLE COED or lady
employed by U of F wanted to
share apartment, 2 blocks from
University. Phone 372-3342. (C (C---121-lt-c).
--121-lt-c). (C---121-lt-c).
WANTED 3 FEMALE room roommates
mates roommates for Spring Trimester 2
for full term one for A term.
Large clean apartment very near
campus. Low rent plus utilities.
Call Jean 376-0523. (C-120-st-c).
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 3 bedroom trailer with 2
students. S3O per month plus 1/3
utilities. Swimming Pool. 3860 SW
Archer Road, Lot P 4. Ask for Mike.
(C-119-st-c).
-
Autos
Hill n Ill wiFWiai Ji
*62 FALCON. Radio, heater, Ford-
A-matic. Sell equity for S4OO.
'55 Jaguar 140 me. $750. Peggy
Herrington, Ext. 2777 8:00 12:00
8-1042 after 5:30. (G-121-3t-c).
MG '57 4-door sedan(MAGNE TTE)
$250. Call Boese 372-9501. If not
in leave message. (G-121-3t-c).
1953 M.G. TJ). Good condition,
needs interior work. Must sell
Immediately. Very reasonably
priced. Call Jay Foley 372-9307.
(G-120-2t-c).

STARTS FRIDAY
GAINESVH
Shoving
K a^STF

s LAN j pikula
ROBERT MULLftAM |
starts rday
GAINESVILLE
drivi-in theatm
A TO. Hw>im m.

For Rent
LARGE ROOMS FOR MALE
Students. Fully equipped, upstairs
kitchen for roomers use only.
Close to shopping center and
campus. Make plans now for
summer and fall trimester at 104
SW Bth Street or call 372-0243.
(B-120-tf-nc).
APRIL Ist. AIR-CONDITIONED, 1
bedroom apartment, completely
furnished (double bed or twins).
$90.00 monthly. Students welcome.
2-3488, 6-4360, or 6-1073. (B (B---120-3t-c).
--120-3t-c). (B---120-3t-c).
2-BEDROOM UNFURNISHED
apartment to sublet beginning in
April. Couples only. Air Airconditioned,
conditioned, Airconditioned, kitchen equipped. See
after 6 p.m., 310 NW 19th Ave.
(B-120-st-p).
AVAILABLE APRIL Ist., APART APARTMENTS,
MENTS, APARTMENTS, completely furnished. One
bedroom, swimming pool, all
electric kitchen, central heat,
air-conditioning. S9O per month.
372-3826. (B-120-ts-c).
AVAILABLE MAY Ist. 4 room
apt., furnished. Adults only, no
pets. S7O/mo. Near Norman Hall
and campus. Call 376-5043 12:00-
4:30 p.m. (B-120-2t-c).
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY, 2-
bedroom unfurnished apartment,
1 block from campus. Kitchen
equipped, Venetian blinds. 103 NW
21st Street. Call 6-6112. (B-l 19-
3t-c).
AIR-CONDITIONED Apartments
for 3A and/or 38. Suitable for 2
or 3 people S7O per mo. plus
electric. 1829 N. W. 2nd Ave.
Suitable for 2 or 3 people at 1530
NW 4th Ave. $75-SBO plus electric.
Suitable for 3 or 4 people at 1518
NW 4th Ave. S9O-SIOO with air airconditioning
conditioning airconditioning included. Also renting
for fall at slightly higher rates.
Call 376-4353 evenings. (B-lll (B-llltf-c).
tf-c). (B-llltf-c).
1 BEDROOM, unfurnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, kitchen equipped. Couples
only. $75 per month. 1913 NW
2nd Ave. Phone 2-1362. (B-113-
ts-c).
mmmmmmmmmmammmm
moOecn
Shoe Repair Shop
HEELS ATTACHED
5 Mina.
SOLES ATTACHED
15 Mina.
At Two Locations
CAROLYN PLAZA
FR 6-0315
And
101 N. Main St.
Opp, Ist Nat'l Bank
AIIIQAtOP AOS
Always AttPACt
(you*re reading one now)



,* fill -i W
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W w gfrMffln JJai%, I
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** I I b|
... '-' --v::;;: %iiK...'a safe -'W**- v JH MwW*'' W * -,****s!**w..**

INSTANT
NtttONESS
I yours with
YELLO YELLOBOLE.
BOLE. YELLOBOLE.
jKWuHmh
A h jtT*
VT\ I ;'f
Aristocrat, Billiard Shape, $5.95 and $6.95
No matter what you smoke youll
like Yello-Bole. The new formula,
honey lining insures Instant Mild Mildness;
ness; Mildness; protects the imported briar
bowlso completely, its guaran guaranteed
teed guaranteed against burn out for life. Why
not change your smoking habits
the easy way the Yello-Bole
way. $2.50 to $6.95.
Spartan V Checker s Thorn f]
$2.50 M $3.50 B $4.95 / /
JH j < I
Official Pipes New York World's Fair
ree Booklet tells how to smoke a pipe;
shows shapes, write: YELLO-BOLE
PIPES, INC N Y 22. N Y Dept 100.
By the makers of KAYWOODIE

There will be no letup in the
on-campus housing shortage for
another couple of years said Harold
C. Riker, director of housing.
Riker said plans for a new
dormitory that would house 800
women were under way, but the
building would not be completed
until September of 1967.
Two hundred apartments are
under construction for married
students,** Riker said, and they
should be completed by September
of 1965.
These are the only plans that
are under way at the present
time,** Riker said.
The housing shortage has been
caused by the large increase of
students during the past few years.
This is one of the main reasons
why the quota of incoming fresh freshmen
men freshmen has already been filled.
Construction architect for the
university, Arnold F. Butt, ex explained
plained explained why it is so difficult to
obtain the funds for new dorms.
All the colleges in the state

l
A profitable summer of study
and recreation...
C.W.POST COLLEGE
OF LONG ISLAND UNIVERSITY i
Applications now being accepted for
TWO 5-WEEK SUMMER SESSIONS
JUNE 21 to JULY 23; JULY 26 to AUGUST 27 Hi! Jfljp
Day and Evening 1
Accelerate your degree program
with a distinguished visiting
and resident faculty, outstanding laboratory
and library facilities.
UNDERGRADUATE I
COURSE offerings Lang island University
include studies in include studies in Biological
inciuae suiuw* Sciences, Business Administration,
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Education, English, Guidance and
Pro-Professional Counseling, History, Library Science,
. j Mathematics, Music Education.
Pre-Engineering, Physics, Political Science,
Business and Education. sociology, speech.
Located on the beautiful North Shore
of Long Island, the 270-acre campus
is just 30 minutes from the Worlds Fair,
60 minutes from midtown Manhattan. \j*/dr>
Enjoy swimming, tennis, riding, bowling, mm. ~. (wi) mm smsr I
outdoor plays and concerts on the campus. *- 1
Nearby are famous beaches, sailing clubs, summer
stock theatres, parks and golf courses.
New mens and women's residence halls.
APPLY NOW ... Admission open to VISITING STUDENTS
from other accredited colleges.
For additional information, summer bulletin and
application, phona SIS MAyfair 6-1200 or mail coupon
I Doan of Summer School, C. W. Post College, P. 0., Greenwale, L.L, N.Y. 11548 M
I Please send me Summer Sessions information bulletin. C p
I g Womens Residence Hali Mens Residence Hall
l Undergraduate Graduate Day Evanlng
J i|
} Address I
I City !||
I If visiting student, from which college?.

. . New Flavets going UP. .

I- I I I , I r "' I - -t I "v s-s* 5 * c-* H r ~ " 1 1 51 V I ' v I H l H H 1 '< rIH r. H I V^-1
- v -'
A, fBBML d- nj j.

IB
-ls lf sf, *

need new buildings and facilities/*
Butt said, and each one must be
given equal consideration.
Even inside each college, the
different schools have needs,** Butt
continued. The administration,

Wednesday. March 24, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Building U foundation
to be torn DOWN. .

The concrete foundation which
is all that remains of frame
building U** in front of the Main
Library will be torn down in the
next few weeks, according to Noel
R. Lake, superintendent of
Physical Plants and Grounds.
Lake said the foundation will
probably be torn up between the
winter and spring trimesters when
students will not be studying in
the library.
He added that work on the
grounds of the new Architecture
and Fine Arts complex, the
engineering annex and the new

department heads, and my office,
(architect) all work very closely
together to decide which needs
are the most pressing.**
Butt explained that even after
the building has been decided upon
a lot of paper work has to be done
before work can begin.

. . and students to
repair local housing

Houses in north west Gainesville
will take on a new appearance
this weekend when a group of
interested UF students conduct a
work camp in that area.
Sponsored by the Gainesville
Society of Friends (Quaker
Meeting), the group will perform
necessary repairs on homes lo located
cated located between Main Street and
North West 6th Avenue, according
to Maurice Trimmer, building
construction instructor and the
projects adult leader from the
Quaker Meeting.
Trimmer, who worked with this
same type program ten years ago
in Trenton, New Jersey, said that
the work camp area next weekend
is predominantly Negro.
The group will work on interior
patching, replace broken glass,
and in some cases recommend
extermination.
According to Dr. Richard Hiers,
associate professor of religion
and spokesman for the programs
steering committee, the landlords
will provide the materials and
the tenants will work with the
students.
Hiers stated, the real problem
in this area is that the landlord
is getting to small an amount of
rent and can*t afford to make
repairs.**
Also,** he continued, the
tennant, whose salary is very little,
feels he is paying too much rent
to have to improve his home by
himself.*'
Hiers stated that this program,
which was Initiated 20 years ago
by the American Friends Service
Committee in Philadelphia, pro-

classroom building have also taken
away much of the manpower needed
to destroy the frame buildings
foundations.
The area will be temporarily
planted with grass until
construction on the graduate school
library begins across the street,
Lake said.
The superintendent said he would
like to see the area paved, walled
in and provided with benches,
making it part of the pedestrian
area between the library and
Peabody Hall.

A location has to be decided
on, concrete plans have to be
made, and a sound program
worked out,** Butt said.
These things take time,** he
said. We have to work on them
years in advance.**

vides an incentive for others
living in the designated area, but
are not receiving aid.
One home showing improve improvement
ment improvement can be an inspiring sight for
others,** commented Hiers.
He noted some houses cant be
helped if their condition is ex extremely
tremely extremely bad.
In some cases the walls are
ready to crumble.'*
The area was selected on the
findings of such reports from the
United States Census of Substand Substandard
ard Substandard Living, the Office of Off-
Campus Housing, and the League
of Women Voters.
In cooperation with the
University Religious Association
and the Unitarian Church of
Gainesville, the Society of Friends
is planning to continue the work
camp project in other areas of
Gainesville.
Engame presented
£ The Florida Players lab laboratory
oratory laboratory theatre will present £
; ; 'j: Endgame by the French ab- £;
surdist playwright Samuel :£
| Beckett the 26th and 27th of %
ij: March or this Friday and :£
ivSaturday night at 8:00 p.m. ;£
y in Room 239 Tlgert Hall.
The production is directed
by Mr. Ron Jerit of the
of Speech and £;
Swill feature Diane Pelfrey S
ixas Ham, and Marty Fer- :£
S gueson as Clov. Holly Howard :£
;£ will be seen as Nell, and :g
;£ Jerry Jones will play the role
;sof Nag. %

Page 9



Page 10

>, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 24, 1965

44 We found ourselves camped by
our water hole, among a whole herd
of elephant bulls, cows and calves.
We were awakened from our
Volkswagen camper by the sounds
of snorting and bellowing bull
elephants. As we looked out we
saw them lifting their long trunks
and swaying back ans forth.
"Without bothering us, the whole
herd finally moved to a waterhole
about three miles away. It was
then that we heard a clashing
thunder, louder than anything we 4 ve
ever experienced.
"THE ELEPHANT herd had met
head-on with another herd of ele-

4< lts not uncommon for
Indonesian students to spend more
on light bulbs than rent, 44 said
Prof, of Agriculture Economics
Harold B. Clark after recently
returning from Indonesia this
trimester.
Under the support of the federal
Agency to International Govern Government
ment Government (AID), a technical assistance
program for foreign aid, Clark
was granted a two year leave of
absence from the UF.
44 THE EXPENSE of light bulbs, 44
explained Clark, "is due to faulty
and irregular generators. The
environment isn 4 t conducive to long
and intensive studying. Students
live in crowded dormitories and
inadequate housing. 44
Clark was a member of a 14-man
team which functioned to improve
the Agriculture Institute of Bagar
located 35 miles south of Djakarta
on the Island of Sumatra.
THE TEAM helped Indonesian
professors improve the college

Dr, Lyle N. McAllister, director of the center
for Latin American studies, is leaving for Colombia,
South America today. He will discuss the development
of inter-university relationships between UF and
Universidad del Balle.
McAllister, who is making his first trip to del
Balle as a UF representative, will be accompanied
by Miss LoisN. Knowles, assistant dean of the college
of nursing, who will also assist in the project.
She will remain in Colombia until April 2 and
McAllister will return Sunday.

FACULTY ANNOUNCES ON SOFTBALL
No mercy for younger men

By SAM ULLMAN
A crack softball team made up
of UF faculty members and
officials has challenged a team
made up of IFC and student gov government
ernment government leaders.
Bill Cross, advisor to
fraternities, is the spokesmah and
organizer of the faculty team. He
announced that no mercy would be
shown to the younger men.
Jim Hauser, IFC president, who
is taking charge of the student
team was Incensed by the remark
and said this his group plans to
give no quarters to the faculty.
IFC Public Relations Chairman
Paul Ashdown and Student Govern Government
ment Government Administrative Assistant Bill

UF profs journey to Africa .


. . Indonesia. .

...and Colombia

phants at the waterhole. They were
fighting furiously.
"In the morning my wife and I
journied to the scene of the battle
and picked up a large boxfull of
broken ivory.. .from the splintered
tusks of the big bulls. 44
This is an actual account of
UF Prof. E. G. F. Sauer who,
with his wife, journied alone late
last year into the deserts and bush
of South Africa in search of be*
havorial and ecological patterns
of the wild ostrich.
UNDER A National Science
Foundation research grant, Sauer
and his wife returned in January,

teaching program. It prepared
Indonesian exchange students for
the culture and language of the
United States, and advised the
expenditures for books and other
needed institute equipment.
"Books are scarce, 44 stated
Clark. "Students are taught to
memorize from their lecture
notes. 44
"INDONESIAN students are en engaged
gaged engaged in more political activities, 44
than American students, asserted
Clark. A revolution is taking place
in all spheres of Indonesian life,
military, political, economic and
social, he cited.
The people are working as
"babes in the woods, 44 Clark said.
The revolution tends to unite the
nation of 2,000 islands containing
approximately 50 major tribes
speaking over 100 different lan languages.
guages. languages.
CLARK POINTED out the
Indonesians have similar interests
as Americans. 44 They 4 re
interested in bicycles, transistor

Fleming, who are aiding Hauser,
promised complete annihiliation of
the faculty group.
Hauser remarked that spring
often brings unusual thoughts to
the minds of men, but the idea
of the f aculty defeating the students
is an absurdity.
The game has been scheduled
for the afternoon of March 30.
Admission will be free, and the
location of the game will be at
the field by Norman Hall at 4:00
p.m.
After making the announcement,
the student group departed im immediately
mediately immediately for the training room,
after which they played kick brick
walls for an hour for practice.
Qato aOs sell

The Center for Latin American Studies will sponsor
the trip.
It is hoped that regional studies and research
programs between the faculty and graduate students
can be established, said McAllister. This initial
meeting will attempt to find out the needs and
availabilities of both schools in this respect.
We hope the needs can be put together to come
up with a program.

1965, after spending nine months
in the wilds of South Africa.
Both Sauer and his wife have
PhJVs in zoology. Dr. Sauer is
presently directing research in the
ethology (branch of biology dealing
with relationships of organisms to
their environment) laboratory
adjacent to Flint Hall.
THE BUSH AND wilds of South Southwest
west Southwest Africa are not unfamiliar
to the Sauers, as they spent two
years there on similar research
in 1957 and 1958.
In their study of the wild ostrich
(largest of all living birds), Sauer
discounted the popular belief that

radios, movies, cars, and im improved
proved improved pots and pans. 44
Interestingly, "it is the custom
to drive on if you hit a person
while driving, 44 the professor
included. "The gathering crowd
may become enraged to the point
of brutally beating the driver. 44
For his own safety the driver must
leave the scene of the accident
and report it to the police.
THE AVERAGE income per
capita is SBO a year. Agriculture
accounts for 75 per cent of the
family income. Clark said it wasnt
uncommon for parents to have
eight children and only five of
them reach maturity. This is due
to the health, sanitation, and
nutrition problems of the country.
Because of the extremely gre gregarious
garious gregarious nature of Indonesians,
festivals called "selamatans 44 are
held to celebrate every occasion
from harvests, and weddings, to
circumcisions. 4 'Sometimes I
longed for the foothills of my
native Kentucky and the sand dimes
of Florida, 44 chuckled Clark.

j-fWHlN'fflfc-j j-fWHlN'fflfc-j---f
--f j-fWHlN'fflfc-j---f WALLEYE 1
ISA ALLY GAMUT AT MONT /
ON SANDBARS WHERE THEY j
FORAGE ON MINNOWS. DARING |
THE BAYNE WILL BE DEEP I
(ARONNO 2S FEET) MNNOWS I
ANE THE TICBET BENE. |
376-2696
m* Jm AtiwnoN
2310 SW 13th St.

ostriches stick their head in the
sand when frightened, 44 as an old
fairy tale. 44 "They run when
frightened, 44 Sauer said, but added
the nine-foot tall bird is
"extremely dangerous in
captivity, 44 with "tremendous
kicking and pecking power. 44
SAUER INDICATED the wild
ostrich is quite different from
the domestic ostrich and, until
recently, this was not known.
"Ostrich farms of populations
exceeding the 1,000 4 s are scattered
through South Africa, 44 Sauer said.

1 j
WHERE BOY MEETS GIRL AND ROMANCE BLOOMS
JOIN THE WASH PARTY
SAVE 50% ON YOUR LAUNDRY
COIN-OP DRY CLEANING NOW AVAILABLE
8 I bs $1.50
GATOR GROOMER COIN LAUNDRY
Adjoining University Post Office
FOR YOUR FRATERNITY
AND SORORITY SUPPLIES
BILL BOSTAIN
District Representative
376-6081 9 AM-5 PM
JEWELRYS FINEST CRAFTSMEN
The latest and greatest ln footwear.sa*
Ideal for demonstrations, T.lv v
G.l.F.s -- you name it! Hand
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these sandals are imported from f"J *V. jSSi* *
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(El Tanque model also available In black
plus 80 Send check or money order with style and size to:
LATIN VILLAGE
Box 3428 Dept. F-l Santa Barbara, Calif,
U of f COED DAY
25 c Game
SATURDAY, MARCH 27ONLY i PM so 7 PM
Free Transportation From Campus To Lanes & Back
SCHEDULE FOR SATURDAY & SUNDAY
STOP NO. 1 Norman Hall (Parking Lot)
1:30 p.m. 2:30 3:30 5:00 6:00
STOP NO. 2 Broward & Rawlings Halls (Parking Lot)
1:40 p.m. 2:40 3:40 5:10 6:20
STOP NO. 3 lnfirmary Parking Area (Lot #5)
1:50 p.m. 2:50 3:50 5:20 6:30
STOP NO. 4 Military Science Bldg. (Rear Parking Lot)
2:00 p.m. 3:00 4:00 5:30 6:30
LAST BUS BACK TO CAMPUS @ 8:30 P.M.
< Lpa[m ||||^.

Their commercial value is in
their colorful plumes,* 1 he added.
DR. SAUER claimed no real
danger in walking through the
wild-animal lands of South Africa.
Many days, according to Sauer,
he would walk alone in lion and
leopard country.
IPs a simple matter of staying
out of the animals way when they're
out for food. If you know the daily
activity cycles of dangerous
animals, you're all right, Sauer
said.



\ Campus Cutie
n
i
:! Today's Campus Cutie hails ]
jfroro the southland of Miami ;
i and last trimester transfer- \
: red from Agnes Scott College :
:-in Decatur, Ga.
She is Susan Dorn, a Delta ;
Gamma pledge who has been >
SPORTSMENS
CYCLE CENTER
617 N. Main St.
SUZUKI
Sales & Service

K i MW
[ W NoDoz J
KEEP ALERT TABLETS
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msm
Gainesville I I
Stockman H H
Supply Co.wf H
At the Gainesville Livestock Market ViJ
' 5001 N.W. 13th St.- -- J

named Pledge of the Week for §
two weeks by her sorority.
Susan, 2UC, plans to major
in elementary education. She $
likes Italian food, mainly pizza ;i*i:
and spaghetti. :£
| Spring is sprung
Dig out the bathing suits and
: bermuda shorts, the weather is
:j: getting warmer.
Dr. John F. Gerber, assistant
climatologist at the Florida
j: Agricultural Experiment Station,
said, Central and South Florida
may have experienced temper temper:
: temper: atures below 28 degrees for the
; last time. Seasonable warm
weather should be the rule. Our
chances of having temperatures
below 28 degrees are one in ten.
The reason we have had so
much unseasonable weather
recently, was because of the
westerly winds which were dipping
more South than normal, he
added.

y
fc' 'l { s**' i L Ax m
ITS SPRING. .
. AND A YOUNG MAN'S FANCY TURNS TO FINALS
Commencement change explained

Why is the graduation
commencement going to be held
on Monday this year? Why can't
summer and winter graduates have
a ceremony?
As April and the FINAL finals
approach, these two questions are
being asked by hundreds of
future graduates.
In an interview, Dr. Lester L.
Hale, Dean of student affairs, gave
the administration's answers.
To the first question, Hale said,
Actually this change to Monday
ceremonies just reverts back to
a long standing commencement
weekend format used during the
semester system.'*
He explained that prior to the
adoption of the trimester system,
the UF had two ceremonies plus
many extra events.
There was the Bacculaureate
Service and the Commencement
Convocation plus other events such
as ROTC commissioning cere ceremonies
monies ceremonies and the President's
reception. These ceremonies were
held on Sunday and Monday.
So many students complained
about the compulsory two- day
graduation that in 1964 the
ceremony was cut, leaving only
graduation convocation, Hale con continued.
tinued. continued.
Again complaints began rolling
in, said Hale. This time they were
against the impersonalizatlon of
the ceremony caused by the cut
in exercises. And again, a decision
was made to change the ceremony.
The administration decided to
return to the two-day schedule.
Hale also discussed the lack

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might SPECIAL
Filet Mignon Dinner $1.49
Tossed Salad Hot Buttered Rolls
French Fries Tea or Coffee
Child's Plate 89<
FROM 5 TIL' 9
STUDENTS WELCOME
"Mono* He&tauHGiit"
ads: Momox Moiml
our specialty*. Ribs and
Charcoal Broiled Steaks
H.S.KUUI NoxLL QaiMtitullt,
Across From J.M, Fields- I

Wednesday, March 24, 1965/ The Florida Alligator, 1

of ceremonies for summer and
winter graduates.
Under the trimester it just
seemed wise not to have a cere ceremony
mony ceremony for every term, he said.
Everybody wants to go home at
Christmas time and the summer
trimester is divided into two
sections, he continued.
Hale claimed the administration
was not aware of the popular
demand for winter and summer
ceremonies.
At the present we are waiting
to find out whether or not we will
remain on the trimester system,
he said.
If the students want more
ceremonies once the plans are
final, we will consider adding
them.
For the present, however, the
ceremonies will remain as they
are now, he stated.
Many students ask why they
must pay the $lO graduation fee
if they do not intend to participate
in graduation ceremonies.
Hale said that many costs of
graduation are not related to the
actual ceremony. He cited the
handling and mailing costs of
diplomas as an example.
William E. Elmore, Associate
Business Manager, said there is
no set breakdown of the $lO fee.
He also said, there were two
possible methods for handling
graduation fees.
Either the university could
charge everyone a set fee (as it
does now) or it could charge only
those students who plan to attend
ceremonies. The second policy

would have to be accompanied by
an increase in the general student
fee, Elmore said.
Richer rally
set today
There will be a rally staged
by the Freedom Forum this
morning at 11:00 a.m. in the Plaza
of the Americas. The purpose of
the rally is to publicize the
Richer petition program, and to
discuss faculty dismissals in
general.
The featured speaker will be
Steve Weissman, chairman of the
graduate students during the recent
free- speech movement at
Berkeley.
There will be four other
speakers, including student body
leader Cathy Pierce, Dr. Mc-
Cleary, Dr. Marshall Jones, and
Jack Zucker. A program of folk
singers will also be presented.
I TUTORS i
(Continued from p. 1)
source of the students will be
from their own teachers, although
the program will accept students
who volunteer themselves.
The students will be tutored
in their own schools following
classes during the week, or on
Saturday mornings. When arrange arrangements
ments arrangements to tutor in their own school
cant be arranged, well use UF
facilities, probably the Florida
Union on Saturdays, stated
Malaghan.
The first concern of this
effort, Harmeling pointed out,
is to forestall a student from
dropping out of school; our long'
range goal is to instill in the
student the Importance of edu education
cation education and the conviction that he is
capable of doing the work.
Harmeling continued, Children,
entering school from culturally
deprived environments, lack the
basis of self-expression, compre comprehension,
hension, comprehension, and motivation in their
home environment. These students
become bored in the classroom
for they are behind their fellow
classmates and their embryonic
frustrations in the first grade
develop drop-outs in high school.
If we can prevent one high school
drop-out a year, our program will
be a success.
Our program is designed to
attack the core of this problem,
emphasized Harmeling. We seek
to Increase the mental alertness
of the student body by pointing
out the rewards of education and
by motivating him.
Early indications point to en enthusiastic
thusiastic enthusiastic acceptance of the
program by both students on this
campus and principals of the Ala Alachua
chua Alachua County school system.

Page 11



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 24, 1965

SPORTS
jlI&>.:-.
Yale falls to Gators
on Blomgren triples

Bill Blomgrens sleeping bat
awakened to the tune of two trip triples
les triples and four RBl's and the Ga-
Track team
whips rough
Ohio State
The era of Coach Jimmy Carnes
began yesterday as the UF track
team submerged Ohio State by the
surprisingly wide margin of 91-
54.
Dave Wilson gave top efforts in
winning the mile and two mile
events, while Dave Westerman,
Mike Dosch and Bill Crawford
finished 1-2-3 in the high jump.
John Anderson led the way home
in the 220, while Dosch downed
the Buckeyes' best in the triple
jump with a 45 foot effort.
In the field events, Pete Skafte
took the medal in the javelin with
a heave of 199 feet, while Scott
Hager finished second in the pole
vault with a 14 foot leap. Hager
also won the intermediate hurdles
in 15 flat.
Harry Winkler copped seconds in
the discus throw and shot put and
wound up third in the javelin com competition.
petition. competition.
In the relays, the Gators won the
440 in the fast time of 42.9 but
were edged out in the mile relay
by a tenth of a second at 3:21.7.
Next big test for the team (2-0
in outdoor competition) comes this
weekend with the Florida Relays.

More intermurals competition
in evidence this year

There has been an approximate
10 to 15 percent increase in in intramurals
tramurals intramurals this year, according to
Paul R. Varnes, Asst. Intramural
Program Director.
The increase has been due to
the growth in the UF student en enrollment
rollment enrollment and expanding intramural
programs to the dormitories, ex explained
plained explained Varnes.
Intramural track, volleyball, and
tennis or table tennis (depending
on facilities available) were in introduced
troduced introduced to the dormitories this
year.
The murals program is impor important
tant important to students, asserted Varnes,
because it gives students the act activities
ivities activities they want and should have.
There are 145 basketball teams
in the program on campus. These
include dormitories, sororities,
Golfers win over
Georgia Tech
UFs golfers upped their record
to 6-2 with a 24 1/2-2 1/2 victory
over Georgia Tech here yesterday.
Captain Laurie Hammer led the
Gator charges with a 69 while
Bob Murphy carded a 71.
In freshman competition, UF
emgerged victorious by a 14-4
count.
The golfers will travel to Miami
this weekend for competition in the
Miami Invitational before traveling
to Cape Coral for the Florida
Invitational late next week.

tor baseball team got its seventh
win of the year 10-5 yesterday over
Yale.
Blomgren's second triple came
with the bases full in the fourth
and gave UF an insurmountable
8-2 lead at that point.
Danny Eggart hurled the first
four innings for the Gators and
allowed two runs before giving way
to Charlie Casey who pitched the
next two stanzas. The Elis got
two runs off Casey in the sixth
on a triple, an error and two walks.
Jack Withrow finished the game and
allowed the fifth run.
Allen TrammelP continued his
fantastic hitting pace with two
hits in three official times at
bat. He also got on base on a
walk and was hit by the Eli pit pitcher
cher pitcher in the eighth. Trammell
brought the crowd to its feet with
a 300 foot liner which dropped
two feet foul in the fourth.
Tommy Shannon had two hits for
the Gators while the only extra
base hit save Blomgren's pair was
a double garnered by pinch hit hitter
ter hitter Brownie Johnston in the sixth.
The Gators wound up with 10
runs on 12 hits and committed
2 errors while Yale had 5 runs on
9 hits and made four miscues.
Starter Eggart was credited with
the win.
Coach Dave Fuller's club trav travels
els travels to Miami for three games in
three days over the weekend again against
st against Miami, Michigan State and Ar Army.
my. Army.

fraternities, and varied leagues
as the engineering and law
leagues."
Because only five players are
needed, the basketball teams are
more easily organized, however,
softball probably has the great greatest
est greatest number of participants as soft softball
ball softball team needs ten players.
Fraternities are the most vig vigorous
orous vigorous competitors, stated Varnes.
But, he said, the greatest number
of participants are dormitory res residents.
idents. residents.
Since the trimester came into
being swimming has been dropped
from the intramural curriculum.
The number of weeks were short shortened,
ened, shortened, explained Varnes, and the
warm weather sport was drowned
out.
Probably 75 to 80 per cent of
UF students participate sometime
in intramurals while attending col college,
lege, college, said Varnes.
The intramural program is also
in charge of 20 special clubs
ranging from weight lifting to
chess. These clubs offer students
of varying interests to organize
and meet one another, according
to Varnes.
' Sj|Sg||j"

PRO DUFFERS RETURN
Former University of Florida golfers Frank Beard second from left
and Tommy Aaron, center, returned here and staged a clinic and nine ninehole
hole ninehole exhibition at the University Golf Club Prior to the golf action,
the two professional stars were honored by the University Golf Asso Association
ciation Association during a luncheon Shown with them are Conrad Rehling, left
who coached the pair as collegians ,* Tom Martin, second from right
incoming president of the association and William Boaz, right current
head of the group

Florida Relays fish contest
offers prizes for top catches
The Fifteenth Annual Florida Relays Fishing Contest will be
held this Friday and Saturday. The contest is open to all residents
and non-residents of Gainesville.
The contest will be in two divisions, Resident and Non-Resident.
UF students are welcome.
Fishermen can cast their rods at daylight Friday, and must
have their catches at noon on Saturday. No registration is re required.
quired. required.
All entries must be cuaght legally within Alachua County
waters. Either artificial or live bait may be used. Prizes
will be given for the largest Bass caught and the largest Speckled
Perch caught during this time.
Prizes will be a Zebco Spinning Rod and Reel for the largest
and a Zebco Spinning Reel for the largest speckled perch. Runner Runnerup
up Runnerup prizes in both divisions will by My Buddy tackle boxes.
Chairman for the tourney is Dr. Frank E. Philpott. All entries
must be weighted at the UF Police Station Saturday noon. This
weighing station is open day and night.

Should -freshmen
use It, ito?
(Theyd probably let If qo "so fheir heads)
But then, wouldn't any man? If he suddenly
found all those starry-eyed gals looking at him?
So, if you think you can handle it, go f*sj|
ahead, use SHORT CUT! Itll tame the
wildest crew cut, brush cut, any cut; |Up||
give it more body, more life. Keep it Kl|
under control. And make you look B~l|
great! Try it (if you dare!)... Old
Spice SHORT CUT Hair
Groom by Shulton ... tube
or jar, only .50 plus tax.
smo v.--

ktMCMUt'IM
gSKjjjlSH* wl TTr*^f-
Lasagna Raviola
f Val Pormigano
Home-Mad
l,alian Sausa 9*
In Every Town Or City, You
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THIS IS IT!
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Near Drive-In Theatre