Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 18/ 1965

Page 4

Wgjfl
\My

ERNIE.UTZ
Mttor-i*-Chl*f

LOU FERRIS
Editorial Pan Editor

VJiWPOtNT
Hats off
This Week the Gator salutes Dr. Robert B.
Mautz, UF vice president in charge of academic
affairs. Dean Mautz has served the UF
continuously since coming here in 1950.
Before coming to the UF, Dean Mautz was
an associate with Root, Clark, Buchner and
Ballantine law firm in New York, 1940-1941;
attorney with Pan American Airways of Africa,
Ltd., 1941-1942; and Lt. Col. in the Army
Air Force from 1942-1946.
After the war Dean Mautz served with the
legal division of the Office of Military
Government for Germany before returning
to the United States in 1949 to attend Yale
University.
In 1950 Dean Mautz joined the UF law
faculty and served as assistant dean and
professor of law, 1955-1958. In 1958 he was
appointed Dean of Academic Affairs.
Dean Mautz was born Jan. 22, 1915, in
Marion, Ohio. He received his B.A. at the
University of Miami in Oxford, Ohio and his
L.L.B. at Yale in New Haven, Conn.
Dean Mautzs professional memberships
include the bar of New York state.

Folks cant come

IT IS VERY Interesting to find
out that after attending the
University of Florida for five
years, it will be impossible for
my mother and father, close
relatives and fiancee to attend
the graduation exercises.
IN CHANGING Commencement
from the 25th of April to the
26th, a Monday morning, the
administration has all but rendered
it impossible for parents of many
students to see their son or
daughter graduate. Not many will
be able to leave work.
TO SOME PEOPLE, this is
insignificant. To many other
graduating friends of mine, the
event that culminates several
years of hard work will be com completely
pletely completely erased from that part of
life which we hoped to call fond
college memories.* 1
THOSE MEMORIES will be very
important to the UF when it seeks
to inform the alumni of the needs

EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Lee
Alexander, (Correspondents), Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles,
Donita Mathison, Dan Taylor, Sam Ullman, Selwin H. Ciment,
Jay Foley, Stephen Kanar, Dee Wright, Bob Wilcox.
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Kurvin, Ann Carter, Thelma Mossman, Fran Snider, Cynthia
Tunstall, Harvey Wolfson, Karen Vitunac, Jack Zucker, Ami
Saperstein, Carl Brown, Jane Young, Bill Lockhart, Ken Simon,
Drex Dobson, Jeffrey Denkewalter, G. S. Corseri, Eunice Tall,
Linda Cody, Woody Leonard, Jennell Close, Nancy Van Zile,
Kay Huff master, Jon Demme.
i mmmm i tfi.r.m ~- ,
Tlm Florida Alltcator roMnros H rlftrt to rvcvlate tho typographical ton* of all adrartlaomonts and
to xvytoa or tars away copy which it coMora objectionable.
MO POSITION B GUARANTEED, though dooirod position will bo (tow wbaoooor possible.
Tho Florida Alligator wUI not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement Involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or errooooos Insertion unless notice is given to the Advertising Manager within
(I) one day after advertisement wears.
Tbs Florida Alligator will sot be for more than out Incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR to the official student newspaper of tbs University of Florida and to
published five times weakly except dutog May, fees and July when It to published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator to entered as second class
matter at tot United States Post Office at Gaines Tills.

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International

STEVE VAUGHN
Managing Editor

of the school, and makes a plea
for financial aid in memory of
college days/' There will be a
large number in this year's class
who will find it hard to contribute
on that basis.
THE ALLIGATOR would do a
valuable service to many students
if its staff would investigate this
change in plans and offer the
student body an explanation of the
extreme circumstances," what whatever
ever whatever they may be, behind the act
responsible for wrecking a long longanticipated
anticipated longanticipated event.
AT LEAST THE disappointment
would be somewhat easier to bear
if the graduating senior was con consoled
soled consoled with the thought that his
plans were changed in order that
some sudden, great and extenuating
circumstance could be mitigated.
RICHARD F. D. PARKER, SEG
CHARLES F. CAPRON, SEG
MARION BARNETT, JR. 4AS

JOE CASTELLO
Executive Editor

ANDY MOOR
Sports Editor

Iwf gj£ M
DEAN ROBERT B. MAUTZ

How much is a vote worth?

By MICHAEL ALAN CARSON
Columnist
Long after things quiet down in
Selma, Alabama, after the pictures
of swollen crowds ofdemon ofdemonstrators
strators ofdemonstrators leave the pages of
newspapers and the screens of
television sets, after the last
blood has been shed, some
Americans may take the time to
study the current phase of the civil
rights struggle.
SPECIFICALLY, the fact that
Negro citizens in the heart of
Dixie are being denied a funda fundamental
mental fundamental right, the right to vote.
What is the significance of this
encroachment upon a constitutional
privilege? Well, I cannot help
but wonder How much a vote
is worth?
Many Americans may continue
to go on disregarding the right to
vote, but a few citizens are

EDITOR:
CONGRATULATIONS on the
courage shown in your article
questioning the presence of
venereal disease on the UF
campus.
AS A FORMER venereal disease
epidemologist for the Venereal
Disease Branch of the U. S. Public
Health Service, I feel that I have
some knowledge of the problem
in general, if not specifically in
the Gainesville area, where I have
never worked.
THE OBVIOUS REASON that
university officials are not ad admitting
mitting admitting that the problem exists
is that other colleges have not
done so. They don't want to be
singled out and given special
notoriety, for understandable
reasons.
BUT, THIS IS the very attitude
that has allowed VD to remain

EDITOR;
RE: GRADUATION COSTS THE
SAME, NO MATTER WHAT! Lo
and behold! How nice this choice
tidbit greets the ears. It makes
one want to shout for joy while
running down Main Street waving
$lO bills yelling, Look at me,
I paid the fee that I'll never
see!" How nice it will be to know
that this is a democratic univer university,
sity, university, and that two-thirds of us will
pay for what one-third shall enjoy.
HOW NICE IT will be when we
plant that last goodbye kiss on the
face of old Alexander Hamilton
and wonder just what Mr. Elmore
means by the general expenses
of graduation" that two-thirds of

Gives Gator pat on back

Costs the same

fCarson Comments*

becoming increasingly more con conscious
scious conscious of a right that they should
have, but do not have. During the
past eight weeks, Selma, Alabama,
has been the scene of numerous
civil rights demonstrations.
These demonstrations have
centered around the failure of
election officials to register Negro
citizens to vote. The
demonstrations have been far from
peaceful, the results extremely
unsatisfactory, and the repercus repercussions
sions repercussions quite tragic.
On Sunday, March 7, an Alabama
judge refused to allow demonstra demonstrators
tors demonstrators to march upon Alabamas
capital at Montgomery. Thursday,
March 11, a Unitarian Minister
died after being seriously beaten
several days earlier by white
racists. Saturday, March 13,
Alabama's Governor George
Wallace flew to Washington to

among us for years after it would
have been eradicated, had it been
a disease caught in any other
manner, and causing the same
ravages.
Syphilis attacks every tissue
of the human body, causing insanity
and heart disease,, among other
things, and killing 4,000 people
annually in the U. S. alone, by
actual record.
GONORRHEA CAUSES blindness
in children, sterility and fatal
peritonitis in adults.
Unfortunately, in the female,
diagnosis is practically
impossible, and treatment
uncertain. Females should be
treated with massive doses of
penicillin merely on history of
exposure to an infected male. She
will usually experience no warning
symptoms, as does the male, and
will be unaware that she has the
disease.

us will never know?
HOW INSPIRING IT will be when
those lovely caps and gowns are
seen draped over the April grads
while so many of us have visions
of Pomp and Circumstance that
may never be heard except in the
audience.
AND ALAS! Does one dare defy
THE UF and hold back that lovely
ten spot for fear of not graduating?
Nay, one cannot conceive of such
a felony as grand larceny when that
dear old sheepskin might be
delayed for a five cent library
fine. Heavens and Mercy, No!
SAY FOLKS, BACK to that ten
dollar bill again. Most of those
that were asked if they minded
being taken replied they werl

confer with President Johnson
about the Selma situation.
The President emerged from
the conference with one impres impression
sion impression of what had been accomplished
and quite obviously the Governor
had another impression.
Hopefully, the Presidents
attitude will prevail. This would
mean that a federal court would
order the state of Alabama to
allow the demonstrators to march
peacefully upon Montgomery.
Secondly, steps would be taken to
give civil rights demonstrators
proper protection, and most
important of all federal registrars
would be sent into Alabama to
register Negro citizens.
How much is a vote worth
the question seems to depend upon
whether or not you can register
to vote and whether or not you
are a white or a Negro in Alabama.

STUDENTS SHOULD demand VD
education in high schools and
college, as it is only through
such public awareness that these
diseases will be wiped out.
THE QUESTION is not whether
or not VD is present on the UF
campus of course it is, and
always has been. The question is
what are we going to do about it?
IF ANYONE WANTS information,
confidential or otherwise,
concerning this very serious
problem, 1 would suggest they call
the local county health department
and ask to speak to one of the
many specially trained graduate
venereal disease representatives
working with health departments
all over the country by the virtue
of the U. S. Public Health Service.
JOHN T. WAYLAND JR.

too glad to be leaving to quibble
over such details. Why not ask
the degree candidates in the
married villages? I*m sure the
details could fill quite a lot of
little bellies here. By the way,
what does happen to the ten dollars
apiece that IS received in
December and August? Hmmmm.
BY THE WAY again, could an
explanation be offered as to why
there are no graduation
ceremonies in December and
August? Thats a heck of a lot
of students left out. It's also double
the number of dissappointed
parents.
ABOUT YOU April grads isn't
it nice to graduate on a Monday?
NORMAN SMALL, 4ED



FAIR APPLICATIONS
The Student Government Labor
Office is accepting applications
from 1:30 5 p.m. in Room 309,
Florida Union, for jobs at the
Brass Rail of the New York World's
Fair.
FOOD SCIENCE CLUB
Dr. Johnson of the Food Science
Department will speak to members
of the Food Science Club tonight
at 7:30 p.m. in Room 305, McCarty
Hall.
FORESTRY CLUB
The Forestry Club will meet
tonight at 7:00 p.m. in Austin Cary
Forest.
GAME NIGHT
The Presbyterian University
Center invites interested students
to an informal Game Night,
tomorrow at 8:00 p.m. at the
Presbyterian University Center.
Refreshments are free and games
include chess, checkers,
ping-pong and cards.
GATOR GRAS
TRYOUTS
Tryouts for Gator Gras Variety
Show will be held tonight at 8 p.m.
in the Social Room of the Florida
Union.
YWCA recruiter
at UF today
A recruiter for Young Women's
Christian Association (YWCA)
professional positions will be on
the UF campus today, from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m., at the Florida Union.
Girls from the fields of
sociology, religion, education,
political science, psychology,
recreation, physical education or
related areas are invited to sign
up for interviews at the Place Placement
ment Placement Office, Building H.
Upperclassmen and graduate
students may be interested in
serving as youth or young adult
program directors, or as program
directors in health or physical
education departments.
Mrs. Emmanuel Gitlin is the
YWCA national recruiter for
northern Florida.
Oti HoMB'BAm
lASA§NA:
THE H\r OF The
UltfO LF CA/MPuS
(ftX%
Carmattellas
706 West University Avenue

* campus news briefs i

AGRICULTURAL
COUNCIL
Florida Congressman Don Fuqua
will speak at the Agricultural
Leadership and Scholarship
Convocation tomorrow at 7 p.m.
in McCarty Hall Auditorium.
Interested students and faculty are
urged to attend.
GERMAN SUPPER
Tickets for the German Supper
to be held Tuesday, March 23,
are available today and tomorrow
from 10:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. at
the Information Booth across from
the Hub or Room 315, Florida
Union. Tickets are $1.55 and the
deadline for reservations is to tomorrow.
morrow. tomorrow.
ORIENTATION
All students interested in the
Fall Orientation Program may sign
up for an interview outside of Room
200, Florida Union, any time from
2:30 5 p.m. this week.lnterviews
will be held through tomorrow.

t Jf-m \ m
w -* m \ J m
f mm *** w f
} k
I SoSyksu
Delicious suiting .. lavished with lovely
details and lots of lace. Jacket, shell and pleat-y
skirt in a breezy blend of rayon-cotton-acetate.
Delicious colors too. 5 15. 25*??
I The Personality shop
18 E, University Ave. Open Friday Until 9PM
OPEN STUDENT CHARGE ACCOUNT jf

SUMMER PROJECT
Students interested in parti participating
cipating participating in a summer tutorial
project in St. Augustine should
call Dr. Hiers (Ext. 2219) to sign
up for an interview with Reverend
Richard Unsworth, Chaplain of
Dartmouth College, who will be
here from 12:00 3:30 p.m.
tomorrow.
TUTORIAL SER VICES
Students may sign up for the
Tutorial Service of the Student
Government in Room 311, Florida
Union, from 1:30 5 p.m.
TOASTMASTERS
University Toastmasters will
hold their weekly meeting today at
11:45 a.m. in the Garden Room of
the Faculty Club.
TICKETS
Tickets for the Military Ball will
be on sale this week and Saturday
at the Military Ball Review.
Tickets for Basic Cadets are $2.00.
The Ball will begin at 9 p.m. and
the dress is formal.

Thursday. March 18, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

1 LAW 1
xjx
** Continued from p, 1
Bartley predicted southern support for the bill. He pointed out that
Sen. Smathers of Florida has indicated general support for it. The
governor of Kentucky made a speech at a demonstration and the
Birmingham News has "slapped Wallace in the face.
This wouldn't have happened five years ago," Bartley said. When
the history of civil rights is written 20 years from now, Selma will
be a turning point."
Provisions for voting rights have been rejected in the past. But
though such provisions failed to go through in 1957, 1960 and again
in 1964, Bartley predicted all opposition in Congress to quickly fall.
Sen. Allen J. Ellender (D, La.) has threatened to filibuster against
it "as long as the Lord gives me breath." But Bartley predicted the
Senate would smash such a filibuster within 24 hours.
The battleground for passage of this legislation couldn't have been
better chosen, said Bartley. "With voter rights, the Negroes stand on
unimpeachable grounds."
Jflj Ik x t|
a 9 m
* jtfr w v
HP ,y? l
I love a man in Van Heusen 417
Its wild, the way his long, lean
good looks come on strong in that
V-Tapered fit. Anyone can tell
hes top man on my scene when he
steps out in the stepped-up styling of
authentic Button-Downs or smooth
Snap-Tabs. And the added
attraction of Van Heusen spring
fabrics and colors make him my
favorite distraction.
fltlfTj VAN HEUSEN
V-Taperfor the lean trim look
{ j I^>^BUTTO.-t}OWN
& (J WITH BUILT-IN APPEAL
s.;-:
t When a man means business he
M M counts on a Van Heusen to
M M spell it out. He takes on the
turned*on authority of its authentic
styling, with its great soft collar
T (417) T roll * s *' m > nimble V-Taper
1 fit, fastback pleat, collar button
and locker loop. Plus the spring
yT> B Cool price, too!
V-Taper $5.00
Belk-Lindsey
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

Page 5



> f The Florida Alligator/ Thursday, March 18, 1965

Page 6

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I For Sale |
SET OF FENDER SKIRTS FOR
64 PONTIAC. Metalic blue. S2O
tor the pair. FR 2-6118. (A-117-
2t-c).
STEWART MOBILE HOME 8x38:
Air conditioned, 1-bedroom,
1-study or 2-bedroom. Excellent
condition. Lot 35 Hickory Hill
Mobile Home Park. Call 372-5501.
(A-117-3t-p).
1963 LAMBRETTA SCOOTER, 4-
speed, 150 cc. Excellent Condition.
Many extras: Windshield, luggage
rack, basket. $225 or best offer.
Call Marvin, 6-9102.(A-117-3t-c).
GAINESVILLE MINIATURE
RACEWAY is selling the best skate
boards in the world! HOBIE of
California at discount prices. See
them at 807 W. University Ave.
Gainesville Miniature Raceway.
(A-117-2t-c).
1961 PARILLA MOTOR CYCLE.
Good tires, good condition. $295.
372-7253. (A-116-2t-c).
FOR SALE FEDDERS 3/4 ton
air-conditioner. Call 378-2982
after 6:00 p.m. (A-116-3t-p).
1964 TEN WIDE MOBILE HOME.
Wolverine 2 bedroom. Part equity
and take up low payments. See at
Shady Nook Trailer Park, Lot #23.
(A-116-3t-p).
PAMPERED 1960 MERCURY 35
HP Outboard. Steal it for $200.00.
Phone FR 2-4967 after $ p.m.
(A-116-2t-p).
TRIUMPH TIGER CUB Must
sell. Newly rebuilt motor, lower
end, drive and clutch. Super clean.
Call George 8-1235, 7-9 p.m. (A (A---115-st-c).
--115-st-c). (A---115-st-c).
MOTOR CYCLE HARLEY DAVID DAVIDSON.
SON. DAVIDSON. Sprint, 250 cc. Modified,
potent. Must sell. Need $250. Call
Ozzie at 2-0491 after 5 p.m. (A (A---115-st-c).
--115-st-c). (A---115-st-c).
SKATE BOARDS, professional
ball-bearing wheels, oak board,
fully adjustable. Limited supply.
$6.50. E. Lee Reid Jr., 2-6938.
(A-113-st-c).
1958 RICHARDSON TRAILER.
B*x36* 2-bedrooms, completely
furnished, with air-conditioning.
Call 376-1048 or see at Raileys
Trailer Park. (A-114-ts-c).
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER.
Six 500 sheet boxes of Buff. Retail
for S2O per box. Will sacrifice for
$lO per box. Call Ext. 2832 between
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. (A-110-tf-nc).
Wanted
WANTED: RIDE TO VERO BEACH
Friday afternoon. Call August
Rubrecht 6-8565 or leave message.
(C-117-lt-c).
WE NEED GIRLS! Volunteer now
to be a hostess at Graham Area's
Harold's Club Party on March 27.
If interested contact Cherry Orth
6-9248 or 6-1804. (C-117-lt-c).
sls REWARD FOR INFORMATION
leading to rental of 3 or 4 bedroom
bouse in Finley area, in Sept.
376-2570. (C-115-St-c).
WANTED FEMALE ROOMMATES
for new furnished apartment near
campus for Fall trimester. Call
Sandie or Cheryl Room 4010
FR 2-9494. (C-U6-2t-p).

I For Kent |
AVAILABLE NOW OR AT
semester break, duplex apartment.
Living room, dining room, kitchen
downstairs, 2-bedroom and bath
upstairs. Will sell all or part of
furniture at a good price. SBS/mo
for 2, S9O/mo. for 3 or more.
Behind Norman Hall. Call 2-6043.
(B-116-3t-c).
NICE FURNISHED HOUSE CLOSE
to campus. Suitable for 2 or 3
for the summer A term. $l5O.
1918 NW 2nd Ave. or call 378-
2423. (B-116-st-c).
AIR-CONDITIONED Apartments
for 3A and/or 38. Suitable for 2
or 3 people S7O per mo. plus
electric. 1829 NW 2nd Ave.
Suitable for 2 or 3 people at 1530
NW 4th Ave. $75-SBO plus electric.
Suitable for 3 or 4 people at 1518
NW 4th Ave. S9O-SIOO with air airconditioning
conditioning airconditioning included. Also renting
for fall at slightly higher rates.
Call 376-4353 evenings. (B-lll (B-llltf-c).
tf-c). (B-llltf-c).
1 BEDROOM, unfurnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, kitchen equipped. Couples
only. $75 per month. 1913 NW
2nd Ave. Phone 2-1362. (B-113-
ts-c).
APARTMENT TO SUBLET for
summer 322-A NE 11th Street.
Furnished 2-bedroom, kitchen.
378-1509. (B-115-3t-c).
ABOVE STANDARD ROOMS FOR
BELOW STANDARD RENT! Rooms
for male students at 104 SW Bth
Street. FR 2-0243. (B-114-tf-nc).
SMALL FURNISHED CCB Cottage.
Bedroom, electric kitchen, tile
shower. SSO per month. Couple
preferred. Baby welcome. South
on Ocala Road. Linda Ann Court.
376-5826. (B-108-tf-nc).
FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY.
Air-conditioned apt. 1 block off
campus. TV, heat, steam bath,
private carport, etc. For one only
see at 117 SW 12th Street. Apt. 1
$55 per month. If interested call
Jim, 372-6178. (B-111-ts-c).
Personal
NOT AVAILABLE in the United
States, "BEATLES FOR SALE"
and "The Rolling Stones Album
H." Can have both for $lO. Call
372-7253 anytime. (J-117-lt-c).
DON'T MISS THE FUN AND
EXCITEMENT of the Sebring
races. GO VIA Gainesville Minia Miniature
ture Miniature Raceway air-conditioned
buses. sls per person or $25 for
couples (includes admission to
Sebring). Leaving March 26 in
the afternoon returning early
March 28. For more Information
and reservations to Sebring, stop
by Gainesville Miniature Raceway,
807 W. Univ. Ave. (J-117-ts-c).
ROOMMATE FOR SALE His
name is Luis E chart. Tall, bald,
and answers to the name of Tiger.
Make offer. Easy Payments. He's
all yours. Contact 803 SW sth Ave.
6-7652. (J-117-lt-p).
p 1
Serv ices
ACCURATE TYPING done on IBM
Typewriter. Call 372-2163 after 5
or anytime weekends. (M-115-
3t-c).

| Seryices |
EXPERT TYPING done in my
home. Will pick up and deliver.
376-8586 before 7:30 a.m. or after
5 p.m. (M-117-lt-p).
Autos
PRIVATE OWNER 61 FORD V-8
station wagon. Power, air, R&H,
good condition. SI3OO, or will take
small boat and motor in trade.
455-3443. (G-115-st-c).
HURTIN FROM HOOFIN' (look),
'57 RENAULT (saves gas), '57
RENAULT $50.00 (doesn't run),
*55 FORD convertible (looks, runs
great), R&H, 51 CHEVROLET
(runs great). 236 NW 4th Avenue.
FR 6-3583. (G-114-st-c).
VOLVO 1959, new battery, good
tires. S3OO and take over payments
of only $22.00 per month. May
trade. 372-7170. (G-113-st-c).
1960 VOLKSWAGEN SEDAN.
Radio, heater, and good tires. $795.
Call 372-7059. (G-116-3t-c).
'56 FORD V-8. Heater, good
condition. $350, price can be
negotiated. Call Bryan Danese,
Room 355 at FR 2-9167. (G-116-
3t-p).
56 RAMBLER WAGON. Rebuilt
engine-transmission. R&H, good
tires, makes into bed. Slow but
dependable make offer. Bob
Souvorin 2-7929. (G-115-3t-p).
1961 OLDS 88, 4-door sport sedan,
R&H, A/C, PS & PB, excellent
condition throughout. Arrange your
own financing. Call evenings
and weekends. 372-8221. (G-110-
lOt-c).
\
11 ""
I -

Lost & Found |
FOUND: LADY'S PRESCRIPTION
sun glasses in leather case from
Webb City. Jim Shields 2-9410.
(L-117-2t-c).
Real Estate
DESIRABLE ACREAGE HIGH and
rolling. 40 acres. S3OO per acre.
Highway frontage. 20 minutes from
U of F. Convenient terms. Will
consider exchange. Call Les
Jackson, Associate, Ernest Tew
Realty, 376-6461. (I-111-Bt-c).

3 5 7 4 U at
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Help Wanted
11 ' 1
GIRLS ONLY! VACATION WHILE
YOU WORK. Spend an exotic
vacation in the Bahamas and earn
money lor next trimester. Apply
now and spend your Easter
Vacation nn the island expenses
paid. Contact Mr. Baldwin
Johnson, Same Ole Place
Restaurant, iovernors Harbor,
Eleuthera Island, Bahamas. (E (E---117-st-c).
--117-st-c). (E---117-st-c).
RECEPTIONIST-SECRETARY for
Pediatrician's Office. State
qualifications and references.
Write Pediatrician, 810 NE 4th
Ave., Gainesville. (E-116-ts-c).
I YAMAHA BMW
Motorcycles I
For The Discriminating S
CYCLE RAMA I
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fkT rpo Orange-Blue football
MMHBM pits evenly matched teams

BENCH AND BUCKET -|
Tennis cnptain
Vic Stone is f3lj|
'The Sports Guy iMnifl
By MARK GRAHAM
Assistant Sports Editor
So you*re Vic Stone, Captain of the Gator tennis team. On
countless Saturday nights I've seen you standing on New York
streetcorners watching the broads go by and casing the scene
for the nearest action. Your personality makes you incongruous
with the sport of tennis. Most tennis players have a suburban
makeup complete with lily-white attire, Princeton haircuts, an
affinity for bridge played in smug airtight rooms, and all the
etiquettes dug by the supposed upper echelons of American
society, but you, Vic, have an asphalt personality. You've handled
everything from Carol Lynley to betting on the nags at Hialeah.
I've seen you in the greens, and handle everyone's tab in the
house. The bright lights and the big city are your scope. You
go the whole route because you couldn't have it any other way.
You started off at Michigan State majoring in time and space on
a basketball scholarship. Then you switched over to a more
cosmopolitan scene at Mexico City College. After a brief interlude
there you blew Into Havana. After running the mill you ended up
at St. Pete J.C.
. o
You arrived here in September 1963 as a tennis player with
assorted credentials. Last year you became the gallery
one point in your match with Georgia you received a standing
ovation while playing on the last court. From that point on special
interest was taken in the proceedings on the sixth of the varsity
courts whenever you (the 5,000 year old man) made an appearance.
In short, you're unlike most guys in this world. What separates
you from the numerous nonentities on hand is heart. You stick
up for what you believe in without walking over the next guy. You're
the heart and soul of the Gator tennis team. You're a credit to the
school, to the coach, and to the members of the team.
So you're cosmopolitan. So your interests are different from
those shared by most of the tennis playing community. You don't
quit. You have heart. You are the sports guy.

Trammell drives in 6
in wild, wooly inning

The Gator baseball team took a
while to get in gear yesterday,
but when it did there was no
stopping it as UF steam rolled past
Kentucky by the astronomical
score of 25-1.
UF*s charges scored 18 runs in
the sixth inning which saw 23
Gators bat against a trio of Wild Wildcat
cat Wildcat hurlers.
Allen Trammell was the big
Gator in the attack, knocking in
six runs in the sixth inning me melee.
lee. melee. Trammell had two doubles
and a grand-slam homer during
that stanza.
The Gators added seven more,
mostly due to Francis RooTs con control
trol control problem, in the seventh to
up the total to 25.
Before the sixth, things looked
bleak as UF could muster only
three hits off Kentucky hurler
Ken Gravitt.
The Wildcats got to starter Dan
Orr for a single run in the first
inning on two singles and an in infield
field infield out. They made it stand up
through the sixth.
Charlie Casey pitched the middle
three innings and got the win.
Casey was on target striking out
five and allowing no hits during
his mound tenure. Adrian Zabala

shut out the Wildcats in the last
three.
The Gators final totals were
25 runs, 12 hits, 0 errors while
Kentucky had 1 run, 6 hits and
4 errors.

MEN'S WEAR
FOR FLORIDA
Slim-Tapered
SIZES 27-40
S.W U. 99
>:* 7
!J
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

Using starting lineups as an
indicator, this year's Orange-Blue
game, 2:30 p.m. Saturday, will be
one of the most even contests yet
held to wind upUFs football spring
practice.
WOMENS
INTRAMURAL
STANDINGS
INDEPENDENT:
Blue: : ti ___
Women Off Campus 467
E. Jennings 467
N. Rawlings 334
S. Rawlings 281
C. Jennings 267
Graham 130
W. Jennings 90
Orange:
Reid 474
Yulee 374
Mallory 320
S.E. Broward 317
N.E. Broward 291
N.W. Broward 220
S.W. Broward 110
SORORITY:
Orange:
Alpha Delta Pi 494
Kappa Alpha Theta 420
Alpha Epsilon Phi 374
Alpha Omlcron Pi 274
Zeta Tau Alpha 220
Delta Delta Delta 184
Blue:
Chi Omega 420
Sigma Kappa 367
Delta Phi Epsilon 311
Phi Mu 287
Kappa Delta 284
Delta Gamma 220
Alpha Chi Omega 210

I WOODROW,

Thursday, March 18, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Gator head coach Ray Graves
and his staff have split the team
into two equal groups and picking
an advance favorite would be a
most difficult task.
I believe this will be one of the
best spring games we've ever had
here," says Graves. There is so
much spirit and the two teams are
so evenly matched.'
Starting offensive teams:
Orange Split End Paul
Ewaldsen (Jr., Savannah, Ga.), LT-
John Whatley (Sr., Tampa), LG
David Hiss (So., Miami), CBUI
Carr (Jr., Pensacola), RG Phil
Maggio (Jr., Tampa), RT Sam
Ford (Jr., Fort Myers), Tight
End Barry Brown (Sr., Ann
Arbor, Mich.), QB Harmon
Wages (So., Jacksonville), WB
Alan Poe (Sr. f Tampa), TB
Jimmy Jordan (Jr., Tampa), FB
John Feiber (Jr., Gainesville).
Blue Split End Richard
Trapp (Sq.j Bradenton), LT
Mike Waxman (Sr., Miami), LG
Larry Beckman (Sr., Miami), C
John Higbe (So., Jacksonville), RG*
Neal Sneed (Sr., Fort Lauderdale),
RT. Randy Jackson (Sr., Lake
City), Tight End Jack Coons
(So., Lake Worth), QB Kay
Stephenson (Jr., Pensacola), WB
Tommy Glenn (So., Jacksonville),
TBJack Harper (Sr., Lakeland),
FB Graham McKeel (Jr., Lake Lakeland).
land). Lakeland).
PIQUE

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M II Sizes 5 fro 20
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Free Parking on let Federal Parking Lot

Starting Defensive Teams:
Orange LE Lynn Matthews
(Sr., Tampa), LTJulian Johnson
(Sr., Green Cove Springs), MG
Larry Gagner (Sr., Daytona Beach)
LBsSteve Heidt (Jr., Albany,
Ga.) and John Watson (Jr., West
Palm Beach), RT Lee Langley
(Sr., Jacksonville), RE Brian
Jetter (So., Fort Lauderdale),
CpDick Kirk (Sr., Fort Lauder Lauderdale),
dale), Lauderdale), LHBDan Manry (So., Jack Jacksonville),
sonville), Jacksonville), RHB George Grandy
(Jr., Jacksonville Beach), SAF
Bruce Bennett (Sr., Valdosta, Ga.).

Blue LE Chip Hoye (Jr.,
Jacksonville Beach), LT Wally
Colson (Jr., Valdosta, Ga.), MG
Ed Warner (Jr., Seneca, S.C.),
LBs Bill Holt (So., Valdosta,
Ga.), and Jerry Anderson (Jr.,
N. Miami), RT Paige Cutcliffe
(So. Birmingham, Ala.), RE
Don Barrett (Jr., Vero Beach),
CB Wayne McCall (So., Ocala),
LHB Tom Hungerbuhler (So.,
N. Miami), RHB Tom Tarbert
(So., Miami), SAF Hal Seymour
(Sr., Starke).
&
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CYCLE CENTER
617 N. Main St.
SUZUKI
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THIS IS IT!
Dial 372-4690
2120 Hawthorne Rd.
Near Driye-In Theatre

Page 7



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 18, 1965

Page 8

Sebring records likely to fall

The race record for distance
covered, as well as average speed,
is expected to be broken with the
running of the 12 Hours of Sebring
on Saturday, March 27th.
The record was set by Sebrings
1964 winners, Umberto Maglioli
of Italy and Mike Parkes of
England. This pair, co-driving
a Ferrari, covered 1112.8 miles
at a speed of 92.364 miles per
hour.
This mark is not likely to with withstand
stand withstand the challenge of the 70 sports,
GT, and prototype cars that will
take the famed Le Mans start on
the 27th. Every maker of topflight
racing cars in the world is repre represented
sented represented in the full field.
The rise of the Ford GTs and*

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I Next deer to lire station Open Sunday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Ford-powered Cobras is expected
to play a large part in setting new
records. These American racers
have come a long way in the past
few years, and have reached the
point where they not only are as
fast as any car on the track, but
have the stamina to rim the twelve
full hours that Sebring demands.
Ferrari, Sebring winners for the
past four years, will not be able
to slack off for one minute as they
have been able to do in the past.
The Cobras and Fords will be
flying from the start and flying
at the finish.
This all-out battle between the
Fords and the Ferraris, with no

quarter given, might possibly pave
the way for other manufacturers
to take the major share of the
more than $40,000 in prize money.
The Porsche isn't as fast, but
consistency and dependability are
its watchwords, \nd if the
Ferraris and Fords fall by the
wayside, the sleek German car
could move to the fore front.
The 12 Hours of Sebring
climaxes three days of racing
in this world mecca of auto racing.
On Thursday and Friday, March
25 and 26, there will be inter international
national international motorcycle races on the
5.2 mile road course, and on Friday
there will also be a three hour
production sedan race.

X'*' Ifc I?' ? A :
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AILIQAtOR AOS
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