Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
vii V'
' flLr

Blue Key
honoraries
selected
Florida Blue Key selected nine
honorary members this weekend in
addition to the previously an announced
nounced announced active tappees.
This is the largest group to
be honorarily tapped since 1930.
Chosen were two public officials,
a past president of the alumni
association, and nine members of
the academic community. They
were cited for outstanding service
to the University of Florida with without
out without hope or expectation of reward.**
Public officials who were
selected were Congressman
Claude Pepper and State Senator
John E. Jack** Mathews Jr.
Former UJS. Senator Pepper,
who is currently representing
Floridas third Congressional dis district
trict district in Congress, was selected
because of continuing prolonged
interest and promotion of higher
education and the University,** ac according
cording according to Fred Lane, Honorary
Tapping Committee Chairman.
Mathews, former Duval County
state representative and now state
senator, is currently chairman of
the Legislative Councils Commit Committee
tee Committee on Higher Education. His pro promotion
motion promotion of quality higher education
in Florida was cited.
Louis S. Bonsteel, president of
the UF Alumni Association 1953-
54, was the third of those
off-campus selections. Lane noted,
Mr. Bonsteel*s continuous ser service
vice service to the University since his
graduation from Law School here
both in formal and informal capa capacities
cities capacities demonstrates his dedica-
See 'KEY on p, 5
Dean Bannisters
condition serious
at Hillis Miller
Dean Turpin C. Bannister was
pronounced in serious** condi condition
tion condition at J. Hillis Miller Health
Center yesterday after suffering
a stroke Friday afternoon.
Bannister was found by Warren
P. Hultman, assistant professor of
art, in the projection room of the
Architecture and Fine Arts Build Building
ing Building after having given a lecture.
Bannister has been dean of the
College of Architecture and Fine
Arts since 1957.
Before coming to the UF, he
was Dean of the school of archi architecture
tecture architecture at the University of Illi Illinois.
nois. Illinois.

1?. tk § ** m &** '¥ .: i $ *' v
THE WALLS COME TUMBLING DOWN
Workmen tear into the walls of time.
History is ripped apart, board by board.
3 The new replaces the old.
Being swiftly removed from the UF scene is the
Old Pi Kappa Phi house at 13th St. and Univ
Ave stood for tt wlll ** gone in
Wn M a few It has stood alone and
iv I | desolate for the past It*s windows
111 I were wiped out by rocks. It*s rooms
I I II were slept in by tramps.
- J flf ts BBK Hk soon it will be gone gone-19||
19|| gone-19|| : f orev e r.
I
BBBEiBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBK

'..lets go to Selma
...its a good thing

By EUNICE TALL
Staff Writer
We were sitting in Saras Sand Sandwich
wich Sandwich Shop Thursday night with
some Negro people who were very
nice, and they were sharing their
beer with us. And I just thought,
let's go to Selma because it's
a good thing.''
Susan Bennett, 3AS, and four
other UF students left for Selma,
Ala., at 3 on Friday afternoon.
Three to five hundred demon demonstrators
strators demonstrators were singing and praying
in the streets when we arrived at
11 that night,'* said Morton Hart Hartman,
man, Hartman, 7AS. They kept it up all
weekend.*'
Hartman, who completes his phi philosophy
losophy philosophy master's degree in
August, returned to the UF Sunday
night merely to teach his
Philosophy 201 class on Monday
evening.

CHEERLEADER SELECTIONS: WIPED OUT

BY CARL BROWN
Staff Writer
Cheerleader selections made last Friday have been
termed null and void by Student Body President
Bruce Culpepper*
As a result of unconstitutional** proceedings in
the selections, another tryout must be held, Cul Culpepper
pepper Culpepper said.
He said the method of tabulating votes was in incorrect
correct incorrect and required judges were not present for
the voting.
*Another try-out will be held,** Culpepper said,
and the constitution will be followed. It just
wasnt done correctly and will have to be done
over.**
The new tryout will be Thursday at 4 p.m.
Questions have been raised concerning the com composition
position composition of the group selected last week. Three
of the six male cheerleaders selected by the Offi Official
cial Official judges** were members of Theta Chi fraternity.

FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Vol. 57, No. 114

He's returning to Selma
tomorrow.
It was rainy, foggy, cold, and
muddy in Selma as we walked up

'Selma Wall
comes down
SELMA, Ala. (UPI)-City offi officials
cials officials lowered the Selma wall'*
yesterday and Dr. Martin Luther
King led more than 1,500 Negroes
and whites to the Dallas County
Courthouse to honor the Rev.
James J. Reeb.
Police and state troopers, under
orders to give the marchers max maximum
imum maximum protection,'* lined the route
to the courthouse.
King carrying a large wreath,
led the long, silent line of marchers
away from the Brown Chapel AME
Church, where they held a memor memorial
ial memorial service for Reeb.

RAH RAH RAH RAH RAH ...

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

and down the street trying to
avoid some 800 uniformed guards
who were armed with guns and billy
clubs,** responded Miss Bennett
who also returned Sunday with
Chris Smith, lUC and Bob Engel,
2UC. Mike Geison, 2UC, had not
returned by Monday afternoon.
During the night, police cars
surrounding the area shone their
bright lights on the demonstrators
who were from all parts of the
country.
When we slept it was in the
churches, and some private homes;
We were very well treated,** con continued
tinued continued H ant man. There wasnt
much food, but the people shared
what they had.**
Hantman explained that there
were less than 60 registered
negro voters in Dallas County
See SELMA on p. 5

Hie head cheerleader is a member of that frater fraternity,
nity, fraternity, as are two of the five alternates.
Judges for the selection which hold tryouts for
the aspirants after a two week practice are rigidly
specified by the Cheerleader Constitution to be:
student body president, president of the athletic
council, captain of the football team, dean of men,
dean of women, fraternity advise, r, and past head
cheerleader.
Only two of the seven official judges were among
those who made the selection last week.
The Cheerleader Constitution, effective since 1950,
sets down the method for running the whole or organization,
ganization, organization, including selection of officers. All organ organizations
izations organizations which receive funds from Student Govern Government
ment Government must have such an organizational constitu constitution.
tion. constitution.
The constitution also states that the head cheer cheerleader
leader cheerleader must have had at least one year of exper experience
ience experience before holding the head cheerleader's office.
The man selected for this office had not been a
cheerleader here before.

Gainesville
voters go
to polls
Gainesville voters hit the polls
today to select two city commis commissioners
sioners commissioners from a field of five.
Commissioners from Groups
One and Two will be elected.
Hugh W. Cunningham and Dr.
Ralph B. Thompson are UF pro professors
fessors professors running for the Commis Commission
sion Commission seats.
Thompson, editor of a new Flor Florida
ida Florida businessmen's magazine, is
running against incumbent Mayor Mayorcommissioner
commissioner Mayorcommissioner Howard McKinney
and Rev. A. F. Alexander for
the Group One seat.
Cunningham, associate pro professor
fessor professor of journalism, Rev. W. E.
Wright, Dr. Walter E. Murphree,
a former Mayor-Commissioner
and William Reynolds, a Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Attorney, are the choices for
Group Two.
Byron M. Winn resigned his seat
as commissioner from Group Two
and only two years of that term
remain. The Group One Commis Commisloner
loner Commisloner will serve the full three
year commission term.
Alexander and Wright are the
first Negro candidates in recent
history.

Faculty politicos
get blessings
of administration
By CYNTHIA TUNSTALL
Staff Writer
UF professors running in city
elections have the full approval of
the administration, according to
Franklin A. Doty, Assistant Dean
of Academic Affairs.
"A UF professor can serve in
any city or county position as long
as hfis elected position does not
interfere with his duties at the
University," Doty said.
Before running for an elected
position a UF faculty member
must sign a "delcaration of in intention"
tention" intention" which must be approved
by the president of the University
before the faculty member can
run for an office.
"Faculty members cannot
remain on the staff and bold elec elected
ted elected state offices, they roust re resign
sign resign from the faculty," he said.
Two UF faculty members, Hugh
See 'FACULTY* onp.6



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday/ March 16/ 1965

campus
news
briefs

CHAIRMEN
Applications for chairmanships
of the Florida Union Dance Comm Committee
ittee Committee and the Public Relations
Committee must be turned in by
4 p.m. this afternoon. Applications
will be interviewed at this time
in Room 315, Florida Union.
MODERN DANCE
Interested students are invited to
try out for Orchesis, the modern
dance club, tonight at 7 p.m. Men
and women may audition.
NEW ORANGE PEEL
There will be an urgent meeting
of the editors of the New Orange
Peel today at 5 p.m. in Room
15, Florida Union. There will be
no magazine unless there is at attendance
tendance attendance at this time.
MARINE CORPS
The U. S. Marine Corps Officer
Selection Team will be located in
the Hub today and Wednesday to
interview prospective officer
applicants for Marine Aviation and
Marine Ground Officer programs.
Limited openings are still avail available
able available for April 1965 graduates.
EUROPEAN CLUB
Students interested in forming
a European Club are invited to
attend an organizational meeting
Wednesday, March 17, at 8 p.m.
in Room 324, Florida Union.
DEBATE SOCIETY
The Debate Society will meet
tonight at 7:30 p.m. in Room 331,
Tigert Hall. Practice debates will
be held for participants in the
coming tournaments at the Univer University
sity University of Tennessee and the Univer University
sity University of Miami.
ALPHA KAPPA PSI
Alpha Kappa Psi will hold an
election meeting tonight at 7 p.m.
in Room 212, Florida Union. Dean
Allen Robertson, Public Relations
Manager for the UF, will be the
guest speaker.
ELECTION OFFICIALS
The following people are re requested
quested requested to stop by the Treasurers
office, Room 307, Florida Union:
Richard Fleitas, Susan Lebovitz,
Dan McKinnon, James Rice, R.
Sonthalia, and Lenny Weissman,
Your social security number is
needed in order for you to re receive
ceive receive payment for your work in
the elections.
THERAPY
The Student Physical Therapy
Association will hold an open house
tonight at 7:30 p.m., at the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center.
SUMMER SERVICE
Gainesville Friends meeting will
sponsor a table concerning sum summer
mer summer service opportunities from 9
to 5 on Wednesday, March 17
in the Florida Union. Information
will be available on activities and
projects leading to social and
international understanding.
SPANISH CLUB
Students interested in forming a
new Spanish Conversation Club
are invited to attend an organiza organizational
tional organizational meeting tonight at 8:30 p.m.
in the International Center. Amer American
ican American and foreign students are in invited.
vited. invited.

Freedom sets up shop at gator pen

Albert the Alligators pen was
the scene of Freedom Forums
drive to reinstate Edward Richer,
humanities instructor.
Members of Freedom Forum
gathered at the UF mascots cage
and asked people to sign a peti petition
tion petition demanding renewal of Richers
contract for one year until a full
and public investigation can be
made.
Lucien Cross, the chairman of
the Faculty Dismissal Investiga Investigation
tion Investigation Committee, said thatthedrive
to obtain signatures will continue
today with another meeting at Al Alberts
berts Alberts cage today at noon.
Petition tables will also be set
up at key points on campus for
students who are interested in
signing for Richer.
The committee, according to
Cross, is concerned about the case

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/charlotte? /
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Take your first trip on Trailways Trailwaysyou'll
you'll Trailwaysyou'll never go any other way!
In a hurry ? Take Trailways! We whisk you
smoothly over new super-highways, with nary
a traffic or parking problem. You just sink back
in armchair comfort. Enjoy the scenery thru big
picture windows. Air conditioned. Restroom
aboard. Why drive yourself when we make
everything so easy for you ? One trip and you'll
know why folks call Trailways the easiest
travel on earth I

A TRAILWAYS. A
WM Easiest travel on earth

because it shows the lack of
com munication between faculty and
student interests and the ad administrative
ministrative administrative policy.
GARGOYLE
Gargoyle, the honor society for
college of architecture and fine
arts, recently initiated the follow following
ing following persons: from building con construction:
struction: construction: Mel Bryan, George
Hemenway, Donald Marshall, Flet Fletcher
cher Fletcher Sessoms, and Andy Hogan.
From Architecture: Chris Ben Benninger,
ninger, Benninger, Lon Crow, Don Duer, Fred
Evans, Dan Ideasfalean, John Ni Nichols,
chols, Nichols, Marc Treib, and Jim Mc-
Ginley.
From Art. Herbert Mcae, and
Jane Rae Snider.
From advertising design, Penny
Johnson.

; ..'';'./ '"l't 1 fliH- ,
I
l|
A fflj

TOKYO (UPI) Communist
China Monday issued its most
direct and savage attack on the
new Soviet leadership since the
ouster of Nikita S. Khrushchev as
Russian premier last October.
The Peking Reds charged the new
Russian government is subser-

From GAINESVILLE
ST. PETERSBURG $4.20
4 1/2 hourss trips daily
MIAMI SB.BO
thru service via Everglades route /
WASHINGTON $23.70
thru service over 2 hours faster
MEMPHIS $21.05
new Silver Eagle service
' TAM IAM I TRAILWAYS

Red Chinese blast Soviets

CHRISTENING
.. .UF Homecoming
Queen Mary Arliskas
had the honors last
weekend of christen christening
ing christening the bulldozer that
began work on the new
Worn etco Theater in
the J.M. Fields Shop Shopping
ping Shopping Center


vient to and subjects itselfjmder
the thumb of U.S. imperialism,
the common enemy of the people
of the world.
The Chinese Communists pre previously
viously previously had confined themselves
to less vitriolic attacks on
Khrushchevism "



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Corbin's skillfully tailors these trousers from the finest
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regular, short and long rises available

$21.00
Corbins dacron & cotton poplins are $15.95.
Our complete selection of trousers from $10.95
I
raman dman
number 6 mo in street south

Tuesday, March 16, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Fair winners named

Society and individual division
prize winners have been announced
by Engineer's Fair Chairman Do Dolores
lores Dolores L. Srooleny.
First place was awarded to The
American Society of Civil En Engineers
gineers Engineers for its "College of En Engineering
gineering Engineering Expansion Program.
The American Institute of Chemi Chemical
cal Chemical Engineers took second place
for a variety of displays; third
was awarded to The American
Society of Agricultural Engineers

State Supreme Court ruling
wont effect UF trailerites
The State Supreme Court ruling that allowed counties to tax house
trailers will apparently have no effect on the number of UF students
who live in mobile homes.
Several Gainesville trailer park managers agreed that the new
tax law would not reduce the number of their tenants.

Classroom busses
working overtime
The Student Government (SG)
classroom bus will be working
overtime this week.
"We are expanding the service
on a one-week trial basis/' said
Alan M. Brunswick, director of
communications under Secretary
of Interior, Mike Malaghan.
The SG early morning classroom
bus makes single trips to Hume
and Jennings areas before each of
the first three class periods. Next
week the bus will circle around for
another load, therefore making six
trips instead of three.
According to a survey taken by
last year's Secretary of Interior
Marty Schwartz, over 96 per cent
of students questioned favored the
service and most wanted the
service to expand.
"Because we have the use of the
bus from Plants and Grounds for
the first three periods, there will
be no extra cost to the students
or to SG for the expanding," said
Brunswick.
"If there is favorable student
reaction," added Brunswick, "the
service will be continued past next
week."
OGr^urMft
Svf It A
\/ivtukl &al(ery
O* Delicacies
< r V
u /
aatmanella's
11. a.m.-7 p.m.
7 days a week
706 W. Univ.

for its experiments concerning the
designing of citrus pulp storage
bins.
In the individual division en engineering
gineering engineering students Dick Flagg,
Norm Keevers, Max Robinson, and
Ralph Roth won first place so r
their Satellite Tracking Station,
which was planned under the ad advisement
visement advisement of Professor M.H.
Latour. The 'Gator Amateur Radio
Club was awarded second place in
the individual division.

"I've talked to several of the
people who rent from me, and they
are not too much concerned," said
Mrs. A. J. Davis, manager of the
Archer Road Village Trailer Park.
Mrs. Davis estimates that 97 per
cent of her renters are UF
students.
"In fact," Mrs. Davis said, "this
new rule will even help out some
people financially. Not many of my
tenants have new trailers."
Jack Fitzgerald, of the Alachua
County tax assessor's office, ex explained
plained explained that owners of large, new
trailers would be the ones that
suffered the largest Increase in
taxes.
"Tax rates will be figured on a
square foot basis," Fitzgerald
said. "We will also take in to
account the age of the trailer and
the depreciation value."
The new tax ruling on house
trailers started when the State
Supreme Court upheld the right of
St. Johns County to tax house
trailers as homesteads.
Before the Court's decision,
trailers were classified as motor
vehicle units and were only
required to buy a motor vehicle
license tag.
Mrs. Shirley Peterson, of the
Alachua County tax collector's
office, said this year's trailer tags
would have cost $16.80.
The funds collected from
trailer owners will be used to
help support public schools. All
money collected in this way will
remain with the individual county.
Mrs. Virgil Braddock, manager
of the Glynwood Trailer Park, that
rents to students only, agreed with
Mrs. Davis and others that the new
ruling would not hurt the mobile
home business.
"Os course I'm not certain,"
she said, "but I don't think anyone
will be moving out because of it.
"The only ones that will really
feel the increase," Mrs. Braddock
said, "are those that haven't been
buying any tag at all."
Metallurgy huddle
set here today
A special conference on metal metallurgy,
lurgy, metallurgy, designed to acquaint
industry with current research in
that field, is scheduled at the
UF today.
More than 50 representatives
from industry and universities in
the South are expected to attend
the all-day meeting at McCarty
Hall.
Papers on metallurgical and
materials research now under way
at Florida will be presented by
faculty members and graduate stu students.
dents. students. Present sponsor xl research
is valued at over $500,000.
Dr. R. W. Gould and Dr. R. H.
Buck are co-chairmen of the con conference.
ference. conference.

Page 3



, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Page 4

K^MBUTZ
Bdttor-Ufr-Chtef

LOU FERRIS
Editorial Pin Editor

p- GUEST COLUMN=i
A small voice
By PAUL DANISH
Collegiate Press Service
AN OPEN LETTER to the administrators of the nation's colleges
and universities.
GENTLEMEN:
"FOR GOD'S SAKE, you're hurting me,'' the young man screamed
at the four policemen who were holding him down. "For Christ's
sake, let go of my foot. It hurts! It hurts!"
THE OFFICERS weren't buying, however. They continued to pin
their charge against the hood of a parked car while about 20 spectators
looked on.
"APPARENTLY HE had a nervous breakdown," the man standing
next to me said.
"I THINK HE'S a law student at the university," he added. "They're
making those finals harder all the time," another spectator --a
student with an economics textbook smilingly said.
THE LANDLADY started talking with some hangers-on. "This has
happened before," she said.
I TURNED TO one of the young man's friends who had been listening
sadly and asked him about the incident.
"HE HAS BEEN under severe pressure at the law school for some
time," he said. "Last year he had some trouble with the campus
police."
THE FOREGOING story is true, gentlemen; it happened last month
in Philadelphia.
THE ONLY REASON I'm telling it to you is that such breakdowns
are becoming an all too familiar and sinister fixture in America's
institutions of higher education, and I think you are in part responsible.
And I have a forlorn hope that if for once you look at the dirty details
of one such incident, you might pause and for one consider just what
sort of institutions you are creating.
BEFORE YOU return to the everyday task of turning your
institutions into multiversities, of making them larger and more
efficient and more mechanized; before you go back to "coping" with
your respective enrollment rises, just take a moment and try to
picture what effect your actions will have on those persons who will
pass through the schools you are building in the next half century.
Clearly you are men who are doing their best to deal
with a set of extraordinarily complex and difficult problems.
MOST OF you are men of good will, but that in itself is not enough.
One must recognize the consequences' of one's actions, and you have
been incredibly lax in this.
GUIDED BY the highest motivations, you are building institutions
of higher learning that do not humanize, but depersonalize, that do
not permit the human spirit to soar, but which chain it to the alter of
efficiency. It is a losing proposition. You cannot spread the
enlightenment with a bureaucracy. You cannot humanize with a
computer.
I CANNOT believe that you do this deliberately, as some of your
harsher critics have suggested, but I do believe that too often you have
bowed to expediency without fully considering the human consequence.
THIS IS too bad, because an untold number of future difficulties
would be avoided if you would only consider them now. In fact, many
of your problems would be avoided if you would simply make a greater
effort than you are doing now to listen to your students.
THAT ISN'T too great a request, is it? After all, they are the
whole point of your labors,
IT MAY NOT be too easy to hear them over the clamor of trustees,
and alumni, and legislators, and researchers, and the thousand and
one other voices that bid for your ear, but I am convinced that it will
be well worth the trouble, if you would only take the time to do so.
IF YOU LISTEN closely you may well hear a very small voice
screaming "For God's sake, you're hurting me."
GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Lee
Alexander, (Correspondents), Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles,
Donita Mathison, Dan Taylor, Sam Ullman, Selwin H. Ciment,
Jay Foley, Stephen Kanar, Dee Wright, Bob Wilcox.
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Kurvin, Ann Carter, Thelma Mossman, Fran Snider, Cynthia
Tuns tall, Harvey Wolfson, Karen Vitunac, Jack Zucker, Ami
Sapersteln, Carl Brown, Jane Young, Bill Lockhart, Ken Simon,
Drex Dobson, Jeffrey Denkewalter, G. S. Corseri, Eunice Tall,
Linda Cody, Woody Leonard, Jennell Close, Nancy Van Zile,
Kay Huff master.
| Th Florida Alligator reserves tlw rifM to rwgulate Uw typographical tone of all advertisements and
to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION E GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for eny advertisement involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before nest insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and Is
published five times weekly except dutng May, June and July when it Is published semi-aeokly. Onlv
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class
matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International

STEVE VAUGHN
Managing Editor

JOE CASTE LLO
Executive Editor

ANDY MOOR
Sports Editor

FREEMAN FORMULATES
xVVmtXMllni IHi TiM i

| Insult to injury ||

EDITOR:
MONDAY, March 8, the Alligator
had a front page article entitled,
Critique
EDITOR:
IN REFERENCE to Mr.
Moorhead's "cliche-ridden"
article appearing in last
Monday's Alligator and its
subsequent 4JM "critique,"
may I say that I for one
found the former much more
worthwhile and enjoyable
reading. Mr. 4JM would do
well to go to his "cliche"
dictionary and check the
definition of "expert."
CHRISTOPHER L. COMBS,
3AS

: : : :
Xanadu revisited

By G. S. CORSERI
Columnist
I HAD AN idea I'd be sacking
in early last night, before one.
Just as I'm bopping into bed there's
a rapping on the door and
someone's calling out "Corseri!
Hey, Corseri!" I open the door
and there are these three grubby
looking guys standing there, and
when they see me they start to

laugh.
"WHAT DYOU
know," one of
them says," he
looks just like the
picture!"
"Just how old
are you?" another
one asks me.
"Really I'm
four and a half,"
I explain, "only
I'm precocious."
"Don't use dirty

words with us, kid," they tell me.
Pm sorry/* I say, and I ask
them what they want.
YOU*D BETTER come with
us/* the grubbiest one tells me.
I figure they didn't hear me right
so I ask them again what they want.
You*d better come with us/*
this guy says again.
I*m about to tell them all to
kiss off when I feel a strange
pressure in my abdomen. Looking
down I notice a sawed-off shot
gun curiously appended to my dear
litUe gut.
Be happy to accompany you,**
3%

fc
Bp;
CORSERI

will wage jump curb irresponsi irresponsibility?
bility? irresponsibility? This article added insult
to the injury of low pay. The
main theme of this article was
not the proposed $1 minimum wage,
it was a slander on student
laborers.
I HAVE no ax to grind, as I
have never worked on campus.
However, it appears to me that the
only semblance of efficiency on
campus is in the work of the UF
students.
IT WOULD become apparent
even to Mr. Magoo, that: the'
fastest cashiers are students, the
most helpful clerks are students,
the employees with the most
initiative are students, ad
infinitum.
ON THE other side of the coin,
some of the non-student labor on
campus is a joke. For example,
yesterday I watched five painters
paint the gym wall. Os the five,

I tell them. Be my pleasure,
Sirs. . .Delighted! Delighted!**
I emphasize.
They blindfold me and when they
take the blindfold off I*m standing
in the street by the Century Tower
and Alberts cage. They take the
lid of of this manhole and they tell
me to climb down.
Pm down in the manhole walking
through this dark tunnel, the grubs
behind me, when we come to a sort
of auditorium where it*s very light.
After my eyes get used to the
light I see that there are all grubs
in the room and they all look the
same.
One of the grubs comes up to
me and he says he*s Frank Dis.
Corseri here/* I tell him.
We*ve been expecting you/* he
says.
Just what*s going on?** I want
to know.
We*re having a meeting/* Dis
says. We represent the Student
Group for Rights/* he explains.
What rights?** I ask.
Any rights/* he says, so long
as we can agitate for them.**
I tell Dis it all sounds fine and
dandy, but would they please excuse
me cause I*m really kind of tired
and maybe I could come to another
meeting sometime.
Impossible/* Dis says.
Youre the reason we called the
meeting. Youre column has
offended the Chief.**
Chief?*
Yes. IJis Majesty will be here

no more than two ever worked at
one time.
IN SUMMATION student
labor is a big bargain. These
students are among the most
responsible people on campus.
HARRY B. WEINSTEIN, 2UC
Heart attack
DEAR RONNIE:
It's a good thing that you did
not see Floyd Hall which
houses the departments of
Geography and Geology; you
would have had a heart attack!
CLAIRE DOLLIVER, 7AS

soon. At any rate, we've decided
to obliterate you. . .Its our
right."
Before I can answer him there's
a fanfare of trumpets and in walks
the Chief with his attendants,
some pomp he takes his seat on
stage.
I run up to him suddenly, drop
to my knees and beg for mercy.
The Chief doesn't say a word,
so I look him straight in the face,
and kick my pants if it isn't old
Albert himself sitting there
regal-like smiling like only an
alligator can smile!
Albert,' still smiling at me,
waves his scepter and Dis runs
up to me and he tells me not to
worry, it won't hurt much, they're
only going to cut my nose off
a simple operation.
I'm in no mood to have the old
snouter clipped, so, being drastic,
I take my shirt off, baring toy
chest, so to speak, I jump onto
a chandelier and start to scream.
King Albert, who has. no doubt
seen his share of Tarzanpictures,
becomes frightened and leaves.
The rest of them are still after
me, though, carrying scape Is and
forceps and now starting to whistle
"We Shall Overcome."
Swinging from the chandeliers,
Im soon out into the tunnel, and
then I'm climbing up the ladder.
Out of the manhole, I put the lid
back on and I tape it down with
band-aids which 1 carry around for
emergencies.



mEt
|k flflft 1 \ y Ji
- V i^Hfe^>w-v
B m ji :- ;'V
fIH
Selling a ticket to what should be the $
| t/F's largest Military Ball, is Army $
| Sweethearts Commander, Jeanie Maynard. $
| Tickets for basic cadets will be on sale up |
| through the parade on the morning of March |
| 20th. |
| The Ball will be highlighted by the crown- |
| **g of the new Military Ball Queen by |
| reigning queen, Paula Hicks.
The NORAD Commanders, an elite section |
| of the NORAD Calvacade of Music specializ- $
jjj: ing in swing and popular music, will provide $
| the music for the ROTC cadets and their |
| dates. A popular folk singing group will g
I entertain during the band's break. Approxi- |
g mately SIOO in door prizes will be awarded g
g to basic cadets with the lucky numbers on g
$ their tickets. g

KEY
(Continued From Page 1)
tion and efforts In behalf of our
campus.* Bonsteel is a Miami
attorney.
Completing the nine selections
for honorary membership were six
members of the UF administration
and faculty. They are:
* Dr. John V. McQuitty, Uni University
versity University Examiner since 1946, and
Director of Universitys Role and
Sc ope Study during the early 19605.
* Director Rae O. Weimer,
head of the School of Journalism
and Communications, credited with
building one of the nations top
three communications colleges
during his sixteen years at the
UF.
Hayes K. McClelland, As Assistant
sistant Assistant Dean of Men since 1949
and former adviser to the Inter Interfraternity
fraternity Interfraternity Council.
Dr. Arthur W. Thompson,
Professor of History and former
Fulbrlght Fellow, cited for as assistanting
sistanting assistanting and counseling numer numerous
ous numerous students; former Student
Government Outstanding Profes Professor,
sor, Professor, widely known expert in the
field of cultural history.
John E. Kiker, Research Pro Professor
fessor Professor of Engineering and head of
the U Fs bioenvironmental en-
division; credited with
establishing the first PhJ)
pfograj t 'or sanitary engineering
in the utheastern United States
ano c < loping an extensive re re
- re *rch program.
- Vernon W. Danny Clark,
Professor of Law, expert in Cri Criminal
minal Criminal Law and state leader in the
Juvenile Court reform movement;
recognized for excellence as tea teacher
cher teacher ami counselor.

(Continued From Page 1)
where more than 59 per cent of
the population were negro resi residents.
dents. residents.
The Selma negroes are totally
receptive to the demonstrations
and they are well-aware of their
unfair conditions in the city.
Once during the weekend, Hant Hantman
man Hantman asked a three-year-old negro
girl what she was doing in the
march. Pro fighting for free freedom,
dom, freedom, she answered him.
You really begin to wonder
about people. Its frightening.
Facing fierce, backward people
who are just waiting to beat you,
said Miss Bennett.
For the past week,
Gator Staff photo photographer
grapher photographer Bob Ellison
has been in Selma cov covering
ering covering the demonstra demonstrations.
tions. demonstrations. When he re returns,
turns, returns, The Alligator
will run a story of his
experiences there
She said that approximately 40
per cent of the demonstrators
were women; one fourth of the en entire
tire entire group being university
students.
Something must be done to
allow the negro to register to
vote, said Hantman. They are
being held back* from voting by
uniformed men who are directly
supported by the negro taxes.
On Sunday morning ministers,
students, and local negroes, went

Leaders 9 Banquet set

The Annual Leaders Banquet
has been set for Thursday, March
25, at 7 p.m. in the Blue Room of
the Hub.
This sixth annual event honors
senior student leaders from all
campus organizations. Secretary
of State Tom Adams will pre present
sent present a program.
All organizations wishing to sub-

The Department of Religion has
announced that the Rev. Richard
Uns worth, Chaplain at Dartmouth
College, will be on the campus
Friday to meet with students in interested
terested interested in participating in the
St. Augustine tutorial project this
summer.
Fifteen students from Florida
colleges and Universities will be
selected to take part in the pro project,
ject, project, which was initiated last sum summer
mer summer and involved mainly students
from Yale, Amherst, Dartmouth
and Smith Colleges. Five students
from northern schools will be
selected to serve as tutors also.
Propeller Club
hosts Jax group
The *UF Propeller Club will
host a delegation from the Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville Club today, at the annual
Jacksonville UF meeting. A
panel of four men will give talks
on various aspects of the Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville Port facilities. The meet meeting
ing meeting will take place at 7:30 p.m.
in Room 403 of the Main Library.
This meeting is a return visit.
The UF was the guest of the Port
of Jacksonville last Thursday. The
student members were given a
tour of Astro-Jet General Ship Shipyards,
yards, Shipyards, a tour on the St. Johns
River, and a luncheon at the re revolving
volving revolving Embers restaurant.

SELHA

to several churches. We want
to worship in the house of the
Lord, they said.
This house doesnt belong to
God; it belongs to us, replied the
ministers and decons, reported
Miss Bennett.They bodily pushed
the demonstrators out the door into
the street.
The trip to Selma was re rewarding
warding rewarding in away, and depressing
in away, said Hantman. Ive
seen people this weekend with so
little good will, and those others
with so much; people with faces
distorted with hate and ignorance
and others who are concerned with
the rights of their fellow men.

(University Food Service Offers
l Tuesday Gator Special
J LUNCHEON Q7s> in !! ca | ,eterio *j
> v t) Complete Meal i
j and DINNER r j
| Golden Fried Chicken j
| CHOICE OF POTATO OR BUTTERED RICE I
I 1 other VEGETABLE I
[ Any 10< or 15$ SALAD \* |
[ Any 10$ or 15$ DESSERT j
I 2 ROLLS (or bread slices) 1
And 2 BUTTER PATS j

Summer tutor project ouuouced

Tuesday/ March 16 # 1965/ The Florida Alligator,

mit nominations for the outstanding
student leader award must do so
by Wednesday, March 17. Nomina Nominations
tions Nominations will be accepted at Room
315 at the Florida Union.
Cost is $2.25 per person. No
deadline has yet been established
lor reservations, but there are a
limited number of tickets
available.

Emphasis in the project will be
on developing educational back background
ground background and skills of culturally de deprived
prived deprived Negro children in the junior
and senior high school grades in
the St. Augustine area.
The project will run from the
latter part of June through early
August.
Students interested in having
lunch or interviews with Mr. Uns Unsworth
worth Unsworth can call the Dept, of Reli Religion
gion Religion (ext. 2219). Application forms
and forms for letters of recom recommendation
mendation recommendation for students wishing to
apply for the project may be pick picked
ed picked up at the Dept, of Religion
office, 207 Florida Union.

DIAMOND RINGS
. f >
ftoSetlbop
211 W. University Ave. 372-8658

HULLS
BRAKE
SERVICE
& SUPPLY
* COMPLETE BRAKE
SERVICE ON ALL
AMERICAN AND
FOREIGN CARS.
* 10,000-MILE OR
ONE-YEAR GUA GUARANTEE.
RANTEE. GUARANTEE.
* WHEEL BALANCING.
* REBUILT GENERA GENERATORS
TORS GENERATORS & STARTERS.
* EXPERT TRAINED
MECHANICS HERE
TO SERVE YOU.
Member of
Independent Garage
Owners of America, Inc.
1314 So Main St
Ph. 3721497

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator/ Tuesday/ March 16. 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

For Sale
TRIUMPH TIGER CUB Must
sell. Newly rebuilt motor, lower
end, drive and clutch. Super clean.
Call George 8-1235, 7-9 p.m. (A (A---115-st-c).
--115-st-c). (A---115-st-c).
MOTOR CYCLE HARLEY DAVID DAVIDSON.
SON. DAVIDSON. Sprint, 250 cc. Modified,
potent. Must selL Need $250. Call
Ozzie at 2-0491 after 5 p.m. (A (A---115-st-c).
--115-st-c). (A---115-st-c).
' I-
SKATE BOARDS, professional
ball-bearing wheels, oak board,
fully adjustable. Limited supply.
$6.50, E. Lee Reid Jr., 2-6938.
(A-U3-st-c).
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER.
Six 500 sheet boxes of Buff. Retail
for S2O per box. Will sacrifice for
$lO per box.CaUExt. 2832 between
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. (A-110-tf-nc).
1962 HORIZON MOBILE Home. 2
bedroom. Equity plus take up pay payments
ments payments of $76.07 per month. Call
378-2854. (A-112-st-c).
1964 MERCURY 100 HP outboard.
Used less than 30 hours. New
motor warranty. Controls, 12 gal.
tank, bronze propeller. Cost SI4OO.
Price $750. Call 376-0973. (A (A---112-st-c).
--112-st-c). (A---112-st-c).
YELLOW CHROME TABLE, Good
condition. Unfinished lounge frame
with foam mattress. Call 6-8823
or see at 356-F Flavet n. (A (A---114-2t-c).
--114-2t-c). (A---114-2t-c).
ADMIRAL HI-FI, has 4-speed
changer, 3-speaker system, all in
one cabinet, $45. Call 6-8119.
(A-114*3t-p).
1958 RICHARDSON TRAILER.
8* x 36 2-bedrooms, completely
furnished, with air-conditioning.
Call 376-1048 or see at Raileys
Trailer Park. (A-114-ts-c).
M^BPclassifiedsl
IS ISTONITEI
TONITEI ISTONITEI 3 SUSPENSE HITS!
FIRST AREA RUN*
At 7:10
SEAN CONNERY
MARNE**
At 9:05
At lOrfT**
VOYAGE TO BOTTOM OF SEA**
STARTS FRIDAY
Jmr.gfUm
TilMfJ
SCRftN ENTERTAINMENT CO. I
1... i.

Autos
*56 RAMBLER WAGON. Rebuilt
engine-transmission, RAH, good
tires, makes into bed. Slow but
dependable make offer. Bob
Souvorin 2-7929. (G-115-3t-p).
PRIVATE OWNER *6l FORD V-8
station wagon. Power, air, R&H,
good condition. SI3OO, or will take
small boat and motor in trade.
455-3443. (G-115-st-c).
1953 MUG. TJD. Good condition,
needs interior work. Must sell
immediately. Very reasonably
priced. Call Jay Foley, 372-9307.
(G-115-2t-p).
1957 HILLMAN. Best offer. CaU
6-8823 or see at 356-F Flavet IL
(G-114-2t-c).
HURTIN FROM HOOFIN* (look),
*57 RENAULT (saves gas), *57
RENAULT $50.00 (doesnt run),
*55 FORD convertible (looks, runs
great), R&H, *sl CHEVROLET
(runs great). 236 NW 4th Avenue,
FR 6-3583. (G-114-st-c).
VOLVO 1959, new battery, good
tires. S3OO and take over payments
of only $22.00 per month. May
trade. 372-7170. (G-113-st-c).
*63 VW, GREAT SHAPE. Needs
no work. $250 down, total $1250.
Call Coach EHenson, Ext. 2131,
home FR 6-9768. (G-112-st-c).
1961 FORD COUNTRY Sedan
Station wagon. 6 cylinder, R&H,
45,000 mUes, excellent condition.
CaU Dr. Robbins, Ext. 5205, at
Med. Center. (G-112-st-c).
1961 OLDS 88, 4-door sport sedan,
R&H, A/C, PS & PB, excellent
condition throughoutArrange your
own financing. Call evenings
and weekends. 372-8221. (G-110-
lOt-c).
Real Estate
DESIRABLE ACREAGE HIGH and
rolling. 40 acres. S3OO per acre.
Highway frontage. 20 minutes from
U of F. Convenient terms. WiU
consider exchange. CaU Les
Jackson, Associate, Ernest Tew
Realty, 376-6461, (I-111-Bt-c).
(YAMAHA BMW V
Motorcycles
For The Discriminating ||
CYCLERAMA I
378-2811 21 SE 2nd Place I
out
irrU|Ciaf

For Rent
MAKE ARRANGEMENTS for
comfortable accommodations now
for summer semester. Two effi efficiency
ciency efficiency apartments and a room with
private bath will be available at
321 SW 13th Street. (B-ll 5-lt-c).
APARTMENT TO SUBLET for
summer 322-A NE 11th Street.
Furnished 2 bedroom, kitchen.
378-1509. (B-115-3t-c).
ABOVE STANDARD ROOMS FOR
BELOW STANDARD RENT! Rooms
for male students at 104 SW Bth
Street. FR 2-0243. (B-114-tf-nc).
NEW, MODERN APARTMENT,
fully furnished, central heating,
and air-conditioning, private en enclosed
closed enclosed patio. 423 SE Bth Street.
CaU 372-3576. (B-114-3t-c).
AVAILABLE APRIL Ist. Near
campus. AIR-CONDITIONED, one
bedroom apartment, furnished,
patio, and barbeque. Couple or
students, 4 month lease. 6-1073.
(After 3 p.m.). (B-114-3t-p).
SMALL FURNISHED CCB Cottage.
Bedroom, electric kitchen, tile
shower. SSO per month. Coiqrie
preferred. Baby welcome. South
on Ocala Road. Linda Ann Court.
376-5826. (B-108-tf-nc).
LIVE BETTER FOR LESS. Brand
new 2 bedroom furnished apts.,
air-cond. Accommodates up to 4.
39th Ave. and 6th St. NW. $125
per month. FR 2-1003, after 7
p.m. (B-112-st-c).
3 BEDROOM HOUSE, unfurnished,
but has stove. 1 bath, fenced back
yard, four car garage. Near
Stephen Foster School. 519 NW
27th Ave. CaU after 6, 475-4101.
(B-113-3t-c).
1101 SW sth Ave. 4-br. 2-bath
FURNISHED APARTMENT,
very clean. Carpeted Uving room,
central heat and AC. 4-6 nurses
or students. 376-2892. (B-111-st-c).
st-c).
FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY.
Air-conditioned apt. 1 block off
campus. TV, heat, steam bath,
private carport, etc. For one only
see at 117 SW 12th Street. Apt. 1.
$55 per month. If interested caU
Jim 372-6178. (B-111-ts-c).
AIR-CONDITIONED Apartments
fbr 3A and/or 38. Suitable for 2
or 3 people S7O per mo. plus
electric. 1829 NW 2nd Ave.
Suitable for 2 or 3 people at 1530
NW 4th Ave. $75-SBO plus electric.
Suitable for 3 or 4 people at 1518
NW 4th Ave. S9O-SIOO with air airconditioning
conditioning airconditioning included. Also renting
for fall at slightly higher rates.
CaU 376-4353 evenings. (B-lll (B-llltf-c).
tf-c). (B-llltf-c).
CHARMING SPLIT-LEVEL APT.
Available 2 blocks from campus,
semi-furnished, modern kitchen,
washing machine, AIR-CON AIR-CONDITIONING.
DITIONING. AIR-CONDITIONING. Perfect for young
couples, working people, students.
Please caU 376-9986. (B-112-
st-c).
HM'f'lOR T IDaI

For Rent
1 BEDROOM, unfurnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, kitchen equipped. Couples
only. $75 per month. 1913 NW
2nd Ave. Phone 2-1362. (B-113-
ts-c),
Services
ACCURATE TYPING done on IBM
Typewriter. CaU 372-2163 after 5
or anytime weekends. (M (M---115-3t-c).
--115-3t-c). (M---115-3t-c).
VARSITY RESTAURANT.
ATTENTION: We are now serving
STEAKS. $.99 and up. Large
selection. 209 NW 13th Street.
(M-113-4t-c),
Add QUALITY to your home or
apt. Pure gold-leaf trim added to
lamps, frames, antiques, mirrors.
$6.00 minimum. Tom Baugh. 117
NW 17th Street. 376-8087. (M (M---111-st-c).
--111-st-c). (M---111-st-c).
Lost & Found
FOUND: At State Theatre 2 pairs
of womens prescription glasses,
during the running of 8 1/2.**
Contact BiU Henderson, State
Theatre 6-6606. (L-112-tf-nc).

'Devastating new
Viet strike made

WASHINGTON(UPI)-President Johnson, still waiting for a peace
signal from North Viet Nam, tightened the screw of military pressure
one more turn yesterday with an apparently devastating new air strike
deep in Communist territory.

His highest military aide, Gen.
Earle G. Wheeler, termed the at attack
tack attack on a Red ammunition dump,
only 100 miles from Hanoi, very
favorable*' on the basis of early
reconnaissance reports.
And Gen, Harold Johnson, Army
chief of staff who has just returned
from a tour of South Viet Nam,
told newsmen the United States
was cons idee ing bolstering its
helicopter and logistics forces in
the anti-Communist war.
The President heard Johnson's
report at a 90-minute White House
meeting with Defense Secretary
Robert S. McNamara and the joint
chiefs.
Other officials said Monday's
air strike represented an inten intensification
sification intensification of the President's care carefully
fully carefully graduated campaign to force
the Communists to halt their ag aggression
gression aggression in South Viet Nam.
Daytona doesnt
want collegians
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (CPS)
Students planning beach-party,
fun-in-the-sun spring vacations
are being discouraged from bring bringing
ing bringing their revels to this vacation
resort.
The city, the police department,
and the chamber of commerce
are hoping to stave off the colleg collegiate
iate collegiate invasion that has become an
annual rite since Fort Lauderdale
withdrew its hospitality to
students.
The chamber of commerce board
of governors said they opposed
"the annual spring and Easter
visitation of the youths who, by
their actions in the past, repel
other tourist business."

Help Wanted
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY. Our company
will train college men to present
our investment plan to single
employed girls this summer in
major Florida cities. Earn SIOQ
to $175 WEEKLYI Male 18-28,
neat, personable, possess auto automobile,
mobile, automobile, and be able to work full
time this summer. For interview
contact Mr. Gibson, at the Student
Government Placement Office, 309
Florida Union, Mon. or Tues.,
March 15 and 16, between noon and
7 p.m, (E-114-2t-c).
Wanted
sls REWARD FOR INFORMATION
leading to rental of 3 or 4 bedroom
house in Finley area, in Sept.
376-2570. (C-115-3t-c).
WANTED USED 15-20 gaL
Aquarium tank. Phone 2-3164. (C (C---115-lt-p).
--115-lt-p). (C---115-lt-p).
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED for
furnished apartment three blocks
from law school (111 SW 10th St.)
S4O/month. See after 6 p.m. (C (C---115-2t-p).
--115-2t-p). (C---115-2t-p).

FACU LTY m
(Continued Frpfo Page 1)
W. Cunningham, instructor of
Journalism, and Ralph B.
Thompson, professor of marketing
are running for city commission
now.
University professors have had
permission to run for elected city
and county positions for about
two or three years, according to
former Pres, of the American
Association of University / Pro Professors
fessors Professors (AAUP), Seymours. Block.
"Faculty members are citizens
of their community and have a
lot to contribute to the city in
the capacity of commissioner and
in that capacity there would be
no conflict of interests," Block
said.
"Almost all universities per permitted
mitted permitted their faculty members to
run for city elections, at the time
the University of Florida Board
of Control passed the law al allowing
lowing allowing UF faculty members to
run," Block said.
Before UF professors were
allowed to run for city offices
they held many board positions,
according to Block.
"University faculty were on
many boards, which took as much
or more work, and held prominent
positions in the city yet they could
not run for an elected position,"
Block said.
The first University faculty
member to run tor city commis commission
sion commission was Alan Sutherland, a part parttime
time parttime professor of electrical
engineering.
Sutherland, no longer with the
University, remains a member
of the City Commission of Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville.



I campus curie |
1
2
.V
£
8
I
g
1
8
>
&
1
:$
C-22 a bore,
says Bonnie
if you have no great love
for C-22, you have something
x i n common with todays
campus Cutie. Bonnie Stacks 8
$: likes most of her courses, but :£
*: found C-22 somewhat of a 8
bore. :j:j
Bonnie is a member of AOPi
$ sorority ami Little Sister of
the Laurel. She is a Junior $
8 majoring in Elementary Edu- 8
ijlj cation from Jacksonville.
Her hobbies include twirling :£
Sand swimming. She is $
especially fond of Johnny
Mathis and Barbra Streisand.
$ Bonnie is an active member
of the Gatorettes, and was on x
: the Co-ed Calendar. She was 8
runner-up for Miss Seminole, v
Rhodes named to
Esquire board
Richard Douglas Rhoades, a
junior in Journalism at the UF
has been appointed to Esquire
Magazines College Board.
The College Board is a newly
established panel of ten know knowledgeable
ledgeable knowledgeable college students from a
representative cross-section of
colleges and universities.
RHODES v s
. .on College 2224^'8- Mjm
Board
Rhoades will be ESQUIRES
guest in New York City from
March 8-11. Vice President of
Sigma Nu Fraternity, he was
honored as the Outstanding
Freshman Student in the Fall of
1962.
Interclub Council
may be reborn
A plan to reactivate the defunct
Interclub Council will highlight the
Student Government (SG)
Leadership Training Conference
on March 20th.
The small clubs, as individual
units, have little influe nee, said
Secretary of Organizations Andy
Hall, but as a group, the Inter Interclub
club Interclub Council could take over
sponsorship of social and academic
functions like the training
conference.**
The aquainting of student
organization leaders with new and
different methods to answer their
clubs problems is the main
purpose of the conference
according to Hall.
Os the 200 small organizations,
most do not have the opportunity
to train their leaders,** said Hall.
The SG training conference will
allow those leaders to meet with
each other and exchange ideas.**
Simply learning all the dlf dlfferent
ferent dlfferent methods of recruiting
members by publicity would be a
great aid to these organizations.**
Hall said guide sheets and
literature mntaining case
problems would be used todemon todemonstraie
straie todemonstraie administrative techniques
to the club leaders.

UF orchestra concert Wednesday

The UF Symphony Orchestra, with Edward Troupin
conducting, will present a concert Wednesday at the
University Auditorium.
The program, beginning at 8 p.m. will feature
a special salute to Brazilian Week on campus by Mrs.
Sarah T. Turner, assistant professor of music. Mrs.
Turner will sing Bachianas Brasileiras No. s**
by Villa-Lobos.
Sabo mi Tachibana, a Japanese dancer, will perform

Alumni Reunion herd here this weekend

The 1965 annual Alumni Reunion
will be held on the UF campus
Friday and Saturday.
Graduating classes of 1915,
1920, 1925, 1930, 1935, and 1940
will be honored.
Graduating classes of preceding
years have more tendency to return
to check the situation out than
more current graduating classes
stated Alvin V. Alsobrook,
assistant director of alumni
services.
The annual UF Alumni
Association executive business
meeting will be held on Friday
along with registration and an
alumni reunion banquet in the
evening.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz
will address the Alumni
Association business meeting Sat Saturday
urday Saturday morning. A barbeque will be
held at 11:30 a.m. and all alumni
are invited to attend the Orange-
Big brother
is watching
(CPS) Student demonstrators
at the University of Wisconsin in
Madison discovered recently that
their protests were being recorded
by police department movie
cameras.
Madison Police Chief Wilbur
Emery admitted that a special file
has been compiled of
demonstrators who have
repeatedly been observed at
political rallies in the area. The
purpose of the file, according to
Emery, is to help the department
in preserving the peace and
maintaining law and order.
The disclosure of police filming
came in the wake of demonstrations
protesting U. S. bombings of North
Viet Nam. The University of
Wisconsin Daily Cardinal reported
that the files, which have been in
existence since 1959, include pic pictures
tures pictures of and a brief report on
demonstrators observed by
Madison police at political rallies.
Emery said that the movies
would be used to make a training
film** for instructing police on how
to deal with large groups of people.
The chief also said the filmings
have other investigative values,
such as photographic evidence in
court in case of disturbances or
crimes committed.

Tony Conigliaro Ron Hunt I
BBS Dean Chance jerry Lucas
Charlie Taylor Ron Ellis
Cassius Clay Randy Matoon I
r verv month enjoy a bigger, better, more action-packed SPORT! Get more
in-depth profiles, exclusive interviews and thrilling color photographs.

Blue Spring football game played
later in the afternoon.
Alsobrook said the purpose of
the Alumni Association is to
develop and maintain a spirit
of unity among the alumni body.
It also has the duty to carry out
projects for the betterment of the
Viet Nam liked
by volunteers
The number of volunteers for
duty in Viet Nam is so high the
Army can choose who it will send
there, according to Lt. Col. Milton
B. Christian, director of adminis administration
tration administration for Army R.O.T.C. at the
UF.
Only the best are taken,** said
Christian, since relations with
the Vietnamese people are so
important.**
Reasons for volunteering for
such duty probably vary with the
individual, commented Christian.
The rate at which Americans
are killed in action has not in increased
creased increased much since the U. S. first
entered the conflict, according to
Christian. He did note that national
attention focused on the country
due to the successive coups has
emphasized the number killed.
Air Force Col. W. N. Boaz Jr.,
coordinator of military science at
the UF, said recent emphasis on
the Viet Nam crises has not
tangibly affected the schools
ROTC program.
Col. Boaz mentioned the Korean
conflict and said the ROTC
program at that time had an over overabundance
abundance overabundance of interested students.
He Indicated there had been no
added interest shown because of
the action in Viet Nam.
Sgt.F. M. Crowley of the U. S.
Army Recruiting Service in
Gainesville said that not more than
one out of 20 or 30 enlistees
expresses an interest in serving
in Viet Nam.
He said the bulk of volunteers
for the country came from regulars
as opposed to recruits.
Dr. Everette E. Hall, psycholo psychologist
gist psychologist at the UF Mental Health Clinic,
indicated men probably
volunteered for duty in Viet Nam
for the same reasons they do any
dangerous thing.

wag,
TROUPIN

Tuesday, March 16, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

mtm
TURNER

UF.
The 1965 projects of the UF
alumni include the availability of
56 tuition scholarships for entering

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at the University Auditorium Thursday at 8:15 p.m.
The program is the last in a series of Florida Union
Fine Arts Committee presentations.
Miss Tachibana is a master of both the classical
and modern dance forms. She has appeared with the
Philadelphia Symphony. Radio City Music Hall. Ted
Shawn Theatre and numerous TV shows.
The annual spring alumni weekend is scheduled
Friday and Saturday on campus to cap the weekly
activities.

freshmen this fall. The scholar scholarships
ships scholarships are awarded on the basis u*
leadership, academic standing, and
general ability.

Page 7



, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday/ March 16, 1965

Page 8

Nine meets Kentucky
in SEC opener today

- UF opens its 1965 Southeastern
Conference baseball season today
against powerful Kentucky in the
first of a two-game series.
The Gators, second place
finishers last year in the SEC
Eastern Division, will be seeking
Golfers to meet
Kentucky twice
UFs golf team will attempt to
improve on the current 3-2 record
when it meets Kentucky in two
Southeastern Conference battles.
The team, captained by Laurie
Hammer of Sarasota, has been
idle for over two weeks following
consecutive defeats to Florida
State in late February,
Earlier the golfers had won
matches against the Naval Air
Station, Jacksonville, Stetson and
Rollins.
Track scholarships
availableCarnes
**Track scholarships are avail available
able available to any freshmen who can
perform well, says Gator track
coach Jimmy Carnes.
Carnes said his track team was
in need of more fine athletes.
Anyone is welcomed and urged to
try out for the track team.
A lot of good talent is on the
campus but students arent coming
out for the team, Carnes said.
Carnes said that when he came
to the UF a shortage of freshmen
were out for the team and these
vacancies were never filled
because students failed to come
out.

Henderson, Baxley named
to Academic All-SEC

UFs senior guards, Brooks
Henderson and Tom Baxley, have
been named to the 1965 edition
of the Academic All-SEC squad.
Henderson, named earlier to the
Coachs All-SEC first team, was
voted the first team, while Bax Baxley
ley Baxley earned a spot on the second
team.
The first team, due to a tie
in the voting, Is a well-balanced
six-man group consisting of two
Mathematics majors, a pre-den pre-dentistry
tistry pre-dentistry student, a Philosophy, a
Journalism and an English major.
In this period of preparation in
those professional fields they are
better known as: Center Bob An Andrews
drews Andrews of Alabama, Forward
Freddie Guy of Auburn, Forward
Larry Conley of Kentucky, Guard

1965 ACADEMIC ALL-SEC BASKETBALL TEAM
Position Player and school Major Study Ht. 4 Wt.
Center Bob Andrews, Ala. Mathematics 6-5 200
Forward Freddie Guy, Aub. Philosophy 6-7 210
Forward Larry Conley, Ky. Dentistry 6-3 170
Guard Brooks Henderson, Fla. Journalsim 6-2 173
Guard Jimmy Pitts, Ga. Mathematics 6-1 170
F-G A1 Andrews, Tul. English 6-1 175
Second Team
Center Jerry Waller, Ga. Phys. Ed. 6-7 205
Forward Tommy Kron, Ky. Ind. Adm. 6-5 204
Forward Pat Riley, Ky. Phys. Ed. 6-3 202
Guard Tom Baxley, Fla. Psychology 5-10 174
Guard Louie Dampier, Ky. Phys. Ed. 6-0 165

some hitting to go along with a
strong pitching staff and solid
defense.
Kentucky finished third in the
Eastern section last season with a
young club which wound up the
year as one of the best in the
conference.
Hie series concludes with a
single game Wednesday. Starting
time both days is 3 p.m.
Florida coach Dave Fuller plans
to start the same lineup which has
split a two-game series with
Florida Southern to currently stand
1-1. This includes first baseman
Toro Shannon, second baseman
Bruce Moore, shortstop Randy
Morcroft, and third hangman Don
Pendley.
Outfield spots will be manned by
Allen Trammell in left field, Ron
Creese in center and Bill
Blomgren in right.
Starting pitcher hasnt been
decided upon by Fuller but will
come from a list which includes
Danny Eggart, Dan Griff ip, Dan
Orr and Ray Rollyson. Jack Ken Kenworthy
worthy Kenworthy will be behind the plate.
SEC play this weekend with a
two-game series Friday and Sat Saturday
urday Saturday against Tennessee. Fridays
game will begin at 3 p.m. while
Saturdays is set for 10 a.m. so
as not to conflict with the football
spring Orange-Blue game.
INTRAMURAL
RESULTS
SOFTBALL
Alpha Tau Omega 6
Alpha Epsilon Pi 3

Jimmy Pitts of Georgia, Forward
-Guard A1 Andrews of Tulane, and
Henderson.
The second team is composed
of a Psychology student, an In Industrial
dustrial Industrial Administration major and
three Physical Education majors.
They perform on the court as:
Center Jerry Waller of Georgia,
Forwards Tommy Kron and Pat
Riley of Kentucky and Guards Tom
Baxley of Florida and Louie Dam Dampier
pier Dampier of Kentuckv.
Ten more A-B students, with ma majors
jors majors including Business, History,
Engineering and Medicine, were
nominated and are being given
honorable mention. Twenty-one of
the 152 players listed on the 11
SEC squads as the 1964-65 season
began were A or B students,
and they all became starters.

UF netmen whip Kentucky
in first SEC match, 8-1

m A .H
" ifelllll 111111 Ilil
K'MfSfc Ipiigl! § ;
TWO SIDES OF RICK CHACE
.... serving (above), on the
follow through (below)

w 1
PHOTOS BY
GERALD JONES
THE
BEST TEST
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The UF tennis team, led by
sophomore Rick Chace, evened
their season log at 2-2 Monday
afternoon with a convincing 8-1
SEC triumph over Kentucky.
Ken Fugate defeated Dave
Bonner 6-4, 6-4 to gain the only
win of the day for the Wildcats.
Steve Gardner came out of ar
early season slump to score an
easy win over Jack Trump 6-i,
6-0. Bill Perrin and Capt. Vic
Stone (the 5,000 year old man)
canpe through with routine'
victories. Ron Fick chipped in the
clinching fifth point for the Gators.

Chace, the first sophomore to
hold down the No. 1 slot since
the days of the great Jim Schaeffer,
continued to impress. Ricks style
of play reminds one of Australia's
great Fred Stolle, the world's se second
cond second ranking player. His serve
and well placed volleys have won
acclaim.
The Gators next face Pennsyl Pennsylvania
vania Pennsylvania Thursday at the varsity
courts. The Quakers, an Ivy League
invader, are loaded this year as
galley Brown and John Reese are
two of the top collegiate netters
in the country this year.
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