Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Up THE FLORIDA
4LL Mk TOR
Vol. 57, No, 113 Mondoy / March 15, 1965 University of Florida, Gainesville

\
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NATIONALIZING THE NATIVES
. .0/ downtown Gainesville were the KAs,
who celebrated their annual weekend, high highlighted
lighted highlighted by withdrawal from the Union See
other fraternity weekend pictures on page 7.
(Photo by Gerald Jones)
UF gets $1 million
scholarship fund
The UF is due an estimated sl-million trust fund to provide scholar scholarships
ships scholarships from the last will and testament of Miss Metta Heathcote,
wealthy St. Petersburg woman who died Feb. 16 at the age of 57.
The funds, believed to be the largest single scholarship fund ever
left to any of Floridas state universities, were designated in the will
primarily for the use of deserving and needy Pinellas County students.
The monies will be available for scholarships before September, 1966
after the final probate has been made on the will, according to W.H.
Kerns, director of UF Informational Services.
Miss Heathcote named C. Frank Harrison, St. Petersburg attorney,
and the Florida National Bank of Jacksonville as co-executors of the
will and co-trustees of the scholarship fund.
George W. Corrick, director of UF Development Services, and Kerns
met with Harrison last week in St. Petersburg to discuss provisions of
the will. Claire Bacon, assistant trust officer for Florida National Bank

oi Jacksonville, also attended.
See TRUST FUND p. 3
Berlin Wall
up in Selma
SELMA, Ala. (.UPIJ Selina
Public Safety Director Wilson
Baker erected a Berlin Wall**
in the street yesterday to ease a
tense four-day confrontation be between
tween between police and demonstrators.
Baker, caught in a clash with
city and county officials, said he
put up the barricade in Sylvan
Street to stop the eye-to-eye
confrontation** between white and
Negro civil rights advocates and
police.
But he said that today one of the
countys two days a month for
voter registration, he would pull
down the barrier and let the
Negroes go to the courthouse
their goal since the demonstration
began Wednesday night.

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FLORIDA BLUE KEY TAPPEES
. .first' row, Ze/Z Zo Randy Williams, Brian Ellis, Martin
Schwartz, and Martin Edwards. Second row, left to right, Dick
Dandurand, Nick Touchton, Byron Groves, John Ritch, and Herb
Schwartz. Not pictured is Al Leonard.

UF classroom
need'critical'
By AMI SAPERSTEIN
Staff Writer
Robert B. Jennings, academic
service director, listed the UFs
need for more classroom buildings
as *critical last week but indi indicated
cated indicated hope that the Florida Legis Legislature
lature Legislature would try to correct the
situation.
Space at the university is at
such a premium, said Jennings,
that although the temporary
buildings are not very good, we
have no alternative (but to use
them). He said that as soon as
classes move into a new building,
he receives requests for rooms in
the old one.
Vice-President of Academic Af Affairs
fairs Affairs Robert B. Mautz added that
the UF is the only university
(in the state) with so high a space
utilization of temporary build buildings.
ings. buildings.
Building funds may be increased,
however when the UF administra administration
tion administration presents the Florida Legis Legislature
lature Legislature with carefully compiled sta statistics
tistics statistics pointing up the universitys
needs.
Use, condition, location, facili facilities,
ties, facilities, and capacity of every class**
room on the campus are some of
the facts which are now being
compiled and which will be ready
when the Legislature meets. Al Although
though Although such a survey of building
needs has been done before,
Jennings said, It was never as
complete as this or as accurate.
Bobby who?
jiji Bobby Baker at UF? Yes, jx
in Hume Hall lives Robert x x(Bobby)
(Bobby) x(Bobby) Baker, lUC, from
S Washington, D.C., and on the
:£ third floor of the Florida Union *:
works Robert (Bobby) Baker,
assistant secretary of labor.
$; When I first came here, I
V, 9 V
X; was never introduced as
Robert or Bob, but always as X;
Bobby Baker from Wash Washs
s Washs ington, D. C., explained :£
Baker.
Im not related to and dont >:
X even know the famous Bobby X;
Baker, stated Baker, but :£
iji he has made my life more
interesting.

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BRAAACH!
A most un-ladylike pose by Lynda Vary
won top honors in the Graham Area playday
decoration contest Saturday. She was decorated
(?) by George Lakich. (Photo by Nick Arroyo)
/^"^'-->'';*>!":*;x-:*:':-::-:"!!:-:^!::*>;!>:I;I;!;IOv!;;x!;!x!v!%;'.v^I;lv!-I% iv;;!Mv !*!*!-:%*>Mv''M*r-^
| THE ENGINEERING FAIR |
i See FAIR PICTURES onp.2 I
Gator Gras in works

Gator Gras, one of the few
events on the UF campus which
gives independent organizations a
chance to compete against the
Greeks, is set for March 27.
One of the biggest and best
carnivals ever is being planned
according to Chairman Frank
Ferguson and will include a student
variety show, the crowning of a
queen, and 18 organization-spon organization-sponsored
sored organization-sponsored booths. Door prizes will be
awarded at the variety show and
the booths will compete for
trophies.
Booths will be divided into three
divisions and a trophy given to the
most creative booth in each
division. Another trophy will go
to the booth bringing in the most
revenue.
Prizes will be awarded to the v
best acts in the variety show,
and will include a large cash
prize for the winner. Other prizes

in this area will be gift certificates
for clothes and food and possibly
some photography equipment.
Door prizes at the variety show
will include gift certificates for
clothes and food.
Two showings are planned for
the variety show, at 7:30 p.m.
and 9:15 p.m. Gator Gras queen
will De crowned at the end of
the second show.
The queen's contest will begin
with an interview March 13.
Bathing suit and formal
competition will be held Monday
night before Gator Gras. The wili wiline
ne wiline r and two runners-up will
receive trophies.
As an added attraction, a band
will play for dancing. Ferguson
said he is trying to get the street
blocked off as a dancing area.
This year's budget for Gator
Gras is $1,300 which comes from
the Florida Union. The only cost
to the organizations participating
is the cost of the booth.
'Gator GreeK
coming soon
Approximately 10,000 copies of
the. 1965 Gator Greek will be
distributed by the Interfraternity
Council (IFC) at the end of March,
according to editor Jim Carleto,
(3BA), a member of Kappa Alpha
fraternity.
Hie 16-page booklet will be
mailed to UF fraternities, to
businessmen and to members of
the state legislature, said Carleto.
It will also be distributed during
Orientation Week in September.
"The publication is a fraternity
guide for incoming freshmen and
prospective rushees as well as an
information booklet for
businessmen and legislators," the
editor said.



Page 2

\, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 15, 1965

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FAIR HEADS GATHER . .car was Mere *OO ,
.from left, Bill Hartman, president of Benton Engineering Council; f
Brock, ASCE Fair Chairman; Bill Slippy, judges and awards BPl^^^HKiiL^fl
chairman, and Dolores Smolenv, Engineering Fair Chairman. m

VACUUM TUBE DISPLAY^
.estimated value $2,000
'-j|ft& : jgfit r
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r
11
?s&ft 9 U
. .in Saturday dual meet with FSU. From left Is Richard Woodworth,
drill team head, Maj. J. E. Stacey, judge, Lt. Col. W. L. Prichett,
and Capt. F, W. Williams, In rear Is drill team,
CITY AUTOMATIC
TRANSMISSION, INC
ESTIMATES GUARANTEED
* Specializing in transmissions only
* Free pickup and delivery
10% DISCOUNT
To all UF students showing ID's
1409 S. Main St. Ph. 372-5196

PHOTOS BY SAM JOHNSTON XIH 1
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PHOTOSTRESS ANALYSIS TSStSSy"
. . colored lines showed stress . .by Air Force
I University Food Service Offers 1
/ Monday Gator Special l
I LUNCHEON and DINNER in all cafeterias j
I Complete Heal 970 PLUS TAX J
[ Italian Spaghetti M|ft|ft^|'|f
I with Meat Sauce |
f CHOICE OF Potato or Buttered Rice
I AND 1 Other VEGETABLE (%Jf
I Any or SALAD J}***
\ Any
f 2 ROLLS (or bread slices)
NOTICE
THE BOARD OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS IS ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS (DATES
INDICATE TIMES INTERVIEWS WILL BE CONDUCTED; DEAD DEADLINES
LINES DEADLINES FOR RECEIVING APPLICATIONS ARE ALSO LISTED):
INTERVIEW POSITIONS OPEN
MARCH 18 Alligator editor and managing editor, 3rd
(Summer) Trimester, 1965
- Alligator editor and managing editor, Ist
and 2nd Trimesters, 1965-66
- DEADLINE for applications: 5 p.m., March 16
MARCH 25 Seminole editor, managing editot, and two
editorial assistants 1965-66 school year
- DEADLINE for appl'catlons: 5 p.m., March 23
APRIL 1- New Orange Peel editor and four section
editors, 1965-66 school year
- DEADLINE for applications: 5 p.m. March 30
Applications may be obtained in Room 9, Florida Union, and roust be
returned no later than deadline times indicated above.
Board of Stwdes* Publications



Harrison told UF representatives an inventory of Miss Heath cotes
estate had not been completed. He indicated it would be about $1.2
million.
In addition to setting up the trust fund, she bequeathed money to
employes, relatives and friends.
Harrison estimated sl-million would be left for the trust fund after
all other bequests and estate expenses are paid. He said it may take

a year to settle the estate.
Allowing time for selection of
students eligible for scholarships
under provisions of the will after
the estate is settled, Corrick esti estimated,
mated, estimated, it would be September 1966
before money would be available
for students.
Miss Heath cotes will states that
selection of the deserving needy
men and women students who are to
receive the benefits of the
net annual income for said trust,
shall be made by the scholarship
committee of the UF faculty.
Her will stipulated the scholar scholarship
ship scholarship committee give first prefer preference
ence preference to deserving and needing stu students
dents students who live in St. Petersburg,
secondly to those living in other

YOUR UNIVERSITY CITY
NEEDS!!!
ABILITY-EXPERIENCE-DIGNITY
COMPARE-CAREFULLY CONSIDER-CHOOSE!
WALTER E. MURPHREE
FOR YOUR CITY COMMISSIONER
Background:
Gainesville resident since 1926.
Graduate of the University of Florida.
Graduate of Tulane University, College of Medicine.
Veteran, World War n, Medical Corps.
Member Alachua County Medical Society (Past President),
Florida Medical Association (Past Vice-President),
American Medical Association
Member American Academy of General Practice, American Society General Practice (Past
President).
Member Florida Society of Anaesthesiologists, American Society of Anaesthesiologists.
City Plan Board 1953-55.
City Commissioner 1955-61, Mayor Commissioner 1957-58.
Member of Episcopal Church
Gainesville Kiwanis Club
Gainesville Chamber of Commerce.
Platform:
Dignity in the conduct of municipal affairs.
Emphasis on the policy-making duties of the City Commission.
Immediate consideration of key traffic moving streets and relief for congested areas by extending
restricted parking.
Cooperative emphasis on the Junior Community College.
Continued cooperation with the Administration, Faculty and Student Government of the University
of Florida.
Encouraging desirable and orderly industrial expansion.
Sound and continuous City Planning with a practical view to present conditions.
Full value received for all projects in our six million dollar bond issue.
Sound and continuous City Planning with a practical view to present conditions.
Full value received for all projects in our six million dollar bond issue.
Upgrading and maintaining our downtown business area and consideration of a multistory parking
pavillion.
Expansion of our Utility System as far as economically feasible to do so, and consideration of
lower utility rates.
Lower taxes through a broadened tax base.
Emphasis on recreational and public facilities which growth and prosperity require and justify.
Appreciation of the efforts which our city employees are making to keep pace with the challenging
demands and burdens of service, and a determined resolution to provide the additional
equipment, incentive and personnel that continued growth requires and deserves.
Progress resulting from doing the proper thing at the proper time, rather than politics and
promises.
YOUR INTEREST & YOUR VOTE ARE VITAL
.1

(Continued From Page 1)

areas of Pinellas County and lastly
to students elsewhere in the state.
Miss Heathcote had explained
her desire was simply to aid and
assist deserving and needy
persons, male and female, to ac acquire
quire acquire a college education in what whateverfield
everfield whateverfield they may desire.
Harrison said Miss Heathcote
received her education in St.
Petersburg schools, but never at attended
tended attended college.
A native of St. Petersburg, she
was the daughter of the late Mr.
and Mrs. William Emerson Heath Heathcote
cote Heathcote who came to St. Petersburg
in 1904 from Franklin, Pa.
Miss Heath cotes wealth was de derived
rived derived from the family fortune,

TRUST FUND

amassed from interest in Pennsy Pennsylvania
lvania Pennsylvania oil.
UF administrators were elated
with the scholarship gift. Dr. Harry
M. Philpott, UF vice-president,
said, We are deeply grateful for
the magnificient gift Miss
Heathcote has made for the benefit

'Masks of Love
is presented

Fifty minutes of emotion and
unintelligible electronic whispers
were presented in Masks of
Love, the one act play by Dr.
Didier Graeffe.
A highly-charged teaching
drama portraying the psychoanaly psychoanalysis
sis psychoanalysis of a young woman imprisoned
by her hand to a husband she
is incapable: of loving, Masks
of Love was presented to a capa capacity
city capacity crows in McCarty Auditorium.
A cast of two unfolded the drama

Monday, March 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

of the youth of Florida.
She certainly has established
one of lasting significance and one
that will continue to benefit the
young people of her home area and
of the state forever."
** We greatly appreciate this
magnificient gift," Corrick said.

of "Masks of Love." They re remained
mained remained seated on the stage
throughout the performance,
building the action through the re recollections
collections recollections of the patients,
portrayed by Miss Louise Rothen Rothenberg,
berg, Rothenberg, as they were drawn to light
by her doctor, played by Dr. Arthur
Funk.
Electronic sound effects repre represented
sented represented the inarticulate thoughts
within the deeper layers of the
patients mind. The eerie sounds
were the most time consuming
preparation for the production, ac according
cording according to Graeffe. "You work
many hours to tape just ten seconds
of sound," he said.
The play was written for Miss
Rothenberg, who is a speech major.
Graeffe said he had the idea for
the play and was looking fpr some someone
one someone who could play the female part.
He listened to Miss Rothenbergs
voice and then wrote the play
over Christmas vacation.
Miss Rothenberg said she does
nothing to prepare for the
emotional part beforhand because
the play builds its own emotions
as it progresses.
Graeffe intended "Masks of
Love" to be introductory teach teaching
ing teaching play for students of psycho psychoanalysis,
analysis, psychoanalysis, especially in conjunction
with the study of Freud. Since it
is only fifty minutes long, the
play can be given in a regular
class period.
As part of the teaching function
of the play, the patient often mis mistakenly
takenly mistakenly used psychological terms
and was corrected by the doctor.
According to Graeffe, she was
like many people of today who
think they know a lot about psy psychoanalysis
choanalysis psychoanalysis but really have a lot
of mistaken and confused informa information.
tion. information.
"Masks of Love" has not been
published yet, but it will be even eventually,
tually, eventually, according to Graeffe. He
has done seven productions which
have been performed at the UF
and have also been done at other
schools across the country. None
of his work is published yet, as
he hopes to publish it all at once.
i '

NOTICE
Hie Board of Student Publications is
accepting applications for the posi positions
tions positions of
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
BUSINESS MANAGER
for the third trimester, 1965 and
first and second trimesters, 1965-66.
Application forms are available in
Room 9, Florida Union. Forms
must be turned in by 5 p.m., March
23. Interviews will be conducted
March 25.
Board of Stvdeat Publications

y^Vt'.V.iV.W.V^V.VV.V^V.V.VAV.VAV.;
Â¥ % %
i l
wm'l
Carol Is |
a writer |
Todays Campus Cutie is $:
jji Carol Wallace, a freshman
j:j: from St. Pete who plans to
major in English. :£
She is pledge trainer of :£
Kappa Alpha Theta and a
Lyceum usher. Carols
$ hobbies are creative $
£ writing and cartooning. $
Freedom Forum
cuts Alligator,
administration
Freedom Partys own newspaper
The Freedom Forum has made
its first appearance on campus
and began by attacking both the
UF administration and The Florida
Alligator for their parts in the
recent dismissal of University
College Instructor Edward J*
Richer.
According to the two-page pub publication,
lication, publication, the Alligator of March
4, contained an article concerning
the dismissal of Richer in which
it said Academic Affairs Vice-
President Robert Mautz was
"grossly misquoted." It also cri criticized
ticized criticized the reporter for his failure
to contact Richer before printing
the story.
Richer was recently informed
that his teaching contract would not
be renewed next year since he is
not working on a PhJ3, and will
not be able to teach on the graduate
level.
The Freedom Party paper went
on to attack the "managed-news*
policies of the UF in the recent
IFC controversy over the IFC
blood drive. Freedom Forum
claimed that the true reason for
the drive's termination was the
presence of venereal disease on
campus not measles.
According to Freedom Party
head Jim Harmeling, recent un unsuccessful
successful unsuccessful candidate for Student
Body president, the paper is the
first in what should be a regular
series. He said that the new paper
is "dedicated to the free commun community
ity community of scholars" espoused by
Richer.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator/ Monday, March 15, 1965

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International
ERNIE UTZ STEVE VAUGHN JOE CASTE LLO
Edttor-itt>Chlf Managing Editor Executive Editor
LOU FERRIS ANDY MOOR
Editorial Page Editor Sports Editor
toaMetoMiittaaHaaaMnHaeHaHHaaaMaHaMHaaHHMeMleaaaMeHeeeaeeHeeaaea^
j CASTELLO COMMENTS =r
Notions of truth
By JOE CASTELLO
Executive Editor
CONSIDERABLE controversy has been engendered by our publication
of a story relating the experiences of Bob Ellison on his recent trip
to Honduras. We have been accused of lack of depth in our reporting,
irresponsibility in our presentation, and contributing to a general
worsening of US-Honduran relations.
SUCH ALLEGATIONS only go to prove how righteously adamant
people can become when the facts fail to fit their own preconceived
notions of truth.
IF WE SAID that Honduras is an underdeveloped nation, the economic
poverty of the country speaks as our witness. Honduras is traditionally
one of the most underdeveloped of the group of underdeveloped
nations that comprise Central America.
IF WE said that the political regime of the country was somewhat
primitive, Mr. Ellison's treatment also speaks as our witness.
WE ADMIT that the problems facing Honduras are of a far more
complex nature than presented in our article; but then our article
was intended to be only a recapitulation of Mr. Ellisons personal
experience, not a master's thesis.
AS A NEWSPAPER, our obligation is to present the facts as they
happen: the explanation of these facts is the obligation of Mr. Popenoe
and his team of researchers. Any interpretation of these facts is
clearly labeled as opinion, as was done in the case of this article
(Mr. Ellison's and Dr. Kantor's opinions were run as separate
articles and clearly labeled.)
NO ONE LIKES to see facts in print that possibly contradict
any cherished notions he has about anything. In order not to offend
anyone's prejudices, we could limit our paper to publicity releases;
and, if we were to run a story on Honduras, we could limit ourselves
to travel brochures prepared by the Honduran government.
BUT THEN we would no longer be a newspaper only a bulletin
board whereon anyone could post only what he wanted to be said about
any question.
LET ME re-emphasize that the hard facts of this situation are
these: Honduras is an economically underdeveloped nation, and
any foreigner who goes there with a camera is likely to be thrown
in jail.
THESE FACTS should not be taken as an insult by Honduran
nationals, rather as a challenge that they might be able to ameliorate
through determined effort.
' I SHOULDN'T have to point out that the reason foreign students
even come to the UF campus is to educate themselves that they might
gain the means to solve these problems. Until that time, however,
the problems still exist and are the legitimate source of newspaper
coverage.
IN CLOSING, I might add that our treatment of this situation was
much milder and more honest in tone than the daily going-over the
U. S. gets in the Latin American press.
AT LEAST we haven't sent anyone to Washington to stone the
Honduras Embassy.
GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Kay
Huffmastor, (Correspondents), Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles,
Doaftta Mathison, Dan Taylor, Sam Uliman, Selwin H. Ciment,
Jay Foley,Stephen Dee Wright, Bob Wilcox
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Kunrtn, Ann Carter, Thelma Mossman, Fran Snider, Cynthia
TunstaU, Harvey WoUson, Karen Vitunac, Jack Zucker, Ami
Saperstein, Carl Brown, Jane Young, Bill Lockhart, Ken Simon,
Dm Dobson, Jeffrey DOnfcewaiter, G. S. Corserl, Eunice Tall,
Linda Cody* Woody Leonard. Jennell Close, Nancy Van Zile.
Hm Florida Alligator WWW* tba right to roftdito Uw typographical too# o( all advertisement* and i
to revise or tarn away copy which It conakten ot>j#cUonabU.
NO POSITION B GUARANTEED, though desired position will ha glvnn when#Ter possible. /
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments ot payment tor any advertisement involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice la given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement gpetrs.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of in advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and U
published five times weekly except cluing May, June and July when It is published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions at their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class
matter at Uw United States Poet Office at Gainesville.

FREEMAN FORMULATES W_


Shock
V.V
EDITOR:
MY RESPONSE to the letter of
Mr. Sam Ell Julcofy from Cam Cambodia
bodia Cambodia in Tuesday's Alligator was
one of purest shock.
I AM HAPPY to be a member
of a small informal group of
American students and foreign
students from all over the world
whe eat, go to shows, concerts
and just about everything together.
We have a great deal of fun and a
large measure of friendship.
Believe me, it is a tearful matter
when any of these foreign students
go back home.
THIS GROUP I speak of con continually
tinually continually strives to include new
foreign students and we continually
find other American friends who
want to be included. Some foreign
students and some Americans
come to join the group and never
leave, others drift in and out
again, seldom to be heard from
again.
YET ANYONE who has seen us
drag several tables together in the
CJ. knows we welcome anyone who
is interested in friends with
different views from all over the
United States and the world.
I SUGGEST THAT this is true

Incoherent mumbling

EDITOR:
THE EMERGING CLASS, as
Mr. Gritfin pointed out in a letter
to the Alligator, is clamoring for
recognition. Only the incoherent
mumbling we hear is not of an
intelligence producing jobs and
wealth but that of a power hungry
mob.
THE IDEA OF social Justice
which the Class wishes to
achieve is the attainment of
political power and yet this is
precisely what they cry out against.
They are ready to send spinning
some unknown power group only to
climb into the throne themselves.
This is done in order to establish
a true democracy. .Athenian
type with slaves and all.
SOCIALISTS, (whether they be
Nazis, communists, or welfare
statists) would do well to devote
their time and energy to the
selfish, materialistic, egotistical,
individualistic process of creating
wealth rather than determining
means of taking it from someone
else.
MAN HAS YET to realize that
he lives by his mind, that he must
deal with others on the basis of
free exchange, and that he cannot
obtain something for nothing. For

Le T TtR 2
Ml
Best wishes
EDITOR:
I SEE BY a few posters about
that the KAs will be seceding
from the Union on March 12.
I WOULD like to be the first
to wish them godspeed.
JOHN MEYER, 7AS
;$§
not only of the people in our group
but equally as true of many of the
students on campus. I believe that
if Mr. Julcofy will arm himself
with a smile and make an honest
effort to be friends with American
students he will find many a
rewarding response.
THE MAJORITY of foreign
students I have met are friendly,
wonderful people. Yet there are
many who seem annoyed by offers
of friendship. Such a response
baffles me. Perhaps Mr. Julcofy
can explain it to me.
AT ANY RATE, if Mr. Julcofy
wants friends, I hereby volunteer
and so do all my friends, American
or foreign, and so will many others
if he will give them a chance.
RUTH DAVE, 4AS

centuries men have devised ways of
taking, by force, the wealth that
others have produced. .but few
have been anxious or even willing
to produce it.
THOSE WHO WISH to lead the
revolution/* those who wish to
add burden upon burden on the
industrious people who have
created the wealth this nation
possesses would do well to stop
and think. It is from them that the
money is taken to finance the
glorious march into antiquity; the
march can go on only as long as
someone else is robbed.
ROBIN HOOD and his merry
band belong in story books and in
the woods, those who wish to live
as they lived would do well to take
the advice given in the letter
referred to earlier.
ONLY WHEN the facts of reality
are accepted can man be free.
No one is morally obligated to
sacrifice himself or his property.
More important, no one is morally
justified in demanding aid without
giving anything in return. No one
and no group can justify any act
by which it forcibly or fraudulently
takes that which another person
has earned or produced.
ANTONIO GARCIA, SEG

v>>%v%voWt%Vtv%vov>v>ViV
Statistic 1
$:
Hw
EDITOR:
IN THE ALUGATOR of March
10, Dr. Kantor brings some
objectivity into the Honduran affair
by citing some figures to support
his views. I would like to add
more information, which does not
necessarily lead to the same
conclusion. For instance:
52.6' per dent of the worlds
population had average Incomes of
less than SIOO.OO per person. In
1559 Honduras had $159.00. 1964
estimates for the Honduras Gross
National Product show $230.00 per
person. This was above the values
for six other Latin American
countries.
Total agricultural production in increase
crease increase per person for the last
decade in Honduras was 17 per
cent, while all Latin American
countries decreased two per cent.
The number of schools in Hon Honduras
duras Honduras went up 67.5 per cent and
registered students increased 128
per cent,.between 1950 and 1963.
Illiteracy decreased in the same
period from 64.8 to 52.7 per cent.
Increasing amounts of the
national budget dedicated to edu education
cation education went from 8.3 in 1953 to
14.4 per cent In 1963.
Food consumption in 1964 was
estimated at 2330 calories per
person, which is better than the
corresponding value tor twelve
other Latin American countries.
Infant mortality has diminished
from 85.6 to 47.0 per 1,000 people
between 1950 and 1963.
The unexploited resources of
Honduras are substantiaL Nearly
half of the country is forested,
agricultural and livestock pro production
duction production may be increased to much
higfier levels. More important yet,
as education is advanced in
Honduras, its human resources
will become more productive.
THE MOVEMENT TOWARD
economic integration of Central
America is far advanced. Even Eventually
tually Eventually our countries will arrive
to political, unity, as did exist
before and after our independence
from Spain in 1821. There is no
question in my mind about our
common destiny, which, I insist,
must be promising.
ALVARE AGUIRRE D.
Guatemala, 7AG



Culpepper names assistant

Student Body Pres. Bruce Cul Culpepper
pepper Culpepper announced the appointment
of William H. Mcride, Jr. as
Special Assistant (SA) to the Pre President
sident President Friday.
Mcride will serve as an offi official
cial official spokesman and representative
of the president and will assist
him in coordinating UF efforts with
state and national university
groups.
After the first few weeks in
office I've realized an assistant is
necessary to make the president's
job more efficient/' Culpepper
said. Ive known of Bill's quali-

COMMITTEE
CHAIRMEN
Applications for chairmanships
of the Florida Union Dance
Committee and the Public
Relations Committee must be
turned in by 4 p.m. Tuesday
afternoon. Applicants will be
interviewed Tuesday afternoon in
Room 315, Florida Union.
election officials
The following people are
requested to stop by the
Treasurers office, Room 307,
Florida Union: Richard Fleitas,
Susan Lebovltz, Dan McKinnon,
James Rice, R. Sonthalia, and
Lenny Weissman. Your social
security number is needed in order
for you to receive payment for
your work in the elections.
HI
A
J \>
Dont stumble through
the literary classics.
CLIFFS NOTES will
help you make better
grades! These study
aids give you a clear,
concise summary and
explanation, chapter by
chapter.CLlFFS NOTES
are now being used by
high school and college
students throughout the
United States. There are
over 100 different
CLIFFS NOTES cover covering
ing covering the literary classics.
at your
bookstore
or write:
BE 1 MANY STATION
LINCOLN. NEBRASKA MibOb
TMbdfotts.

fications and respect him as a
consultant and friend.''
Mcride was cited by past presi president
dent president Ken Kennedy for his work as
chairman of the Dollars for Scho Scholars
lars Scholars drive. He currently holds the
offices of vice-presidert of his
fraternity, Alpha Tau Omega, and
of the Interfraternity Council.
Culpepper explained that the new
position does not overlap with the
functions of the presidents Admin Administrative
istrative Administrative Assistant (AA> The duties
of the current AA, Bill Fleming,
include the coordinating of the
various cabinet programs.

NEW ORANGE PEEL
There will be an urgent meeting
of the editors of the New Orange
Peel on Tuesday, March 16, at
5 p.m. in Room 15, Florida Union.
There will be no magazine unless
there is attendance at this time..
MODERN DANCE CLUB
Interested students are invited
to try out for Orchesis, the modern
dance club, Wednesday, March 17,
at 7 p.m. Men and women may
audition.

Ford Motor
Company is:
?
development
HThe road to management is a two-way street at
Ford Motor Company. On one side of the street,
the college graduate brings to us his talents,
abilities and ambitions. Then it is up to us to
ensure that he realizes his full potential.
There are several methods we use in guiding his
development. One method is periodic evaluations.
These reviews measure performance andmore
importantlychart the best route for an employe
to pursue in developing his capabilities. These
TobyY.Kahr J
b. s Columbia University performance reviews are prepared at least once
a year by the employes immediate supervisor,
reviewed by higher management and discussed with the employe.
In addition, there are frequent reviews and analyses of individual perform performance
ance performance in which promotions, salary increases and developmental moves are
planned. These programs are so important that each division and staff has a
special section responsible for administering them. One of the people who y
helps oversee these programs is Toby Kahr. His experience is also an
example of how a college graduate benefits from these programs.
In 1963, Toby completed our College Graduate Program. During these
first two years, he gained a depth of experience in Company policies involv involving
ing involving all aspects of employe relations. Currently he supervises the Personnel
Planning and Training Section of our Steel Division. In essence, Toby is
helping to implement the program that led to his own career development.
Programs such as these are intended to make certain that your perform performance
ance performance at Ford Motor Company will be recognized and will determine how
fast youll move ahead. The development of future managerial material is
one of our fundamental goals. See our representative when he visits your
campus. Something good may develop for you.
THERES AFIITURE FOR YOU WITH...MOTOR COMPANY
The American Road. Dearborn, Michigan
An equal opportunity employer

Guest lecturers
here today
Speakers from Ohio State Uni University
versity University and the University of Ten Tennessee
nessee Tennessee will visit the University of
Florida campus today. 1
Dr. George Kelly, professor of
psychology and head of psycholo psychological
gical psychological clinics at Ohio State, will
talk on The Psychology of the
Unknown*' in a 4 p.m. address at
the Florida Union Auditorium.
Dr. Harold L. Luper, head of
the Department of Audiology and
Speech Pathology at Tennessee,
will discuss the topic, No Two
Stutterers Are Alike'' at 7:30p.m.
in Room 208 of Tigert Hall.

wampus news brief si

REAL ESTATE CLUB
Professor Jack Clark of the
Department of Architecture will
speak tonight at 7:30 p.m. in Room
218, Florida Union. He will speak
on aspects of real estate and
building construction.
ENGINEERING DAMES
Engineering Dames will hold a
meeting Wednesday, March 17 at
8 p.m. at the University Women's
Club. Election of officers will be
held.

Monday. March 15. 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Europe trip deadline Tues.

Tuesday is the deadline for app applicants
licants applicants for the round trip flight to
Europe.
This trip, at reduced rates, will
leave from New York on June 22,
arriving in London approximately
sL v hours later. The cost is
$325.00, $159.50 under regular
fare. An initial deposit of $125
is due March 16.
A reception for all those taking
the flight and those interested in
arranging passage will be held
Tuesday 7:30 p.m. in the Oak Room
"f the Florida Union.

ORIENTATION
Students interested in working in
the Fall Orientation Program may
sign up for interviews outside of
Room 200, Florida Union, anytime
between 2:30 5 p.m. throughout
this week. Interviews will last
until Friday of this week.
INTERVIEW
Want to earn $l5O a week this
summer? Sign up in Building H
before March 16 for Saladmaster
interviews.

A representative of the airline
will present a short film Europe:
Dusk to Dawn'' at the reception.
All students, faculty and staff
who have been on campus a mini minimum
mum minimum of six months (along with
spouse, dependent children
or parents), are eligible.
The flight returns Jto New York
on August 16, giving the traveler
about eight weeks in Europe.
The flight is being handled by the
Florida Union, Delbert Sterrett,
Program Director. More infor information
mation information is available in Room 315
of the Florida Union.

SAILING CLUB
The Gator Sailing Club will hold
a meeting for nominations of
officers tonight at 7 p.m. Anyone
Interested In sailing is invited to
attend.
COLLOQUIUM
The Latin American colloquium
will meet tonight at 8 p.m. in the
Oak Room of the Florida Union to
hear Professor T. Lynn Smith
speak on 'Sociological Aspects
of Development Processes in
Brazil***

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator/ Monday/ March 15/ 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

For Sale
GIBSON ELECTRIC GUITAR,
Les Paul Junior. Cherry finish,
like new condition. Cost SIBO new.
WiU sell for $95. FR 2-3021.
(A-114-lt-p).
SKATE BOARDS, professional
ball-bearing wheels, oak board,
fully adjustable. Limited supply.
$6.50, E. Lee Reid Jr., 2-6938.
(A-113-st-c).
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER.
Six 500 sheet boxes of Buff. Retail
for S2O per box. Will sacrifice for
$lO per box. Call Ext. 2832 between
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. (A-110-tf-nc).
1959 RANCHERO TRAILER,IOx4S.
Excellent condition, furnished, 2
bedrooms, fenced in yard, close to
campus. See at Glynwood Park,
Lot 2, on Archer Road behind
Florida Power. Phone 8-1596. (A (A---112-3t-c).
--112-3t-c). (A---112-3t-c).
1962 HORIZON MOBILE Home. 2
bedroom. Equity plus take up pay payments
ments payments of $76.07 per month. Call
378-2854. (A-112-st-c).
1963 VESPA 150 cc. Scooter. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition with extras.
Contact Ira Zager AEPi House,
372-9404 or 372-9487. (A-112-
3t-c).
1964 MERCURY 100 HP outboard.
Used less than 30 hours. New
motor warranty. Controls, 12 gal.
tank, bronze propeller. Cost SI4OO.
Price $750. Call 376-0973. (A (A---112-st-c).
--112-st-c). (A---112-st-c).
RADIO FOR TRIUMPH Sports
car, Webcor Stereo tape recorder,
and F-19 Goya Guitar. Call 6-
2420. (A-112-3t-c).
Hi FLORID A |
1 I 1 m |

Classical Sale=-
$4.98 & $5.98 Reg. Price
S 0 49 MONO
/ = end
STERO
Tliis week only on specially purchased albums
which include FINE ARTS QUAR., EASTMAN
PHILHARMONIC, MINNEAPOLIS SYM. ORCH.,
PAUL PARAY and many others.
The RECORD MR
123 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. PHO NE 376- 1042
Open 9 to 6 Mondays and Fridays 9 to 9
CENTRAL CHARGE FREE PARKING IN REAR

For Sale |
YELLOW CHROME TABLE, Good
condition. Unfinished lounge frame
with foam mattress. Call 6-8823
or see at 356-F Flavet 11. (A (A---14-2t-c).
--14-2t-c). (A---14-2t-c).
GOLF CLUBS bag, 2 woods,
6 irons. Good condition. $35. Call
Bob 8-1185 or see at 20 SW 10th
Street. (A-114-3t-c).
ADMIRAL HI-FI, has 4-speed
changer, 3-speaker system, all in
one cabinet, $45. Call 6-8119.
(A-114-3t-p).
1958 RICHARDSON TRAILER.
B*x36*, 2-bedrooms, completely
furnished, with air-conditioning.
Call 376-1048 or see at Ralley's
Trailer Park. (A-114-ts-c).
Bx4l ALUMINUM TRAILER. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition with 9x32 Cabana,
(completely furnished) and 10x20
carport. Cabana & furniture are
new. Call 2-7194 after p.m.
(A-114-lt-c).
*6l HONDA 150 Fair condition.
Call Rick 372-9275. Room 1001
after 7 p.m. (A-114-lt-p).
Lost & Found
FOUND: A mans raincoat at
the Medical Center last weekend.
Call Joel at 2-6762 after 5 p.m.
(L-113-2t-p).
FOUND: At State Theatre 2 pairs
of womens prescription glasses,
during the running of 8 1/2.
Contact BiU Henderson, State
Theatre 6-6606. (L-112-tf-nc).
Wanted
ROOMMATES WANTED: 3
bedroom, 2 bath house with party
room and bar. S3O each, monthly
beginning May Ist. FR 2-3021.
(C-114-lt-p).

Personal
GAINESVILLE MINIATURE
RACEWAY BUSES to Sebring are
beginning to fill. sls per person
or $25 for couples. Price includes
admission to races. Buses will
leave March 26, between 4 and 5
and return early Sun. Morning.
The buses will remain so that you
may sleep in them. For information
drop by Gainesville Miniature
Raceway, 807 W. Univ. Ave. The
best thing about GMR BUSES is
that they are JOHN equipped.
(J-110-st-c).
Help Wanted
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY. Our company
will train college men to present
our investment plan to single
employed girl 6 this summer in
major Florida cities. Earn SIOO
to $175 WEEKLY! Male 18-28,
neat, personable, possess auto automobile,
mobile, automobile, and be able to work full
time this summer. For interview
contact Mr. Gibson, at the Student
Government Placement Office, 309
Florida Union, Mon. or Tues.,
March 15 and 16, between noon and
7 p.m. (E-114-2t-c).
Services
VARSITY RESTAURANT.
ATTENTION: We are now serving
STEAKS. $.99 and up. Large
selection. 209 NW 13th Street.
(M-113-4t-c).
INFANT CARE in private home.
References furnished. 378-2583.
237 SW 2nd Place. (M-98-ts-c).
Add QUALITY to your home or
apt. Pure gold-leaf trim added to
lamps, frames, antiques, mirrors.
$6.00 minimum. Tom Baugh. 117
NW 17th Street. 376-8087. (M (M---111-st-c).
--111-st-c). (M---111-st-c).
TONITE! 3 SUSPENSE HITS!
FIRST AREA RUN*
At 7:10
SEAN CONNERY
MARNIE
_At 9:05
TAYLOR
ItIiiM3DUNUM
CTIMMPV
ttUNWWSAL PtCTURt IfcU
At 10:45
VOYAGE TO BOTTOM OF SEA
STARTS FRIDAY
m THirnrfSS^*" l^
[TAMij
SCREEN ENTERTAINMENT Co |

For Rent
ABOVE STANDARD ROOMS FOR
BELOW STANDARD RENT! Rooms
for male students at 104 SW Bth
Street. FR 2-0243. (B-114-tf-nc).
NEW, MODERN APARTMENT,
fully furnished, central heating,
and air-conditioning, private en enclosed
closed enclosed patio. 423 SE Bth Street.
Call 372-3576. (B-114-3t-c).
AVAILABLE APRIL Ist. Near
campus. AIR-CONDITIONED, one
bedroom apartment, furnished,
patio, and barbeque. Couple or
students, 4 month lease. 6-1073.
(After 3 p.m.). (B-114-3t-p).
Autos
1957 HILLMAN. Best offer. Call
6-8823 or see at 356- F Flavet 11.
(G-114-2t-c).
'HURTIN FROM HOOFIN (look),
*57 RENAULT (saves gas), 57
RENAULT $50.00 (doesnt run),
*55 FORD convertible (Looks, runs
great), R&H, *sl CHEVROLET
(runs great). 236 NW 4th Avenue,
FR 6-3583. (G-114-st-c).
VOLVO 1959, new battery, good
tires. S3OO and take over payments
of only $22.00 per month. May
trade. 372-7170. (G-113-st-c).
*63 VW, GREAT SHAPE. Needs
no work. $250 down, total $1250.
Call Coach Ellenson, Ext. 2131,
home FR 6-9768. (G-U2-st-c).
1961 FORD COUNTRY Sedan
Station wagon. 6 cylinder, R&H,
45,000 miles, excellent condition.
Call Dr. Robbins, Ext. 5205, at
Med. Center. (G-112-st-c).
1961 OLDS 88, 4-door sport sedan,
R&H, A/C, PS & PB, excellent
condition throughout. Arrange your
own financing. Call evenings and
weekends. 372-8221. (G-110-
lOt-c).
Real Estate
DESIRABLE ACREAGE HIGH and
rolling. 40 acres. S3OO per acre.
Highway frontage. 20 minutes from
U of F. Convenient terms. Will
consider exchange. Call Les
Jackson, Associate, Ernest Tew
Realty, 376-6461. (I-111-Bt-c).
a tSn Bastraiaii
f DeSica's
Marriage naua suit
* pctum Mw. -Color

For Rent
SMALL FURNISHED CCB Cottage.
Bedroom, electric kitchen, tile
shower. SSO per month. Couple
preferred. Baby welcome. South
on Ocala Road. Linda Ann Court.
376-5826. (B-108-tf-nc).
ROOMS FOR RENT, Central heat,
maid service, everything
furnished. 378-2583. 273 SW 2nd
Place. (B-98-ts-c).
LIVE BETTER FOR LESS. Brand
new 2 bedroom furnished apts.,
air-cond. Accommodates up to 4.
39th Ave. and 6th St. NW. $125
per month. FR 2-1003, after 7
p.m. (B-112-st-c).
3 BEDROOM HOUSE, unfurnished,
but has stove. 1 bath, fenced back
yard, four car garage* Near
Stephen Foster School. 519 NW
27th Ave. Call after 6, 475-4101.
(B-113-3t-c).
1101 SW sth Ave. 4-br. 2-bath
FURNISHED APARTMENT,
very clean. Carpeted living room,
central heat and AC. 4-6 nurses
or students. 376-2892. (B-111-3t-c).
3t-c).
FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY.
Air-conditioned apt. 1 block off
campus. TV, heat, steam bath,
private carport, etc. For one only
see at 117 SW 12th Street. Apt. 1.
$55 per month. If interested call
Jim 372-6178. (B-111-ts-c).
AIR-CONDITIONED Apartments
for 3A and/or 38. Suitable for 2
or 3 people S7O per mo. plus
electric. 1829 NW 2nd Ave.
Suitable for 2 or 3 people at 1530
NW 4th Ave. $75-soplus electric.
Suitable for 3 or 4 people at 1518
NW 4th Ave. S9O-SIOO with air airconditioning
conditioning airconditioning included. Also renting
for fall at slightly higher rates.
Call 376-4353 evenings. (B-lll (B-llltf-c).
tf-c). (B-llltf-c).
CHARMING SPLIT-LEVEL APT.
Available 2 blocks from campus,
semi-furnished, modern kitchen,
washing machine, AIR-CON AIR-CONDITIONING.
DITIONING. AIR-CONDITIONING. Perfect for young
couples, working people, students.
Please call 376-9986. (B-112-st (B-112-stc).
c). (B-112-stc).
1 BEDROOM, unfurnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, kitchen equipped. Couples
only. $75 per month. 1913 NW
2nd Ave. Phono 2-1362. (B-113-
ts-c).
TO FIND IT
WP TO BUY IT
TO SELL IT
Room *9, Florida
|Or Call Umv. Ex: 2832 M
B YAMAHABMW I
Motorcycles
fl For The Discriminating 8
I CYCLERAMA I
378-2811 21 SE 2nd Place



I A weekly page featuring news and views ofUF fraternities and sororities *

Bilk 4 ISp Sms: ;CSBI MMbI S i 1
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j n jiMMfi 11 jf

pPBr
Fiji Queen
:: x
Pert Miss Peggy*
j: Kemmerer, an Alpha!;:
gOmicron Pi pledge, was:-:
i; selected as Fiji Sweet- :|:
: heart this weekend.
.*
;X-:::-::S:>>:x:x:S::x>-::x:::>:::>::-:::::>:>:-:::-:::-:v

...and fraternities

PI KAPPA ALPHA
Pi Kappa Alpha and Alpha Delta
5 i combined efforts to win the
annual Beauty and the Beast
contest, accumulating $375.44 for
the World University Service.
Brother Mike Roache led the
rive as the beast with ADII beauty
Rosalyn Brown.
Pi Kappa Alphas newly elected
ind installed officers are: Presi Presilent:
lent: Presilent: Mike Neal; Vice President:
i m Bogner; Treasurer: Bud
t)obbs; Social Chairman: Joe
landers; Pledgemaster: Jack
} almer; House Manager: Bill
Aacomber.
ALPHA TAU OMEGA
Alpha Tau Omega held a formal
1 edging ceremony March 4th for
2 new Little Sisters of the Maltese
ross. The neophytes include:
laire Miller, KAT; Jo Franklin,
XO; Ellen Eason, Janice Eason,
ri-Delta; Harriett Hughes, AOPi;
anet Collins, DG; Beverly Beall,
ee Wright, Susan Saunders, KD;
baron Fitzgerald, ADPi; Linda
lales, SK; Casey Linwich.
I Susan Saunders, KD, was
fleeted as a semi-finalist in the
pOs National Sweetheart of the
fentury contest. She was the
lorida chapters sweetheart last
lar and was selected to represent
|e state of Florida by ATO
lumnus, Art Linkletter.
I KAPPA SIGMA
The new officers of Kappa Sigma
re sworn in Wednesday night
i present Grand Master, David
le. President-elect is Dennis
frAagan; vice president, Jim
pledge master, Wayne
eri; treasurer, Dick Wannall;
ftretary, Jim Seith; guards are
V Tillberg, Allan Farrington
Fred Mutt.

DELTA DELTA DELTA
Finalists for Military Ball
Queen: Ann Breslauer, Diane
Denning, Kathy Green, Jennifer
McKinnon, and Suz Ann Hull. New
Little Sister of ATO: Janice Eason;
and Jennifer McKinnon, Little
Sister of SAE.
Karen Reed, Penny Port and
Jennifer McKinnon are new
officers in WSA. Tri Delt, Jinny
Jasper, sponsored by Pi Kappa
Alpha is the new Miss University
of Florida. The chapter also
received a trophy for Cutest
Presentation at Panhellenic Sing.

CHI PHI
The Chi Phi fraternity announces
its new pledge class members:
George Crockett, Boca Raton;
Brent Espy, Kingston Jamaica;
Joe Hines, Key West; Steve Kauf Kaufman,
man, Kaufman, Plattsburgh, New York;
Parker Lawrence, Gainesville;
Jim McCollum, Ft. Lauderdale;
Stan Parker, Miami; RodPolitano,
Lake Worth; Bob Post, Arlington,
Virginia; Don Roberts, Ft. Myers;
Carl Sagro, Westboro, Mass.;
Dwight Spaulding, Lake Wales,
Fla.; Pete Welsh, Lake Worth;
Frank Morgan, Winter Haven.
PHI EPSILON PI
Phi Epsilon Pi is making plans
for its annual Senior Banquet to
be held at the University Inn March
27th. On March 20, the Phi Ep
pledges will hold their weekend.
Theme tor the Saturday night party
will be Shipwreck.
ALPHA GAMMA RHO
Alpha Gamma Rho ranked first
among the Blue League fraternities
in collecting the most money in
the annual Alachua County Heart
Fund Drive sponsored by the Sigma
Phi Epsilon fraternity.
Bill Retey, service projects
chairman, was present at the Sigma
Phi Epsilon fraternity Tuesday,
March 9, to receive the trophy.
This is the first year the trophy
has been awarded to a Blue League
fraternity.
DELTA UPSILON
Present officers are: JohL
Baum, president; Dick Grant, vice
president; Richard DAlli, secre secretary;
tary; secretary; George Mueller, treasurer;
Richard Reddig, chapter relations
officer; George Jackson, pledge pledgemaster.
master. pledgemaster.

DELTA GAMMA
The Delta Gamma's have seven
Blue Key Speakers - Dianne
Cueny, Carol Ralston, Betty Jean
McNaull, Ginger Jochem, Betty
Wendt, Candy Hampton and Suzanne
Pohlman.
Three D Gs were chosen little
sisters recently: Dianne Davich
ATO; Janie Brady, Phi Tau; Carol
Waters, SAE.
Betty Wendt and Janie Brady
were chosen finalists in the Miss
UF contest; Karen Vitunac, Beta
Sweetheart finalist; Janet Collins,
finalist in the Military Ball Queen
contest.

DELTA TAU DELTA
Last weekend, Delta Tau Delta
initiated twenty-seven neophytes,
1 one of the largest classes yet for
Delta Zeta chapter. New brothers
are: Harry Bopp, Ford Byrd, Jim
Chapin, Don Crichlow, Rick Cul Culver,
ver, Culver, Roy Faulkner, Bill Feaster,
Ozzie Garrard, John Gwynn, Tom
Headly, Rick Horter, Tom Lockart,
Dave Parhalo, Jack Par iso, Ken
Poss, Dave Ropes, Mike Shehee,
Paul Skaggs, Tory Slaughter, Chris
Smith, Bob Stevens, Harvey Tyler,
Lance Walker, Bob White, Ken
Yates, Bob Yohe, and Vic Zaloom.
Brother Braxton Northern served
as head of the ritual team.
PHI KAPPA PSI
Phi Kappa Psi, the newest
fraternity on campus, was
formaUy recognized by the IFC
as a colony Sunday, February 27.
The presentation of the group was
made by their president, David
Hague.
Phi Psi is holding a work
party in conjunction with the
Salvation Army Saturday morning,
March 13. This is the first service
project attempted by Phi Psi here.
KAPPA SIGMA
KS has initiated its I,oooth mem member.
ber. member. The honor goes to Jim Seith.
A banquet was held for the new
brothers at the Holiday Inn. Allan
Farrington received the Pledge of
the Year Award* Other brothers
initiated are Paul Siegal, Mike
Alfano, Bill Colvin, Wess Corbett,
Mike Culpepper, Mike Evans,
Kent Harmeling, Hi Lewis, Bill
Tillberg, Ken Wells, Bob Wise,
Larry Wynn.

Monday/ March 15/ 1965, The Florida Alligator/

ALPHA DELTA PI
ADPi members, Sharon Fitz Fitzgerald
gerald Fitzgerald and Jerri Starr are new
Little Sisters of the Maltese Cross;
Pam Ohm an and Rosylyn Brown,
Little Sisters of Minerva; and Cari
Campbell, Little Sister of the
Laurel.
For the second year ADPis
have won the WUS Beauty and the
Beast contest, joining the Pikes
for the contest.
alpha chi omega
Jo Franklin has been chosen
a Little Sister of the Maltese
Cross and Becky Quinn won a first
place in the National Hearst
Journalism Contest.
As a house project the pledges
landscaped the back yard. Kitty
Golnick was selected as a member
of Angel Flight and Cindy Klausner
was chosen as Beauty of the Week
by the Lakeland Ledger.
KAPPA DELTA
The 22 new initiates of Kappa
Delta are: Leta Belcher, Carol
Boyer, Sherry Brush, Susan Cope Copeland,
land, Copeland, Claudia Daly, Pat Gautier,
Susan Hathaway, Carolyn Huggins,
Suzanne Meyer, Glnny Monte,
Meredyth Myers, Judy Schnabel,
Judy Silver, Jane Silverman,
Cathie Skinner, Gail Trelber, Suzi
Turmail, Sharon Wlllcox, Dee
Wright, Paula Young, Jacquie Sue
Maynard, and Susan Westnedge.
SIGMA KAPPA
Sigma Kappa members have been
named to several campus honors
recently.
Pam Dormany, 2UC, has been
named a finalist in the UF Mili Military
tary Military Ball Queen Contest. Pam is
from Tampa.
A new Little Sister of the Maltese
Cross (Alpha Tau Omega) is Lynda
Bales, 3AS, of Pensacola.
Pledgling Theta Sigma Phi,
honorary professional organi organization
zation organization for women in journalism
is Peggy Blanchard, 4JM of
Lantana.
Other Sigmas active in campus
contests include:
Wanda Argo, 2UC, Daytona
Beach, competing in the Gator
Gras Queen contest.
Beverly Faber, 2UC, Fort
Lauderdale, the chapter's entrant
in the Engineering Fair Queen
contest.
Susan Bartley, 3ED, Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, the chapter's representative
to the coming Student Leadership
Banquet.

/a
FIJIS GO NATIVE
Phi Gamma Delta
pledges are shown
preparing to deliver
invitations for the an annual
nual annual Fiji Island Week Weekend,
end, Weekend, Decorations for
the weekend, which in included
cluded included a waterfall and
bamboo fence, were
three weeks in prepar preparation.
ation. preparation. Margaret
Meade, anyone?
IRC TEC

ALPHA EPSILON PHI
Three AEPhi members honored
this week: Patty Effroh, new Little
Sister of Minerva; Carol Schwartz,
a semi-finalist for Military Ball
Queen; and Louise Rothenberg,
for her performance in the
Humanities play.
KAPPA ALPHA THETA
Suzanne Hillaker was initiated
into Little Sisters of Minerva and
Claire Miller was selected for
Little Sisters of the Maltese
Cross.
Two Thetas, Pam Johnson and
Jane Everett, were 4 appointed to
the student body Cabinet, as Sec Secretary
retary Secretary to the Cabinet and Secretary
of School Traditions.
Thetas defeated Alpha Delta Pi,
14-6, to win the basketbaU cham championship.
pionship. championship.
PIKE LUAU
A tropical rainstorm
failed to dampen the
spirits of those at attending
tending attending the Pi Kappa
Alpha Hawaiian Week Weekend,
end, Weekend, as evidenced by
the costumed Miss
above.

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator/ Monday/ March 15/ 1965

Upsets throttle state cage tourney favorites

By ANDY MOOR
Sports Editor
1965 was truly the year of the
upset in the state high school
basketball tournament.
Jacksonville Paxon, a team who
shouldnt even have made the trip
(according t o experts), won the
State AA Class in the most drama*
tic of ways.
Jump shots from 30 feet out as
the buzzer sounded gave Paxon
wins in both the Semi-Finals and
Finals and Finals after opponents
held seemingly insurmountable
leads late in the fourth quarter.
In the Semi-Finals against Or Orlando
lando Orlando Edgewater, Paxon wasa
beaten team, down 11 points early
in the fourth quarter. Then Edge Edgewater
water Edgewater appeared tobewham tobewhammied,
mied, tobewhammied, collapsing completely and

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HENLEY SHOOTS FOR HILLSBOROUGH
. . Paxons Caron (1) looks on
Netmen walloped by FSU
in match played on wood

FSU continued to assert its
athletic m astery of the UF Saturday
' l"'' i
Frosh nine loses
to Manatee JC
UF's Baby Gator baseball team
dropped a pair of games this past
weekend, falling to Manatee Junior
College Friday and Saturday
at Perry Field, 6-3 and 3-0.
The frosh suffered from a hit
shortage, managing only nine hits
in the two games.
The Baby Gators now sport a
2-3 record. Their next game will
be Wednesday night at St. Johns
River Junior College in Palatka.

allowing Paxon to tie the score
with less than a minute remaining.
Ronnie Sellers capped the come comeback
back comeback with a 30 footer at the buzzer
for a 58-56 win.
Few experts gave Paxon a chance
against Tampa Hillsborough in the
finals. The Terriers had looked
invincible in their Semi-Final win
over highly touted Miami Beach,
56-35.
When the game came off, how however,
ever, however, it was Paxon who was hot
as a firecracker, jumping to a
quick advantage, and more im important,
portant, important, putting Hillsborough on the
defensive. Andy Owens, Hills Hillsboroughs
boroughs Hillsboroughs All-America candidate,
was hitting well, but Paxon defense
was so tight that Owens, who
averaged 30 points per game in
the regular season, got off but 11
shots in the entire game.

as the Gator tennis team fell before
the Seminole onslaught by an 8-1
count.
The Gators only victory came in
the second doubles match with Rick
Chace and Bill Perrin ousting Paul
Bennet and Terry Poore of FSU
10-12, 6-1, 8-6 in a two hour
marathon.
Rick Chace played brilliantly in
a losing cause in his match with
Paul DeZueew, the Seminoles* No.
1 Man. Chace, only a sophomore,
is now the No. 1 player of the UF
squad. The match was played on
wood due to inclement weather.
Chace and his teammates
attempt to even their season slate
at 2-2 when they meet Kentucky
today at 2:15 on the varsity courts.

Still, with all the adversities,
Hillsborough held a 50-46 lead with
two minutes remaining. Then a
lapse at the free throw line al allowed
lowed allowed Paxon to tie the score with
1:20 remaining. In the last minute
Dale Klay missed three charity
tosses and Paxon cleared the
boards with 8 seconds left. The
Eagles hurriedly brought the ball
down and Gary Pajcic hit a jum jumper
per jumper at the buzzer from the same
as §H
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HILLSBOROUGHS
OWENS FIRES AWAY
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spot as Sellers had the night before
to give Paxon the championship
54-52.
Pensacola Tate, considered by
most the least likely to win in
Class A, did just that, with back
to back overtime victories over
Apopka and Plant City.
In the former game, Apopka
socred 26 points in the first period
but could garner only 21 for the
reaminder of the clash and bowed
to Tate in the extra period 51-47.
Plant City gained the finals by oust ousting
ing ousting Arcadia 64-56 after the Bull Bulldogs
dogs Bulldogs big center, Jim Yarbrough
fouled out early in the fourth
quarter.
Plant City made a remarkable
comeback in the finals to lead
58-52 with two minutes left, but
free throw inaccuracy combined
with some Tate sharpshooting sent
the game into overtime where Dave
Wiggins tip with two seconds left
won it 64-62.
Chattahoochee was the only pre pretournament
tournament pretournament favorite to emerge vic victorious,
torious, victorious, but they had to scramble
to get past scrappy Oviedo in the
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finals. Oviedo had taken the lead
with an all-court press late in the
third quarter but strong rebound rebounding
ing rebounding took its toll on the shorter
Oviedo team. When ace forward
Jimmy Courier fouled out, Chatta Chattachooche
chooche Chattachooche had the victory L
Fans who witnessed the Class C
Finals saw the best shooting in
the tournament as Cedar Key's
Toro Slaughterand Jerry Beckham
matched long shots with Hilliard's
Norval and Twain Conner through throughout
out throughout the first half. Slaughter, only
a ninth grader, and Beckham had
36 points between them in the
first half, giving Cedar Key a 38-
32 lead. Hilliard's fast break began
to work in the third stanza and the
Red Flashes puUed even at the
end of the third quarter. The teams
matched baskets through the final
period, with Cedar Key getting the
win after Slaughter's steal and
length-of-the-court drive, 69-65.
The Semi Finals saw Cedar Key
whip Lake Placid in overtime as
Placid's Kit Royer and Beckham
matched outside shots aU the way.
The final was 62-55.
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