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The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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I

Wailes
speaks
tonight
By 808 WILCOX
Staff Writer
Moral Re-Armament, an ideo ideology
logy ideology for change of world in indifference,
difference, indifference, will be presented at the
Modernizing America produc production,
tion, production, 7:30 p.m. tonight in the UF
auditorium.
Rusty Wailes, Olympic gold
medal winner, will speak on pur purpose
pose purpose and discipline in Americans.
The Colwell brothers, an inter international
national international singing group, will en entertain
tertain entertain during the presentation.
Wailes has won three gold med medals
als medals for rowing competition. While
See WAILES on p. 3
Pickets 'cheaper 9
than telegrams 9
It's cheaper than sending tele telegrams.
grams. telegrams.
According to Edward J. Richer,
UF instructor of humanities, thats
why the Student Group for Equal
Rights staged its picket line dem demonstration
onstration demonstration in front of the Federal
Building Monday evening.
The group was protesting the
police-brutality in Selma, Ala Alabama,
bama, Alabama, last Sunday.

BULLETIN
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (UII)~
Rev. James J. Reeb, a white Bos Boston
ton Boston minister who *couldnt stand
idly by, died Thursday from a
beating at the hands of white seg segregationists
regationists segregationists in Selma.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Vol, 57, No 112

jg MBBSNM £ ?%% -xU''= v II
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| ANALOG COMPUTER DEMONSTRATION 3
I S
::. .* .left to right, A1 Higgins, Walter Rose, and Jim Schroeder ofs
| Engineers Fair, $
| Engineers Fair opens |

Twenty-four businesses, organizations and
corporations will provide exhibits for the 20th
: annual Engineers* Fair at the UF today through
: Sunday.
The displays will be of an Instructional nature,
| illustrating major products or service provided
: by the firms.

i See additional Fair stories on
pages 2, 10
**" 1 " I in. .- .i -- fcMi mmmm n ... li
The Fair starts at 6:30 p.m. today and will
remain open until 9:30 p.m. Hours Saturday
and Sunday are 2:30 to 9:30 p.m. and 2-8 p.m.
respectively. The College of Engineering
building and other nearby facilities will be
used to house exhibits and student projects.
For the first time in the Fair's history, women

University of Florida, Gainesville

will enter a display. .The Society of Women
Engineers will have an exhibit built around the
theme of women in the home with an engineering
approach.
In addition, a radio satellite tracking station
constructed and operated by five College of
Engineering students will be available for
observation throughout the three-day event in
the lounge of Dormitory O, west of Florida
Field near the Military Building.
Continuous 15-minute lectures will explain
the function of the station and tapes will be
played with the sounds of the Gemini and Soviet
Voshod space shots.
Chrysler Corporation will show its famed
turbine car, featuring the powerful twin re regenerator
generator regenerator gas turbine engine that offers smooth,
quiet, vibration-free driving.

Friday, March 12, 1965

Breeze
named
HC clerk
Fred Breeze, 4AS, defeated in
the race for Clerk of the Honor
Court (HC) was appointed to that
position by HC Chancellor Sid
Stubbs yesterday.
Breeze lost out to Robert Segal
who was declared ineligible Tues Tuesday.
day. Tuesday.
In the event a vacancy should
occur in the HC office, the Chan Chancellor
cellor Chancellor is called upon to make the
appointment. In this case, Segal
was declared as ineligible to have
run in the Spring elections, thus
making Breeze the winner.
Pm glad its been settled so
something can be done in the office
now, Breeze said upon taking
office.
He said he was surprised at the
appointment but felt it was ap appropriate
propriate appropriate since Segal was not
qualified to have run nor to have
held the office and he did qualify.
U.S. bombers
strike again
SAIGON (UPI) U. S. Air
Force jet fighter-bombers yester yesterday
day yesterday carried out another major air
strike against the Communists in
the Viet Nam war. The target
area remained secret but the 15
to 20 FIOO Supersabres that took
part in the raid returned to the
Marine-guarded Da Nang Air Base
apparently without loss.
In a simultaneous air attack,
the Vietnamese air force said
five of its Skyraider fighter fighterbombers
bombers fighterbombers also took off from the
Da Nang base to blast positions
occupied by two Communist Viet
Cong battalions in South Viet Nam.



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator/ Friday/ March 12, 1965

mit h kef
; BB m
V-}. W
ENGINEERING FAIR OFFICIALS
. .from left Larry Whittington publicity
chairman Delores L. Smoleny fair
chairman and Charles Fosha, industrial
chairman

UF faculty pay scale low
UF faculty pay scale Is lower than that of other large puonv,
universities over the nation, according to statistics compiled by
the American Association of University Professors (AAUP).

Student Leaders
Conference set
Student Government is
sponsoring a meeting of all the
heads of campus organizations at
a Student Leaders Training Con Conference,
ference, Conference, Saturday, March 20.
The purpose of the conference
is to inform the student organi organizations
zations organizations about funds available to
them from student government and
a new publicity bureau to help
the organizations with their
activities.
A plan to instigate an SG
interclub council will also be
discussed, according to Andy Hall,
secretary of organizations.
Hie conference is for all student
organizations including living
areas and social clubs.
The conference will start at
10:30 a.m., include lunch and end
at 1:30 p.m. The cost is $2 per
person.
Presidents of organizations can
register anytime in Room 311 or
in the SG office.

NOTICE

The Board of Student Publications is
accepting applications for the posi positions
tions positions of
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
BUSINESS MANAGER
for the third trimester, 1965 and
first and second trimesters, 1965-66.
Application forms are available in
Room 9, Florida Union. Forms
must be turned in by 5 p.m., March
23. Interviews will be conducted
March 25.
Board of Student Publications

Among these universities with
enrollment over 10,000 and
awarding 100 or more doctorates
a year are, Purdue, the University
of Texas, the University of
Maryland, the University of North
Carolina and Michigan State.
The UF is competing with these
institutions for competent faculty,
said Dr. Cecil Smith, President
of the UFs chapter of the AAUP.
Even such well known* insti institutions
tutions institutions as, Kalamazoo College,
Modesto Jr. College, A lam a
College, Wheellock College, El
Camino College and Foot Hills
College have a higher faculty
compensation than does the UF,
Smith said.
One reason for this low ratio
Smith said, is the lack of fringe
benefits that are given at other
Institutions.
UNITED CHURCH
OF GAINESVILLE
Worship: 10 a m.
Fla. Union Auditorium
Rev. Pierson P. Harris
Ph. 376-1026

Fair spreads over UF campus

The Engineering Fair, beginning
today, is not only going to be held
in the Engineering Building,
according to Miss Dolores L.
Smoleny, the first woman chairman
in the fair's 20 years.
Starting at the west end of
campus will be the Hangar. In
the Hangar the Chemical and
Aerospace exhibits will be
located. The most startling exhibit
there will be the Ground Effect
Machine, which is a sort of
Hovercraft and floats on a thin
layer of air.
The next building over is
Temporary Dormitory **o* where
the Sattelite Tracking Station will

...the radio will
be there, too
The fair's on the air.
That's right, the
Engineering Fair will be
on the radio.
Radio Station WDVH
980 kc. in Gainesville will
be broadcasting from their
mobile broadcast booth at
the fair on Saturday and
Sunday from 2:30 p.m. till
sign-off at 6:30 p.m.

I mm $ m.
% tT* lifi .I
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Jf v \4mLi f m*"'*" MM
Wf w
ft
H u i' \ ix ~. '5. V* "i r { i *. i,' -v s r .-** -I s
University Food Service Offers
Weekend Gator Specials
LUNCHEON and dinner I
Complete Meal 97C plus tax) I
Friday" FRENCH fried fillet of fish with tartar sauce
Saturday BAKED sugar cured ham with fruit sauce
Sundnv ROAST YOUNG TOM turkey, cornbread dressing,
UMHUWJ GIBLET GRAVY & CRANBERRY SAUCE
Choice of,
POTATO or BUTTERED RICE Any 10c or 15$ SALAD
ond ANY BEVERAGE Any 10$ or 15$ DESSERT
I other VEGETABLE 2 ROLLS or 2 BREAD SLICES and 2 BUTTER PATS

have lectures and guided tours.
In the Engineering Building,
affectionately called the engine
house,'' the Chrysler Corp.
Turbine Car will be on display.
So will the electron microscope
in the roetalurgy department. Not
to be forgotten is Otto Matix,
the robot, who'll greet all at the
west door.
In back of the Engineering Build Building
ing Building is the Nuclear Science Building.
The prime attraction will be the
nuclear reactor, the hot box''
and the mechanical hands used in
the hot box.''

See Europe For Less-All Student Trips
Travel in a small group with other students of your
same age and interests. All-expense low-cost trips
by ship or plane:
ADVENTURER: 47 days -10 countries $1072
BUCCANEER: 62 days -10 countries (incl. Greece) $1296
VOYAGEUR: 69 days 14 countries (incl. Scandinavia) $1440
VAGABOND: 46 days 14 countries (incl. Russia) $1199
Write for FREE itineraries and details, to:
AMERICAN YOUTH ABROAD
44 University Station, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55414
- i

From the Nuclear Science
Building, its a short walk to the
Physics Building.
In the Physics Building all the
laboratories will be open and there
will be a special liquid air display.
The last of the buildings is
Frazier Rogers Hall. Inside will
be located all the agriculture
engineering exhibits.
According to Larry Whittington,
this years fair is to be the best
since the first fair.
The honoraries, Sigma Pi Sigma,
Sigma Tau and Tau Beta Pi, will
also participate.



Rain delaying Union construction

Rain has delayed construction of the new Florida Union on Radio
Road, according to D. Neil Webb, zone architect for the Board of
Regents.
Webb said that by the end of February, 42 per cent of the time
allocated for construction of the center had passed, but only 13
per cent of the construction had been completed.
The rain has been unseasonably heavy since construction began
and has held up foundation work on the building,** he said.

HARK!
ANNOUNCING
The Best News Lately
For Meat Lovers of All Types
* %
Billys Butcher Shop
is NOW OPEN
504 NW Stk Ave. Ph. 376-8905
Featuring OlC) fAShIOOCC) Service
And Finest Meats at Fairest Prices
w .jjv/.yv'm
VW' JjTCv.*. -m
v
fl. f:
Muflr. ;
B !SB.: tuii* i > JR S*j ; f:_ / Jm B
I nHf; f;
r jJIlB: t i: fl*fl J
BjHv
I HALF SLEEVES 7 )
I wholly royal comfort VT 1
I sleeves, Bthe 8 the gentle- J
man can look forward //J ff /& w' II
I Wn COOln et SS count r on $? I
I unfitted spruceness ' I
1 in our shirts of finest JpL < \l 1
B cotton Oxford cloth, I|ff \ I
I Colours, whites and / 0 I
I fi*A/Vl ta I
l\ Srag I

One or two inches or rain makes the ground so wet and foggy
that workers have to wait several days for it to dry out before
resuming work.**
He said construction should pick up now that work has begun on
the upper floors.
He added that once the floors are in place the ground will be protected
and work on the ducts, pipes and other interior elements can be
finished.

Friday, March 12, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

ROTC units
to compete
Air Force ROTC marching units
from the UF and Florida State
University (FSU) will meet here
Saturday at 1 p.m. for their annual
drill competition.
Florida will be represented by
the Billy Mitchell Drill Team with
Capt. Norman Farmer as advisor.
Capt. William Taliaferro will
supervise the FSU group.
The two 24-man units will go
through two maneuvers on the main
drill field a regulation sequence
without arms and a special drill
movement with weapons. Local
reserve officers will judge the
teams and a trophy will be
-presented to the winning school.
Florida will seek its third
straight decision, following a
victory over FSU at Tallahassee
in 1964.
WAILES*
' :
?)
Continued from Page 1
in Japan, he wrote the statement
of aims and goals for the U.S.
Olympic Committee and adopted
by the 1964 UJS. team.
The effect of Wailes* work drew
comment from the Japanese and
Russian press, who remarked on
the difference in American ath athletes
letes athletes since the 1960 Olympics.
The Japanese asked Wailes to
give two million Japanese youth
the same training that was given
to the American athletes.
Similarly, after hearing Wailes
speak, the Russian athletes ex exclaimed,
claimed, exclaimed, M lt is unbelievable for us
to meet young Americans like you
who know where you are going
and have an aim for the world.**
-Moral Re-Armament is a pos position
ition position that the All-American not
only talk like one but act like one.
Wailes explains it thusly: Mor Moral
al Moral strength through conviction and
discipline will bring a revolution
of change in the aims and mo motives
tives motives of men.
Moral Re-Armament offers a
next step forward for both com communist
munist communist and non-communist alike.
The world need be neither red
nor wrecked. It can be rebuilt.
Moral Re-Armament is out to end
moral pacifism and give birth to
a fighting spirit.**
After talking with Wailes, a top
Soviet intelligence officer said,
I will call you a Columbus who is
charting a new course on an un untried
tried untried sea. A -moral revolution is
the hardest. A revolution of the
heart is what is needed.**

I CAMPUS cum I
3 f $
$
:*
$
i
8 f $
Lee s a
8 I
surfer girl
v.
X !
£: Todays Campus Cutle &
is a member of Alpha Delta
Pi sorority, a Little Sister
of Phi Kappa Tau, and :$
::] a member of Angel Flight. :£
She is Lee Craig, a >:
:j:j language major from
:j: Hollywood, who likes
surfing, tennis, picnics, §:
*: and cant stand a rainy
:jij day- £
Research Library
bids are tabea
Tassinari Construction
Company of Gainesville submitted
| a base bid of $1,786,700 yesterday
to become apparent low bidder for
building a new research library
on the UF campus.
The six-story structure will be
located on the northern portion of
the Plaza of the Americas, north north|
| north| west of the present main library,
| and will face south.
It will house approximately
600,000 volumes in an open stack
plan designed primarily for
graduate students and faculty and
will be used for reference works,
rare books and the P.K. Yonge
Library of Florida History.
Slightly larger than the main
library, the research faculty win
include 100,000 square feet and
can take on an additional 80,000
feet when funds are available.
Groundbreaking is anticipated
in late AprU or early May with
an ensuing 18-month construction
schedule.
Tasslnarls bid was low among
ten firms seeking the contract.
Architects for the new building
are Arthur Lee Campbell of
Gainesville and Warren H. Smith
of Lakeland.
Washington trip
winners namod
Cadet winners of the trip to
Washington, D.C., offered by the
ROTC Department are, in the Army
program, ERIC J. HAUGDAHL and
and in Air Force ROTC, RICHARD
A. GREESMAN.
The two lucky winners left this
morning on an Air Force C-47
Goonybird** and will stay at An Andrews
drews Andrews Air Force Base.
A guided tour of Washington,
including the Pentagon, Washing Washington
ton Washington Monument, Lincoln and Jeffer Jefferson
son Jefferson Memorials, the White House,
the Capitol, and the Arlington Na National
tional National Cemetery, with th changing
of the guard at the Tomb of the
Unknown soldier, will highlight
this memorable experience.
This excursion will be made in
conjunction with the three day trip
of the Arnold Air Society on the
same date.

Page 3



\ t The Florida Alligator/ Friday/ March 12/ 1965

Page 4

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International
ERNIE.UTZ STEVE VAUGHN JOE CASTE LLO
Editar-in-Chief Managing Editor Executive Editor
LOU FERRIS ANDY MOOR
Editorial Page Editor Sports Editor

VIEWPOINT
Grass roots plan
Disraeli, the eminent British statesman,
once said, It is easier to be critical than
correct.
Often the policy of .editorials is to be
critical of new ideas which present no value.
We think we will be correct in this editorial.
The new idea of Pres. Bruce Culpepper of
taking Student Government to the students is r
in our minds a very good one. We refer to
dorm stomping by student leaders and
cabinet officials oefore each bi-weekly cabinet
meeting.
This approach although not perfect
is at least a beginning in creating interest
in Student Government by the students.
The leaders ask if there are any criticisms
of campus life and if they are, what would
they suggest should be done.
All of the dorm areas are covered, and
students are selected on a random basis. The
ideas which are presented are then compiled
and discussed at cabinet meetings.
If anything can be done by Student Government
to complete a suggestion action is taken.
We commend this new idea and suggest
students take the opportunity of presenting to
these officers their ideas about making Student
Government better for all.
We have often heard the usual promise to
take Student Government to the student. How However,
ever, However, we hope that this beginning will genuinely
affect the future policies of Student
Government.
When a good idea is presented and perhaps
more important when it is used those of
us in the business of observation should take
note.
Indeed, students should be aware of their
student officers and their plans and snould
display an active interest in seeing that the
programs promised are completed.
This new approach should provide the student
body with an opportunity to voice its opinion
and to make certain that its voice is heard.
Oood government demands participation on
the part of its citizens. We challenge our
readers to assume this role.
GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Kay
Huffmaster, (Correspondents), Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles,
Donita Mathison, Dan Taylor, Sam Oilman, Selwin H. Ciment,
Jay Foley,Stephen Kanan Dee Wright, Bob Wilcox
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Kurrin, Ann .Carter, Thelma Mossman, Fran Snider, Cynthia
Tunstall, Harvey Wolf son, Karen Vitunac, Jack Zucker, Ami
Saperstein, Carl Brown, Jane Young, Bill Lockhart, Ken Simon,
Drex Dobson, Jeffrey DOnke waiter, G. S. Corseri, Eunice Tall,
Linda Cody, Woody Leonard, Jennell Close, Nancy Van Zile.
Th Florida AlUfator rMimi th. 'right to tiro typofnphlcal ton. oi all .dv.rtu*ntonto ,nd
to rrtse or torn awxy copy which tt con.ld.rs obtocttoirobto.
MO POSITION E GUARANTEED, thonfh dMtiwd portion wUI tro flw wh.n.w poMtoto.
Th. Florid. AUicttor will not consider adjustments of paymsat tor any sdwertto.ro.nl luvolring typ typogrtohlcal
ogrtohlcal typogrtohlcal errors or arroatoits toaortton unless notice Is flvaa to tbs Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not b. responsible for more than one insertion of en . to run several times. Notices for correction roust be given before nest insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U tbs official student newspaper of the University of Florida and la
Dublished five times weekly except duing May, June and July when It to pabltohed s*mi-eekly. Only
editorials repmeit the official opinions of their ronhors. The Alligator la antered as second class
matter at the United Statoe Poet Office at Gainesville.

~ f ** I

EDITOR:
I READ THE article in the
Alligator about the woman who
complained about so much noise
being made by the Kappa Alphas.
As a result of her complaint, the
KAs are on probation.
I WOULD JUST like to know
what she thinks they are supposed
to be doing. .playing cowboys

DEAR COACH MOOR:
WHEN YOU SAY, Eyes of all
Florida sports fans will be cast
upon Florida Gym this weekend
when the State High School Bas Basketball
ketball Basketball Tournament comes to a
close. you have committed quite
an erroneous observation. I know
that we will get to the tournament
before it ends. And, instead of
casting your eyes, we suggest that
you open them.
YOUR PERCEPTIVE scouting
leaves us cold. Yes, you are right
Orlando Edgewater, Jax Paxon,
Tampa Hillsborough, all have fine
teams. You are also correct in
your recording of statistical data
concerning these teams (height,
records, etc.). However, The
Sports Eye" seems to be
exceedingly myopic (nearsighted
for you laymen), and is in dire

The other side of a worn coin

EDITOR:
WITH THE DEVELOPMENT of
the atom bomb and the annhlala annhlalation
tion annhlalation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
at the conclusion of World War
H, the Communists realized that
their strategy for world domina domination
tion domination would have to be changed.
INSTEAD OF LARGE central centralized
ized centralized armies, they switched to small
decentralized units and the tactics
were those of guerrilla warfare.
South Viet Nam is one of the
proving grounds.
WHAT IS SOUTH Viet Nam? Well
it's only about the size of Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, yet because of its strategic
costal location, Viet Nam has for
centuries been an important factor
in Southeast Asian affairs, not to
mention its richness in natural
resources particularly food and
rubber, which makes South Viet
Nam a coveted prize by food foodshort
short foodshort North Viet Nam and Com Communist
munist Communist China.
AUSTRIA WASN'T a strategic
loss for the Allies prior to World
Var n, and neither was part of

Hoo-ray for KA

and Indians quietly in the front
yard??? She'd just better be
thankful that they are in college
trying to make a go of life instead
of roaming the street jobless.
AFTER BEING engrossed in
textbooks all week long, a guy
needs to blow off a little bit of
steam. I think that the lady should
be glad that they blow off steam

Dear Coach Moor

need of corrective lenses.
THRU YEARS of acute obser observation,
vation, observation, (and we mean acute, not
a cute) our experience tells us
that you are in foul trouble
again. There's no doubt that Andy
Moor has tried his best, but, alas,
his final desperation shot has
missed the backboard and the final
seconds have ticked away.
WE HAVE BEEN witnesses at
the last three state tournaments
here at Gainesville and we have
seen many fine teams, and this
year we have seen another such
team.
WATCHING THE MIAMI Beach
Senior High School basketball team
play is a unique experience. .
Their slick offense, tenacious de defense,
fense, defense, and overall balance, poise,
and depth leaves the basketball
buff breathless (alliteration). We
can truthfully state that Miami
Beach S.H. has the finest high

Czechoslovakia, let when Poland,
Denmark, Norway, Belgium,
Luxembourg, and the Netherlands'
were added the United States could
no longer look the other way.
YET WE WERE too late to savfe
France, Yugoslavia and the Greece
from occupation, and too late to
save the nine million soldiers
who had to die to save democracy.
All Americans may ask, What
would cost have been if the United
States had had the guts to stop
Germany in the very beginning?*'
IS SOUTH VIET Nam, another
Austria or Poland? Not if the UJS.
can help it. In terms of men and
money, the assistance effort has
been costly, but obviously neces necessary
sary necessary to provide more than a mea measure
sure measure of hope in the form of tangi tangible
ble tangible support to the 14 million free
Vietnamese in their long battle to
defeat Communism.
LIVES ARE VERY obviously im important
portant important toj you, Mr. Stanfield. I
wish you would explain how three
to four hundred American lives

i V V> in

-.LETTERS::::

UGLIEST LETTER Z

by loud music instead of doing
wreckless high scbool-harry
stunts.
MY SUGGESTION to the Laay
is for her to get' a pair of ear
plugs anri start being a little bit
more grateful for tomorrows
leaders.
A KA FAN

school basketball team this state
has ever seen.
ANYONE WHO KNOWS, knows
that Miami Beach had three of its
starters placed by the Miami News
and Miami Herald on their All-
City first teams. The remaining
two starters were mentioned for
runner-up berths. Never before
has one team so dominated any
citys basketball in this state.
RICK ASCOTT, senior forward,
was (only) named player of the
year for the city of Miami's
eighteen high schools.
CHUCK (the genias) Fleldsons
charges, captained by senior Alan
(Cousy the court wizard) Goldfarb
and Neal (the Best of the Giants)
Walk (6'9), defeat any team in
this state.
RICHARD MELKER
PHILIP FREIDIN
JEFF CHASE

are wortn more than fourteen
million Asian lives.
TOO, IF SOUTH Viet Nam is
not worth having UJS. soldiers
die over,'* then I wish you would
convince the Communists leaders
the same thing, tor they have got
thirty full time soldiers
and perhaps eighty thousand or
more-irregulars fighting and dying
for Viet Nam.
THERE HAS GOT to be a rea reason
son reason if they are willing .to suffer
monthly losses of eighteen hundred
compared to five hundred and fifty
South Vietnamese. How then, can
the UJS. and the other countries
providing aid possibly afford to
label this outside the vital interests
of this country?
MICHAEL STANFIELD, if you
doubt these facts, then check
February's Army Digest.
Ronald Gaffeny died for freedom
which will never be a death in
vain. Look past your tears and
see the hope of the fourteen million
who stand as a monument to Ronald.
DON GOLD, iuc



V ASSASSINATION!

During intermission
last night at the
Florida Theatre
General William T.
Sherman of Union
Forces launched a
tirade of Southern
abuse and was widely
Protested by staunch
Rebels attending the
movie.
At the height of
Sherman*s oration he
was assassinated by an

Wester is new SDX president

Chip Wester, 4JM of Gainesville,
is the new president for 1965-66
of Sigma Delta Chi, professional
journalism society.
Other new officers are A1
Leonard, 3JM of Milton, vice
president; and Bruce Dudley,
3JM of Orlando, secretary-treas secretary-treasurer.
urer. secretary-treasurer.
Outgoing officers are Carl
Fabry of Orlando, Skip Haviser
WBm Dont stumble through
I3SKI the literary classics.
fflj CUFFS NOTES will
help you make better
hH grades! These study
ra aids give you a clear,
concise summary and
3H| explanation, chapter by
HH chapter.CLIFF'SNOTES
HI are now being used by
high school and college
ijjffl students throughoutthe
BB United States. There are
|H over 100 different
BB CLIFF'S NOTES cover covern
n covern ing the literary classics.
fflm
s l g
ISJ favorite
bookstore
or writer
BUHANY STATION
lINCOtN. NfBRASKA 68505

infantryman of Fort
Betz Zeta, Kappa
Alpha Order who when
questioned replied,
Suh, we could not
let such abuse of
Southern honor go un unpunished.**
punished.** unpunished.**
Latest reports
indicate a parade of
Southern strength at
three this afternoon
followed by Secession
from the Union.

of Bartow and Benny Cason of
Worthington Springs.
SDX will hold a business
meeting next Thursday night at
8 p.m.

Graduation was only the beginning
of Jim Browns education
Hp*.. ** W& f f .:
c iMiB i. IHHI?
jHjL fm
Because he joined Western Electric

Jim Brown, Northwestern University, '62, came
with Western Electric because he had heard about
the Company's concern for the continued develop development
ment development of its engineers after college graduation.
Jim has his degree in industrial engineering and
is continuing to learn and grow in professional
stature through Western Electrics Graduate Engi
neering Training Program. The objectives and edu educational
cational educational philosophy of this Program are in the best
of academic traditions, designed for both experi experienced
enced experienced and new engineers.
Like other Western Electric engineers, Jim
started out in this Program with a six-week course
to help in the transition from the classroom to
industry. Since then, Jim Brown has continued to
take courses that will help him keep up with the
newest engineering techniques in communications.

Western Electric MANUFACTURING AND SUPPLY UNIT OF THE BELL SYSTEM
A* EQUAL OfPOATimiTY EMPLOYE*
Principal manufacturing locations in 13 cities Operating centers in many of these same cities plus 36 others throughout the U.S.
Engineering Research Center, Princeton, N J.DTeletype Corp., Skokie, 111., Little Rock, Ark.DGeneral Headquarters. New VortfCity

12 here win
Wilson fellowships

Twelve UF students won
academic achievement awards
from the Woodrow Wilson National
Fellowship Foundation yesterday.
The number ranked Florida,
Florida State University and
Emory University at the top of
Region 6, which includes colleges
in Alabama, Florida, Georgia,
South Carolina and Peurto Rico.
The three institutions earned 12
awards.
Six Florida students won the
coveted fellowships given each
year b recruit the nations leading
academic talent into the ranks
of college teaching. They were
among 1,395 selected for the 1965-
66 academic year from an original
list of 11,000 seniors nominated
by faculty throughout the United
States and Canada.
Six others won honorable
mention status, automatically en entering
tering entering their names on graduate
school lists over the country for
preferred scholarships considera consideration.
tion. consideration.
The fellowships cover tuition
and fixed fees at the graduate

This training, together with formal college
engineering studies, has given Jim the ability to
develop his talents to the fullest extent. His present
responsibilities include the solution of engineer engineering
ing engineering problems in the manufacture of moly-permal moly-permalloy
loy moly-permalloy core rings, a component used to improve the
quality of voice transmission.
If you set the highest standards for yourself,
enjoy a challenge, and have the qualifications
were looking for we want to talk to you! Oppor Opportunities
tunities Opportunities exist now for electrical, mechanical and
industrial engineers, and for physical science, lib liberal
eral liberal arts and business majors. For more informa information,
tion, information, get your copy of the Western Electric Career
Opportunities booklet from your Placement Officer.
And be sure to arrange for an interview when the
Bell System recruiting team visits your campus.

Friday March 12/ 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

school of the nominees choice,
plus SI,BOO for living expenses
with extra allowances for depen dependents.
dents. dependents.
The Wilson program is the
largest private source of support
for advanced work in the liberal
arts. It has been financed, since
expansion to its present size in
1958, by the Ford Foundation
grants totalling $52 million.
UF winners and their proposed
continuing studies are: Eugene El Ellis
lis Ellis Clark, Miami, physics; Mary
Elizabeth Lewis, Gainesville, psy psychology;
chology; psychology; Thomas B. Muenzenber Muenzenberger,
ger, Muenzenberger, Miami, mathematics; JoAnn
Notar is, Miami Springs, political
science; Kirby L. Smith, Miami,
political science, and Alice Wolk Wolking,
ing, Wolking, Jacksonville, history.
The honorable mention choices
were: Charles J. Butler Jr., Mar Marianna,
ianna, Marianna, physics; Kathleen Lowry,
Ft. Lauderdale, English; Danny
McElrath, Wildwood, history;
Donald L. McElwee, Gainesville,
chemistry; Helen Neel, Bradenton,
mathematics, and Kenneth Seid,
Miami, English.

If Are you still)
wearing
those creasy
V)
jn
/ I /o jW
J Mr 0 w
/ si 0 w
I 1 o m
Q 111
1 \ II
Get into some wised-up
Post-Grads that know where 1
a crease should always be and
where it should never be, and
how to keep things*that way
The reason is the Kotetron*
fabric of 65% Dacron*/35%
cotton. No matter how many
times you wash andwearthese
trimly tapered Post-Grad
slacks, they'll stay completely
neat and make the iron obso obsolete.
lete. obsolete. In tan. clay, black.-navy
or loden, in poplin*
At swinging stores.
Press-Free*
Post-Grad
slacks by
his
OUFOMT'S RIO. T* roa POLVUTU PIMM.
&tag
Brag
13 W Univ.

Page 5



>, The Florida Alligator/ Friday/ March 12, 1965

Page 6

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1

UF HOUSING MAY FACI

By DREX DOBSON
Staff Writer
The UF could be a campus in
few years with housing the cr
The crisis may stem from the
off-campus because of deplorabl
the needed housing facilities for
campus and surrounding area.
For its rapidly growing enroll*
the 15,500 mark last fall trimestei
houses only about 50 percent of
The national housing average for
the UF is approximately 60 per
to the National Housing Associate
When restrictions were placed
incoming freshmen in Septembe
facilities, number of faculty, and
were cited for limiting the size
freshman class, according to the R
When freshmen and other studer
filled campus housing capacity, the
housing off-campus which extent
miles from the UF, according
Off- Campus Housing.
Off-campus housing officials sa
enough time for clerical and other 1
ister the program as they would lil
Applicants to live in either worm i
itories are taken one year in adv r
are usually filled by the last o 1
to the Housing Office.
The minimum rates for a roor
approximately $25 monthly per p< <
SSO per person monthly including c
air conditioning with private bath n
is about standard for a private rooi i.
Dwelling unit rates vary from $
month," he said. The bulk of the: e
are one bedroom, modern apartr e
S9O monthly including utilities.
Two bedroom apartments rar
sllO unfurnished to around $135 furi i:
The Off-Campus Housing Divisio i
a go-between for students and facul y
off-campus and the landlords who ha r e
for rent.
The OCHD interviewed almost 3,)(
a four month period last year, nc
interviews, according to Opp.
We arrange for interviews arx
ments about rentals," Opp said. 4, S
been a great increase in rental o fi
increase, in the number of studeit
campus housing, and no increasi
since 1957, the OCHD is going d
feral policy.
Applicants fill out requests for of of-a
-a of-a brief check interview is m: d
place desired is what the applic; n
Then the interviewer refers the a ){
mation boards in his category.
By reducing the time and anni
conferences, greater overall efficii n
tained for the largest number of stu ii
The UF Senate approved the; j
regulations for off-campus housity
1964, Opp said. The regulations
together the policy requirements
time.
The Senate approved the overhl
sections to go in effect when pot;
As early as May 30, 1963, a
made by the Alachua County Healtl

Housing contn
No student is released from a
housing contract for personal con convenience,
venience, convenience, says Fred E. King,
Assistant Director of Housing.
Students living in UF housing
are under contract for one aca academic
demic academic year ending in August, King
said.
A student may be released from
a contract fortwo_reasons,hesaid.
Men who have found off campus
housing may be released before
classes start in September if there
are surplus applicants, King said.
The Committee on Student Hous Housing
ing Housing may release any student on the
basis of critical persortal circum circumstances,
stances, circumstances, he said. If a student asks
for release because of health there
must be a recommendation from
the Director of the Infirmary.
If the' reasons are financial, a



CRISIS

sis in the next
,f this crisis,
jusing situation
1 conditions and
a future on the
t, which bounded
the UF campus
e student body,
campus such as
cent, according
i the number of
1963, physical
>using facilities
of the entering
nstrars Office,
s are faced with
udents must find
as far as 25
Carl B. Opp,
they dont have
iuties to admin admin
admin
or mens dorm dormnce.
nce. dormnce. The dorms
May, according
off-campus are
son, Opp said,
central heat and
nd maid service
i.
$45 to $250 per
e accomodations
ents for around
ie from $95 to
ished.
i (OCHD) acts as
housing
re accomodations
300 applicants in
including phone
post announce-
Since there has
ferings, a great
its desiring off offin
in offin OCHD staff
d change its re re-campus
-campus re-campus housing
de to assure the
nt really needs,
iplicant to infor informant
mant informant of personal
jncy can be main mainlie
lie mainlie nts, Opp said,
revised student
ig on April 30,
fcrified and pulled
3 existing at that
Ml program with
psible, he said,
fusing evaluation
I Department and


acts are strict
detailed financial petition form
must be submitted, he said.
Students who marry may be re released
leased released if Housing is notiied be before
fore before the beginning of the term. This #
is an administrative policy, King
said, and not stated in the con contract.
tract. contract.
All students under 21 and all
women undergraduates must
petition for permiting to move off
campus, even if not bound by
contract.
The academic year contract was
indicated when the trimester sys system
tem system started, King said.
UF housing is financed by var various
ious various loans and bonding agreements
an d maximum occupancy is needed
10 me et the cost of the dorms and
their operations.
The contract is not binding un unless
less unless the student is enrolled.

the Off-Campus Housing Division of the UF found
many of the existing off-campus facilities to be
deplorable.
The area encompassed by this survey was bounded
on the west by NW 20th Street, on the North by
NW sth street, on the East by NW-SW 10th Street
and on the South by SW Bth Avenue.
In the survey of 72 buildings, the survey found
18 structures to be excellent; 18 good; 11, fair;
20, poor; five, unclassified because of insufficient
information.
Approximately one-half of the occupants were
housed in structures which were in acceptable
physical condition. Ofthetoal 36 buildings considered
to be excellent or good shape, 18 were judged to
be deficiencies in the area of suitability for
future occupancy.
Os the remaining 31 structures, which accommo accommodated
dated accommodated the other one-half of the persons housed, 11
could be revitalized with only extensive remodeling.
The other were felt to be beyond reconstitution.
The report described all of these 31 structures
as being unsatisfactory as dwellings.
Nothing in the report was said about the 21
structures which fell into the poor category beyond
that the dwellings were manifestly unsuitable for
human habitation.
The report stated that these structures were not
referred to students by the Off Campus Housing
Office, but there was no way now available to pre prevent
vent prevent university students from occupying them.
The dwellings exterior features showed as un unacceptable
acceptable unacceptable 68 per cent of the roofs and 65 per cent
of the foundations and walls. It also revealed
rat harborage and insect breeding in 68 percent of
the dwellings inspected.
The dwellings interiors showed unacceptable 72
per cent of the electrical wiring, 65 per cent of
the bath layout and design, 50 percent of expecta expectation
tion expectation of continued maintenance, 64 per cent for suit suitability
ability suitability for occupancy, 66 per cent of suitability for
future occupancy.
-*
'The Greeks Speak/ usual Friday
feature of this page will run Monday.

The report concluded much of the housing in the
area observed, and occupied by university students,
was not satisfactory for residential use. The result
came from a combination of factors: age, conversion
from one use to another, type of construction and
increasing costs of maintenance being chief among
them.
The report also stated there was no reason to
suspect that a rapid replacement of unsatisfactory
housing will result.
Examination of the area and buildings and city
records in question by Alligator staffers shows the
dwellings have not been replaced, but some have been
improved by alterations.
To combat these and similar conditions which were
found almost two years ago, the OCHD has devised
a program for off-campus housing which involves
new examination of all the aspects of student life
from physical condition of the buildings to student
-tenant relationships.
Opps said his office is inaugerating these pro proposals
posals proposals as soon as they are passed by the Off-Campus
Housing committee.

i 1 mRm 4
' ' "Hr i "
HOUSING LIKE THIS ALSO AVAILABLE
. .if youve got enough money

t .... i - 5... , .Mil f... nil
I HP* P**
I I- 1 I phHl
H i? m
m 1 m 1 I
me ft .awSi | smmMmmmm wgz p, it
11 _ L l 1 '!! t
a s rim 1
PBb I
UHL
- Wr LflPi
§1 m IHMwi..
I wm m am
m
H&4IH Bml. .HHHHRHPPH
(m I
. .. i. ftflM HMMf'v' I i Jf/JjP I x
im iSf I f I I Iplf 1 V 3 x
I MM f mm ft |LI I Mgr M >;
| NOT ALL TRAILERS LIKE THIS |
. .some much smaller &
x

(Trailers: special problems!
>** T~l.. T A ATT-' trATTAT/. (TA aaa T ~ X m I

Xj By JANE YOUNG
g Staff Writer
Those who take up trailer
life have very special
problems.
There is the problem of
small showers. Here, great
care must be exercised in
handling soap, because if you
ever drop it you simply
cant bend down to pick it
I U P*
Even if one has become an
expert at handling wet soap,
g dangers still exist in the show showg
g showg er. Not many people think
v to electrically ground the
trailer. Those who dont are in
g for a shock.
:£ The plumbing system of a
x trailer i$ unique. All drains
fMmmmm. % & *mm

UF enrollment increases
but housing staff doesn f t

By JEANNE MARCY
Staff Writer
The UF student enrollment has
increased approximately one-third
in the past seven years, but.there
has been no increase in the off offcampus
campus offcampus housing staff.
In 1957 with 11,207 UF students
there was a staff of five. In the
fall of 1964 the UF had 15,701
students. The off-campus housing
has dwindled to four this year.

Friday, March 12, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

go into one pipe. Last week
a sink stopped up at Archer
Road Village. No less than
seven people were there giv giving
ing giving advice and plunging plung plungers.
ers. plungers. Finally the problem was
solved. Then, one of them
heard water running and rush rushed
ed rushed back to the bathroom where
the comode was overflowing.
The plumbers were rushed
back and the comode was fix fixed,
ed, fixed, but the water started
coming up in the bathtub. At
this point the adventure was
stopped because the plumb plumbers
ers plumbers didnt want to find out
where the water would pop up
next.
The trailer with the sink sinkcomode-bathtub
comode-bathtub sinkcomode-bathtub problem was

Not all off-campus housing is
inspected before being referred to
students, states Carl B. Opp, head
of the off-campus section of hous housing
ing housing division.. At tiroes the office
is over flowed with students seek seeking
ing seeking housing and landlords seeking
tenants.
Housing inspection is a justi justified
fied justified complaint of students/* agreed
Opp. Presently, there is one hous housing
ing housing inspector doing the job, he
explained.
Financial limitations prevent
additions to the staff, Opp said.
Inspection is done on the basis
of minimum requirements, the off offcampus
campus offcampus official stated.
To improve the quality, in increase
crease increase the quantity, and improve
the use of private rentals, as asserted
serted asserted Opp, is the purpose of
the off-campus section of housing.
Assistance in maintaining good
relations between landlords and
tenants is, also included.
Off-campus housing is not an
enforcement agency, cited Opp.
We can't force students to pay
rent or get their deposits back.
Though, students may be brought
to the attention to the administra administration
tion administration by landlord complaints.
Landlords and certain housing
may be delisted, said Opp,
if management is unsound. Unsafe
and unsanitary conditions may also
be prevailing reasons for delisting.
Both students and landlords have
grips. Students state places aren't
clean and aren't well furnished.

one of the bigger ones, it could
hold seven people more or
less comfortably. But, con consider
sider consider the man with the 8 by
20.
He has a clear living room
floor space of exactly five by
four feet.
A few weeks ago the weather
was beautiful and he decided
to throw a dinner party.
Everything was going very
smoothly, until the sun went
down and the temperature
dropped 20 degrees and eight
people had to move Inside,
balancing dinner plates.
Nobody seemed to know what
to do in the event of a flat
tire.
A:::::; £ mmm#

K £o* 11
£
CARL OPP
. .housing head
They feel, cited Opp, that some
landlords have sharp business
practices. These may include land landlords
lords landlords requiring students to pay the
first and last months rent in
advance.
There is no evidence of ho hokey-pokey
key-pokey hokey-pokey rates by landlords,
stated Opp.
Student rumors say landlords
may fudge until the last minute
and get higher rent prices.
Landlords complain that stu students
dents students misuse accomodations, have
poor housekeeping practices, and
leave places in a mess. Opps cited
examples of students moving ele electric
ctric electric light fixtures, and nailing
heavy boards to the walls and
floors.

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator/ Friday/ March 12, 1965

Page 8

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

For Sale |
1960 ALLSTATE Scooter (Vespa),
good condition; best offer. Silver Silvertone
tone Silvertone electric guitar, sunburst
finish, SSO. Webcor 4-speed
record changer. Call 372-2119.
(A-113-lt-p).
SKATE BOARDS, professional
ball-bearing wheels, oak board,
fully adjustable. Limited supply.
$6.50, E. Lee Reid Jr., 2-6938.
(A-113-st-c).
1960 HARLEY DAVIDSON Topper.
Automatic. New parts, just over overhauled.
hauled. overhauled. $l5O or best offer. Call
Karen, Reid Room 223, 372-9389.
(A-113-lt-p).
ONE 30 GAS STOVE like new.
One arm chair. Brand new 3/4
bed. For information call 2-3734
after 5:15 p.m. (A-110-4t-c).
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER.
Six 500 sheet boxes of Buff. Retail
for S2O per box. Will sacrifice for
$lO per box. Call Ext. 2832 between
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. (A-110-tf-nc).
PROFESSIONAL GEIGER
COUNTER with ear phone and etc.
J. W. Van Buskirk, R. D. #l,
Keystone Heights, Fla. Phone
473-4517. (A-l 09-st-p).
1959 RANCHERO TRAILER, 10x45.
Excellent condition, furnished, 2
bedrooms, fenced in yard, close
to campus. See at Glynwood Park,
Lot 2, on Archer Road behind
Florida Power. Phone 8-1596. (A (A---112-3t-c).
--112-3t-c). (A---112-3t-c).
1962 HORIZON MOBILE Home. 2
bedroom. Equity plus take up pay payments
ments payments of $76.07 per month. Call
378-2854. (A-112-st-c).
1963 VESPA 150 cc. Scooter. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition with extras.
Contact Ira Zager AEPI House,
372-9404 or 372-9487. (A-112-
3t-c).
1964 MERCURY 100 HP outboard.
Used less than 30 hours. New
motor warranty. Controls, 12 gal.
tank, bronze propeller. Cost SI4OO.
Price $750. Call 376-0973. (A (A---112-st-c).
--112-st-c). (A---112-st-c).
RADIO FOR TRIUMPH Sports
car, Webcor Stereo tape recorder,
and F-19 Goya Guitar. Call 6-
2420. (A-112-3t-c).
1958 VESPA 150 motor scooter scooterdependable
dependable scooterdependable transportation with
spare tire. Contact Leo Hilke at
372-6298. 503 SW 2nd St. Apt. 2.
(A-111-3t-p),
- t ;
[ruo^en
IShoe Repair Shop
I HEELS ATTACHED
5 Mins.
SOLES ATTACHED
15 Mina.
At Two Locations
CAROLYN PLAZA
FR 6-03)5
And
101 N. Main St.
Opp. Ist Nat'l Bank
|B

i
I Por Sale" |
*SB MO-PED. $65. Good condition.
1713 NW Ist Ave. FR 8-1026.
(A-113-lt-c).
HONDA SUPER HAWK 305 cc.
Black and Silver. Immaculate
condition. 2700 miles. $475. Call
2-6675. (A-113-lt-c).
Lost & Pound
!
FOUND: A mans raincoat at
the Medical Center last weekend.
Call Joel at 2-6762 after 5 p.m.
(L-113-2t-p).
FOUND: At State Theatre 2 pairs
of womens prescription glasses,
during the running of 8 1/2.
Contact Bill Henderson, State
Theatre 6-6606. (L-112-tf-nc).
LOST: GOLD MESH Bracelet
between McCarty Hall and Student
Service Center. Has sentimental
value. Substantial reward. Call
Ken Small, Ext. 2744/L-112-2t-c).
Services
VARSITY RESTAURANT.
ATTENTION: we are now serving
STEAKS. $.99 and up. Large
selection. 209 NW 13th Street.
(M-113-4t-c).
INFANT CARE in private home.
References furnished. 378-2583.
237 SW 2nd Place. (M-98-ts-c).
PROFESSIONAL TYPING in my
home. Supplies will be furnished.
Call Carol Parker. 2-6353 any anytime.
time. anytime. (M-111-3t-c).
Add QUALITY to your home or
apt. Pure gold-leaf trim added to
lamps, frames, antiques, mirrors.
$6.00 minimum. Tom Baugh. 117
NW 17th Street. 376-8087. (M (M---111-st-c).
--111-st-c). (M---111-st-c).

PALM LANES
Free Bus Service
EVERY SAT. & SUN.
From Campus To Palm lanes
And Back
YOU CAN'T BEAT THE BARGAIN
SPECIAL BOWLING RATES
AND FREE TRANSPORTATION, TOO!
SCHEDULE FOR SAT., MARCH 6th and SUN., MARCH 7th
STOP NO. IPass through Sorority Row
1:30 p.m. 2:30 3:30 5:00 6:10
STOP NO. 2Broward & Rawlings Halls (Parking Lot)
1:40 p.m. 2:40 3:40 5:10 6:20
S TOP NO. 3lnfirmary Parking Area (Lot #5)
1:50 p.m. 2:50 3:50 5:20 6:30
STOP NO. 4 Military Science Bldg. (Rear Parking Lot)
2:00 p.m. 3:00 4:00 5:30 6:30
LAST BUS BACK TO CAMPUS @ 8:30 PM
2606 WALDO ROAD
(Go out NW 13th St. to 23rd Ave., by J.M. Fields.
Turn right, go to Waldo Road, and then tom- left*)
SUNDAY
1 PM to 6 PM 3 GAMES FOK SI
All Other Times Special Student Rates 40$ Per Game
Watch Futvure Ads For Sorority Bay

1
Wanted
WANTED ARTIST to exhibit art
work (any media) -by lease or
to sell in exquisite speciality
shop to open soon. FR 2-5048.
(C-111-3t-c).
Personal |
TO THE COOL men of U of F
To your own egos be true and
may your conceit lead to your
own downfall. Especially to M.,
S., and D. We thank you for
nothing. XXXs, K.K. and P. Gi Gill
ll Gill 3-1 t-p).
NOT AVAILABLE in the United
States, Beatles For Sale and
The Rolling Stones Album H.
$lO each or 2 for $lB. Call 372-
7253 anytime. (J-113-lt-c).
GAINESVILLE MINIATURE
RACEWAY BUSES to Sebring are
beginning to fill. sls per person
or $25 for copies. Price includes
admission to races. Buses will
leave March 26, between 4 and 5
and return early Sun. Morning.
The buses will remain so that you
may sleep in them. For information
drop by Gainesville Miniature
Raceway, 807 W. Univ. Ave. The
best thing about GMR BUSES is
that they are JOHN equipped.
(J-110-st-c).
[;UROpe-ssADayl
Hotel, Breakfast, Sightseeing- I
For information contact: I
World Travel Service, Inc. I
808 W. University 376-4641 |
I YAMAHABMW
Motorcycles
For The Discriminating M
CYCLERAMA I
378-2811 21 SE 2nd Place

Real Estate
i
DESIRABLE ACREAGE HIGH and
rolling. 40 acres. S3OO per acre,
highway frontage. 20 minutes from
U of F. Convenient terms. Will
consider exchange. Call Les
Jackson, Associate, Ernest Tew
Realty, 376-6461. (I-111-Bt-c).

aMHUiiuiiiy
I 2400 Hawthorn* Road Rf. 20 m Phone FR 6-5011 1
TONITE & SATURDAY 3 SUSPENSE HITS!
*EXCLUSIVE FIRST AREA RUN
PRODUCER WILLIAM CASTLE
11l DARES YOU TO CLAIM
MM

::::
yni I have never felt the touch
Â¥UU of a stranger in your dreams!



YAII have never had forbidden
aiIUU desires in your dreams!




yAI I hav& never had the impulse
I wU to kill in your dreams!




yAI I have never found yourself
l vU without clothes in your dreams!



yAI I have never been attacked
MU in your dreams!
:i!s
;:::
Yfil I have never been murdered
U W i n y o u r dreams!
mi
|| iF ANY OF YOUR ANSWERS ARE YES
...THEN IT IS SAFE FOR YOU TO SEE
ill : kB
I H M.-.x % r;U
B B I B B I fl B W.- .'/^ai
III k I k B B M vjvr .- vQmf
**** B B | H B B M > Bl
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. AUU fc M aaittiiiv-...-.v:.:'J '* m-.-.j* a *. .. M V BHHBISr Hk^kAs
X \ \
.. - '> w*.^ww.v.'
l ROBERT TAYLOR
I BARBARA STANtfyCK v
1 JUDITH MEREDITH BOCHNER^ 1^
" Shown first at 7:00/that "GOLDFINGER" MAN.
I T^"!cSSS^B^Mlflr^E*KE^!!!Zfa^
3rd Bonus Hit at 11:00 FRANKIE AVALON
_ IRWIN
Si
M BAC*tmtammb

....



::::

88

::::


I
::::
::::

For Rent
FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY.
Air-conditioned apt. 1 block off
campus. TV, heat, steam bath,
private carport, etc. For one only
see at 117 SW 12th Street. Apt. 1.
$55 per month. If interested call
Jim 372-6178. (B-111-ts-c).



Star Rent
AIR-CONDITIONED Apartments
for 3A and/or 38. Suitable for 2
or 3 people S7O per mo. plus
electric. 1829. NW 2nd Ave.
Suitable for 2 or 3 people at 1530
NW 4th Ave. $75-soplus electric.
Suitable for 3 or 4 people at 1518
NW 4th Ave. S9O-SIOO with air airconditioning
conditioning airconditioning included. Also renting
for fall at slightly higher rates.
Call 376-4353 evenings. (B-11l-
ts-c).
TWO 1 Bedroom apartments for
rent May Ist. 3 blocks from
campus. Air-conditioned, fur furnished,
nished, furnished, S9O per month. Days call
372-7032, nights 378-2229. 1716
NW 3rd Avenue. (B-111-3t-c).
2 BEDROOM UNFURNISHED
Apartment, 1 block from campus.
Kitchen equipped, Venetian blinds.
103 NW 21st Street. Call 6-6112.
(B-111-3t-c).
i
LARGE, CLEAN COMFORTABLE
ROOMS now available to male
students. Reasonable rates;
utilities and maid service included.
5 blocks from law school. For
information stop by 104 SW Bth
Street or call 372-0243. (B-110-
tf-nc).
CHARMING SPLIT-LEVEL APT.
Available 2 blocks from campus,
semi-furnished, modern kitchen,
washing machine, AIR-CON AIR-CONDITIONING.
DITIONING. AIR-CONDITIONING. Perfect for young
couples, working people, students.
Please call 376-9986. (B-112-st (B-112-st-1
-1 (B-112-st-1 BEDROOM, unfurnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, kitchen equipped. Couples
only. $75 per month. 1913 NW
'2nd Ave. Phone 2-1362. (B-113-
ts-c).
SMALL FURNISHED CCB Cottage.
Bedroom, electric kitchen, tile
shower. SSO per month. Couple
preferred. Baby welcome. South
on Ocala Road. Linda Ann Court.
376-5826. (B-108-tf-nc).
ROOMS FOR RENT, Central heat,
maid service, everything
furnished. 378-2583. 273 SW 2nd
Place. (B-98-ts-c).
LIVE BETTER FOR LESS. Brand
new 2 bedroom furnished apts.,
air-cond. Accommodates up to 4.
39th Ave. and 6th St. NW. $125
per month. FR 2-1003, after 7
p.m. (B-112-st-c).

jj
1:00,3:07,5:14
Mjjytiil 7:21,9:28
IN "PINK PAJAMAS" 1
ISuhia Marcello
Loren MastroiannL^^P
JmT] Marriage J9s
| Italian
WONDERFUL AFRICA %
Listen to the State Theatre Jazz hour every Son.
Midnite with your host/ Guy Graham on WGGG.

i
| For Rent
3 BEDROOM HOUSE, unfurnished,
but has stove. 1 bath, fenced back
yard, four car garage. Near
Stephen Foster SchooL 519 NW
27th Ave. Call after 6. 475-4101.
(B-113-3t-c).
1101 SW sth Ave. 4-br. 2-bath
FURNISHED APARTMENT,
very clean. Carpeted living room,
central heat and AC. 4-6 nurses
or students. 376-2892. (B-111-3t-c).
3t-c).
FOR RENT FRONT bedroom, with
kitchen privileges. 317 NW 12th
Street. (B-109-st-c).
Autos
VOLVO 1959, new battery, good
tires. S3OO and take over payments
of only $22.00 per month. May
trade. 372-7170. (G-113-st-c).
*63 VW, GREAT SHAPE. Needs
no work. $250 down, total $1250.
Call Coach Ellenson, Ext. 2131,
home FR 6-9768. (G-112-st-c).
1961 FORD COUNTRY SEDAN
Station wagon. 6 cylinder, R&H,
45,000 miles, excellent condition.
Call Dr. Robbins, Ext. 5205, at
Med. Center. (G-112-st-c).
i.
LOTUS XI LE MANS, Extra clean,
ready for street or track. Very
inexpensive. Can be seen at 17 NW
20th Drive. Apt. 6. Call 376-0962.
(G-109-st-c).
1961 VOLKSWAGEN SEDAN. In
exceptionally clean condition. Me Mechanically
chanically Mechanically perfect. White walls,
$995. Call 376-8863 after 5:30p.m.
(G-109-ts-c).
1956 MERCURY 4-door. Automatic
transmission, power steering, and
power brakes. Excellent condition
Phone FR 2-5244. (G-109-st-c).
1957 DODGE 2-dr. H. T* Custom
Royal. PS, PB, AT, Heater. Runs
and looks good. $2lO. FR 2-6118.
(G-110-4t-c).
1961 OLDS 88, 4-door sport
sedan, R&H, A/C, PS & PB,
excellent condition throughout.
Arrange your own financing. Call
evenings and weekends. 372-8221.
fG-110-10t-c).

CLUB RENDEZVOUS
Club Rendezvous will hold a
dance, Club Rendezvous Visits
Hades** tonight from 8-12 p.m.
Admission is free.
DISCUSSION GROUPS >
Florida Christian Fellowship
will hold discussion groups tonight
at 7 p.m. in Room 215, Florida
Union. The subject will be Life
Together.**
GAMMA DELTA
t
Gamma Delta, the Lutheran
Student Group, will hold a supper
Sunday at 6 p.m. at the First
Lutheran Church.
GATOR GRAS
Today is the last day for Gator
Gras Variety Show tryouts. All
interested individuals or groups
may sign up in Room 315, Florida
Union, from 1-5 n.m.
GEOLOGY TALK
The Geology Department is
sponsoring a speech by Dr. Robert
J. Menzies Monday, March 15, at
8 p.m. in Flint HalL
YOUNG REPUBLICANS
Young Republicans will meet to
distribute campaign material Sat Saturday
urday Saturday at 9:30 a.m. in the Florida
Union.

t NEW APPROACH IN THE
WRIGHT DIRECTION
VOTE FOR AN ACTIVE PROGRAM
FOR A GREATER GAINESVILLE
Moke the Ueiversify a real part of
the Gainesville Commoafty
Recognition that students and faculty are members of the community with full
citizen status, including the RIGHT TO VOTE
Positive interest and concern for student needs and desires
Fair hearings of any complaints against actions of city employees or officials
Better communication with students through student oigzanizationrand
student government
Use Uaiverslty Resoarces To Solve Local Probleais
Use University facilities and talent rather than ignoring tbem
Look for special consultants first in Gainesville, then in the state before going
elsewhere
I WRIGHT
City Commission Group H
fiHHHj Pull lever 7A on Tuesday, March 16
88888 l % 88881 paid for by Florence W. Smith, Cbmpaign Treasurer
Mini ii ii- i mmmmmmmm

Friday, March 12, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

campus news briefs

MORAL
RE-ARMAMENT
A program discussing moral
re-armament is scheduled for
tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the Uni University
versity University Auditorium.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
Mr. Charles Beall will speak
on The Gospel According to
Peanuts** at the Wesley Founda Foundation
tion Foundation Forum Hour, Sunday at 6:30
p.m. at the Wesley Foundation.

A LETTER:

To the Student Body of the UF:
We of Tau Epsilon Phi wouild
like to take this opportunity to
express our deepest regret con concerning
cerning concerning the incidences of the past
weeks concerning brother Robert
Segal.
Through some administrative
problems concerning Roberts
academic standing it has been de decided
cided decided that he is ineligible to serve
the student body as Clerk of the
Honor Court.
In regards to this matter we cer certainly
tainly certainly feel that Robert ran for this
position with the best of intentions
and so conducted himself during the
recent political campaign.

'deepest regret

SAILING CLUB
The Gator Sailing Club will hold
a meeting to nominate next year's
officers Monday, March 15, at 7
p.m. in Room 121, Florida Union.
ORIENTATION
The deadline for signing up for
the Fall Orientation Program has
been extended until this afternoon.
Interested students may sign up
for an interview outside Room
200, Florida Union.

The events which followed have
proven to be unforturnate to Rob Robert
ert Robert because he ran with a sin sincere
cere sincere belief that he was eligible for
this position.
The men of Tau Epsilon Phi wish
to thank the student body for its
support and especially we apprec appreciate
iate appreciate the efforts of President Bruce
Culpepper and Honor Court Chan Chancellor
cellor Chancellor Sid Stubbs for their pat patience
ience patience and help in clearing up
this misunderstanding.
Tau Epsilon Phi rallied behind
its brother during his political
activity and stands behind Robert
even more now.
Sincerely,
Tau Epsilon Phi

Page 9



Page 10

), The Florida Alligator/ Friday, March 12, 1965

r I V B -WV"
f X SBegfo- lllfllllk '''
jmF. K\X^^^HMHKf^|
2 If l
I 9bF v k | I
. ./e/it so rog/tf, Roger Thomas, fair curator,
Bill Slippy, fair judge chairman, and Tony
Bisselle, graduate student

'Hot Cell 1 hands
can do everything

Too hot to handle has come to mean a lot of things to a lot
of people.
But in the Nuclear Engineering Building, the term refers to
radioactive material that is far to radioactive to handle by humans,

even with gloves.
According to Richard Gurley,
an engineering doctoral student,
the only way to handle hot
materials is the hot cell.
The hot cell is a big brick
radiation-proof box about one
story high and big enough for two
or three men to stand in.
Gurley, said the hot cell and
accessories are made by Ray Proof
and are worth about $35,000. The
special protective window that lets
you see in is worth $4,000.
But the most spectacular thing
about the cell are the hands. These
hands, worth $7,000, can do every everything
thing everything the human hand can do and
more.
Tony Bisselle, an engineering
doctoral student, said, as he
showed the hands to William A.
Slippy, 3EG and Roger E. Thomas,
4EG, it could probably light a
cigarette and smoke it.
The hands are made by American

Mitflit /IPBIk
Humpty
Dumpty
FRIDAY All The Fl*
You Con Eat,
OLD-FASHIONED Hu* PUppla*,
FISH NIGHT Col Sl 5 PM -9 PM
*r- Fradi Cedar Kay Fidi
HUM PTY DUMPTY
Drive-In & Restaurant
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEALS
Fft2-538T 310N.W.t351.

Machine Foundry (AMF) the same
company that makes Voit sports
equipment and AMF bowling pin pinsetters.
setters. pinsetters.
*
UNIVERSITY
Lutheran Church j
1826 W. Univ. Ave.
(opp. handball courts)
2 services for student
convenience:
9-9:45 a.m.
11-12 noon
Sunday Evening Stu Student
dent Student Fellowship, 5:30
LENTEN SERVICE
Wednesday, 7t 3opm

Deans meddle say Richer

No more than five percent of
what the Dean of Student Affair's
office does is their business.
They're meddling in student's
lives,'* charged Edward J. Richer,
instructor of humanities, at the
Freedom Forum meeting Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday night.
I'm sure Mr. Richer has a
right to his own opinions,'' stated
Dean of Student Affairs Lester I.
Hale yesterday, but I really have
no comment as to what he said.
Richer, the faculty advisor to
the Freedom Forum, was the main
speaker at the second public meet meeting
ing meeting of the group.
Richer spoke to an audience of
about 100 in the Hillel Founda Foundation
tion Foundation Auditorium on the Philos Philosophy
ophy Philosophy and Problems of a Com Community
munity Community of Scholars.
He charged that students feel
like tourists at the UF, not like
members of a community. We
need freedom to create the com community,
munity, community, Richer said.
The administration, accord according
ing according to Richer, exists in the uni university
versity university for one purposeto rep represent
resent represent the multiple audiences off

65 CHEVROLET
These great performers are the lowest priced
models at our One-Stop Shopping Center
.* \ |f iMi. 1 I Hi 1 p 1 8 r ifB 11 It v I i'l> A,
HllMfln ''MBWtotfMHHuMj&jflMaaiMMKCiMtijaKUMiAttMM/gHMMMHMi
iwjim t
h ,'- ~, ... ;-
" : . w"*yTr.s^~-
7 -....... I vli
-
-- J 8
JB Mm lH §§
**- x oak W
-v v 1; UXFX?-
Top to bottom: Chevy LI 100 Corvair 500, Chevelle 300
Chevrolet Biscayne. All 2-door models.

Each of these beauties is the lowest
priced in its line. But the ride doesnt
show it. Or the interior. Or the
performance.
That luxurious Biscayne is as roomy
as many expensive cars, has color-keyed
interiors, plush vinyls, fine fabrics, full
deep-twist carpeting.
Chevelle, Americas favorite inter intermediate-size
mediate-size intermediate-size car, has clean new styling,
wide doors, roomy, tasteful interiors
and Chevrolet easy-care features.
Chevy 13 got a lot smarter for 6s
stayed sensible! Still family-size,
easy to handle, economical, and the
lowest priced Chevrolet you can buy.

Drive something really new-discover the difference at your Chevrolet dealer's
Chevrolet Chevelle Chevy U- Corvair Corvette

campus. They's training us to go
out and fit in society as it is.
A university should create stu students
dents students who want to go out and change
society. He admitted that freedom
is burdensome. Perhaps it is
easier to be machine processed,
Richer said.
He conjured a vision of an ideal
school, a free UF, that would
parasitically tap the energies of
the one across the street.
Maybe we could even print
schedules. We could send Tigert
a copy, joked Richer.
A basket weaving course was
proposed as part of a program that
Freedom Forum should consider
setting up.
We could bring our own baskets
to the Hub to sell, Richer said.
The Freedom Forum meeting
also included a speech entitled
Selma and What It Means, given
by James Dacey, 7AS, whose wife
Lynn Dacey, had just left for
Selma, Alabama.
You don't have to go to Selma
to care, Dacey told the audience.
He claimed that he had dissuaded
several people from leaving the

Or get a sporty rear-engine hardtop
in a Corvair Sport Coupe or Sport
Sedan for fun in the months ahead.
Chevrolet, Chevelle and Chevy II are
available with the Turbo-Thrift Six for
fuel economy, quick warmups, quiet
idling. Its light, efficient, smooth and
spirited.
Corvairs air-cooled rear-mounted
Turbo-Air Six delivers the best balance
and traction for
this size car. discover the
So be practical. difference
Only you will
know. Because it
sure wont show!

afternoon before the meeting.
Theres ugly parts to Selma,**
Dacey said.
If theres any meaning to us usit's
it's usit's that we cant forget its going
on.
No man is free until all men
are free,** concluded Dacey.
Computer
dance tonight
My man is number * says
IBM cards hanging on Broward
Hall walls.
These cards refer to the com computer
puter computer dance planned for tonight
in the Broward Hall Recreation
Room.
Coinciding with the opening of
BEC Weekend, the RW 300 digital
computer has set up blind dates
between Broward and Tolbert resi residents.
dents. residents. The dates were arranged
from information given on ques questionnaires
tionnaires questionnaires by Broward and Tolbert
residents.



Sports

Florida Relays host
top notch competition

-Early entries indicate the 22nd
annual Florida Relays, set for
March 27, will be the biggest and
finest yet held.
With many more teams expec expec[
[ expec[ Are you still |
wearing
those creasy
| kid slacks? J
Get into
h.i.s
Press-Free*
Post-Grad
slacks
Get into some wised-up
Post-Grads that know where
a crease should always be and
where it should never be, and
how to keep things that way.
The reason is the Koratron*
fabric of 65% Dacron*/35%
cotton. No matter how many
times you wash and wearthese
trimly tapered Post-Grad
slacks, they'll stay completely
neat and make the iron obso obsolete.
lete. obsolete. In tan, clay, black, navy
or loden, $6.98 in poplin
Th Store With More
Gainesville
Shopping Cantor
Use Your Charge
Open Til 9: P.M.

ted to enter before deadline Jim Jimmy
my Jimmy Carnes, University of Flor Florida
ida Florida track coach, reports 87 teams
already in the high school divi division,
sion, division, 34 in the University Divi Division
sion Division and approximately 30 in the
Junior College and Freshman
Division.
University Division entries in include
clude include most Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference teams plus teams from as
far away as Illinois, Delaware,
New Jersey, Virginia, Maryland,
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island
and Arkansas.
The Relays begin Saturday
morning, March 27, at JfcSQ, with
high school high hurdles. High
School events continue until 11
a.m. when the first University
Division event, 330 yard hur hurdles,
dles, hurdles, will be run.
Finals in high school field
events begin at 9*30 while all
other finals start after 2:15 with
the first being the two mile relay
(University Division).
Highlight of the day will be pre presentation
sentation presentation of the Kearney-Rayburn
Memorial Trophy, given in mem memory
ory memory of former Florida track cap captains
tains captains Francis Kearney and A1
Rayburn, to the athlete voted
as the roost outstanding in the
Relays.
Coppley Vickers, star distance
runner from the University of
Tennessee, captured last year's
trophy.

if she doesnt give it to you...
get it yourself!
JADE EAS£*.
~ ~ I4-ILi r-r- -
Cologne, 6 oz., s4*so
After Shave, 6 oz., $3.50 j§§
Deodorant Stick, $1.75 = =gML/% HI
Buddha Cologne Gift Package, 12 oz., SS.SO
Spray Cologne, $3.50 r J r ~ rs P
Buddha Soap Gift Set, $4.00
Cologne, 4 oz., $3.00
After Shave, 4 oz, $2.50 ***- NE YO,,K SOLE o' s B *'"
~
8-L Men'* Weor Dep.
THE STORE WITH MORE
'* *, GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER **
*; 1302 NORTH MAIN STREET
Store Hourv 100.m.-9 0.m.. Mon. thru Sot. U*e Your Chorpe Account Or Loyowoy

Contact lenses becoming
standard athletic gear

Cries of "Watch out for my
contacts" recently brought to a
halt the furious action of a pro professional
fessional professional basketball game.
Time was called, and the
tAlpvision audience watched as

I HIGH SCHOOL TOURNEY SLATE i
1 I
(Games to be played in order listed) ;ij:
S :$
:£ Session 1, 9 a.m. Friday g
Lake Placid vs. Cedar Key (Class B)
Zephyrhills vs. Chattahoochee (Class B)
, Session 2,1 p.m. Friday
Grand Ridge vs. Hilliard (Class C)
Oviedo vs. St. Cloud (Class B)
Gonzalez Tate vs. Apopka (ClassA)
Session 3, 6:30 p.m. Friday
Miami Beach vs. Tampa Hillsiborough
(Class AA)
Arcadia vs. Plant City (Class A)
Jacksonville Paxon vs. Orlando Edge Edgewater
water Edgewater (Class AA)
Session 4, Saturday afternoon
Class C and B Finals
Session 5, Saturday night
Class A ana AA Finals

Netmen tackle
Florida State
UFs tennis team meets its third
opponent Saturday when the net netmen
men netmen travel to Tallahassee to take
on Florida State.
The team's record stands at
1-1 after winning against Stetson in
the opener and losing to Miami
last Saturday.

Friday, March 12, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

several six and seven foot giants
crawled on hands and knees until
the tiny piece of plastic was found.
The object of the search was
a small dish-shaped eye-piece
known as a contact lens without

You, too, should know these famous West German cars
with modern 2 s and 4 s and SPORT by Bertone!
EVERYBODY IN EUROPE DOES; MANY IN AMERICA
DO! CURIOUS? Just ask lor color brochure A address
of nearest dealer and service station. Spare Parts
natly. Contact Exclusive IMPORTER. Trans Transcontinental
continental Transcontinental Motors, 421 East 91 St., New York, N.Y,
I 10028, Tel: (212) TR 6-7013 ACT TODAY

The glowing light of a diamond is a wonderful
thing, but there's more to a diamond than the
sparkle. It takes an expert to determine the
| j value of diamonds, and integrity to*r ,ce them
I / right. We have both.
1/ Exclusive Dealer for Gem cmonds
l\utll£A^enillX
I
1M W. UNIVIMITV AVI. ** * *-***

which the lanky ball player is
blind as a bat.
Since their introduction several
years' ago, contacts have virtually
replaced eyeglasses in pro professional
fessional professional and collegiate sports.
UF Assistant Football Coach
Eugene Ellenson said contacts are
used by some Florida football
players. He referred to Jimmy
Bernhardt in who used them
this year.
Jimmy had a little trouble
with them/ 1 Ellenson said, I
remember having to relieve him
a few times while he got them
fixed uo.
Associate Professor of Physical
Education Richard H. Reisinger
said that a former UF student
recently won the 150 pound class
championship in a Judo tournament
held in Miami wearing contacts all
the while.
Contact wearers worry more
about losing them than the
possibility of Injury. Everyday acts
like washing the face or yawning
are enough to dislodge the lenses
for some wearers, while others
say they have no such problems.
Pi Lams win
handball crown
Pi Lambda Phi won the Orange
League Handball Championship
Thursday, defeating Delta Tau
Delta by a score of 5-0.
Both teams survives tough semi semifinal
final semifinal matches en route to the
finals. The Delts edged Sigma JNu
3-2 while the Pi Lams smashed
Tau Epsilon Phi 4-1.
Leading the Pi Lams to the
championship were George Bant
and Paul Levitan, both unbeaten
in the singles, and double's pair
Howie Kreps and Gene Kay.

Page 11



Alans Mister
Sandwich [gH,
just across from campus in\ jSj- 1 I
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Gator of the Week

Tom Dioguardi
Tom Dioguardi, sophomore swimmer from West Palm Beach, is
this weeks choice as Gator of The Week after a record-setting
performance last weekend to lead Florida to the Southeastern
Conference swimming title.
Dioguardi became the first swimmer in SEC history to capture
three first places and swim on a winning relay team as the Gators
easily won their 10th consecutive conference crown.
Dioguardi captured the 50, 100 and 200 yard freestyle events
and came from one lap behind as anchor man on the free style relay
team to win this event also.
His times in the 50 (:21 7) and 100 (:48.5) tied conference record
times for these two events. He captured the 200 in 1:50.7, only
three-tenths of a second off the record.
Dioguardi thus lived up to the promise of a sophomore season
which saw him set all Florida records in his three specialties and
lose only one time in all three events combined.
Dioguardis times this season rank among the top six in the nation
in his three events and Coach Bill Harlan, who will take several
swmmers to the NCAA meet in Ames, lowa later this month, expects
the 6-4 youngster to earn All-America status this year by placing
in the national finals. 6

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