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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Collins tells of race problems

By ED BARBER
Former Florida Governor
Leoy Collins, unexpectedly
returned to the racial wars in
Selma, Ala., today, was able to
discourse on race relations during
an interrupted visit here
yesterday.
Collins, director of the UJS.
Commerce Departments Com Community
munity Community Relations Service (CRS),
was called back yesterday
afternoon by President Lyndon
Johnson to the scenes of violence
in the strife-torn southern
Alabama town. This ruled out his
featured appearance at the annual

Segal is officially out

Robert Segal is a student.
He is not Clerk of the Honor
Court.
In an official memo of clarifi clarification
cation clarification handed down by Dean of
Student Affairs Lester L.- Hale
yesterday, Segal was ruled ineli ineligible
gible ineligible to hold the student body
office.
The memo explained that Segal
has registered during the early
registration period last trimester,
but that at the end of the trimes trimester
ter trimester he had failed half of his hours

Culpepper letter on Segal
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a letter
by Student Body Pres Bruce Culpepper stating
his and student government's position on the
Segal affair.)
The final question of seating Bob Segal as Clerk of the Honor Court
has troubled our administration ever since we learned of Segals
questionable registration.
The problem of seating Segal is now answered. Segal is not a full fulltime
time fulltime student, therefore he cannot hold the office to which he was
elected. This policy is not stated in the Student Body Constitution,
but is recognized by the Dean of Student Affairs' office as a definite
requirement to seat any SG official.
Originally, this situation was created by a misunderstanding be between
tween between Segal and the Registrar's office. Due to his inactivity in trying
to get this matter corrected and his failure to attend classes, Segal
cannot possibly obtain a full-time student status at this time
I am disappointed in Bob and am sorry for the embarrassment that
he has caused our administration, our party and his fraternity. We
were aware of his potential and are sorry that it cannot be realized
now. We are scrutinizing the system of checking election qualifications
so that a similar situation will not happen again.
I personally feel it is only just to allow Fred Breeze of Action
Party to take the position. Strictly speaking, Segal was not qualified
to run; therefore, Breeze should be declared winner.
Signed
Bruce Culpepper
. .are (left to right), Pres. Stew Parsons,
Vice-Pres. Barry Sinoff, Secy. Chip Block and
Treasurer Joe MaHnelli.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

VSI. 57, N:>. 111

IN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

David Levy Yulee Lecture.
But he didnt get away before
granting an exclusive interview
to The Florida Alligator in which
he said, As we remove this
scar on our national character,
as we make the Negro free in a
REAL sense, each of us, in a
real sense, becomes free.
Commenting before he received
word of the latest incident involv involving
ing involving the beatings of three white
ministers in Selma, Collins
praised the cool heads of both
factions.
I was tremendously pleased
with what happened in Selma yes yesterday
terday yesterday (Tuesday),* he said. I

and was suspended for one trimes trimester.
ter. trimester.
At the time Mr. Segals name
was on the ballot he was not a
student at the University nor was
he eligible to be one,* according
to Hale.
He was notified of the suspen suspension
sion suspension by a letter dated Dec. 22,
1964, according to Hale, and the
suspension was confirmed in a
face-to-face conversation bet between
ween between Segal and the Associate Re Registrar,
gistrar, Registrar, Richard H. Whitehead.

University of Florida, Gainesville

think the demonstrators acted
under great emotional stress at the
same time with dignity. I also
think the police officers acted
Cancellation

§ A call yesterday from Pres- v
X; ident Johnson sent Ex-Gov.
Leroy Collins back to Selma, I:*::
Alabama and cancelled the g
ft speech Collins had planned to ::j;
;j:j give last night at University :£
Auditorium.
Collins has been serving as
|:)i the presidents representative
*: in Alabama to mediate in the
Selma situation. .

During this conversation, Segal
was given two ways In which he
could be reinstated in school, Hale
said.
One consisted of getting an I**
he had received in an honors
course changed.
If this step had been completed
by the last day for late regis registration,
tration, registration, Segals prior status of
having registered early would have
made him elegible to hold office.
A second alternative was offered
to Segal by the registrar that
consisted of Segal requesting the
Senate Committee onStudent Peti Petitions
tions Petitions to permit him to be read readmitted.
mitted. readmitted. However, Hale said the
Petitions Committee would proba probably
bly probably have placed him on academic
probation, thus making him ineli ineligible
gible ineligible to be HC Clerk.
Segal said yesterday he knew
nothing of the second alternative.
On Feb. 24, the registrar
received notice that the I grade
had been changed to a B. Hale
said this removed Segal from sus-i
pension, and made him eligible to
re-register, but did not fully
restore him as a registered
student.
Segal still contends that at the
time of qualification for the Spring
elections he assumed the record
had been straightened out since he
was cleared to run for Clerk.
Segal did appeal to the University
College Committee on Petitions
and was granted permission to
register late and to take less than
the minimum load.
Yesterday Segal registered for
seven hours and it was decreed
that he was ineligible to hold a
student office because, as Hale
said, He is not a full time
student.
The would-be Clerk had been
told by the registrar to obtain
signatures from this trimesters
professors saying they would let
him back in their classes. He was
also told to keep attending classes.
1 dont understand how a student
with Segals record at the Univer University
sity University could have possibly mis under understood
stood understood the instructions, White Whitebead,
bead, Whitebead, the Associate Registrar,
said.
Segal admitted being very lax
in obtaining the necessary signa signatures
tures signatures and causing the delay in
getting the question settled.
According to the Student Body
Constitution the Chancellor of the
Honor Court shall fill the now
vacant Clerk spot.

with reason and restraint.
The whole experience of
Tuesday seemed to me to be on
the credit side for the state of
Alabama. And it was certainly
satisfying especially in the light
of the horrible, disgraceful event
of two days before that time."
Sunday, voter-registration mar marchers
chers marchers were turned back by police
tear gas and clubs, the free use
of which caused nationwide reac reaction.
tion. reaction.
When asked if he had any part
in the lengthy discussions immedi immediately
ately immediately prior to the second march,
Collins said, Under the law, we
cant relate specific information
about our conciliatory efforts. The
law expressly prevents us
from doing that.*
I will say this,* he continued,
that at the request of the Presi President,

Thailand diplomat
hits U.S. Asian policy

Talking at an informal reception
Tuesday night, Ambassador Sukit
Nimmanheimin of Thailand said,
NIMMANHEIMIN
xXvXyX^XxXvXyXvXvX^vXX'XX'lxX'.

5 students leave for Ala.

Five UF students dropped out of
school and are on their way to
Selma, Ala., to become part of
the civil rights movement there,
the Freedom Forum said yester yesterday.
day. yesterday.
The five, Dana Swann, David
Purviance, Judie Harman, Lynn
Dacey and Carrol Richardson have

Docs stopped
SELMA, Ala. (UPI)--Doctors
serving with the Medical Com Committee
mittee Committee for Human Rights said yes yesterday
terday yesterday they were taken to the
Dallas County Courthouse by state
troopers and ordered not to give
first aid to persons hurt in racial
demonstrations.
The physicians were Drs.
Richard Hausknecht of New York
and Jack Gleger, a professor at
Harvard University.
The committee helped set up
first aid units Tuesday because of
last Sundays violence.
First aid corps men wore arm armbands
bands armbands and several churches had
their basements designated as first
aid shelters.
Hausknecht said he and Geiger
were taken to a man who identified
himself as Douglas Benton who told
them he represented the state
agency that licenses physicians.
He said Benton told them*'if we
touch anybody we would be arres arrested
ted arrested on the spot.*'

Thursday, March 11, 1965

dent, President, I went to Selma.
While there, Collins did talk to
the various factions involved in
the demonstrations.
He said he could not comment
further on what was discussed,
but did say that he was glad both
King and his forces, and the police
officers and their forces, acted
in the manner they did.
And I'm sure, he added, that
it was a matter of great pride
to the President also.
He said that the CRS had been
See Collins* p. 5

Formal* anti-amerlcan feeling
by neutral countries in Southeast
Asia is largely due to conflicting
attitudes of American foreign po policy
licy policy makers.**
Southeast Asia hears one UJS.
senator say one thing and another
senator say something else. Be Because
cause Because of this the neutral countries
are afraid to voice their approval
of American actions in Asia.
These countries are watching
the confusion. When it straightens
out, America will win the formal
support of nations like India.**
The ambassador said SE Asia
SeeTHAILAND* on p. 3

all been connected with civil rights
movements on or around the cam campus.
pus. campus.
Tigert Hall confirmed the with withdrawal
drawal withdrawal of Richardson and Swann.
Edward Richer, Humanities in instructor,
structor, instructor, said more were plan planning
ning planning to arrive in Selma this week weekend.
end. weekend. He said, "If more people
don't take action like this the
country won't Jae worth living in
within the next twenty years. This
is the only way the injustice can
be undone."
Freedom Forum, with which the
traveling students are all connect connected,
ed, connected, made a statement of purpose
for the students who left in a
declaration made by the executive
secretary, Marilyn Sokolof.
She said, "We as students of
the University of Florida, feel
ashamed that such atrocities can go
on within the United States. We
feel we cannot sit by and just
watch these things happen. Thats
why some of us have gone to
Selma."
According to Richer tue students
are answering an appeal made by
King, who has urged people to
volunteer to help in the demon demonstrations.
strations. demonstrations. "I did not encourage
them to go," be said.
Bob Ellison, Alligator photogra photographer,
pher, photographer, joined the group headed for
Selma yesterday.
Freedom Forum was formerly
Freedom Party of the UF.



, The Hondo Alligator, Thursday, March IT,- 1965

Page 2

: *TTji M W"** I fS
ISfe Wm
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jjK;
ENGINEERING FAIR QUEEN JANETTE WOODY
.and her runner-ups, Bebe Parker (right) Kappa Delta Sorority,
and Kim Hadley (left), Zeta Tau Alpha. Miss Woody is a Chi Omega.

Engineering Queen chosen
Miss Janette Woody, 2UC, was chosen Engineering Queen at
the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) meet meeting
ing meeting this week.
Miss Woody is majoring in business statistics and is a member
of Chi Omega sorority.
The first runner 19 was Miss Bebe Parker, KD, and the second
runner 19 was Miss Kim Hadley, ZTA.
The girls were judged on the basis of poise, charm, beauty and
voice.
The IEEE annual banquet will be held at 7 p.m. tonight at the
Holiday Inn. The new queen and her runners-up will be in attendance.

Slaughter to speak here tonight

Dr. Frank G. Slaughter, Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville author, lecturer and sur surgeon,
geon, surgeon, will speak on the Right
To Be Wrong tonight at 8:15
p.m. in the Florida Union Aud Auditorium.
itorium. Auditorium.
Dr. Slaughter graduated Phi Beta
Kappa at seventeen from Duke
University, and in 1930 became
one of the youngest graduates of
John Hopkins Medical School.
Acompetertsurgeon^hejgaveju^

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NlgHt
HUmpty
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Large Del Monico,
THURSDAY Baked Potatoes,
Tossed Salad,
STEAK NIGHT 5-9 P.M. Hos Buffered Roll*.
$ 1,07
HUMPTY DUMPTY
Drive-In & Restaurant
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEALS
372-5387 310 NW 13th St.

practicing medicine in 1946, to be
a writer.
His first success, That None
Should Die, came after several
frustating years of pounding a
five dollar second-hand type typewriter.
writer. typewriter.
Today, he has 42 books printed
in over 20 countries to his credit.
Besides being a full-time writer
and lecturer, Dr. Slaughter is a
Trustee of Jacksonville Univer University,
sity, University, president of his local Dad's
Club, and served two years as a
trustee and Chairman of the Aca Academic
demic Academic Committee of the Bolles
School.
The Crown and Cross and
Sword and Scalpel are among
his best known books. His most
recent novel is Upon His Rock.

.: 'i! m
|: I
> I aww
j/f r~
Its your first interview.
Youre a nervous wreck.
What are you going to wear? And say?
Maybe youll go back to grad school.
Rnt impressions ore lasting, so don't get caught with your appearance
down. Wear a Doctor* and worsted suit in a new medium tone. At least
the Interviewar will see you have good taste. And tell him how suits
with Dacron stay neat and wrinkle free. He'll be imoressed.
Hart Schoffher & Marx Racquet Club Suit.. .$85.00
Cricketeer University Dacian .....$59.95
Deansgote University Natural Shoulder $59.95
Deansgate Dacron-Cotton fool in $45.00
ASK ABOUT OUR U of F STUDENT CHARGE ACCOUNT
&iAmuu&
Free Paiking on the First Federal Bank Lot. Rearof Store
| 225 W. University Open 'til 9 Fridays Ph. 378 1611

34 UF groups
to exhibit at Fair

UF student engineering groups
will present 34 different exhibits
and displays this week during the
20th annual Engineers' Fair.
The three-day event opens tom tomorrow
orrow tomorrow night at 6:30 p.m. and will
continue Saturday and Sunday in
the College of Engineering building
and other adjacent facilities.
The student projects will be m
addition to 24 displays set up by
national, state and local business
firms and corporations.
One of the most interesting at attractions
tractions attractions should be the hot cell,
,a brick radiation-proof box about
one story high and large enough
for two or three men to move
comfortably within its walls.
The cell has mechnical hands
worth $7,000 that can do everything
human hands can do in their
assigned duty of transporting ra radioactive
dioactive radioactive material when handles
outside the cell are coordinated
by an operator.
The hot cell will be located in
the radio chemistrv laboratory in

the Nuclear Science Building, just
behind the main structure.
Officials expect students from
at least 20 Florida high schools
will visit the Fair, many because
of the State High School Basket*
ball Tournament tomorrow and
Saturday or in conjunction with
the National Academy of Sciences
meeting in Tallahassee this week weekend.
end. weekend.
Joseph Weil, dean emeritus of
the College of Engineering, noted,
One of the important aspects
of the Fair is its value to high
school students in focusing their
attention on the picture of pro professional
fessional professional engineering in the state
and giving them an opportunity to
see the instructional equipment
at the UF.
Dr. John C. Slater, a leading
expert on quantum theory of atoms,
will be the featured speaker at
Saturdays smoker in the Social
Room of the Florida Union at
1 p.m.



Likes the Beatles
If you like the Beatles, you
have something in common
with today's Campus Cutie.
Sandy Shapiro is a Freshman
from Asheville, North Caro Carolina,
lina, Carolina, whose first love is the
Beatles.
Sandy is a member of Alpha
Epsilon Phi sorority, and ser serves
ves serves on the Fine Arts Com Committee
mittee Committee of the Florida Union.
She plans to major in art.
Her hobbies include (appro (appropriately
priately (appropriately enough) painting and
modern jazz dancing.

1 l 11 ii
aaSL Silvermans
VGkladies sportswear
Short-Skirt ...$13.98 ( | \
Hooded Top ...$9.98 V
Overblouse ... $ 9 .98
Bermudas $ 7.98 \
W
INSEPARABLE ... he short-*krt
combination by Country Set. Rainbow
stripe skirt is attached to solid natural
color shorts. Top has attached hood.
Team with stripe overblouse and
Bermudas. Sizes 3*13
Sifveww*
225 W. University Ave.
Specialists in University Clothing

Continued
is living in fear of the Chinese
Communists. A policy of support
to America would benefit the
nations, but neutrality must be
maintained until the direction of
American policy is clear."
The recent American strikes on.
North Viet Nam raised this com comment
ment comment from Nimmanheimin. "The
stepped-up war is a natural conse consequence
quence consequence of the commitments made
by the Eisenhower administration
when the UJS. undertook to defend
any country from the encroach encroachment
ment encroachment of communism."
"The feeling against America in
Southeast Asia is not so much
anti-American as it is anti-West,"
said the ambassador. "Only in the
last decade has Southeast Asia
freed itself from Western domina domination.
tion. domination. This exploitation is still
fresh in the minds of the people
and they can't see how America
can be any better."
Explaining the instability of Viet
Nam government, Nimmanheimin
said, "Viet Nam is new at go government.
vernment. government. Colonial rule in Indo Indochina
china Indochina produced few experienced
administrators in Viet Nam.
"When the French pulled out a
power vacuum was left. It will

THAILAND

from Page.l
take lime to produce leaders strong
enouch to fill this vacuum and hold
this country together," he said.
The ambassador was sure of
continued stability in Thailand.
"In Thailand each farmer owns
his land. Communism would take
this away.
Nimmanheimin also explained
that the main inducement to gain
influence used by the Chinese Com Communists
munists Communists in SE Asia is a plea for
unification of Chinese peoples
scattered throughout SE Asia. "In
Thailand our ancestry is not con connected
nected connected with the Chinese. Conse Consequently,
quently, Consequently, Mao Tse Tung has no
chance there."
When asked about Buddhist riots,
I realized that many of the monks
were communist agitators."
Ambassador Nimmanheimin was
educated at London University. He
has served in Thailand's Ministry
of Education and the Ministry of
Industry. He is a former Minister
of Thailand Economic Affairs and
served in the Department of the
Prime Minister, 1957-1959.
His diplomatic posts include;
Ambassador to India, Ceylon, and
Afghanistan.
Karl cites
college crisis
"Gov. (Haydon) Burns must soon
realize that there is a crisis in
Florida's higher education and if
the trend continues on its present
course a tragedy cannot be aver averted,"
ted," averted," Fred Karl, defeated Florida
Gubernatorial candidate said here
yesterday.
He cited the Board of Regents
situation and said it should be
cleared up as soon as possible.
Karl said that Gov. Burns has
made some excellent selections for
various state positions, specifi specifically
cally specifically on the Road Board. He stated
that the Governor is structuring
the state government much like the
See KARLon p. 7

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Thursday, March 11, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

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'
THE COLWELLS
. .Paul, Ralph and Steve, will appear in the
University Auditorium tomorrow night at 7:30
p.m.

Colwells to sing
of revolution
A group of folksingers who sing about revolution will appear at the
Moral Re-Arm ament program tomorrow night 7:30 p.m. in University
Auditorium.
The Colwell brothers, a three man group, have spent the last nine
years on a tour of the world singing in 37 countries on six continents.
They have been guests of 27 prime ministers, kings, queens, and
presidents during these years.
They sing over 300 songs in 48 languages. According to the Colwell
brothers, their aim is to raise hundreds of thousands of youth around
the world who will be the angry young men of their generation, irate
about what is wrong, ready to give everything for what they believe
is right/*
This group was active in helping unify the Congo after its independence
in 1960. They worked for 14 months singing their songs about demo democracy,
cracy, democracy, trying to divert the Congo from Communism.
They also accompanied a march through India with Vinobha Bhave,
the disciple of Mahatma Gandhi.
The Colwell brothers compose most of their own songs. They include
folk-songs, African rhythm, surfing music, rock *n roll, and English
ballads.
They will be on the same program with Richard (Rusty) Wailes,
winner of three gold medals for rowing in the 1956 and 1960 Olympics
and the 1959 Pan American Games on behalf of Moral Re-Armament.

odR HoMt-BAKf
Lasa§na:
me Hi t 0,8 The
umolf campus
jQjL
Carman el las
jjf <£a*ajr
706 West University Avenue

Page 3



Page 4

> The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 11, 1965

ERNIE UTZ
Edttor-lfraChluf

LOU FERRIS
Editorial Pag* Editor

VIEWPOINT
Good work men
Fraternities all too often hide their light
under a bushel. Many hours of unselfish
service to the community and university are
given by individual fraternity men and whole
chapters. Most of the time no publicity is
sought or given to these projects. This is
unfortunate since thoughtless critics are quick
to publicize mistakes made by the fraternity
system.
I am very proud of the work done by a
number of our UF chapters. All students
benefit from the good-will these chapters
perform in the name of the university. I have
a feeling that service of this sort builds
a stronger tie between the student and the
university, the type of identity a large
institution finds hard to cultivate.
These are the words of Dr. Frank Maturo,
member of the IFC Disciplinary Committee,
and a judge for the Dan McCarty Memorial
Service Trophy Competition.
Criticism recently has been leveled at the
fraternity system by men whom, we believe,
have not considered the full picture.
The majority of social fraternities perform
many services which are all too often over overlooked.
looked. overlooked. Since we cannot recognize every
fraternity, we wish to mention a few whose
have given of themselves beyond
the call of duty.
The IFC Service Award was given to Phi
Gamma Delta. The award was based 15% on
service to the campus, 60% on service to the
community, and 25% on appearance of the
projects.
The Fijis performedprojects too numerous
to discuss here. The Theta Chis were given
honorable mention, and Lambda Chi Alpha
was runner-up in the competition.
The IFC blood-drive trophy was given to
Phi Kappa Tau for the largest amount donated,
Delta Tau Delta for the second highest amount,
and to Chi Phi for the greatest percentage of
donors.
And finally, Pi Lambda Phi fraternity was
awarded the coveted IFC scholarship trophy
for general excellence in academic com competition
petition competition with other Greeks.
The Alligator is happy to take this
opportunity to point out tne services done
in many areas by the fraternity system.
The fraternity system is .a definite asset
to the UF.
S. U.
GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EWXOBIAL BTAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Kay
Mtaeter. (Correspondents), Yvette Cardoso, Agnes Fowles,
KMta Mathlson, Dan Taylor, Sam Uliman, Selwin H, Ciment,
Jay foley Stephen Kana% Dee Wright, Bob Wilcox
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Kurvln, Ann Carter, Thelma Mossman, Fran Snider, Cynthia
Tnastall, Harvey WoHson, Karen Vitunac, Jack Zucker, Ami
Shperstein, Cart Brown, Jane Young, Bill Lockhart, Ken Simon,
Dtm Dobson, Jeffrey DOnke waiter, G. S. Corserl, Eunice Tall,
Unde Cody, Woody Leonard, Jennell Close, Nancy Van Zile.
, Th. Florida Alligator rmmi to. rtgto to ragnUto to. typographical tern, of all adv.rtlami.iito and
to rwlw or tom away copy which it cwridwra objbettohto.
MO KBIIIOM B GUARANTEED, tho*t fealmd poaitton will b. given whenever poMlble.
Th. Florida Allocator will not oontotor ad]tnt.nto of payaawt tor any ndvertla.in.nt Involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or orromoea lnmrtlon unites notice la given to ton Advertising Manager within
(1) oat day after advertisement *>pairs.
The Florida Alligator will aot be responsible tor more than oat Incorrect Insertion of an ndvertlsement
scheduled to ren several times. Mottoes tor correction most bo gives baton east Insertion.
TIB FLORIDA ALLIGATOR to toe official student newwapsr of toe Untveraity of Florida and la
pSbUshad five times weekly except doing May, Jam and July vhm It Is published aemt-woekly. Only
ailllnriilr represent toe official opinions of toelr authors. Tbs Alligator la entered as second class
matter at ton Ototed States Post Office at GslnesvlUe.

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International

STEVE VAUGHN
Managing Editor

JOE CASTE LLO
Executive Editor

ANDY MOOR
Sports Editor

\y l\
"WELL DOC. IT ALL STARTED
WHEN I HAD THREE PROGS IN ONE DAY"

EDITOR:
IN THE ALLIGATOR of March
5, I could not help but notice
the letter from Quien Sabe?.
Aside from his clever use of
vocabulary, I was impressed and
saw little to reflect the authors
knowledge of the function of student
government or the value of campus
politics.
, THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
can be proud of the fact that it is
reputed to have one of the most
politically active student bodies
in the United States. Politics are
the result of free speech and
democracy.
THE COLOR, INTENSITY, and
excitement of a political campaign
on' this campus is part of the
teaching to future leaders of a
great American tradition. The
practical experience and
knowledge gained is invaluable.
THE FUNCTION OF student
government here is more than to

EDITOR:
IM WRITING THIS letter in
reply to your guest letter of last
Friday, written by Michael
Stanfield, advocating an American
withdrawal in Viet Nam.
YES, MR. STANFIELD, you do
have a right to express your
thoughts on the conditions in Viet
Nam. Even if you had not lost a
dear friend in the war there, you
would still have the right to
express your feelings, because
MILLIONS of men like your friend
Ronald have fought and died to
protect this and other rights you
now-possess.
YOU HAVE MAINTAINED that
we have vastly over-extended
ourselves and that by withdrawing
we will not jeopardize our national
security. I disagree on both points.

EDITOR:
I WAS MOST interested in
columnist Moorheads article on
the nudist colony (sic) which
appeared in Mondays Alligator.
Especially since I had just returned
from a nudist convention in Tampa
where I had gone to gather material
for a magazine article.
HE GEE WHIZ narrative of
voyeuristic thrills was somewhat
nauseating. The column read like
a dictionary of cliches
interspersed with * Tom S wifties.
(i.e.*...most revealing experience
of my life ... and ...
perspiringly armed myself with
camera,. .) What happened to
he other old standbyes like drop
iverything?
MOORHEAD CERTAINLY was

Micky Mouse-ism

effect simple liaison with the
administration. Divided into three
branches; legislative, executive,
and judicial, student government
provides a multitude of services
td the student that Tigert Hall
could not possibly render with any
degree of efficiency.
THE WRITER OF the letter
in question based it on a number
of incorrect assumptions and
irrelevant questions. I would like
to know how a council could be
chosen from among the students
of this campus democratically and
non-politic ally? How would this
effect more closely integrated
student-faculty cooperation?
GRANTED, WE DO and always
will have problems that present
difficulties in their solution at the
student government level; no
institution is free of faults
or inadequacies. It is a popular
myth that if only student govern government
ment government pleaded their cases in a

Replies to Stanfield

FIRST, WE ARE capable of air airlifting
lifting airlifting thousands of men and
necessary hardware to any part
of the world in a matter of hours;
the Seventh Fleet is the dominant
military force in Southeast Asia;
and our intelligence knows the
exact military posture of China
and N. Viet Nam at any given*
moment. We may be everything
else, but*, we are not overextended
to any degree.
SECOND, TO COMPARE our
withdrawal with that of France
ten years ago, is, I feel, a mis misleading
leading misleading and quite dangerous
comparison, indeed.
WHEN YOU SAY that Frances
national security was not
endangered when she withdrew,
you overlook two very real facts.
First, her national security was
-not jeopardized because the U. S.
moved in when tne Communists

Cliche-ridden column

right when he stated that he
showed a little enterprise in his
capacity as a reporter. He showed
VERY little enterprise. The first
person, cliche-ridden article on
Distressed |
EDITOR: ;£
V
I WAS VERY distressed to learn
the Agriculture Department has :j:j
had no new buildings in the past iiji
ten years.
BUT CAN YOU imagine my dis distress
tress distress when I saw' Walker Hall
which serves the Mathematics Si
Department? Or Anderson, $
English? Or Peabody, history?!*:;
$
* KONALD KEYSER, 4AS |j

-LETTERS -LETTERS

more adamant fashion to the
big people in Tigert all would be
well.
THE TRUTH IS, that adminis administrators
trators administrators will not cooperate any more
or less by closer integration,
students will always be
dissatisfied, student government
will always be the scapegoat for
do-gooders and malcontents.
IN CONCLUSION, I would like
to comment on the question that
irked me the most. Why cam campaign?
paign? campaign? The answer is so obvious;
how else will a responsible voter
know the qualifications of the
candidates or the important
issues?
PERHAPS QUIEN SABE
should start a society (it seems to
be a popular pastime around here),
naming it what he will, and pro professing
fessing professing the ideology of Mic ke y
Mouse-ism.
TERRY RUSSELL, 3AS

started pushing South again, and
second, had the U. S. ignored
Saigons plea for assistance, we
would have discovered in a very
short time the willingness of China
to engulf the whole of Indochim
including Burma and Malaysia.
THIS IS THE very reason why
we must stay in Viet Nam now.
The freedom of the people of
Viet Nam and the whole of Indochina
is very much in the national
interest of the United States. Indo Indochina
china Indochina is the richest area on the
Asian continent in natural
resources, both strategic andnon andnonstrategic;
strategic; andnonstrategic; to give Red China
access to these resources could
be a fatal mistake tor us to make.
The long-rundhnger to world peace
is the prime consideration of our
Viet Nam policy.
MICHAEL MCCARTHY, 2UC

the local nudist camp has been used
for filler material around dead city
rooAs tor years.
THE REFERENCE to the
cheater, a girl in shorts showed
complete ignorance of', the
situation.
TWO POINTS in conclusion.
Being such a keen reporter, Mr.
Moorhead should have learastfthat
a nudist CAMP is never referred
to as a colony** by nudists
themselves, only by the
half-informed. Also, if Moorhead
has such a nose tor news, how
come he didnt know that the
American Nudist Association
affair (Lady Godiva contest) in
Delray, was cancelled?
DON BELLEW, 4JM



Continued from p. 1
asked to help in St. Augustine, and
that they had people in and out of
the city on many occasions.
(Some progress has been made
there, but I still think that there
is still much to be done to im improve
prove improve the climate of race
relations.
As to progress of race rela relations
tions relations in Florida generally, Collins
called them spotty.
We have some cities and some
counties that have done a very
superior job of improving race
relations and providing for the har harmonious
monious harmonious and constructive working
together of people of different
racial backgrounds.
* : 'JE-
The hands. .
According to Collins, it is dif difficult
ficult difficult to relate one state to another
because there is good and bad
in almost every state.
And, he added, that's not
only true in the South, but it's
true all over the country.
The best single test that I
think that can be made as far as
the state is concerned is the de degree
gree degree to which there are inter interracial
racial interracial efforts in the communities

RING ORDERS

IN mSm V 1 wfl Rflf
/ l*>P|
< .u' -.' ; C#W I K ; NIP': y
K
J: ,: -;- P*-; 1 ' W *'
1 BH ' ''W** ** : : r s, W'
* r :q:-'J :> r .. v
now being taken at
THE HUB
FOR DELIVERY BY GRADUATION
Factory representatives will be at The Hub Friday (March 12,
to take orders and answer any questions you might have.
["COMPLETE LINE OF FINISHES AND STONES ON DISPLAY AT HUB AT ALL TIMES"

This is the bis issue of our time-Collins

where there are interracial
groups that are meeting and ex exchanging
changing exchanging information and develop developing
ing developing together future plans for the
progress of the community.
Where you have these groups,
he said, almost invariably, you
have progress.
There was a great reaction all
over the nation to that horrible
experience last Sunday in Selma.
Individuals felt deeply shocked and
grieved that such a thing would
happen in our country. I felt it
personally, as millions and mil millions
lions millions of other people did.
Collins said further that the ear earlier
lier earlier actions in Selma are the type
of thing which encourages re rebellion
bellion rebellion and demonstrations of one
kind or another.
I think well continue to have
reflections of this frustration and
reflections of this yearning on the
part of the Negro to be accepted
as any other American citizen is
accepted, until that'good day'when
they are accepted.
I think that as free American
citizens, Collins continued, we
should expect them to manifest
their dissatisfaction and unhap unhappiness
piness unhappiness in various ways.
I only urge, he emphasized,
that any manifestation, any protest,
any demonstration be within the
range of the law.
He continued by saying that if -a
protest is within the range of law,
then I don't see where we have
reasonable grounds to say, 'you
should not do it.' But if it gets
beyond the range of law, then I

mw
would certainly, STRONGLY as assert
sert assert .that no one has the right to
take the law into his own hands.
When asked about what the in individual
dividual individual college student could or
should do to help race relations in
a community, Collins answered
that different people have many
different ways to express their
feelings.
I don't think, he continued,
WF"*
we should ever say to any uni university
versity university student body that they
should not demonstrate a feeling
that they have about whats right
and what's wrong.
I think that is simply the re reflection
flection reflection of virile, active, concer concerned
ned concerned student body, he said.
He added, Certainly reason and
respect for law should be part

Thursday. March 11, 1965, The Florido Alligator,

and parcel of any such demonstra demonstrations.
tions. demonstrations.
The BIG thing, of course, is a
tolerance of ideas and an open openmindedness
mindedness openmindedness to listen and consider
ideas that other people may have
that may not be acceptable and in
line with previous thinking.
This, he continued, is so at
the core and so much the essence
of university life and university
experience and exploring exploringsearchingfinding
searchingfinding exploringsearchingfinding new ideas and
testing and exerting those ideas.
**l think it would be ridiculous
to assume that an issue that is as
important to the American people
and to the future of this country
as this one, should be one that any
university would expect to smoth smother.
er. smother.
This is the BIG issue of our
times.
This is the big test that the
people of this generationpart
mine and part yoursis going
to have to be able to measure up
to.
Pausing for a moment, Collins
declared, Its time for our gen-

ifer' Wyi Ti
COOL IS THE WORD!
This cool h.l.s suit is light as a falling leaf
but you'll lean upon it heavily to carry you
through Spring and Summer! Tailored with
traditional details such as 3-button front,
center vent, flap pockets and naturally, natural
shoulders. Trousers are lean and tapered Post-
Grads; belt-looped in the University manner.
Fabrics are easy to care for, easy to look at
and the whole job is easy to own at ...
Sizes 36 44 WJ
Reg. & Longs 8-L Men's Weor Dept. j
THE STORE WITH MORE M /?
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
1302 NORTH MAIN STREET
Store Hours" 100.m.-9 0.m.. Mon. thru Sot. Use Your Charge Account Or Layawayr

eration to find an effective way to
try to remedy this wrong and to
set this nation on the course it
was really charted to follow; and
that is equal opportunity for all
people, without regard to race,
color, creed or national origin.
In conclusion, lie said,ln a very
real sense, the elevation of the
status of Negroes to first-class
American citizenship is not only
going to help the Negroes, but every
other American.
**As we remove this scar on
our national character, as we make
the Negro free in a REAL sense,
each of us, in a real sense, be becomes
comes becomes free.
.of hope.

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator. Thursday, March 11. 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

Lost & Pound I
FOUND at State Theatre 2 pairs
of womens prescription glasses,
during the running of 8 1/2.
Contact Bill Henderson, State
Theatre 6-6606. (L-112-tf-nc).
LOST: GOLD MESH Bracelet
between McCarty Hall and Student
Service Center. Has sentimental
value. Substantial reward. Call
Ken Small, Ext. 2744^L-U2-2t-c).
Services
STUDY IN GUADALAJARA, MEX MEXICO.
ICO. MEXICO. The Guadalajara Summer
School, a fully accredited
University of Arizona program,
conducted in cooperation with
professors from Stanford
University, University of Cal California
ifornia California and Guadalajara, will offer
June 28 to Aug. 7, art, folklore,
geography, history, language and
literature courses. Tuition, board
and room is $265. Write Prof.
Juan B. Rael, P. O. Box 7227,
Stanford, Calif. (M-112-lt-c).
INFANT CARE in private home.
References furnished. 378-2583.
237 SW 2nd Place. (M-98-ts-c).
I YAMAHA BMW I
Motorcycles J
For The Discriminating JK
CYCLERAMA I
378-2811 21 SE 2nd Place I

I MMUJUfI
dkivb-in TwearagW
{ 2400 Hawthorn* Road RK2O Won* ffl 6-SOll \
STARTS TONITE 3 SHOCK HITS
Exclusive
nHni WARNS YOU...
of the answers
m dont see... A
H m- jH JA
Wk \ HP
STARRING
DR ROBERT TAYLOR BARBARA STANWYCK
gM JUDITH MEREDITH n st** LIOYD BOCHNER as ''The Dream I
Wm ScrttnpU) by ROBERT BLOCH .Produced and Directed by WILLIAM CASTLE *A Universal Picture
Mamie, shes TW "GOLDFINGER" Mon
Jli Frankie Voyage To The
Hit At Avolon Bottom Os The Sea
10:50

""I i
Services
PROFESSIONAL TYPING in my
home. Supplies will be furnished.
Call Carol Parker. 2-6353 any anytime.
time. anytime. (M-111-3t-c).
Add QUALITY to your home or
apt. Pure gold-leaf trim added to
lamps, frames, antiques, mirrors.
$6.00 minimum. Tom Baugh. 117
NW 17th Street. 376-8087. (M (M---111-st-c).
--111-st-c). (M---111-st-c).
For Sale
*6l HONDA 150 Fair condition.
Call Rick 372-9275. Room 1001
after 7 p.m. (A-111-2t-c).
ONE 30 GAS STOVE like new.
One arm chair. Brand new 3/4
bed. For information call 2-3734
after 5:15 p.m. (A-110-4t-c).
1963 BSA sport-star 250 cc. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Metallic red with
chrome trim. Crash bar and tool
kit included. $475. Phone 376-
3569, (A-110-3t-p).'
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER.
Six 500 sheet boxes of Buff. Retail
for S2O per box. Will sacrifice for
$lO per box. Call Ext. 2832 between
8 and 5 p.m. (A-110-tf-nc).
PROFESSIONAL GEIGER
COUNTER with ear phone and etc.
J. W. Van Buskirk, R. D. #l,
Keystone Heights, Fla. Phone
473-4517. (A-109-st-p).

> t-v
For Sale
1959 RANCHERO TRAILER, 10x45.
Excellent condition, furnished, 2
bedrooms, fenced in yard, close
to campus. See at Glynwood Park,
Lot 2, on Archer Road behind
Florida Power. Phone 8-1596. (A (A---112-3t-c).
--112-3t-c). (A---112-3t-c).
1960 ALLSTATE SCOOTER
(Vespa). Good condition runs
excellent. Good tires. $l5O. Call
372-2119 days before 6 p.m. (A (A---112-lt-p).
--112-lt-p). (A---112-lt-p).
1962 HORIZON MOBILE Home. 2
bedroom. Equity plus take up pay payments
ments payments of $76.07 per month. Call
378-2854. (A-112-st-c).
1963 VESPA 150 cc. Scooter. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition with extras.
Contact Ira Zager AEPi House,
372-9404 or 372-9487. (A-112-
3t-c).
1964 MERCURY 100 HP outboard.
Used less than 30 hours. New
motor warranty. Controls, 12 gal.
tank, bronze propeller. Cost SI4OO.
Price $750. Call 376-0973. (A (A---112-st-c).
--112-st-c). (A---112-st-c).
RADIO FOR TRIUMPH Sports
car, Webcor Stereo tape recorder,
and F-19 Goya Guitar. Call 6-
2420. (A-112-3t-c).
1958 VESPA 150 motor scooter scooterdependable
dependable scooterdependable transportation with
spare tire. Contact Leo Hilke at
372-6298. 503 SW 2nd St. Apt. 2.
(A-111-3t-p).
Personal
GAINESVILLE MINIATURE
RACEWAY BUSES to Sebring are
beginning to fill. sls per person
or $25 for couples. Price includes
admission to races. Buses will
leave March 26, between 4 and 5
and return early Sun. Morning.
The buses will remain so that you
may sleep in them. For information
drop by Gainesville Miniature
Raceway, 807 W. Univ. Ave. The
best thing about GMR BUSES is
that thdy are JOHN equipped.
(J-110-st-c).
Wanted
WANTED ARTIST to exhibit art
work (any media) by lease or to
sell in exquisite speciality shop
to open soon. FR 2-5048, (C-111-3t-c).
3t-c).

-
Josephe.Levineprwent* 1:00,3:05,5:05,7:10,9:10 dSh
l MlL *? 1 | . Marriage Italian Style
PANTHER IN
PI NK PAJAMAS IH^liaWylHMal

Autos
*63 VW, GREAT SHAPE. Needs
no work. $250 down, total $1250.
Call Coach Ellenson, Ext. 2131,
home FR 6-9768. (G-112-st-c).
1961 FORD COUNTRY SEDAN
Station wagon. 6 cylinder, RAH,
45,000 miles, exceUent condition.
Call Dr. Robbins, Ext. 5205, at
Med Center. (G-112-st-c).
1956 CHRYSLER WINDSOR. Auto Automatic
matic Automatic transmission and engine
recently overhauled. Power seats,
brakes, and steering. ExceUent
tires, seat covers. Grille has sneer
of cold command. Price $285 cash.
Ext. 2802 or phone 376-7619. (G (G---108-st-c).
--108-st-c). (G---108-st-c).
LOTUS XI LE MANS, Extra clean,
ready for street or track. Very
inexpensive. Can be seen at 17NW
20th Drive. Apt. 6. Call 376-0962.
(G-108-4t-c).
M
1961 VOLKSWAGEN SEDAN. In
exceptlonaUy clean condition. Me Mechanically
chanically Mechanically perfect. White walls,
$995. CaU 376-8863 after 5:30p.m.
(G-109-ts-c).
MUST SELL! *53 OldsmobUe-98,
2-door, power steering, brakes,
windows and seat. Radio and
beater, automatic headlight dim dimmer,
mer, dimmer, good running condition. Price
$175. CaU FR 2-9283, ask for
Tom Shaw. (G-109-4t-p).
1956 MERCURY 4-door. Automatic
transmission, power steering, and
power brakes. ExceUent condition
Phone FR 2-5244. (G-109-st-c).
1957 DODGE 2-dr. H. T. Custom
Royal. PS, PB, AT, Heater. Runs
and looks good. $2lO. FR 2-6118.
(G-110-4t-c).
1961 OLDS 88, 4-door sport
sedan, R&H, A/C, PS & PB,
exceUent condition throughout.
Arrange your own financing. CaU
evenings and weekends. 372-8221.
(G-110-10t-c).
1956 FORD CONVERTIBLE, V-8,
Auto, RAH, clean dependable
transportation. See at 105 NE 4th
Street. After 5 p.m. (G-110-3t-c).
Help Wanted
PART-TIME deUvery boy. Must
have car and know campus. $1.25
per hour. Apply after 4 p.m. Louis
Seafare, 309 NW 13th Street. (E (E---112-lt-c).
--112-lt-c). (E---112-lt-c).

For Rent
SMALL FURNISHED CCB Cottage.
Bedroom, electric kitchen, tile
shower. SSO per month. Couple
preferred. Baby welcome. South
on Ocala Road. Linda Ann Court.
376-5826. (B-108-tf-nc).
ROOMS FOR RENT, Central heat,
maid service, everything
furnished. 378-2583. 273 SW 2nd
Place. (B-98-ts-c).
LIVE BETTER FOR LESS. Brand
new 2 bedroom furnished apts.,
alr-cond. Accommodates up to 4.
39th Ave. and 6th St. NW. $125
per month. FR 2-1003, after 7
p.m. (B-112-st-c).
CHARMING SPLIT-LEVEL APT.
Available 2 blocks from campus,
semi-furnished, modern kitchen,
washing machine,
DITIONING. Perfect for young
couples, working people, students.
Please call 376-9986. (B-112-st (B-112-stc);
c); (B-112-stc);
FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY.
Air-conditioned apt. 1 block off
campus. TV, heat, steam bath,
private carport, etc. For one only
see at 117 SW 12th Street. Apt. 1.
$55 per month. If interested call
Jim 372-6178. (B-111-lt-c).
AIR-CONDITIONED Apartments
for 3A and/or 38. Suitable for 2
or 3 people S7O per mo. plus
electric. 1829 NW 2nd Ave.
Suitable for 2 or 3 people at 1530
NW 4th Ave. $75-soplus electric.
Suitable for 3 or 4 people at 1518
NW 4th Ave. S9O-SIOO with air airconditioning
conditioning airconditioning included. Also renting
for fall at slightly higher rates*
Call 376-4353 evenings. (B-lll (B-llltf-c).
tf-c). (B-llltf-c).
TWO 1 Bedroom apartments foi
rent May Ist. 3 blocks from
campus. Air-conditioned, fur furnished.
nished. furnished. S9O per month. Days call
372-7032, nights 378-2229. 1716
NW 3rd Avenue. (B-111-3t-c).
2 BEDROOM UNFURNISHED
Apartment, 1 block from campus.
Kitchen equipped, Venetian blinds.
103 NW 21st Street. Call 6-6112.
(B-111-3t-c).
LARGE, CLEAN, COMFORTABLE
ROOMS now available to male
students. Reasonable rates;
utilities and maid service included.
5 blocks from law school. For
information stop by 104 SW Bth
Street or call 372-0243. (B-110-
tf-nc).
1101 SW sth Ave. 4-br. 2-bath
FURNISHED APARTMENT,
Very clean. Carpeted living room,
central heat and AC. 4-6 nurses
or students. 376-2892. (B-110-
3t-c).
sagna Raviola
lal Parnpigana
Home-Made
o alion Sausage'
In Every Dewe Or City, Yon
.Will Find One Good Italian
Restaurant
THIS IS m
Dial 372-4690
2120 Hawthorne Rd.
Jlear Drive-In Thaakr*



I For Rent
B a 7p CONDITIONED, Modern
Apt Furnished. Private patio.
Walk- in closet, 1 bdr. 4 blocks
from campus. S9O. FR 60452 or
|fr 6-1234. (B-112-lt-p).
FOR RENT FRONT bedroom, with
kitchen privileges. 317 NW 12
street. (B-109-st-c).
r
1 Real Estate
I DESIRABLE ACREAGE HIGH and
I rolling. 40 acres. S3OO per acre.
I Highway frontage. 20 minutes from
I U of F. Convenient terms. Will
I consider exchange. Call Les
I Jackson Associate, Ernest Tew
Realty, 376-6461. (I-111-Bt-c).
aIIIQAtOR AOS
Always AttRACt

(you're reading one now)

? University Food Service Offers <
j Thursday Gator Special I
) LUNCHEON and DINNER in all cafeterias <
\ Complete Meal 97C
1 1 (PIUS
{English Meat Loaf Mlffljply $ <
j With Brown Gravy j
j CHOICE OF POTATO OR BUTTERED RICE \
c 1 other vegetable JC j
| Any 10<: or 15<: dessert 1
t 2 rolls or 2 slices bread |
\ Any beverage rV j
WHICH CANDIDATE IS WRIGHT!
The WRIGHT CANDIDATE Is
YOUR CANDIDATE FOR BETTER GOVERNMENT
A NEW APPROACH NOT OLD HABITS
UNIFIED CITY GOVERNMENT
UNDER MEN YOU ELECT TO YOUR CITY COMMISSION
FACING UP TO TODAY'S PROBLEMS
* MORE USE OF UNIVERSITY TALENT AND
COOPERATION WITH THE UNIVERSITY.
* ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE AND
PROGRAMS FOR NEW INDUSTRY
* NEW PARKS, AN AUDITORIUM,
PLANNING FORA ZOO
* ACTION ON BOND ISSUE PROJECTS,
AND MORE SAFETY PROGRAMS
* COOPERATION WITH COUNTY ON
ANTI-POVERTY PROGRAMS
_ FOR THOMAS A.
VOTE WRIGHT!
FOR CITY COMMISSION, GROUP II
(Paid Political Advertisement)
(Paid fer by Mrs. Florence Smith, Compoin Treasurer

KARL

Continued from Page 3
one in Jacksonville, a one man
centered operation.
The necessity to have closed
door meetings, is another point of
contention, Karl said. He stated
that he tried to make these areas
. of contention known in the cam campaign.
paign. campaign.
He was defeated in the Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic Primary.
Karl spoke earlier to a lunch luncheon
eon luncheon group of 60 members of the
John Marshall Bar Assn, at the
Hotel Thomas. Past Governor Le Leroy
roy Leroy Collins was introduced but did
not speak.
Karl is city attorney for Or Ormond
mond Ormond Beach and had served in the
State Legislature from 1956 until
he ran for governor last year.
Karl said that there are certain
obligations a lawyer brings upon
himself when he takes his oath and
some of these are never discussed
in the classroom.
At one time or another every
lawyer must accept indignent and
unpopular cases, he said. Karl
cited a reapportionment suit
against the county tax assesor in
which his firm represented. The
tax assesor has taken the position
which is opposite to the concept
of the law firm.

If 1 ; 1 n: I
mmm 11 I
JL u a
QUEEN SEMI-FINALISTS
.as pictured are (left to right), Carol Schwartz, Pat Goodman,
Nancy Calhoun, Donna Berger, Janet Collins, Pamela Dormany, Diane
Denning, Suzanne Hilliker, Kathy Green, Ann Breslauer, Suzann Hill,
Harriett Hughes and Jennifer McKinnon.

Thursday. March 11, 1965. The Florida Alligator

campus news briefs

GATOR GRAS
Tomorrow is the deadline for
Gator Gras Variety Show tryouts.
All interested individuals or
groups may sign up in Room 315
Florida Union 1-5 p.m.
BABYSITTERS
Students interested in baby babysitting
sitting babysitting are urged to apply in Room
309, Florida Union, 1:30-5 p.m.
Monday-Friday.
SIGMA ALPHA ETA.
Sigma Alpha Eta will meet to
elect officers tonight 7:30 p.m. in
Room 358, Tigert Hall.
BUSINESS SEMINAR
College of Business Adminis Administration
tration Administration will conduct a faculty semi seminar
nar seminar today at 3:40 p.m. in Room 18,
Matherly Hall. Kenyon Poole, pro professor
fessor professor of economics from North Northwestern
western Northwestern University, will speak on
Taxes and Economic Growth in
Peru.** The seminar is open to
the public.
MORAL
RE-ARMAMENT
A program discussing moral
re-armament is scheduled for
tomorrow 7:30 p.m. in the Univer University
sity University Auditorium.
YOUNG REPUBLICANS
Young Republicans will meet to
distribute campaign material
Saturday, 9:30 a.m. in the Florida
Union.

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. 4 Performance assured
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MODEL INTERVIEWS
Miss Barbara Smallwood, as associate
sociate associate fashion editor of Made Mademoiselle'
moiselle' Mademoiselle' magazine, will inter interview
view interview women students today 10 a.m.
4 p.m. in Room 215, Florida
Union. She will select six girls
to model clothes in various loca locations
tions locations on campus for the magazine.
TOASTMASTERS
University Toastmasters will
hold their weekly meeting today
11:45 a.m. in Garden Room. Char Charter
ter Charter memberships are still avail available.
able. available.
AG DAMES
Agriculture Dames will meet
tonight 8 p.m. at the home of Mrs.
George Edds, 1811 N.W. 11th Road.
The speaker will be Mr. Steiger
of House of Carpets.
CHILDREN COUNCIL
University Chapter of the Coun Council
cil Council for Exceptional Children will
hold a luncheon meeting today 12
p.m., in the private dining room of
the Florida Room, Norman Hall.
Students and faculty are invited
to attend.
ORIENTATION
PROGRAM
The deadline for signing up for
the Fall Orientation Program has
been extended until tomorrow. In Interested
terested Interested students may sign up for
an interview outside Room 200,
Florida Union.

Page 7



, The Florido Alllgotor Thursday, March 11, 1965

Page 8


Ramsey sets record
for cage accuracy

Florida's just concluded
basketball season, the most
successful one in Gator history,
produced a flock of team records
and one individual mark.
. Coach Norm Sloan's troops
wound up with the most wins ever
recorded by Florida in a single
season (18), most Southeastern
Conferences wins (11), best SEC
record (11-5) and highest SEC
finish other than the World War
n year of 1940 (tied for third).
Sophomore center Jeff Ramsey
set a field goal shooting standard
by hitting 85x135 for .630 per
cent accuracy. This broke a record
of .527, set last season by Dick
Tomlinson and Mont Highley.
"Overall, I was pleased with the
season like few before in my
coaching career," said Sloan.
"This team came forth with great
effort each and every time out and
it payed off in the long run."
Sloan's lone regret is, quite
naturally, the departure of some
outstanding seniors. Three-year
regulars Dick Tomlinson, Tom

FINAL BASKETBALL STATISTICS
Name FGA-FGM PCT. FTA-FTMPCT. REB Total Avg.
B. Henderson 105-222 .473 140-171 .813. 112 : 350 14.0
Dick Tomlinson 126-266 .474 69-86 .802 178 321 12.9
Gary Keller 121-242 .500 70-112 .625 247 312 1 2.5
Jeff Ramsey 85-135 .630 79-109 .725 196 249 9.9
Tom Baxley 72-195 .369 56-74 .757 51 200 8.0
Paul Morton 40-108 .370 32-52 .615 90 112 4.5
Bob Hoffmann 42-80 .525 20-35 .571 87 104 4.2
Skip Hlgley 35-71 .493 25-42 .595 34 95 3.8
Bill Koss 13-26 .500 5-7 .714 16 31 3.1
Edd Poore 12-26 .462 4-10 .400 21 28 2.4
Ed Mahoney 7-20 .350 10-14 .714 9 24 2.4
Team Rebounds 190
UF 658-1386 .475 510-712 .716 1041 1826 7*3.0
OPPO. 528-1342 .393 512-707 .711 708 1568 62.7
Rifle team finishes 15-5;
logs wins over 3 powers

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Sports Writer
Array Major Harvey M. Dick is,
in his own words, extremely
happy. And as officer in charge
of the UF rifle team, he has every
reason to be.
Maj. Dick commented. This
past season our men compiled a
15-5 record in rifle matches
against other military rifle teams
in the South. This is one of the
finest records a UF rifle team has
had in quite a few years.
Dick also said that this record
was obtained against some of the
stiffest competition in the country.
Some of our wins, Maj. Dick
continued, came against such top topnotch
notch topnotch teams as Florida State,
Gordon Military, and Miami. The
victory over FSU in the All- Florida
Match was the sweetest win for
us since it was the only rifle
defeat the Seminoles had suffered
all year.
Included with the UF victory over
ESU and the other schools repre represented
sented represented in the recently held All-
Florida Match, is the possession
of a replica of the Theed Memorial
rropfay.
A replica of the trophy is given
3 the winning school in each All-

Baxley and Brooks Henderson
closed out their careers along with
reserve Bill Koss.
"Our hopes are high for next
season, however, with the big boys
back in Gary Keller and Jeff
Ramsey," says Sloan. "We have
some capable veterans returning In
these two plus Paul Morton, Skip
Higley, Bob Hoffmann, Edd Poore
and Ed Mahoney.
"Also, we expect good things
out of sophomores-to-be like Gary
McElroy, Harry Winkler and a
few graduates of this years
freshman team."
Sloan admits his big problem
might be in coming up with a
floor leader and clutch perfor performer
mer performer to guide the team like
Henderson did this season.
"Florida hasn't had many
basketball players the caliber of
Henderson," says Sloan." R Replacing
eplacing Replacing him will be quite a task
I'm afraid."
For the 1564-65 season the
Gators were 18-7 and captured
the Gator Bowl championship for
the second consecutive season.

Florida .Match? The original trophy
was donated by Clement Theed
in honor of his son, Clement Jr.,
who was killed in action in the
Pacific in 1944. Both Mr. Theed
and his late son attended UF.
The original trophy. Maj.
Dick stated, **xs given permanently
to any school who wins the All-
Florida Match three successive
years. FSU had taken honors in the
last two years. Thus our victory
kept the trophy from the Seminoles.

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Dioguardis foremost goal:
to win nationals for UF

By ANDY MOOR
Sports Editor
Although he didn't win his first
medal until he was 14, Gator
swimmer Toro Dioguardi has more
than made up for lost time.
The 19-year-old sophomore
from North Palm Beach has set
a host of records in his short
tenure at Florida, and promises
to do more of the same in the
future.
Tom didn't learn to swim until
he reached third grade. At that
time, his father taught him the
art.
He never swam competitively
until he was 10, and then only in
small competition. Says Dioguardi,
"I really didnt win anything of
significance, a medal or something
like that, until I was 14."
A lifetime inhabitant of Palm
Beach County, Tom attended Palm
Beach High for a year before
transferring to Riviera Beach when
his parents moved to North Palm.
Dioguardi captained Riviera
Beachs swim team in his junior
year, and was named outstanding
swimmer in the school in both
junior and senior years.
Despite his high school
accomplishments, Tom's most
important swimming was done in
the summer at sanctioned AAU
meets throughout Florida and
Georgia. In one of these meets,
he set a national record for the
50- yard freestyle in the Junior
I INTRAMURAL I
RESULTS I
Softball
Graham Finals
Cooper 18
Crandall 17 (8 innings)
Tnlhart Finals
East II 5
South I 2
Murphree Finals
Thomas G 9
Murphree M 4
Phi Gamma Delta 10
Alpha Gamma Rho 1
Chi Phi 17
Delta SigmaPhi 1

Olympics (15-17) age group with a
clocking of 22.7 seconds.
"My great improvement through
these years can be directly
attributed to the tutoring of my
coach, Buddy Baarcke. now
Director of the North Palm Beach
Swim Club," comments Dioguardi.
Last year, Tom set three indi individual
vidual individual freshmen records and was
a member of two standard standardsmashing
smashing standardsmashing relay teams. His record
breaking times were: 22.5 in the
50 yard freestyle, 50.1 in the 100
yard free, and 54.7 in the 100 yard
butterfly. In addition, Dioguardi
captained the Baby Gators.
In this season's competition,
Tom lowered the varsity and pool
records for the 50 vard free (21.5)

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and the 100 yard free (47.9). He
was beaten ohly once all year.
Several times Dioguardi has
swum and won the 200 freestyle.
Meet rules which allow a swimmer
to compete in only three events
made it impossible for him to
compete in the butterfly.
"This year I want to go to the
national competition (hes been
selected) and place, if possible.
The ultimate goal of my college
career is to win in the nationals,"
projects Tom.
When' 4 asked about the 1968
OlVmpics, Dioguardis comment
was, "Gee, thats a long way on/'
Judging irom the progress hes
made in the past five years, Tom
Dioguardi may well make it.