Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
A CHEERFUL GIVER

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Pretty Joyce Grassman of Alpha Chi Omega (that's her on the
left!) sto lied across Plaza of the Americas yesterday with glass bottle
in hand to collect for the World University Service Drive. The drive
will continue through this week. Donating is John Toppe. (Photo by
Nick Arroyo).
AT THE ART GALLERY OPENING
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Emm ij| film
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Gallery opens

The artist is a perceptive per person
son person seeking to discover more about
the mystery that surrounds us all,
the director of the Atlanta Art
Association, Dr. Wilhelmus Bryan,
told a dedication audience of the
University of Florida Art Gallery
last Monday night.
A light rainfall which began Just
as the program got under way
w
DR. BRYAN
. .speaker

forced the group into the gallery
portico but failed to dampen en enthusiasm.
thusiasm. enthusiasm.
"The airtlsts can't find the an answers
swers answers but he can find clues to
the answers and make his state statement,"
ment," statement," Dr. Bryan said.
"This building of brick and stone
See GALLERY on p. 3

BENTON HALL ROOF: HEAVYWEIGHT PROBLEM
Wn Wft r t w F
, v i r
Bt 4 V \ V --jjglf ijffi JS^eE * J
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THE
FLORIDA
University of
L Florida
Gainesville
L
I
G
A
T
Vol. 57,
No. 106 fll
R
Wednesday, March 3,
1965

Toynbee talks
here tomorrow
slo
dtp :
Dr. Arnold Toynbee, eminent
British historian, will speak here
tomorrow night at 8:15 pun. in
the University Auditorium. Hla
topic is "The Role of the Gen Generalist,"
eralist," Generalist," and he is sponsored by
the University College TTiirtieth
Anniversary Lecture Series.
Dr. Toynbee is currently Visi Visiting
ting Visiting Professor of History at New
College in Sarasota and a Profes Professor
sor Professor Emeritus of the University
of London.

KAS CLEAN UP MURPHREE STATUE
WiMm i~l3m -* K^gas*
';;.
n <*.'-*.imlm
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* Jr-- V ffwrata&jHKK
4 %w fIPVp v ***WHwF
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5; Bp#"**
. .the Dr. Murphree statue turned mysteriously up Monday with a
technicolor coating of red, yellow, and a few other colors of paint.
Some members of Kappa Alpha fraternity yesterday went to scrubbing
and returned Murphree to his usual form. (Photo by Bob Ellison).
Phi Taus edge
Delts in drive

Phi Kappa Tau and Chi Phi
fraternities have won first places
in the two divisions of the annual
Interfraternity Council blood
drive.
The Phi Taus registered 49
I
l wR'-&ftS
First show of the season for
Orchesls, the UF modern dance
club, is set for tonight at 8:15
p.m. in Norman Hall. The show
is part of the Spring Fine Arts
Festival. Admission is free. Prac Practicing
ticing Practicing above is Linda Hyans.

donors to win honors in the*most
pints given** category. In the per percentage
centage percentage category, the Chi Phis
won with 31 men of the total 58
on their rolls donating.
The drive produced 289 pints,
463% more than last year's total
of 63 pints. It was estimated that
over 50 persons were rejected at
the Medical Center because of
colds, shots, transfusions and ill illnesses
nesses illnesses in recent months.
The Phi Taus were followed
closely by Delta Tau Delta fra fraternity,
ternity, fraternity, which finished a strong
second with 47 pints given.
Dr. Lambert, director of J.
Hillis Miller Blood Blank, said,
I am very pleased with the res response.
ponse. response. We wern*t prepared for
such a startling success. **
All Mathis
tickets gone
Tickets for this Sa Saturday's
turday's Saturday's Fall Frolics,
featuring Johnny
Mathis and the Young
Americans, are all
gone.
The final 600 tic tickets
kets tickets were bought early
yesterday. An esti estimated
mated estimated 6,000 will at attend
tend attend the show at 8 p.m.
Saturday night in
Florida Gymnasium
B
JOHNNY MATHS
.here



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 3, 1965

Hah- 'greatest thing in shoes in a long while'

They're the greatest thing
that has happened to shoes
on campus in a long whil&
This was the reaction of
Pediatrist (foot specialist)
Robert A. Giudice on the arri arrival
val arrival of the black and white sad saddle
dle saddle shoe or rah-rah to
campus footwear.
Its an oxford shoe and
there's plenty of room for
good fitting. said Giudice,
The saddle shoe is good for
the arch, the toes and the
heel.''
Echoing Giudice, from a
sorority housemother's posi position,
tion, position, Mrs. Blanche Banks,
Delta Delta Delta (Tri-delt)
housemother said, I think the
saddle shoe has much more
support than the 'loafer* the
girls have been wearing.
Whether it's for better foot
health or just following a fad,
rah-rahs are definitely
in on the UF campus.
Mitchell's Shoes reports
rah-rah sales since
September have been averag averaging
ing averaging about 40-50 pairs every
week. A bit of pencil work

160 U.S.

New raids called
'dear message
WASHINGTON (UPI) Top UJS.
officials said yesterday the new
air raids on North Viet Nam were
Intended as a clear military mes message
sage message to the Communists that con continued
tinued continued aggression in the south
will not be tolerated.
They said the action did not
signify any change in UJS. policy
merely a continued reply to
North Vietnamese involvement in
the South Vietnamese war.
The White House, the Penta Pentagon
gon Pentagon and congressional leaders re rejected
jected rejected any suggestion that the
strike by more than 160 UJS. and
South Vietnamese planes consti constituted
tuted constituted an unprovoked extension of
the anti-Communist war.
They cited the UJS. policy which
has been stated time and again:
To take continuing actions. .
made necessary by the continuing
aggression of others.
Fashion editor
to visit here
Barbara Smallwood, associate 1
fashion editor of Mademoiselle
Magazine, will visit the UF cam campus
pus campus March 11-13 to interview wo women
men women students and supervise
preparation of pictures for a
special four-page portion of the
June issue devoted to college
fashions.
Miss Smallwood will conduct in interviews
terviews interviews in Room 215 of the Florida
Union from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on
March 11. All University coeds
are invited to attend the session.
Six students will be chosen to model
clothes at various locations
throughout the campus Mar.
12-13.

r FOR YOUR FRATERNITY
AND SORORITY SUPPLIES
BILL BOSTAIN
District Representative
376-6081 9 AM-5 PM
JEWELRYS FINEST CRAFTSMEN
111 1 e

.
jk % '% >1 ,/ < .JJk ... ts. ""
, W '* 'r J A
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shows that close to 1,000 stu students
dents students are now owners of a pair
of rah-rahs" from Mr. Mit Mitchell's
chell's Mitchell's alone.

-.-rtw.-.i-..-. .v. .. >... .. ..ri . .... ..^vAV^%v.v.v.vr.v..vv.vv.w..nYOXXWjCwwK l WWKwWWA .\vW.V.V
planes blast Reds in biggest raid yet

SAIGON (UPI) More than 660 UjS. and South
Vietnamese planes blasted a naval base and am munition
depot Tuesday in the biggest attack yet on Communist
North Viet Nam.
The attack destroyed an estimated 70 to 80 per cent
of the targets. At least three of the attacking planes
were shot down.
The raids represented the first implementation of
a UJS. polity providing for strikes against North Viet
Nam without waiting for specific acts of provocation,
such as those that preceded three earlier American
attacks.
Within hours the Soviet Union denounced the raids
and said, The Pentagon acts like a gambler who has
run amuck.
UJS. 857 jet bombers went into action against
Communist North Viet Nam for the first time against
Vietnamese fighter-bombers and dropped bombs of up
to 750 pounds.
The targets of the two separate raids were a supply
depot at Xom Bang, near the border of Laos, and the
naval base at Quang Khe on the south China coast.
A joint UJS .-Vietnamese statement said both installa installations

High to speak at LXA Founders Day

Robert King High, Mayor of
Miami, will be the guest speaker
at the annual Founders Day Ban Banquet
quet Banquet of Lambda Chi Alpha Fra Fraternity.
ternity. Fraternity.
The banquet, celebrating the re reprisal
prisal reprisal of the Lambda Chi ritual,
will be held this year at the
Silver Springs Banquet Hall in
Silver Springs, March 19.
High, a member of Lambda Chi
Alpha Fraternity, will deliver the
speech at the banquet, talking on
the Value of Fraternity in Post
College Days.*

Add to this number the 15-
20 pairs of rah-rahs sold
by most of the other shoe
stores in Gainesville each

Other events of the evening will
be the announcing of a new Cres Crescent
cent Crescent Girl, fraternity sweetheart,
and other awards to brothers.

1 University Food Service Offers )
) Wednesday Gator Special j
# in all Cafeterias |
) LUNCHEON and DINNER j
( Complete Meal (
) S/70 (l>,usl ) -a r
i Grilled Chopped Steak )
/ With Onion Rings )
/ CHOICE OF POTATO OR BUTTERED RICE J
\ Any beverage #

tions installations are being used for direct support of the Commun Communist
ist Communist Viet Cong guerrillas in South Viet Nam.
A UJS. spokesman in Saigon said three pilots were
rescued, two Americans and one Vietnamese, after
their planes were shot down by ground fire. He said
others were missing but refused to say how many.
North Viet Nam's Radio Hanoi said at least six
UJS. planes were shot down and many others
damaged. The Soviet Tass news agency, quoting
preliminary reports, said between 7 and 11 of the
attacking pirate planes were downed.
Returning American and Vietnamese pilots reported
the bombing touched off many explosions and heavy
fires.
In Washington, a Pentagon spokesman refused to
say how many planes or pilots were missing. But
he said that preliminary reports indicated the raids
were successful.
Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin was in Berlin at the
time the raids were carried out, visiting the Berlin
Wall. Last month, when a series of UJS. and South
Vietnamese air raids were carried out against North
Viet Nam, Kosygin was visiting Hanoi.

week, and the size of the rah rahrah
rah rahrah fad is obvious.
Where and when the fad
started has many answers.

Following the Mayor's address,
a formal dance will be held. All
alumni of Lambda Chi Alpha are
invited to attend.

afreetiiatn''
started many years ago. Bill
Donigan of Donigans Clothing
said they were wearing rah rahrahs*
rahs* rahrahs* when lie graduated in
1954.
Regardless when the fad
started, it disappeared in the
late *sos and made it*s re reappearance
appearance reappearance in Gainesville in
late spring of 1964.
The shoe caught on with the
guys too. Slowly at first, but
gathering momentum on the
news that the rah-rah** was
popular with the guys at the
University of Geogia, rah rahrahs*
rahs* rahrahs* are now being worn by
several fraternities.
Lyle Kielly, a Kappa Alpha
brother, said about 25 KAs now
own a pair of rah-rahs.*
At the Phi Delta Theta house,
J.R. Leach reports 50 guys
with rah-rahs and at the
Alpha Tau Omega house 10
brothers own rah-rahs.**
Whats next? Several shoe
stores in town say the blue
sneaker** is a hot selling
item.

Centaur rocket
explodes on pad
CAPE KENNEDY (UPI)
Americas moon exploration pro program
gram program suffered a severe setback
Tuesday when an Atlas-Centaur
rocket exploded on its launch pad
creating a 200 foot high fire ball
that one observer felt a mile away.
There were no injuries, but 120
missilemen in tiie block-house 800
feet away were forced to remain
within the shelters six-feet thick
walls for more than 2 and one onehalf
half onehalf hours.
The sl2 million rocket rose
about three feet from its pad,
lost power from two of its three
engines, crashed back to the ground
and erupted into a brilliant orange
ball of fire.
Flames fed by thousands of
pounds of kerosene, liquid oxygen
and hydrogen enveloped the $lO
million launch pad for about 15
minutes sending great clouds of
black smoke billowing into the
sky.



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Wednesday, March 3, 1965, The Florida Alligator/

campus news briefs

GREEKS
All social fraternities are re requested
quested requested to have their news for
the Greek page turned in by 5
p.m. this afternoon at The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator office, Room 8 of the Florida
Union,
TAU KAPPA EPSILON
Gamma Theta chapter of Tau
Kappa Epsilon invites all frater fraternity
nity fraternity brothers to attend Carnation
Ball to be held on April 2. For
further information call Don Ko Kozich
zich Kozich at 372-3878.
GERMAN GROUP
Dieter Gebhard, German student
and member of the track team,
will discuss amateur and pro professional
fessional professional sports in Germany at the
German conversational group
tomorrow 7:30 p.m. at the In Internation
ternation Internation Student Center.
ORIENTATION
* Students interested in working
in the fall orientation program may
sign ud for an interview anytime

(CONTINUED FROM P.l
is a symbol of what is happening
in the United Statesa belated
recognition of the place and im importance
portance importance of the visual arts in our
society.
America has been preoccupied
with pioneering the land, economic
growth and political struggle, and
it has been inevitable that art,
like chiffon pie, was good for
dessert but meat and potatoes came
first. But art is the meat and
potatoes, he added.
Only in the past two decades have
institutions of higher learning rec recognized
ognized recognized the visual and performing
arts as part of the curriculum.
People in this country recently
began to realize that there are
those who think not in words, but
in images, he said.
Dr. Bryan noted that the scien scientist,
tist, scientist, with his symbols and formu formulas,
las, formulas, helped us realize that words
were not the only communication
When people are deprived of
art, they are deprived of the in input
put input of important information
through the senses.
He cited the brainwashing tech techniques
niques techniques of the Chinese Communists
during the Korean conflict. Amer American
ican American prisoners of war were placed
in rooms equipped with only the
barest essentials. They wore hel helthis

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Child's Plate 69<
WEDNESDAYS ONLY, 5 PM-9 PM
STUDENTS WELCOME
"Motto* (le&taufuutt"
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this helthis week outside of Room 200
of the Florida Union. Interviews
will last through Friday of next
week.
FLORIDA PLAYERS
A Florida Players production
meeting for The Firebugs will be
held at 7 p.m. tomorrow in Nor Norman
man Norman Hall Auditorium).
FBK APPLICATIONS
Applications for Florida Blue
Key membership must be turned
in to the Florida Union informa information
tion information desk no later than 5 p.m.'
today.
COLLOQUIUM
Dr. Bernardo Weiss, visiting
professor of Brazilian history at
the UF, will discuss An Histori Historical
cal Historical Approach to Some Problems of
Agricultural Development in Bra Brazil
zil Brazil at the meeting of the Latin
American Colloquium tonight 8
p.m. in the Oak Room ofthe
Florida Union.

GALLERY

) mets designed to blind them and
prevent them from hearing.
With no communication through
the senses, the men lost the abil ability
ity ability to distinguish foods, they lost
physical control...and their minds,
with no intellectual sieve left,
were receptive to any idea.
By looking at great works we
learn something about what re relationships
lationships relationships really arenot war,
riot and poverty, but serenity and
peace motivated by the supreme
power in true great works of art,
the power of love.
Dr. Bryan commended Acting
Gallery Director Roy Craven for
his efforts and urged the gathering
to continue Interest in the pro project.
ject. project.
When people become convinced
something is important they are
- willing to pay, he said.
University Vice President of
Academic Affairs Robert Mautz
termed the new gallery an ex exhibition
hibition exhibition case for the best efforts
of the people of the state and
nation.
Following the talks, Mautz cut
the ribbon officially opening the
new gallery and the guests viewed
the first exhibit, Artists of the
Florida Tropics, a collection of
some 40 works by George Catlin,
Winslow Homer, George Inness and
James Audubon.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator/ Wednesday, March 3, 1965

ERNIE.UTZ
Editor-In-Chief

LOU FERRIS
Editorial Page Editor

wtoypolNT
Lets help others
.to help themselves. This is the motto
of World University Service (WUS), which
each year sets aside a few days td especially
focus attention on the needs of stuaents in
other countries. Os course this program goes
on year round. This years program
encompasses March 1 through 6.
But in these few days when the WUS
volunteers of the UF chapter are knocking on
faculty and student doors to raise funds for
this cause, let us not consider it merely another
charity.
Typically, WUS funds have established a
student hospital in Nicaragua; a cafeteria at
the University of Hue, Viet Nam; reconstruction
of the University of Algiers library demolished
during WW II; and a student loan fund in
Nigeria. These are but a few of its projects.
That WUS helps students to help themselves,
rather than giving sums of money outright,
essentially promotes the American ideal of
providing opportunity for those who will take
it and add to it their manpower. Where WUS
provides the lumber to build a library, the
foreign students provide the labor.
What you can do is give so that others
may learn.
In the 1962-63 campaign, $630.00 was raised
at the UF. Last year, about $2,000.00 donated
bv UFers accounted for close to ten per cent
of the total amount raised by colleges and
universities in the Southeast. This year, the
local WUS chapter hopes for .an outstanding
increase over last years amount.
WUS offers a prime opportunity to direct
aid to foreign countries where it is needed
and to insure that it gets to the very people
who are in need. For those who feel tnat
much U. S. aid has been diverted into the
hands of those who control the governments
of foreign countries rather than to the populace,
WUS offers a solution to this proolem, in
some small measure.
Another facet of WUS is its appeal only
to students and faculty, and does not actively
solicit outside funds. The philosophy behind
this being that student-to-student programs
will have a very real effect in the area of
international cooperation.
The Dollars tor Scholars fund this past
year succeeded in raising $20,000.00 for UF
students. Should we not reach around the
world at this time and aid less fortunate
students?
Perhaps WUS can offer a solution to the
problem of the losing war waged by the U.S.
to win foreign countries to the side of the
West.
While others speak of no alternative but
war, let us give another reason for hope.
GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Kay
Huffmaster, (Correspondents), Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles,
Donlta Mathlson, Dan Taylor, Sam Uliman, Selwin H. Ciment,
Jay Foley .Stephen Kanar. f
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Kunrln, Ann Carter, Thelma Mossman, Fran Snider, Cynthia
Tunstall, Harvey Wolfson, Karen Vitunac, Jack Zucker, Ami
Saperstein, Carl Brown, Jane Young, Bill Lockhart, Ken Simon,
Drex Dobson, Jeffrey DSnke waiter, G. S. Corseri, Eunice Tall,
Linda Cody, Woody Leonard, Jennell Close, Nancy Van Zile.
The Florida Alligator reserves tb. right to refulat. the typographical ton. of all advertisements and
to revise or turn sway copy which it con.id.rs objtcttoiuble.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though dMlrod position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement Involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or orronoous Insertion unless notice is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not tie responsible for more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and is
published five times weekly except dulng May, June and July when It Is published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class
matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR

Served By United Press International

STEVE VAUGHN
Managing Editor

JOE CASTE LLO
Executive Editor

ANDY MOOR
Sports Editor

By JON DEMME
Columnist
Ingmar Bergman has
temporarily deserted metaphysics
for slapstick, traded somber black
and white photography for eye eyepleasing
pleasing eyepleasing color, and come up with
a thoroughly enjoyable comedy,
All These Women,* now showing
at the State Theatre.
Bergman assures us that in
Women* any resemblance
between reality and the events
pictured in this film are probably
due to your misconception of
reality.** I*ll have to agree with
him there; the predictiments that
Felix (The Hero) gets himself into
while writing the biography of a
great musician make the Three
Stooges look suave by comparison.
Point of interest Fanny
Hill,** a la* Playboy will be
showing at the State for one week
beginning March 17th. See you,
there.
As None But the Brave** began,
it was to all outward appearances
simply another shoot-em-up
World War II drama. But as the
film progressed, it became
apparent that Frank Sinatra
(who produced, directed and
starred) had something much
BIGGER in mind.
It seems Frank, in telling the
story of a band of Yanks and a
band of Japs isolated on the same
lonely island futilely killing each
Open letter
DEAR MISS EFSTATHION:
I AGREE THAT you dont under understand
stand understand the problem of the fence.**
Are you naive enough to believe,
that whoever tore down the
Murphree Area fence did not know
that it was against the law?
DO YOU REALLY think someone
would tear down a fence for,
prestige points?**
SOMEHOW I KNOW that at an
early date in the history of
America, there must have been a
cowardly fool standing on the docks
of Boston Harbor shouting, Thats
not your teal,** Dont you know
its against the law to destroy
British Property?**
I QUIT LIVING on campus
because of the infractions on
students rights which go on there.
To the person, or persons, who had
the courage to kick down that hated
fence, my hat is off.
TO YOU, Miss Efstathion, let me
only say that, it is my firm personal
belief that the world will bp a
better place in which to live, with
more fence-breakers** and fewer
fools who will blindly submit to
any authority simply because it is
there.
GARY ALAN SUTTON, 2UC

Bergman comedy best bet

MOVIES ON REVIEW

other off, planned to present us with
a see ring indictment on the
absurdity of war.
The basic premise is, that when
you get right down to it, the Jap
soldier wasnt much different from
the American soldier. Many
methods were employed in showing
that the Japs were not the dirty,
little rats earlier war films have
tried to make us believe. The
narrator of the film is the
commander of the Japanese unit,
and oh what a great guy wish
he were on our sidel
And those Japanese enlisted
men when theyre not fighting,
they can be found either fishing,
praying, or dancing together on the
beach what a swell bunch of
fellas. On the other hand, each
American has his bad streak; The

7=- EDITORS DESK
Whose tyranny?
By ERNIE LITZ
Editor-in-chief
(ED. NOTE: This is the second and last part of a column on the recent
Campus Life Conference.)
Anything that happens, even if Tigert Hall had nothing to do with
it, gets blamed by the students as yet another example of Tigert
Tyranny.
If anyone took the time to look at the statements made by those in
the Conference (yesterdays Alligator), you saw that these people are
terribly involved in the very difficult and complex problems related
to running a university in the face of such adversities as: conservative
North Florida legislators, newspapers, lack of funds, poor student
cooperation and an inability to solve many problems with the lack of
tools at hand.
Its sort of like the problem of a fireman trying to put out a fire
with aid from a volunteer (students) who hand you water in one hand
and throw lit matches in the other.
When the UF is running well behind projected enrollment figures
and the university officers are out trying to work as hard as they
can to make this a better and better school all they face back home
is a student body apathetic on one hand, and quick to seize upon any
loose strings with the other.
At the Conference itself I found myself with Augie Schuildbach and
Jim Harroeling, two of the recent candidates for student body president.
We were all very much interested in working with these people to
alleviate these affairs.
Together we are requesting that Student Government get out of its
lethargy and seek some real productivity. For one wed like to expand
the Faculty-Associate Program, an SG function which neither the
faculty members nor the student members seemed to have ever
heard of.
In it we could see students and faculty gathering in small groups
once a week for discussions. Surely a faculty member can devote
2-3 hours one night each trimester towards a better university relation relationship.
ship. relationship. And surely 20-30 students can afford to attend.
Secondly we would like to see a continuation of the Campus Life
Conference.
Dr. Reitz himself suggested that one be held each trimester. I
feel that at the very least one should be held the first two trimesters
with possibly a condensed version for the summer. The problems
o putting together a program of such magnitude are amazing.
Before reaching my final gasps I want to publicly list the members
of the Campus Life Conference Committee. If nowhere else, I would
at least like them to receive praise here.
Chairman Tom Freeman, Bob Mounts, Vernon Swartsel, George
maha. Sherry Allen, Rosalynne Meyer, Dan Applerouth, George
Lloyd, Jean Outler, and Advisors Dr. Harry Philpott and Dr. Richard
Hiers.
Keep up the good work!

Captain (Clint Walker) is a rat
with women, the medic (Frank
Sinatra) is a lush, and the lieutenant
(Tommy Sands) is a conceited
egotist who tends to overact.
The other marines either wont
follow orders or are constantly
talking back to the officers what
a bunch of finks! This all goes to
show I guess, that there is so
much bad in the best of us, and
so much good in the worst of us
that. . and that, as the closing
credits point out, there are no
winners in war.
None But the Brave is now
showing at the Gainesville
Drive-In. Forget the indictment;
It lacks credence. Simply to to
enjoy an absorbing war flick,
packed to the gills with good old
Blood n Guts.



Benton to come down

A UF engineering survey team
has recommended that 53-year-old
Benton Hall be torn down as soon
as possible because it no longer
can be considered a safe structure
for class and laboratory use*
The heavy tile roof which slopes
Emptiness, silence
at Benton Hall
Emptiness and silence pervail.
Occasionally a person enters
to purchase from the vending
machines, to drink from the water
fountain or just to stare at the
*old relic/
The wall plaque re ads,*ln Mem Memorium
orium Memorium JOHN ROBERT BENTON,
Ph. D. and the > clock next to
the inscription ticks away the re remaining
maining remaining hours before the tons of
brick, mortar and steel become
rubble.
Benton Hall, named for the first
dean of the CoUege of Engineering,
will be gone by next September
because of a heavy roof and sagging
walls.
Signs like Psych 301 meets now
in Gym 16, hang from various
doorways. Many rooms are already
empty, completely void of desks
and equipment except for light
fixtures, chalk and erasers.
Soon workmen will strip away
the remaining insides and the 54
year life of Benton Hall, one of
the first UF classroom buildings,
MMW* lllfllll
r . probably
last to go ... f
We will probably be the last
ones to go, said Mrs. Ellen Kim Kimmel,
mel, Kimmel, wife of Dr. H. D. Kim me 1,
head of the psycholofical labora laboratories
tories laboratories in the southeast corner of
Benton Hall.
The heavy equipment in the labs
will cause the psychological units
to be the last removed from the
hall reasoned Mrs. Kimmel
A number of double-steel en enforced
forced enforced soundproof rooms, in which
psychological and physical reation
experiments are done, and the air
conditioning units for the room's
temperature control make up the
bulk of the machinery.
The National Institute of Men Menten
ten Menten Health (NIMH) paid for most
of the $25,000 worth of equipment
in the lab.
Mrs. Kimmel, working on a
NIMH pre-doctorate fellowship, is
using the rooms and the moni monitoring
toring monitoring equipment for her doctor
dissertation experiments on human
judgement of external stimuli.
Eden appointed
Ag professor
Dr. E. T. York, Jr., Provost,
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences, UF, has announced the
appointment of Dr. William G. Eden
as professor and head of the com combined
bined combined Agricultural Experiment
Stations and College of Agriculture
Department of Entomology.
Dr. Eden conies to the UF from
Auburn, University, where he has
been entomologist and professor
since 1953. Dr. Eden took his
B. S. in agriculture and nis M.
S. in entomology at Auburn and his
PhJD. from the University of Ill Illinois.
inois. Illinois.

WERE MOVING f'
Take Advantage of Our watch the alligator ssm /
Current HALF-PRICE Sale and opening date \ 'lg*
franklins #p* 40 w UNIVERSITY AVE. FR2-4600

at a 45 degree angle has forced
the walls at the north and south
ends of the building to extend one
and five inches, respectively, ac according
cording according to Neil Webb, zone archi architect
tect architect for the Board of Regents
and bead of the survey team.
Webb explained there is no hor horizontal
izontal horizontal tie to take the outward
thrust.
How far it has to go before
the building collapses can't be
determined,'* Webb said, but it
is not a happy condition to think
about.
The separation may have been
caused by the shock of sonic booms
since there was no indication of the
problems several years ago when
the building was examined, Webb
noted.
CAMPUS CUTIE
W-V a
Linda was
'Miss CFJC
Pretty Linda Slade was
Miss Central Florida Junior
College before transferring
to the UF last year. She is a
junior from Ocala, majoring
in history and political
science.
The study of the third
force of psychology is one
of her hobbies. She also enjoys
informal modeling, and parti participates
cipates participates in Little Theater pro productions.
ductions. productions.
While at Central Florida Jr.
College, she attained mem membership
bership membership in Who's Who, as well
as Phi Theta Kappa, honorary
scholastic society.
New fad all wet
A new fad is sweeping the
nation's colleges and
universities taking showers.
As nearly as anybody can
tell, Steven Sher started it at
American International College
in Springfield, Mass., when a
student took a 15 hour 41 minute
dousing to establish a record
for the world's longest shower
bath.
Then, into the storm
literally lept Larry Denham,
an 18 year old freshman who
brought the title back to his
school with a 24 hour soaking
that saw nearly 2000 gallons of
water pour over his hide. As
Denham was emerging from his
ordeal, Garry Boggs, another
Kentucky freshman, brushed his
teeth for 10 1/2 hours to
establish world's mark.

UF Vice President Harry Phil Philpott
pott Philpott said Benton Hall will be razed
as soon as all activities can be
shifted elsewhere on the cam campus.
pus. campus.
Classes already have been
moved and we are in the pro process
cess process of relocating laboratories and
complicated equipment, Dr. Phil Philpott
pott Philpott explained.
UF Domes set
fashion show
The UF Domes will present their
annual fashion Show on Friday at
PJC. Yonge Auditorium at 8 p.m.
This year's theme is Fashion
Fantasy.
Sponsored by the Arts and
Sciences Dames the following wo women
men women will be modeling: Business
Administration Dames, Luciene
Decker, Denise Pendergrast* Law
Dames, Carolyn Kaeslin, Betty
Huck, Billie Strickland; Architec Architecture
ture Architecture and Fine Arts Dames, Judy
Johnson, Sandra Priest; Medical
Dames, Andrea Swyers, Beverly
Jenkins, Pogo Righetti; Health Re Related
lated Related Professions, Helen Bramlet,
Sandra Handcock; Agriculture
Dames, Sue Overcash, Brenda
Crum, Education Dames, Donna
Acheson, Joyce Bruan; Pharmacy
Dames, Shelley Miller, Volita
Mongomery; Journalism Dames,
Donnie Tullee, Barbara Merget;
Egnineering Dames, Myrna Day Dayton,
ton, Dayton, Carolyn Smith, Joy Moore;
Arts and Sciences Dames, Kay
Leahon, Cheryl Bledsoe and Anita
Crane.
Their fashions will be supplied
by the following stores; Franklin's,
Lynn's, Wilson's, Personality
Shop, Twig, Silverman's, Fields,
Ruddy's, Donigan's, Cherry's,
Geiger's, Belk Lindsey's,
Blanche's, Casual Woman, and Stag
'n Drag.
Door prizes will be given away
at the end of the show. They were
donated by the following mer merchants:
chants: merchants: Mary Turner's, Holiday
Inn, University Inn, Field's, Flor Florida
ida Florida Theatre, SilverShol, Lanier's,
Gurtner's Jewelry, Rutherfords
Jewelry, Silverman's, Robertson
Jewelry, Geiger's, Chestnut's,
Wilson's, Zales Jewelry, Cox
Furniture, Balad Hardware, Cop Copper
per Copper Kettle, Ruddy's, and Wise's
Drugs.
The models hair styles will be
donated by various beauty salons
in town.
Margaret Merkely will provide
piano accompaniment and Mrs.
Fred Laugbon will narrate. Guest
model will be Marlene Hammer,
First runnerupfor Mrs. University
of Florida. She will model the
Grand Finale.
Tickets may be obtained from
any Dames member for 50 cents
or at the door the night of the
show. For any information call
Carol Kontrovltz, 372-3636, chair chairmain
main chairmain of the show.

Wednesday, March 3, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

Max Shufman
fer Kellogg's
\) (By the Author of Dcbie GiUis,
ii Rally Round the Flag, Boys, etc.)

THREE TRUE AND TRAUMATIZING TALES

Only one problem remains to be
solved before America enters the
Golden Age. I refer, of course, to
the problem of what to eat for
breakfast.
Youd think with the milen milennium
nium milennium so close at hand Americans
would learn to eat a proper break breakfast.
fast. breakfast. But no; two out of three
citizens persist in eating wrong.
Consider the following typical
cases:
1. Hester a Bad Eater

eventssprinting, leaping, pull pulling,
ing, pulling, hauling, hurdling, hop-skip hop-skipand-jumping.
and-jumping. hop-skipand-jumping. But, alas, because
the poor girl had not eaten a
proper breakfast, her energy
soon deserted her. In fact, it
deserted her right smack in the
middle of a hammer throw!
She was able to get the ham hammer
mer hammer flying all right; what she was
not able to do was let go of the
handle. Over the Vassar fence
soared the hammer and into the
streets of nearby Poughkeepsie Poughkeepsiewith
with Poughkeepsiewith limp Hester, alas, trailing
helplessly behind.
Well sir, naturally she was ex expelled
pelled expelled from college for leaving
the grounds without a pass. To Today,
day, Today, a broken woman, she earns
a bare subsistence as a pennant
in Newark.
2. Deus, Another Bad Eater

Jacoscdl

On the morning of the big in inspection
spection inspection by the Commanding
General, Deus decided he had
better store up all the energy he
jcould get, so he breakfasted on
the following: a flitch of bacon,
a clutch of eggs, a batch of bagels,
a notch of ham, a bunch of out outter,
ter, outter, a swatch of grits, a hutch of
honey, a patch of Jelly, a thatch
of jam, a twitch of pepper, and a
pitch of salt.
From breakfast he went to the
barracks and sat down on his foot
locker to await the arrival of the
Commanding General. "Atten "Attention!
tion! "Attention! cried a voice as the Gen General
eral General entered the barracks, and all
the soldiers sprang to their feet feetall
all feetall the soldiers, that is, but

Hester Glebe was
a sophomore at a
prominent Western
girls college (Vas (Vassar).
sar). (Vassar). Hester, a
comely lass of 19,
majoring in flatware
ana madrigals, was
so excited on the
morning of Vassars
annual Field Day
that she forgot to
eat any breakfast at
all. Eagerly she
slang herseli into
the days many jolly

Deus X. Macki Mackinaw
naw Mackinaw was a private
in the United States
Army. Deus, a ro robust
bust robust lad of 20, did
not make poor
Hesters mistake of
facing a strenuous
day without an ade adequate
quate adequate breakfast. He,
alas, erred in the
opposite direction.

bloated, bulging, torpid Deus who
could not budge his stuffed self
from the foot locker.
Well sir, naturally he was
court-martialled and placed be before
fore before a firing squad. Today, a per perforated
forated perforated man, he earns a meagre
living as a colander in Cleveland.
3. E. Pluribus A Good Eater

E. Pluribus Ew Ewbank
bank Ewbank was a claims
adjuster in a large
insurance agency in
Blue Earth, Minn.
E. Pluribus, a saucy
lad of 27, awoke
one morning and
knew it was the
most important
morning oi his life,
for on this morning
he would propose
marriage to the fair-

est secretary in the
entire insurance agency, tbe beau beauteous
teous beauteous Clarissa Menhaden, whose
cheeks were double damask and
whose eyeballs made men slaves.
At breakfast E. Pluribus pre prepared
pared prepared himself well. He had a bit
of juice, a bit of toast, a bit of
coffee, and a heaping bowl of
Kelloggs Corn Flaxes. Not that
it is vital to our story, for all
Kelloggs cereals taste wonderful.
But, more important, each gold golden
en golden spoonful of each Kelloggs
cereal is pure nourishment, pure
energy, pure power to unflab the
muscles and unclog the blood, to
joggle the cells and jiggle the
psyche. Morning is the time of
day when you most need a quick
pick-upsomething that starts
your motor without stripping your
transmission, that tones the body
without tasting like a tonic, thats
quick and crisp and bright and
ready and loyal and true and
obedient. In short, you need
Kelloggs!
So E. Pluribus finished his
brimming bowl of Kelloggs and
off he wentstrong and confi confident,
dent, confident, bright-eyed and jut-jawed,
springy-legged and gleamy gleamyscalpedana
scalpedana gleamyscalpedana made a proposal of
marriage so eloquent, so fervent,
so loua, that the beauteous Clar Clarissa
issa Clarissa could not say him nay. To Today
day Today they are married and own
their very own insurance agency.
They have three lovely children
a boy named Fire & Theft, and
two girls named Public Liability
and Personal Property Floater.
It is the happiest of families familiesespecially
especially familiesespecially in the spring of the
year when E. Pluribus,. with
many a laugh and cheer, drives
them all to Hartford to see the
actuaries in bloom.
W 1965 Mm Shiilmtn


P.S. A note as to how
you like (or dislike)
these columns will
help determine our
plans for them. Write
Kellogg Company,
Dept. TET, Battle
Creek, Michigan.
O lMsby MMoa Company

Page 5



>, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday / March 3, 1965

Page 6

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Gainesville Coca-Cola Bottling Co.
Sam Santos and Anne Curtiss see for themselves where
all that great taste comes from. Locally The Gainesville
Coca-Cola Bottling Co. can supply you with the worlds
most famous drink. Fraternity, sorority, or individual
parties call FR 6-3701.
v/XvX-KwX/l'x'Xv.vX-XvlvX^-ffiyS^

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Fremacs
The clothes reflect
the man. An old
saying, but a true one.
An important part of
the image you create
in others eyes is based
on the quality and taste
of your clothing and
Fremacs, at 112 W.
University Ave.,
carries clothes that
are the height of
quality ana good
taste.
?

University City
Bank
Students, Tommy Tart and Ann
Ropulewis take advantage of the
24 hour depository service at
University City Bank. This service
is the perfect answer for students
who are usually in class during
regular banking hours. University
City Bank is located two convenient
blocks from campus, at 1116 W.
University Ave. Just one more
reason wny University City Bank
is the most popular bank with the
students.

TWO GREAT CO
ORANGE and BLUEGAN

***** ***.*.
w j i :->BBHBBBWBWMWMWWHBBmWBBBWMmwWM.
- y§"
v.% 0, '-4 isllitill
/ J Kikfl

Xlra, -ap ffi* B #-'-?!. v.l!
M Its spring, the time when a young girls fai
:::::: The bright colors and attractive style
*:? at Donigans are irresistible to the well-dr
jig: home of the discerning collegiate dress
jig: Gant, Bass Weejuns for women, John
jijijiji Fog; All await your next visit.
Donigm
.v:-.-.:::::::v:::::*:<::::::::::<::::::::.::::::<::<<.:<.:.v.:.;.:.:.:.:v:-:-:x::::-:::-:::::::-.

1
ini
imlfna!lF
WPI tBBm ' >h
Jsjgpr'
X **>#
X
v. Pg .Igf ' J
*
*-r'
Happiness
of naving a
to decorate
arent sur<
ext. 510 1
376-2250,
J and the 0]



wBINATIONS
NESVILLE and YOU

W;
if /? X'-y, I
I *;
%ss&§£ BS
* iii
H esjs.v.v
i r l E If
BBPB Bf fl . ; B B
Bp. [B. i B
S- i. :
'\;:?^v/ i *'yt V\ -.,
x ** j' .*< *
JF , -\ r MTS***
K / jr-j l |BBi : : : : : ; :
<1 ii
Xv!
ancy turns to a new wardrobe. S#
ies of the new spring clothing :|:&
Iressed coed. Stop in Donigans, $&
sew Villager, Ladybug, Lady iji&
i Meyer of Norwich, London :*::
****
**
****
***
in's
,|....,,.,. ti t #
Campus Federal
mK S !fIME fjffElM jH |g| WBBBBtj
HqX
H 1 v ] I,
I
is owning your own home* Its hard to dispute the joy
a place of your own to come home to after a hard day, and
e as you choose. If you are thinking of buying a home, but
e how to finance, call Campus Federal at ext. 2973, or
For the Campus Federal Dial-a-Loan service, call
anytime day or night. Main office is located at building
ranch office in the Health Center.

Barkley Motors
>m n
y s**&" v-v -< ; : .'" -
, L.
'&r*&":~ '?ogW^ y &.< ~
v< m
Theres that cute Triumph Italia again. Absolutely my favorite
sports cars, says Fran Singer to Babs Bloom. Coeds all
agree: The man who drives a Triumph Italia, is the object of
many admiring glances. Test-drive a Triumph Italia and see
for yourself. Sola in Gainesville exclusively at Barkley Motors,
2201 N. Main Street.

Wednesday, March 3, 1965, The Florida Alligator

- IjWgy , |
BP/ :
SSSSL'I 1 3w| .f 2? /
#A\ Tc *, Z i J&/JBI
Cyclerama
|
$ Would you like a ride on my new BMW?
:: asks Juan Suarez-Rivas, from Havana, Cuba.
j:j: Attractive coed Babs Bloom seems pleased
:: by the idea and no wonder. The BMW Motor Motor:£
:£ Motor:£ cycle is one of the worlds finest. This
:& outstanding machine can be seen in Gainesville
at Cyclerama, 21 S. E. 2nd Place.
I
I
£
*"
X*

Page 7



, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, March 3. 1965

Page 8

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

For Sale ]
TRAILER 6xxs general utility
use. Ford truck chassis, 2,000 lb.
capacity. SIOO. 372-6643. (A-106-
3t-c).
8x36 TRAILER. Located at Shady
Nook Trailer Park. Call 376-9864
before 2:30 or 372-3890 after 2:30.
(A-106-4t-c).
FOR SALE CALCULATOR.
Curta Type I, hand held precision
calculator. Full performance to
11 places. SBS. Call FR 6-7187.
(A-106-2t-c).
PORTABLE STEREO AM-FM
Radio combination. Like new. Cost
$150; will sacrifice for $95. Call
6-8726. (A-106-3t-c).
AIR CONDITIONER KELVINATOR
6300 BTU, 115 V. Used one season,
still in full warranty. Original
price $l6O, selling for slls. Call
FR 6-8420. (A-105-3t-p).
2 STOVES: one electric 30, one
gas 30. Brand new 3/4 bed. One
arm chair. Call 2-3734 after 5.
(A-105-4t-c).
ARMY OFFICERS UNIFORMS in
good condition. Coats: 38, Pants:
31. Set Blues; Greens with extra
pants; overcoat with liner. TW
pants and shirt. All for $75. Call
2-8100. (A-104-4t-p).
1963 LAMBRETTA Scooter, 4-
speed, 150 cc. Excellent condition.
Many extras: Windshield, luggage
rack, spare tire, basket. Great
summer fun. Call 6-9102. (A-104-
3t-c).

A
m Wmmm
wsws iiviiw sm j
KHMHHI
"duMusTsa
TO BELIEVE IT!!!!
1 :00, 3:02 5:04,7:06,9:08
: COLOROtLux.-Owm.Soo ;

| For Rent I
PRIVATE ROOM & BATH. One
block from Norman Hall. S4O per
month, including utilities. 1015
SW sth Ave. (B-105-3t-c).
- I: .II
MODERN EFFICIENCY APART APARTMENT
MENT APARTMENT across from drill field,
SSO per month. 2026 W. University
Ave. Call 376-0082 evenings. (B (B-
- (B- 105-3 t-c).
LARGE ROOMS IN FRIENDLY
Surroundings available to male
students. Reasonable rates;
utilities and maid service included.
' Convenient to campus and town.
See at 104 SW Bth Street or call
372-0243. (B-82-tf-nc).
- SMALL FURNISHED FRAME
House. Living room, one bedroom,
kitchen, dinette & shower. South
on Ocala Road, Linda Ann Court.
Baby welcome. FR 6-5826. (B (B---103-tf-nc).
--103-tf-nc). (B---103-tf-nc).
ROOMS FOR RENT, Central heat,
maid service, everything
furnished. 378-2583. 237 SW 2nd
Place. (B-98-ts-c).

Wanted

WANTED ONE FEMALE
Roommate to share apartment.
1532 1/2 NW 3rd Ave. Phone 376-
6485. (C-106-3t-c).
ONE FEMALE NEEDED for 2
bedroom apartment near campus.
Rent $22.00 plus utilities. Call
6-6666. (C-106-lt-c).

Services
PROFESSIONAL TYPING done in
my home. 12 years experience.
Medical Terminology passed. On
approved Graduate List. Students,
graduate students, offices op
campuscall Mrs. Lyons anytime
6-7160. (M-106-lt-c).
RUBYS ALTERATIONS. 1238 SW
3rd Ave. Phone 6-8506. (M-106-
lt-c).
GARNER DRAFTING SERVICE.
Leroy lettering, charts, graphical
delineation and preparation of
data for OzaUd reproduction for
thesis and dissertations. 372-8008.
(M-101-lt-c).
EXPERT TYPING done in my
home. Will pick 19 and deliver.
376-8586 before 7:30 a.m. or after
5 p.m. (M-106-lt-c).
COME TO THE WASH PARTY
where friends meet and romance
blooms. Gator Groomer Coin
Operated Laundry and Dry
Cleaning, next door to University
Post Office. (M-103-ts-c).
INFANT CARE in private home.
References furnished. 378-2583.
237 SW 2nd Place. (M-98-ts-c).
Lost & Found
LOST: CALICO CAT west of
stadium. Please call 378-2079,
after 5:15. Reward. (L-106-
3t-c).
ii ~
BLACK WALLET LOST containing
sls-$lB. Notify Ed Fernandez at
372-9315 or 876 South Hall.
Reward. (L-102- st-c).

BERGMAN GOES WILD! CMC
grin and bear a. For. Btfomon has mode a L
vary fuany. gaita witty, and charmiaalY bawdy sflfT
film.* -Nawawaafc
zsjo-v.jo
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I Autos I
1959 CHEVROLET 4-door,
standard transmission, radio,
heater, excellent running
condition. Call 2-5839 anytime.
(G-106-10t-c).
LEAVING FOR SOUTH AMERICA
must sell 1959 FIAT 1100, in good
shape. Call Tito FR 2-0243. 104
SW Bth Street. After 1 p.m. (G (G---106-3t-p).
--106-3t-p). (G---106-3t-p).
*SB CHEVROLET Sport Coupe.
Very clean. 2-dr., V-8, standard
trans, radio, heater. 4 almost new
tires, seat covers, and battery.
Excellent condition throughout.
S6OO. See at 905 NW 12th Ave.
Upstairs Apt. After 2:30 Week
days, anytime weekends. (G-106-
3t-c).
NEW PRICE, 63 VW White, radio,
Top condition. $1295. Call Coach
Ellenson, Ext. 2131, or home FR
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1956 MERCURY 4-door. $395.
Automatic transmission, power
steering and power brakes, above
average in condition* Phone FR
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*62 CHEVY II Hardtop. Air, bucket
seats, radio, heater, ww tires,
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372-9549. (G-104-st-c).
Spirit with Economy 1959
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1 Personal
FERRARIS & PORSCHES ARE OUT
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the Action! Thats right GMR is
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and you can go for only sls.
This includes round trip fare and
admission to Sebring. Hie buses
will remain so you can sleep in
them. There will also be space for
picnic coolers. The buses will
leave Friday afternoon, March 26,
between 4 & 5 and return early
Sunday morning. For more
information drop by the Gainesville
Miniature Raceway, 807 W. Univ.
Ave. or call 8-1023 between 7 anc
9 p.m. (J-105-ts-c).
Real Estate
HOUSE AND NINE ACRES Large
2 bedroom home in excellent con condition
dition condition overlooking lake off Archer
Road. Beautiful oak trees. Only
4 miles from UF Med. Center.
$16,500.00 Call CHARLIE MAYO,
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5, 10, and 20 ACRE LOTS west
of city, with large oak and pine
trees. 5 acre tracts on paved
road. Only S3OO down. Call today
for best choice. W. D. Mason,
c/o Ernest Tew Realty, 6-6461.
(I-100-10t-c).
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will train college men to present
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major Florida cities. Earn SIOO
to $175 WEEKLY! Male 18-28,
neat, personable, possess auto automobile,
mobile, automobile, and be able to work full
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phone Mr. Gibson, University Inn,
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:? ; £*'. *.v: <.:£ . ijilinfr"iffni i
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I A GOLDEN DEAL 1
I 77*e vaccum deposition process is i
| being' used by researchers at the UF §
|to deposit gold films some as thin as 1
1 50millionths of an inch on steel. Ken |
| Craig, graduate assistant to Dr. F.N. {
| Rhines, is shown operating the vacuum i
| chamber. The steel under the bell jar was §
| exposed to the vapors from a gold bq.r |
| that was heated by its own resistance. The |
| coated specimens then were exposed to j
| nascent hydrogen in order to check the |
| resistance of the gold films to hydrogen |
| contamination.

Right-wing lecturer Rusty Wales to speak here March 12

States top high school
debators, speakers here for
Forensics tourney this weekend
Sixty-six of the states top high school speakers
and debate specialists will come to the UF Friday
and Saturday for the annual Florida Forensics Tourna Tournament.
ment. Tournament.
The two-day program will be sponsored by the UFs
Department of Speech and the Florida Institute for
Continuing University Studies.
Registration begins at the Florida Union at 1:30
Pm. followed by tournament sessions at 2:30 p.m.
and 7 p.m. Concluding talks are slated Saturday
morning at 8:30 with awards to be presented at a
Student Service Center luncheon at 12 noon.
District competition has been completed in five
sections of the state with speech departments from
Jacksonville University, Florida State University,
Rollins College, University of Miami and University of
South Florida hosting the high schools. The winner
and runnerup entry in the categories of debate, boys'
extemporaneous speaking and girls' extemporaneous
speaking will be here, along with honor entries in
each of those divisions from South Florida which
earned the right for an extra place because of its
1964 status in the forensics event.
The 22 extemporaneous speakers will pick their
six-minute topics from a pool of 35 subjects related
to the general theme of Weapons Control." They
will have five different occasions to present
their views.

loins Math Dept.
One of the world's most reknown
mathematic analytic number
theorists, Dr. StanislowKnap StanislowKnapowski,
owski, StanislowKnapowski, will become a permanent
member Department faculty this week,
according to Dr. John E. Maxfield,
head of the math department.
Knapowski earned Ids PluD. in
mathematics in Poland and has
been a visiting professor at Tulane.
He is presently finishing work at
a University in Germany and should
arrive at UF later this week.

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Rusty Wales, right-wing conser conservative
vative conservative lecturer, will speak at UF
March 12, on Moral Armament,"
a system to fight Communism.
He is being sponsored by the UF'
Student Government (SG) and the
Faculty Committee on Public
Functions and Lectures.
This presentation should make
many apathetic students cognizant
of the Communist threat to our
way of life," said SG Secretary
of Academic Affairs lee J. Borden,
the student representative on the
faculty committee.
According to Borden, Wales'
theory calls for a positive plan
and goal to stamp out Communism
just as the Communists have a
goal to crush capitalism.
Wales, two-time Olympic gold
medal winner in crew, spoke at
Stetson University last Monday,
and was received quite well,"
said Charles Bugg, Stetson student
body president.
The faculty committee, headed
by Dr. James A. Olson, usually
approves all outside public
speakers brought to UF. In
conjunction with SG and the Florida
Union Forums Committee, the
faculty group provided such recent
speakers as Vance Packard,
Erskine Caldwell, and Roy Wilkins.

UF big Peace Corps booster

The UF has taken a leading
position in the South as a supplier
and trainer of Peace Corps per personnel,
sonnel, personnel, said Glenn A, Farris, for foreign
eign foreign student advisor.
The UF has conducted two major
Peace Corps programs in the last
year and has directly contributed
57 volunteers who are stationed in
28 different countries, continued
Farris.
In the summer of 1964, Florida
was one of approximately 80 uni universities
versities universities throughout the nation that
carried on Peace Corps training
programs.
Under the direction of Dr. Wayne
H. Bartz, assistant psychology
professor, the program sought to
prepare 58 trainees for ser service
vice service in Brazil. The appli applicants
cants applicants came from all over
- __

$7,000 EARMARKED FOR 55 STUDENTS

Alumni scholarships still going

The UF Alumni Association is
awarding over $7,000 in scholar scholarships
ships scholarships to 55 future* UF students.
The Coordinated Local Alumni
Scholarship Program (CLASP) will
give full tuition scholarships for
the freshman year of 55 high school
seniors and junior college trans transfers.
fers. transfers.
According to B. A. Fleming,
director of Alumni Affairs, the
scholarships are given in an effort
on the part of the Alumni Associa Association
tion Association to encourage outstanding stu students
dents students around the state to continue
higher education at the UF rather
than go outside of the state.
CLASP Scholarships will be
given by the local Alumni groups
to an outstanding high school senior
or junior college transfers in their
area, Fleming said.

57VOLUNTEERS IN 28 COUNTRIES

Florida State U Quartet
to preform in
Med Auditorium Sunday
The Florida State String Quartet will appear in
the Medical Center Auditorium Sunday at 4 p.m.
as part of an exchange program which will take
the UF string quartet to Tallahassee March 28.
All faculty members at Florida State University,
the faculty quartet will be assisted by Edward Kll Kllenyi,
enyi, Kllenyi, pianist.
In this first exchange program of the UFand
FSU, the audience will hear Quartet in D Major,"
opus 64, Number 5, by Josef Hydon; Quartet in
F-Minor," opus 95, by Ludwig van Beethoven;
and Quartet in G Minor for piano and strings,
opus 25, by Johannes Brahms.
Admission is free.
In exchange for the FSU program, three mem members
bers members of the Florida String Quartet assisted by Wil Willard
lard Willard Brask, pianist, of the UF department of music
faculty, will present a concert in Opperman Music
Hall at Florida State, March 28.

This is the first
year we have
initiated such an
exchange program
and we hope it can
become a regular
pattern," com-'
mented Prof. Reid
Poole, head of the
music department.

Wednesday, March 3, 1965, The Florida Alligator/

the country, reported Dr. Bartz.
The program included 300 hours
of language study, physical and
medical training, studies of Amer American
ican American and foreign affairs, and in instruction
struction instruction in communism, Brazilian
history, and agricultural techni techniques.
ques. techniques.
According to Bartz, training be began
gan began at 6 a.m. and ended at 9:30
p.m. six days a week. On Sundays
trainees were expected to attend
lectures and seminars.
One training device called for
the trainees to eat by themselves
and to speak only Portuguese
during the meal, said Bartz.
Due, in part, to the demanding
nature of the program, only 27
qualified to make the trip to Bra Brazil,
zil, Brazil, said Bartz.
As a result of the successful

Each local alumni group is
alloted one scholarship to give to
a prospective UF student.
Alachua County Alumni Organ Organization
ization Organization awarded eight scholarships
to local Gainesville high school
seniors Mar. 1.
This is the first time the
Alumni Association has ever
awarded tuition scholarships."
**We initiated the Dollars for
Scholars program several years
ago, but that is a student loan
program not a scholarship," he
said.
Four alumni groups outside the
state will give scholarships to stu students
dents students in their states coming to
the UF.
The local Alumni organiza organizations
tions organizations raise money for CLASP
by solicitatlng donations from

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FR 6-5211

completion of this sum me rpro rprogram,
gram, rprogram, the UF received a $42,000
grant for a second program which
ended Dec. 23.
This latest project, coordinated
by education Prof. Maurice
R. Ahrens, called for the instruc instruction
tion instruction of 62 trainees in education
and teaching techniques. The gra graduates
duates graduates of this program were sent
to Jamaica and British Honduras.
Farris said that the administra administration
tion administration has made available every pos possible
sible possible facility and has given their
full support to the Peace Corp
every time its recruiters have
visited the campus. "Sargent
Shriver, national Peace Corp di director,
rector, director, has sent letters of thanks
and appreciation for this
universities contributions to the
Peace Corp," Farris said.

local UF graduates.
The local Alumni organizations
raise money for the Alumni Loy Loyalty
alty Loyalty fund, from which the CLASP
program drav's money.
The Alumni Loyalty fund con consists
sists consists of monies donated by UF
graduates, Fleming said.

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Page 9



Page 10

i, The Florida Alligator/ Wednesday, March 3, 1965

Housing complaints down 50 per cent under trimester

Complaints are down about 50 per cent since
the trimester was started," says Carl B. Opp,
head of Off-Campus Housing.
The trimester seems to weed out trouble in
off-campus housing, Opp said. They (the students)
tell me they just don't have the time to party that
they to under the semester. We also seem to
be getting a more mature type of student, said Opp.
Off-campus Housing, which houses about 50 per
cent of the UF population, gets many other complaints
from landlords besides partying. The other two

Malcolm X assassination
'like epitaph on tombstone

The assassination of Malcolm
X reminds me of the epitaph on
a child's tombstone in an English
graveyard, said Walter A. Rosen Rosenbaum,
baum, Rosenbaum, assistant professor of
political science.
It read, *1 expected this, but
not so soon."
Malcolm X, ex-member of the
Black Muslims, was riddled with
buUets Sunday while speaking to a
group of his disciples in a dingy
Manhattan ballroom.
Dr. Rosenbaum denies that
Malcolm X's death was ordered by
the leaders of the Black Muslims.
They couldn't take the risk,**
he said. If they did something like
this and were found out, it would
hurt the movement's reputation
too much.*'
David Chalmers, associate
professor of social science, said,
that Malcolm X was a fine
speaker," had a most compelling
personality," and was able to
follow a logical argument in a
dizzying method to its
conclusions."
Malcolm X was suspended from
the Black Muslims because of the
intemperate remarks that he made
when President John F. Kennedy
was killed said Dr. Chalmers.
He was punished suspended
for a trimester," quipped
Chalmers.
Unless Malcolm X had a strong
lieutenant, his group will probably
break up said Dr. Rosenbaum. The
group's strength probably rested
more on the popularity of, and
loyalty to, their leader than on
any strong ideals. There is the
chance that the dead leader will
be made a martyr though.
Dr. Chalmers pointed out that
the recent assassinationsofpublic
figures in the United States (Pres.
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Kennedy and Malcolm X) might
make Americans stop and think
a bit before sanctiomoniously con condemning
demning condemning other nations for the
violence attending their
governments.
Dr. Rosenbaum was surprised,
not by the number of
assassinations that we have had,
but by the number that we have
not had." He explained that it
was strange that there have been
so few under the intense
factionalism and competiveness of
groups in America today.

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biggest complaints landlords get are moving, without
leaving proper notice, and leaving units in unsatis unsatisfactory
factory unsatisfactory conditions, according to Opp.
On the other hand students complain too.
The major student complaints are the facilities
are not in the condition they should be, delays or
failures to correct physical deficiencies, high rent
and personal problems.
Personal problems come in two shapes, first,
personal adjustment with roommates and second,
the relationship of the landlords.

Walker Diamanti a Foriegn Ser Service
vice Service Officer, will be on campus
March 11 to meet with the faculty
and student body to discuss current
information concerning careers in
the Foreign Service of the United
States. He will be available to
meet with students at 9:40 a.m.
Foreign Service Officers are
diplomats specially selected
and trained to assist the Secretary
of State in preparing policy recom recommendations
mendations recommendations to the President of
the United States and to carry out
the foreign policy decisions of the
President. Foreign Service
Officers aid UJS. citizens abroad,

Want to work in Foreign service?

assist United States business in
international commerce, and nego negotiate
tiate negotiate treaties and agreements on
many subjects with representa representatives
tives representatives of other countries.
The next annual Foreign Service
Officer examination will be held
May 1. Candidates for the one oneday
day oneday examination must be at least
21 and under 31 years of age at
the time of the examination. Those
20 years of age may apply if they
have completed their junior year.
All candidates must have been citi citizens
zens citizens of the UJS. for at least 7
and one-half years at the time of
the examination.

The roommate problems usually are solved by
counseling sessions, conducted by the off-campus
housing division.
The landlord problem is a little more difficult.
Opp said some of these landlords promote themselves
to the position of adopted-mother* or adopted adoptedfather
father adoptedfather much to the annoyance of the students.
As far as I can see theres been no cases of
fraud or deliberate negligence on the part of the
landlords but there are some cases in which a
lawyer might say so, Opp said.

The Foreign Service requires
officers with training in public
and business administration, exe executive
cutive executive management, economics and
related subjects as well as those
whose major courses of study
include political science, history,
language and area studies.
Applications to take thfe
examination may be obtained from
you Placement Office or by writing
to the Board of Examiners for the
Foreign Service, Department of
State, Washington, D.C. 20520. The
completed application form must
be postmarked not later than March
15, 1965.



60 per cent of UF
students use
Placement service

Approximately 60 per cent of
UF students make use of the Student
Placement Service according to
Director Maurice E. Mayberry.
Mayberry said the Service
deals mainly with graduating
seniors seeking permanent jobs,
but it also helps undergraduates
find summer jobs and alumni find
new jobs.
We are not operating an
employment agency/* Mayberry
said. We do not pick jobs for
the students, but advise and counsel
them in their particular field of
interest.**
Mayberry estimated that 600
employers, excluding those in
education, come to the office to
interview graduating seniors each
year.
Students usually register with
the office about a year before
graduation.
They are then placed on mailing
lists and are notified when inter interviewers
viewers interviewers will be on campus.
The biggest problem in placing
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At the Gainesville Livestock Market

students is that many of them do
not have fairly definite ideas of
their goals, or they may be highly
Specialized in a particular field/*
the director said.
He added that a great many
students change jobs during their
first year of employment.
This is usually because of the
student and not because of the
placement service/* he said.
Many students will change jobs
during the first year because they
have not been able to adjust and
because their impressions of their
careers have changed.**
Mayberry said this is where the
alumni service comes in. Files
are kept on students after they
graduate. If they come back to
the placement office, they are
counseled in finding a new job.
The Service's biggest problem
at present according to the
director, is its limited budget
and inadequate physical facilities.
The office staffs five full-time
employees and works with people
in the various colleges and
departments of the University.
Without their help, we could
never operate effectively/* said
Mayberry.
Placing students in jobs is
an important integral part of the
higher educational system, but it
often does not receive the
attention it should.*'
Mayberry said improvements in
the present facilities will be made
when the office moves to the new
Florida Union in 1966.
The Student Placement Service
has been operating on campus
since the UF was founded.

The Flute Player'
/Vi

Mexican art exhibit coming

The Bold Tradition/* an exhibition of the art of
Mexico, will be shown at the Florida State Museum
March 4-26.
The display consists of paintings, prints and sculp sculptures
tures sculptures on loan from the Department of Arts and Sciences
of International Business Machines Corporation and
represents the works of some of Mexicos most
important artists, including Diego Rivera, Jose Chavez
Morado, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Jose Clemente Orozco
and Rufino Tamayo.
A majority of the paintings and prints are contem contemporary
porary contemporary while the sculptures are from several ancient

Newsmen to change to nudesmen

DELRAY BEACH, Fla. (UPI)
As skydivers fall and a band
plays to entertain the spectators,
a dozen girls, including an Atlanta
entertainer, will parade nude this
weekend for the title of Miss Lady
Godiva.
First prize in this first annual
naked beauty contest includes a
trip to Coventry, England, the
home of the original Lady Godiva.
Officials in Coventry say they
are thrilled,'' Hugh C. Lester,
secretary-treasurer of the Amer American
ican American Nudist Association, said.
Lester said he wasn't sure yet
if the spectators would have to
attend nude, but the press would
have to be naked. Male newshawks
must be accompanied by an equally
naked female reporter.
The contest will take place at
the Sunny Acres nudist camp west

'Brazilian Week 1 here March 17-19

The 400th anniversary of the
founding of Rio de Janeiro will
be celebrated on campus during
Brazilian Week/* March 17-19.
According to Helcio Martins, one
Do your laundry
you shop
I
Every 10th LoadFiE
KOIN KLEEN
704 W. Univ. Avc.
r
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Lasogna Raviola
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In Every Town Or City, You
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Wednesday, March 3, 196 5, The Florida Alligator

J t t T|
Wm H /
'Fruits of Labor

IFOR LADY GODIVA CONTEST

V '''if
of here Saturday and Sunday.
Judges in the event, Lester said,
will Include Bunny Yeager, a Miami
figure photographer and Sepi

of the chairmen for the event, there
will be at least two events each
day during the week.
Some highlights willinclude
films, talks, and exhibits.
Dora Alencar do Vasconsellos,
a Brazilian poet and Consul
General of Brazil in New York,
will lecture on Modern Brazilian
Poetry" on Thursday, March 16,
7:30 p.m., at the University
Library Room 403.
The Given Word," a Brazilian
film based on Dias Gomes' play,
O Pagador de Promessas, will
be shown on Wednesday, March 24,
8:30 p.m,, at the Medical Center
Auditorium. The film won the
'Rescue Squad
turns back marchers
SELMA, Ala. (UPI) Town of officials
ficials officials backed up by a helmeted,
club carrying rescue squad*'
yesterday turned back about 60
Negroes who tried to march on the
Wilcox County courthouse in
Camden, Ala.
Scores of whites lined the streets
and a tense situation developed
before the demonstrators agreed
to disperse.
At one point the demonstrators
knelt on the sidewalk singing and
praying. The group broke up after
about 15 minutes when authorities
insisted they needed a parade
permit.

Indian cultures. Works from the colonial period are
regarded as important links between the contemporary
and ancient examples.
11 The Bold Tradition** is the newest of eight touring
art exhibitions and four touring science shows that
IBM lends to museums, colleges and libraries through throughout
out throughout the country. The displays visited 130 cities in the
United States during 1964 and were viewed by well
over a million people.
Museum hours are from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on
weekdays and from 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays.

Self Portrait
N o>' li
X
k x
wgjr <

Dubronyi, a sculptor who once did
a nude figurine of actress Anita
Ekberg.
Another of the prizes is the
starring role in a planned movie
by the same name.
Lester said the contest had at attracted
tracted attracted a dozen girls, one from
New York City. He would only
identify one, an Atlanta en entertainer.
tertainer. entertainer.
She is Marta Dane,** Lester
said. She has long blonde hair
from her photograph.
Friday's program Includes a
talent show-FULLY DRESSED.
He was asked what kind of talent.
Any kind of talent the girl
wants to exhibit,** Lester said.
About 2,000 tickets were printed
for the affiar. They are being
sold at $5 apiece. They're selling
right along.'*

Golden Palm Award at the Cannes
International Film Festival and
the Best Film Award at San Fran Francisco
cisco Francisco International Film Festival*
No admission will be charged.
~~
Student 'agitators
are broken up
MADRID, Spain (UPI) Armed
police Tuesday broke up a march
through downtown Madrid by 5,000
students shouting Liberty!
Liberty!
About 20 were arrested, accord according
ing according to a police statement.
A government source described
some of the detainees as
agitators. No charges were an announced,
nounced, announced, pending interrogation.
The students defied a govern government
ment government ban on demonstrations to
march through the capital. But
they failed to reach their target
the Education Ministry, where they
had planned todemandformationof
free students' associations and the
lifting of sanctions on students and
professors.
Horsing around
(CPS) A Florida State
University student has learned the
farrier (horse-shoeing) trade to
finance his education.
As one of two farriers' in his
county, he now earns $7.50 an
hour, considerably more than the
$1.25 an hour he previously earned.

Page 11



Page 12

I, The Florida Alligator/ Wednesday, March 3, 1965

Ford challenges Ferrari: wins

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GURNEY (LEFT) SHELBY (RIGHT) WATCH
THEIR FORDS TROUNCE THE FERRARIS

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WINNING CAR WITH BONNET* UP BEFORE RACE

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GURNEY PEDALS LOTUS-FORD WHICH LED FROM 2ND TO 140TH LAPS

By STEVE KANAR
Sports Writer
About two years ago, a certain
automobile manufacturer decided
to enter racing again; switching to
sports car racing.
Before entering, however, a
survey was undergone to ascertain
who he would have to beat. It
turned out to be Ferrari.
Hastily, this manufacturer de decided
cided decided to BUY Ferrari! Later, there
were second thoughts. If the cars
that resulted from the merger
won races everyone would say
it was because they were
Ferraris, if they lost, it would
be the fault of the purchaser.
Finally, the company decided on
another method; they would build
a car that would win, even over
Ferrari. This plan began to look
unfruitful as the new car lost
race after race due to mechanical
failures. Sunday, however, the plan
finally worked when the Ford GT
won the Daytona Continental.
Ford was also working on

another innovation while the GT
was being developed. Carrol Shelby
had come up with the idea of using
a Ford engine in a British body
and frame the AC Cobra. This
car, now with a new body designed
by Mr. Shelby, placed second after
the Ford GT.
The Ferrari was in the pole
position at the start but after the
pace car went in, the Ford GT
driven by Bob Bondurant blasted
into the lead and streaked down the
back stretch (he was clocked at well
over 200 mph). But, when he got
around to the infield course en entrance,
trance, entrance, he shot by the turn. Bon Bondurant
durant Bondurant realized his mistake and
4
slammed on brakes, but lost many
positions by it.
Dan Gurney took the lead which
Bondurant lost. Gurney, driving a
Lotus-Ford, was able to hold the
lead until very late in the race
when his car suffered a blown pis piston.
ton. piston. The speed and endurance were
a surprise to many, especially
those driving Ferraris. When he
retired, he had a five lap (appro (approximately
ximately (approximately 10 minutes) lead over the
second-place car.
Walt Hansgen, driving a Ferrari
of North American Racing Team,
hit a broken Jaguar piston rod
which had fallen on the track. This
punctured his left-rear tire and
sent Hansgrens into a wild spin,
forcing him to retire. This was
the first of Ferraris troubles.
Pedro Rodriguez and world driv driving
ing driving champion, John Surtees, had
new prototype Ferraris and were
racing Gurney for the lead until
both blew tires.
When Gurney left the race on
the 140th lap, the Continental be became
came became nothing more than a race
between the various Fords.
And so it ended with the Fords
total victors and the Ferraris all
alone in their garages. Ford had
met Ferrarls challenge and won.
<
GLOOMY PEDRO
Pedro Rodriguez looks
rather unhappy after
his car, the #77
Ferrari, was retired
with broken sus suspension.
pension. suspension.

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