Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Philpott cites fantastic UF growth

UF growth is expanding at a
greater rate than we can antici anticipate
pate anticipate it/* said UF Vice-President
Harry Philpott at the Campus Life
Conference Friday night.
Philpott was referring to the
fact that enrollment and facility
projections for the future are runn runn
runn

Students miss
conference
By SHARON KELLEY
Staff Writer
Ninety-five per cent of the faculty we invited
attended, but only 25 per cent of the students invited
showed up,'* said Bob Mounts, outgoing president of
the University Religious Association (URA) speaking
of the Campus Life Conference held last weekend.
Mounts said many faculty members mentioned how
much more successful the conference would have
been had a larger number of representative students
chosen to attend the three sessions.
Richard D. Dresdner, associate professor of
chemistry, said It would have been great if another
50 students were there. Those that did attend were
good and expressed themselves well, but we f d have
gotten a better cross section of the student body if
more students had shown up.

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...beauty Janet Thurlow (KD) and
Beast Bill Gulliford (Phi Delt) pre prepare
pare prepare for the World University Ser Service
vice Service drive set this week
$2 million for JC?
Almost $2 million were recommended Friday for
appropriations to the proposed Alachua-Bradford
County Junior College by the State Junior CoUege
Board in Jacksonville.
Dr. James Wattenbarger, director of the Florida
Division of Community Junior Colleges said the board
recommended $1,949,471 for campus construction
during the next biennium. He said the recommendation
includes $346,000 for operating expenses.
The funds were recommended based on an anti anticipated
cipated anticipated enrollment of 700 students at the community
coUege when it opens, according to Wattenbarger.

By JEANNE MARCH
Staff Writer
UF student Clowder L. Daniel,
Jr., 24, and roommate Victor K.
Moore, 23, maintance employee of
tbe J. Hillis Miller Health Center,
were arrested Thursday on
separate charges of armed robbery
and breaking and entering.
A $15,000 bond is set on Daniel,
of Jacksonville.
He is charged with the $560

ing well behind building and well
ahead in enroUment.
In 1962 we projected a fall
1965 enrollment of 15,500. The
actual figure will be close to
16,300, Philpott said.
We plan right now on reach reaching
ing reaching an enroUment of 20,000 stu stu
stu

Ex 'Speakeasy owner booked for motel robbery

armed robbery of the Tom Sawyer
Motel last Nov. 6. The fourth
year engineering student is also
charged with breaking and entering
tbe Hawthorne Hardware Store Oct.
26.
Daniel was the owner and opera operator
tor operator of The Speakeasy a bar
which was recently closed by Ala Alachua
chua Alachua County Health officials for
not having running water available
for public consumption.

AT CAMPUS LIFE CONFERENCE!

THE
FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
University of Florida, Gainesville

Vol. 57, No. 104

VISTA program
opens at UF today
By CARL BROWN
Staff Writer
Miss Nancy Sinkin, field representative for VISTA,
the domestic peace corps formed last December in
Washington, today will address nineteen classes in
political science and sociology at various levels,
being taught in Peabody, Floyd, Matherly, and McCarty
halls.
At 7 p.m. she will appear on a Channel 5 News Newsflash.
flash. Newsflash. And later tonight at 8:30 she wUI speak to
the Womans Student Organization in Room 212 of
the Florida Union.
Miss Sinkin will discuss the many phases of work
in which students may contribute their effort to the
Volunteers In Service to America after a six week
training period in a poverty stricken environment.
Finances wUI be talked about. She wUI point out
that Uvlng, travel and medical expenses will be paid
to the volunteer. He will receive $75 a month for
expenses and SSO for each month of service at the
end of his term of one, two or three years, as the
volunteer chooses.
See VISTA onp. 7

| Former Gator staffer wins SSOO {
| Former AUigator Editorial .4HM
pi Page Editor and Executive
:$ Editor Ed Barber has landed 1
a SSOO first prize in the month- sm
Ily WUliam Randolph Hearst JM 2
g: journalism contest. BARBER
| Barber captured the big SSOO richer
| money during the January edi- mm
| torial writing competition with %
Hie Jacet, a Veterans Day M
| editorial appearing in The Hi I
% AUigator Nov. 11.
Coming up with an eighth
| place in the contest was Ann M
| Pitts, who won $l5O for her
| editorial Heart of the Heart- See HEARST on p. 3 ||
g land, printed in the Gaines Gainesf
f Gainesf ville Sun. g§

dents by what we caU 197 X. The
year will be 1970 IF the physi physical
cal physical and resource needs can be met.
The UF, Dr. PhUpott con continued,
tinued, continued, is beginning to feel real
enroUment pressures. Our 1961
projections are well below what has
resulted in 1965. For example,

City police records show Daniel
was fined twice for serving alco alcoholic
holic alcoholic beverages to minors.
Set with a $5,000 bond, Moore
of Gainesville 1s charged with the
same breaking and entering of the
Hawthorne Hardware Store.
The arrests came after a search
of the boys* apartment revealed
a Halloween skeleton mask re resembling
sembling resembling the one used in the motel
robbery. Evidence of knives

Monday, March 1, 1965

thought to be taken from the hard hardware
ware hardware store were also found.
Lt. Ronald E. Stanley stated the
search was initiated after a con confide
fide confide ntal source*' gave the sheriffs
department a lead.
Daniel has denied the charges
and Moore said he knows nothing
about the offense.
No date for the trial has been
set yet.
Assistant Dean of Men Arnold

we are 250 over in the CoUege of
Arts and Sciences; 250 over in
the College of Education; over
in all four Health fields; 50 per
cent over the projection in the
School of Journalism and especial especially
ly especially the CoUege of Law where we
have more students now than were
projected for 1970.


Berkeley riots
discussed
* Depersonalization, with its symbols of the mimeo mimeograph
graph mimeograph machine and the IBM card was one of the
underlying factors in the Berkeley demonstrations,'*
' said Dr. Charles McCoy Saturday at the Campus
i Life Conference.
The conference held at the UF Faculty Club Friday
night and Saturday morning and afternoon was spon sponsored
sored sponsored by the URA in cooperation with the adminis administration.
tration. administration. Speakers included UF Vice-President Harry
Philpott, who spoke on the "Changing University;
Dr. Benjamin Barger of the department of psychology
who spoke on the "Changing Student and Dr. Charles
McCoy, professor of religion at the Pacific School of
Religion in Berkeley.
See SPEAKERS onp. 2

W f ; §g|g
1111181 } s
UNL OADING PAINTINGS
**Roy C. Craven Jr., left, and
Mrs. Jay B. Haviser inspect
Osceola, one works on display
tonight.
Gallery opens
By DREX DOBSON
Staff Writer
The new University Art Gallery will be openeu
tonight with formal dedication ceremonies and
a preview of the Gallery's March exhibit, "Artists of
the Florida Tropics, according to Roy C. Craven
Jr., acting Gallery director.
Dr. Wilhelmus B. Bryan, director of the Atlanta
Art Association, will be the guest speaker at the
8 p.m. dedication. Bryan will talk on the place of an
art gallery in a university community.
See UF GALLERY onp. 2

With the growth of the state
junior colleges we expect by 1970
to have twice as many juniors as
freshmen.
"The real problem in student
adjustment lies in the fact that
freshmen are coming to the UF
better prepared and on the average
See PHILPOTT onp. 5

E. Wlrtala said, Mo action by
the administration has been, taken,
as yet. Further reports by the
sheriffs department are needed,
he said.
Ironically, the preliminary re report
port report of the Nov. robbery states a
sheriffs patrol car was parked
across the street from the motel
at the time of the hold up* The
two men present in the car ware
on duty.



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Monday. March 1. 1965

EngineersFair to show turbo-jet car


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SATELLITE TRACKING STATION
. .Prof. M. H. Latour, Norman Kevers,
and Max Robinson
Students satellite tracking
station to be Fair feature

A satellite tracking station built
by four UF students will be one
of the major attractions of this
years Engineering Fair.
Working on the tracking station
are Norm Kevers, Max Robinson,
Ralph Roth, and Dick Flagg.
Work began on the tracking
station in January of 64. At that
time it was located at the radar
tower. InSeptember, *64 the station
was moved to room 19 in Dorm
O* because of the need for
antenna space.
According to Miss Dolores L.
Smoleny, chairman of the fair, the

SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
ARE YOU MONEY-HUNGRY?
DO YOU LIKE GIRLS?
Let us help you satisfy BOTH interests! Our company
will train college men to present our investment plan to
single employed girls this summer in major Florida cities.
EARN SIOO TO $175 WEEKLY!!
Qualifications: Must be male, 18-28, neat, person personable,
able, personable, possess automobile, and be able to work full time
this summer.
i
.For interview, phone Mr. Gibson, University Inn, Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday or Wednesday, March 2-3, between noon and 7 p.m.
i

tracking station is presently
capable of detecting and recording
beacon signals from American
satellites transmitting in the 136-
137 megacycles band, detecting
and recording signals from both
Russian and American satellites
in the 20 megacycles region and
detecting voice transmissions
from both Russian and American
satellites in the frequency band
from 15-20 megacycles.
By March 10, the station will
be able to determine the orbittal
period of American satellites by
using an interferometer system.

Exhibits for the 20th annual
Engineers Fair March 12,13, and
14 will center around current
research done in industry this
year, according to Dolores
Smoleny, chairman of the fair.
Some of the exhibits are available
now for the consumer market and
some are not.
Included in these exhibits will
be a new and rarely seen turbo-jet
car sponsored by the Automative
Engineers under the direction of
Dr. Hal Ingman.
A tracking station monitering
Russian and American satellites
will be shown by a group of students
who have been working on this
project for about a year and a half.
For feminine interests, the
(Continued from Page 1)
The Art Gallery is an integral
part of the $1.5 million College
SPEAKERS
(Continued from Page 1)
He also cited as underlying fac factors
tors factors the right of students to find
their own meaning of what educa education
tion education is and not what they are told
it is.
McCoy said one important issue
that exists on all campuses is the
fact that the young adult is ready
for the challenge of a university,
but often the university treats
him as if he werent ready.
There is a lack of identity
today,* McCoy said. Nobody
wants to identify himself with the
university institution as a whole,
everybody goes into their own
special fields.
The trend is toward multiver multiversity
sity multiversity as opposed to university,*
McCoy said. Communication is
lost due to specialization.*
Barger in his speech, pointed
out that although the academic
level of students has risen, their
maturity level has not gone up.
He cited cheating, stealing and
vandalism statistics showing they
have risen along with the academic
level.

Society of Women Engineers is
trying to get an exhibit of an
entirely modern kitchen. This will
be the first time for an exhibit
of this sort, if it is shown.
University facilities will be open
to tours this year something
which has not been done for the
last couple of years.
Participating in the fair are:
College of Engineering, College of
Physics, College of Nuclear En Engineering,
gineering, Engineering, College of Architecture,
and College of Agricultural En Engineering.
gineering. Engineering.
Exhibits will be located in the
engineering building, physics
building, nuclear research building
and the hangar, which will house
the chemical engineering exhibits.
UF GALLERY*
of Architecture and Fine Arts
building complex that was opened
to architecture and art classes in
January.
The Gallerys initial monthly
exhibit will feature works by four
19th century American masters
who painted Florida scenes and

> J
TC e ep s ake
D I A M O D R I N <3 S
True artistry is expressed in the brilliant
fashion styling of every Keepsake diamond en engagement
gagement engagement ring. Each setting is a masterpiece of
design, reflecting the full brilliance and beauty
of the center diamond... a perfect gem of flaw flawless
less flawless clarity, fine color and meticulous modern cut.
The name, Keepsake, in the ring and on the
tag is your assurance of fine quality and lasting
satisfaction. Your very personal Keepsake is
awaiting your selection at your
Keepsake Jewelers store. Find
him in the yellow pages under
Jewelers. Prices from SIOO
t 0 $ 2500, Ri n S s enlarged to
show beauty of detail.Trade detail.Trademark
mark detail.Trademark registered.
HOW TO PLAN YOUR ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING
Please send new 20-page booklet, "How To Plan
Your Engagement and Wedding" and new 12-page
full color folder, both for only 25tf. Also, send
special offer of beautiful 44-page Bride's Book.
Nome.
|
.*GorfHo&k*pi n g* I r I
V Mourns & City Co Stott
L _KEEPSAKE_DjAMOND RINGS, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 13202_

Florida Blue Key
taking applications
until Wednesday
Applications for membership
in Florida Blue Key are being
accepted until Wednesday.
FBK taps for membership out outstanding
standing outstanding male students who have
impressed the brotherhood with
their ability to exercise effective
leadership and to make valuable
contributions to the UF in three
distinct areas of extra curricular
activity.
Each FBK applicant must have a
2.0 overall average and must have
completed five trimesters of
college work. At least three tri trimesters
mesters trimesters must have been attheUF.
The active chapter meets twice
a year to select new members.
>x*x*:*Xwx*>Xv<x:X:X:;
history. They include James Audu Audubon,
bon, Audubon, George Catlin, Winslow
Homer and George Inness.
These artists were chosen for
their depiction of Floridas past,
Craven said. They show the
changing times and faces of
Floridas heritage.



Socialism trend attacked

By 808 WILCOX
Staff Writer
Calling for a change in American
complacency, Justice Millard
Caldwell of the Florida Supreme
Court said Saturday night, We
are reluctant to admit our trend
to socialism, or that the supreme
court has usurped the rights of
Congress to legislate. 1
Caldwell attacked the current
socialism trend in national gov government,
ernment, government, warning governmental
control will expand while individual
freedoms and Initiative shrink.**
Speaking to the Alpha Kappa Psi
business fraternity, Caldwell
appealed to save that
constitution** by encouragement of
argument and controversy among
the American people.

I University Food Service Offers j
| Monday Gator Special
I in all Cafeterias
l LUNCHEON and DINNER
( Complete Meal
f Q7c
I y I v (plus tax; 1
I Italian Spaghetti 1
J with Meat Sauce 11 I
/ CHOICE OF: POTATO or BUTTERED RICE I
I other vegetable J
1 Any 10$ or 15$ Salad f
I Any 10$ or 15$ DESSERT 1
1 2 ROLLS or 2 Bread Slices j
1 and 2 Butter Pats y/ 7 J

The PEEL comes in to the sound of battle
"OK Haleget the girfs selling them first and then Federmanl
i
' *' ;
STILL OJJXiY 25 CEIfTS

CALDWELL DISLIKES 'GREAT SOCIETY

Our country is suffering from
the insideous disease of moder moderation
ation moderation that mam by pamby cult
of no conviction.** He said Our
nations future is imperiled not so
much by the leftist organizations,
. .as by the moderates.**
The majority is slow to stand
up and be counted,** said Caldwell,
explaining moderate complacency.
But neither is that majority
watchful of its own rights and
the freedom it Inherited from
brave ancestors.**
The Supreme Court justice
stated that he liked no part of
the Great Society.** I*m a crusty
old-fashioned sort of fellow who
believes in freedom, individual
initiative and personal
responsibility.**
So long as you conform to

tenets of the Great Society you
can live with that deep sense of
security enjoyed by the guests of
the prison at Raiford.**
Caldwell saterized the Supreme
Courts actions, saying Lets do
these good things now, lets not
wait for the orderly processes of
the law.
Addressing approximately 100
future businessmen at the dinner,
Caldwell said The businessman
used to be able to employ whom whomsoever
soever whomsoever he pleased and pay what he
thought was deserved, based upon
earnings for the business. Under
the New Dispensation, government
tells business who it must employ
and what it roust pay.**
He urged the students and guests
to use their training and
determined wUl* to curb the
* paternalistic Great Society.**

Monday, March 1, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

2
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aA .. ~-3- i / imh) v{, >- fc y|afc|fcSty'
JpGj'
-
FIJIS AID BOYS RANCH
A group of ten men from Phi Gamma Delta
fraternity yesterday made a 70 mile trip to
Live Oak, Fla., to work at the Florida Sheriffs
Boys Ranch.

=HEARST =
(Continued from Page 1)
Weve long maintained that
weve got the best journalism
school in the country, said Hugh
Cunningham, associate professor
of journalism. And our students
consistently winning in the Hearst
Contest is proof of it.
The school finished second na nationally
tionally nationally in the contest last year,
and according to Cunningham is
far ahead of that pace this year.
He said in three of the four months
entered this year, the schools en entrys
trys entrys have both finished in the top
ten.
Competition comes from 47
schools of journalism. Two entrys
are submitted each month.
When asked what he was going
to do with the money, Barber said
he was planning to have mV
typewriter fixed.

| CAMPUS cum i
I Susan will teach i
V. V

>:: Todays Campus Cutie is ij*
Vice President of the Pan- >:
hellenic Council. ::
ij: Susan Bartley is also a jij
jij: past officer of Sigma Kappa
jiji sorority, one of her chief :jij
jiji hobbies is pistol shooting. :jij
jij: Susan majors in education;:*:
and plans to teach high school ijjj
jiji after graduation. She enjoys jij:
jjjj: working with children. jij:

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 1. 1965

ERNIE UTZ
Editor- in-Chief

LOU FERRIS
Editorial Page Editor

VfamlNT
Big push
The University presidents are out stumping
the state for higher education. They are
talking about money, as well they should.
For there is no doubt that Florida spends
an appallingly low amount on higher education
eacn year.
However, this group tour is a new twist
to the money raising technique employed
in years past. But we commend it to you
as a bold new move. It puts the university
presidents in the limelight and throws a new
light on the need for greater financial support
for higher education.
It conveys the impression that if the
presidents have to go out as a group to
enlighten the public, then apparently the
presidents forays to the state legislature
have been less than successful.
Well, if you want to know what university
presidents do with their time, you now know
a small part of their job.
This new twist oi a group stumping the
state for funds probably adds up to three
conclusions:
First and most obvious, the university
presidents are trying to garner public support
for their programs for financing education.
Second, the presidents are traveling as a
group which strengthens their positions and
obviates the possibility of any one of them
receiving legislative censure for this type
of activity.
Finally, this seems to be the year for the
big push for public support of higher
education.
Withal, we highly approve of what the
presidents are doing and add our voice in
support of their programs.

EDITOR:
HAVING READ the letter of
Manuel Rubio and Michael Wyman
(Feb. 23) concerning Commence Commencement
ment Commencement Convocation, I am inclined
to agree.
I WILL BE graduating in April
and since I am the first in my
immediate family to graduate from
college, they would like to be here.'
However, since they are all
working people, Monday
Commencement will mean they

EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Kay
Huffmaster, (Correspondents), Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles,
Donita Mathison, Dan Taylor, Sam Ullman, Selwin H. Ciment.
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Kurvin, Ann Carter, Evan Langbein, Ira Liebsfeld, Thelma Mossman,
Fran Snider, Cynthia Tunstall, Harvey Wolfson, John Shiplett,
Chip Sharon, Karen Vitunac, Jack Zucker, David Ropes, Ami
Saperstein, Carl Brown, Jane Young, Bill Lockhart, Ken Simon,
and Drex Dobson.
** - ..
Th Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements and
to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment tor any advertisement involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and Is
published five times weekly except duing May, June and July when it is published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the offtcl.il opinions of their authors. The Alligator is entered us second class classmutter
mutter classmutter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International

STEVE VAUGHN
Managing E.ditor

Me too

have to take a day away from
their jobs.
I REALIZE that this cannot be
changed this year, but I hope that
the Calendar Committee of the
University can plan
Commencement 1966 so that
parents and others can attend
without being away from their jobs.
THANK YOU for the opportunity
of airing ones views through your
publication.
(MISS) JOYCE J. KELLEY

JOE CASTE LLO
Executive Editor

EDSEARS
Sports Editor

ALL FOR ONE ANDONE FORALL

University system a political pawn

EDITOR:
CONGRATULATIONS to the UF administration.
IN THE STATEMENTS of Vice President Mautz
and Dean HoUingshead (re: Feb. 22 Alligator) it
was made evident that the administration has become
aware of something that the majority of the faculty
and student body have been saying since September
1962 THE TRIMESTER IS A FAILURE.
THE PROBLEMS which have arisen with the
trimester were not inherent in the system. The
problems resulted from the lack of preparation
which preceded its installation in the Florida
university system.
THE LONG Christmas and summer vacations
which moUvated the majority of the freshmen and
sophomores to approve of the trimester in the recent
straw ballot are not sufficient compensation for poor
quality education.
THE LESSON to be learned from this flagrant
abuse of several years of the educational lives of
Florida college students is that we must LOOK
BE FORE WE LEAP. We must withstand the pressures

EDITOR:
AFTER READING the article concerning Robert
Segal, I feel there are several questions left un unanswered.
answered. unanswered.
FIRST, IF Mr. Segal has such a fine average
(during the campaign it was publicized as a 3.4
overall), why would an incomplete grade in one
four-hour course cause such drastic consequences?
AT WORST, when the grade becomes an **E, M his
average might drop a whole grade point. This in no
way could drop him below the required 2.0 average,
and thus put him on probation.
SECOND, SINCE because of the above Mr. Segal
was not allowed to register, how can he be allowed
to accept his clerkship? He certainly is intelligent

EDITOR:
THE GREAT Food Service recently came out with
a plan which offers the students a complete luncheon
or dinner for 97?. At first glance this appears to
be a good deal, but actual savings will amount to a
maximum of sixteen cents per meal.'
ON THIS PLAN it will be quite possible to lose
up to six cents by taking less expensive dishes.
The apparent savings will cause students to buy
more, and the Food Service will reap profits far
in excess of the minute increase in their own costs.
THIS IS JUST one more injustice to the students
on the part of Food Service. Though it may look
rosy at first, this is only a trick to make us spend
more money.

le T TcR s

Wants to know

Dinner deal

from non-academic politicians who have often in the
past used the state's educational system as a pawn
in the pursuit of their own selfish interests.
WE MUST MAKE known to the people of the state
the importance of quality education in spite of the
cost.
THE RECENT attempt to establish a Board of
Regents was a great stride in removing higher
education from the political mud puddle. Its future
now looks dim. It is a sad day for a state when its
incoming and out-going governors stand before the
world like two-year-old children demanding
gratification of their own selfish desires above the
needs of that state.
REJECTING THE trimester system will fulfill
certain campaign promises. It will do little else
if the system which replaces the trimester is not
thought out and planned for much more than was the
trimester.
WILLIAM COOK, 7AS
A Florida Man since 2 B.T.
(before trimester)

enough to realize that teachers we*e not calling
his name in class, that he had no blue I. D. card, etc.
NO NONSTUDENT can run for a student govern government
ment government office much less actually take office.
THIRD, HOW can this whole thing be straightened
out? Admittedly it does cause quite a furor since
he has been elected to the office, but now after
seven weeks of classes he will be replaced on the
course rolls. Is this extra consideration, or would
it be afforded to all students?
I THINK THIS matter should definitely be looked
into quite carefully. The precedent set here will
affect every student and every future student at
the University of Florida.
NAME WITHHELD

AND WHY did the Food Service announce this
plan right after student elections?
GEORGE BYERS, lUC
Litterbugs
EDITOR:
ACCORDING TO the election laws the winning
party has the duty to clean up the campus.
AROUND THE CAMPUS you will notice many
unsightly ropes and other poop stiU on the trees
and other places.
PROGRESS PARTY has not even fulfilled their
first obligation to the student body. I wonder if this
is an omen of things to come.
STAN SOLOMON, 4BA



Author Caldwell
had rough start

By ANN CARTER
Staff Writer
What Erskine Caldwell calls the
typewriter syndrome has
graduated him from an off-campus
course in sociology to being one of
America's best-read writers.
Caldwell talked at University
Auditorium last week about his
start in the writing game.
Pm not sure about the talent
necessary to be a writer, the
61-year-old author of God's
Little Acre and Tobacco Road
said. But I can attest that luck luckand
and luckand I mean lucky luckhas never
been a writer's handicap.
Caldwell said he sold scrap
metal when he was a boy to earn
money for his first typewriter.
Through the years he never let
that machine, or any other type typewriter
writer typewriter he had, out of his sight.
Sometimes the typewriter
marked him as a struggling writer
and hotels wouldn't put him up for
the night fearing he couldn't pay
the bills.
Another time, in the 40's while
he was on his way to Russia as a
correspondent, Caldwell had to
leave his suitcase of clothes at
the Manchurian border. His 20-
pound typewriter filled the greater
part of the weight quota which was
25 pounds. He gave away his extra

KiX ' 'B lb W::M
n b m i
PMIMr W
WILKINS SPECIAL GUEST
Roy Wilkins (left), Executive Secretary of the
NAACP, is special guest on In the Margin of
Culturetomorrow at 8 p.m. over WUFT-TV,
Channel 5.
Wilkins, who has been a staff member of the
NAACP since 1931, is interviewed by producer producerhost
host producerhost Mark Damen, right. Wilkins reminisces
about his length of service with this organiza organization,
tion, organization, the present fight by Negroes for
desegregation and civil rights and the tactics
adopted.

(Continued from Page 1)
with a higher academic standing.
For example 72,5 per cent of the
entering freshmen come from the
upper fifth of Florida high school
graduates. As a result of this the
UF has had to adjust its habits,
or maybe policies, Philpott
pointed out.
The UF has adapted its grading
pattern to higher standards. For
example, last trimester 65,777
letter grades were given. Os this
group there were: 16.73 per cent
As; 31.26 per cent Bs; 37.39
per cent C*s; 10.23 per cent D*s
and 3.32 per cent E*s.
The UF is planning more widely
developed programs of expansion
in several engineering fields and
projected additions of Colleges of

clothes on a first-come, first firstserved
served firstserved basis to the Manchurians.
I probably originated the
American give- away abroad,
Caldwell said.
All the Georgia-born writer
wore while he was in Russia was
a hamburger mustard yellow
wool suit he had tailored in Hong
Kong. This flashy suit raised alarm
among the British and American
diplomatic corps members, and
just before Pearl Harbor, one
Japanese representative, Caldwell
told, almost offered him a job as
counter-spy.
Caldwell disciplines himself to
a nine-to-five work day, his wife
said. The author described the
life of a writer as a lonely
one and ruthlessly demanding
on the individual.
Words put together, one after
the other, have no purpose, he
said, unless they produce a
cumulative effect on the reader.
His fiction is a mirror of the
reader. When Caldwell writes he
injects his personality into a story
to make fiction seem factual.
Caldwell pointed out that he
doesn't make fact into fiction.
During his career, Caldwell has
published about 45 books and short
stories. In April his latest, semi semiautobiographical
autobiographical semiautobiographical novel, InSearch
of Bisco, will be published.

PHILPOTT

Dentistry and Veterinary Medi Medicine.
cine. Medicine. Also projected are a building
for the Humanities and Social
Sciences; a Music and Cultural
Arts Building; and, if an angel
will give the money, a new Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.
Another major UF crisis must
be faced in the living accomoda accomodations
tions accomodations area. Even with the planned
increase in structures on-campus
facilities may not be able to handle
much more than the present 50
per cent living on campus.
What we really fear, in this
mass growth', is that in some way
we will lose the real essence of a
university, the teaching function.
We must avoid at all costs the
feeling by the faculty that your
status will be judged by how
LITTLE teaching you actually do.

Ml it s sure easy M
* your heap \bbbhbbh
I in the parking lot/ Richy/ j I
I with all those Dodge Coronets I
I around it. I
I I
W B wk
know
1 how to hurt I
m a uy!
-ogjp y
> ; igr
' < 1111 r I iiiiliiliilii'
jB '
1b : .s B
ii i .1... i j I
I BS Dodge CoronetSOO I
I DODGE DIVISION I
WiSt MOTDRB CORPORATION
#

Got a second? Lend an ear. Dodge's all
new, hot new Coronet 500 has got an
awful lot going for it (besides your girl).
For instance: buckets and backup lights,
full carpeting and a console, spinners
and a padded dash all standard equip equipment.
ment. equipment. More? Much I Like an engine
lineup that would make any car squeal
for joy: 273, 318, 361, 383 or 426 cubic

Monday. March 1. 1965. The Florida Alligator,

inches. Like a lean and hungry look. And
like a low, low price tagCoronet costs
less than any full-size Dodge in years.
We cant hope to make you a believer
with an ad, so wed like to extend an in invitation-come
vitation-come invitation-come and see the 1965 Coronet
500 at your nearest Dodge dealers.
Bring your girl along ... it makes for
a cheap date.

Page 5



Page 6

# The Florida Alligator/ Monday / March 1, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

38or Rent
LARGE ROOMS IN FRIENDLY
Surroundings available to male
students. Reasonable rates;
utilities and maid service Included.
Convenient to campus and town.
See at 104 SW Bth Street or call
372-0243. (B-82-tf-nc).
SMALL FURNISHED FRAME
House. Living room, one bedroom,
kitchen, dinette & shower. South
on Ocala Road, Linda Ann Court.
Baby welcome, FR 6-5826. (B (B---103-tf-nc).
--103-tf-nc). (B---103-tf-nc).
OCEAN BEACH HOUSE, East End
Grand Bahama. May to Sept. $l5O
per month. W, Cartier, Box 101,
Freeport, Grand Bahama. (B-100-
st-c).
4-BEDROOM, 2-bath available
March 1. 1100 Block SW sth Ave.
Ideal for 4 to 6 students. Central
heat and AC. For appointment call
376-2892. (B-100-st-c).
ROOMS FOR RENT, Central heat,
maid service, everything
furnished. 378-2583. 237 SW 2nd
Place. (B-98-ts-c).
1
Real Estate
" ,l 1,1
HOUSE AND NINE ACRES Large
2 bedroom home in excellent con condition
dition condition overlooking lake off Archer
Road. Beautiful oak trees. Only
4 miles from UF Med. Center.
$16,500.00 Call CHARLIE MAYO,
MARY MOELLER, Realtor, FR 6-
4471. (I-104-st-c).
5, 10, and 20 ACRE LOTS west
of city, with large oak and pine
trees. 5 acre tracts on paved
road. Only S3OO down. Call today
for best choice. W. D. Mason,
c/o Ernest Tew Realty, 6-6461.
(I-100-10t-c).
girl I
WITH I
R GREEN ft
IXtr EYES 1
9ftP Pttt. (ft
fiiuhMl
2 COLOR
HITS
FIRST AREA SHOWING
At 7:00
*Audie Murphy*
BULLET FOR A BADMAN
At 8:40
fwn
am BMWidi
Plus 3rd Hit at 10:15
Richard Burton
THE BRAMBLE BUSH
Starts Thursday
...

r
| Por Sale j
ARMY OFFICERS UNIFORMS in
good condition. Coats: 38, Pants:
31. Set Blues; Greens with extra
pants; overcoat with liner. TW
pants and shirt. All for $75. Call
2-8100. (A-104-3t-c).
BEAUTIFUL FORMAL Wedding
gown. Silk organza with alencon
lace appliques. Size sto 7 worn
once. Call FR 8-1520 after 5:00.
(A-104-lt-p),
1963 LAMBRETTA Scooter, 4-
speed, 150 cc. Excellent condition.
Many extras: Windshield, luggage
rack, spare tire, basket. Great
summer fun. Call 6-9102. (A-104-
3t-c).
COLT .45 army revolver S3O;
Leica 3c $45; Reifler set make
offer; 1961 Monza 4-speed, all
accessories S9OO. 372-6178. (A (A---104-lt-p).
--104-lt-p). (A---104-lt-p).
BELL 20 WATT hi-fi amplifier.
$36. C. A. ColUer. Ext. 2121,
Rm. 128 E. & I. Bldg. (A-102-
3t-c).
5 TYPING CHAIRS SIO.OO each.
6 Dining chairs SIO.OO each. 3
Formica top tables $50.00 each.
Phone 376-3507. (A-101-st-c).
HAVE YOU TRIED the new
VARSITY Restaurant? 209 NW 13th
Street. Chick Fried steak.
Complete Dinners 97?. (A-101-
st-c).
Lost & Pound
BLACK WALLET LOST containing
sls-$lB. Notify Ed Fernandez at
372-9315 or 876 South Hall.
Reward. (L-102-st-c).
LOST: MANS BLACK WALLET
between Grove, the Hub and the
Military Bldg.Desperately need
identification. You can keep the
money. Contact Bill 2-2114. (L (L---102-St-c).
--102-St-c). (L---102-St-c).
''n'li r
GET WITH THE
"GO-GO" GIRLS
And Have Yourself
A BALL 1 I
NmWSff' raKXxS9
"*Pumo
seam
I;

*
Services
COME TO THE WASH PARTY
where friends meet and romance
blooms. Gator Groomer Coin
Operated Laundry and Dry
Cleaning, next door to University
Post Office. (M-103-ts-c).
APPLICATIONS, portraits, thesis
photos at most reasonable prices.
Call for appt. 378-1170 SNEER SNEERINGER
INGER SNEERINGER PHOTOGRAPHY, 1013 1/2
W. University Ave. (M-102-3t-c).
REALTY COURSE. Bert Rodgers
School of Real Estate Law. Evening
class now forming attend first
lecture free. For information
phone George Kirkpatrick. 372-
3472. (M-101-st-c).
INFANT CARE in private home.
References furnished. 378-2583.
237 SW 2nd Place. (M-98-ts-c).
Autos
1956 MERCURY 4-door. $395.
Automatic transmission, power
steering and power brakes, above
average in condition. Phone FR
2-5244. (G-103-st-c).
1962 BUICK SPECIAL
CONVERTIBLE. Radio, heater,
white walls, standard shift, low
mileage. $1495. 372-0601 after 5.
(G-101-st-c).
MUST SELL IMMEDIATELY 1963
FORD Galaxy 500, V-8, 4-door,
SS, RH & factory air-condition.
SIOO plus approximate SI4OO
payoff. Call Mrs. King, Ext. 2888.
(G-101-st-c).
*62 CHEVY II Hardtop. Air, bucket
seats, radio, heater, ww tires,
stick shift. Call Malcolm Dunn
6-3211, Ext. 5255 or after 5 p.m.
372-9549. (G-104-st-c).
Spirit with Economy 1959
AUSTIN HEALY SPRITE. Radio,
heater, seat belts and tonneau.
307 NE 3rd Street. FR 6-1505
preferably after 5 p.m, (G-104-
St-P).

I NOTICE
i s
THE BOARD OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS IS ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS (DATES
INDICATE TIMES INTERVIEWS WILL BE CONDUCTED; DEAD DEADLINES
LINES DEADLINES FOR RECEIVING APPLICATIONS ARE ALSO LISTED):
INTERVIEW POSITIONS OPEN
MARCH 18 Alligator editor and managing editor, 3rd
(Summer) Trimester, 1965
- Alligator editor and managing editor, Ist
and 2nd Trimesters, 1965-66
- DEADLINE for applications: 5 p.ro., March 16
*
MARCH 25 Seminole editor, managing edltof, and two
editorial assistants, 1965-66 school year
- DEADLINE tor appl'cations: 5 p.m., March 23
APWL 1 New Orange Peel editor and tour section
editors, 1965-66 school year
- DEADLINE tor applications: sp.ro* March 30
Applications may be obtained in Room 9, Florida Union, and must be
returned no later than deadline times above.
1 SoardofStudent Publications

Services
FACULTY MEMBER WANTS TO
BUY or rent second hand 1/2 or
3/4 size string bass. Call 372-
7744. (C-102-3t-c).
Personal
007 RENDEVOUS at Gator Gras
Otto has secret Q-bomb plans
Imperative that Otto is disposed
of M. (J-104-lt-c).
GUS Meet you at Harolds
Club night of Gator Gras Minnie.
(J-104-lt-c).

Computer dance
dorm highlight

By CARL BROWN
Staff Writer
In UF dorm activities:
Tolbert area has scheduled a
Computer Dance for March 12
at Broward Hall. Couples for the
dance will be chosen by computer
from information which each
student fills out on cards obtain obtainable
able obtainable from the Tolbert area office.
There will be a band at the dance.
In other activities in the area,
the constitution underwent revision
in a two and a half hour council
meeting. The new charter will
enable the council to elect officers,
a feature deemed more efficient
than the old method of an area
wide elections.
Murphree area is making plans
for the air-conditioning of the
Fletcher lounge Library facility.
The project is a joint undertaking
of the housing division, student
government, and the Murphree
Council.
Social affairs are taking the
spotlight in Graham Area, as plans
are being made for two events.
Graham Play day, on a format
similar to the Sigma Chi Derby,
but on an area-wide basis, will
be held in two weeks. The areas
annual Harolds Club Dance is also
in the planning stage.

| Personal
CONGRATULATIONS, Ed Barber
(the greatest college editorialist
in the country). It couldn't have
happened to a nicer or more
deserving guy. From the Lab and
the Business Office. (J-104-lt-nc).
I YAMAHA BMW
Motorcycles I
For The Discrlminatii* B
CYCLE RAMA ; 1
378-2 BU 21 SE 2nd Place

The Graham radio station for
which money was recently supplied
by student government, is "under"
construction. Equipment pur purchased
chased purchased so far has been limited
to recorders and turntables. The
transmitter has not been obtained
yet.
Hume Hall will hold an area
hayride Friday. The event is
sponsored by the area council
and will start at Cowboy Riding
Stable.
Bseoatotclassirepm
TO FIND IT J
W TO BUY IT
TO SELL IT
toom *9, Florida
|Pr Call Univ. Ex: 2832!



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Monday, March 1, 1965 The Florida Alligator/

campus news briefs

BLOOD DONORS
IFC blood donors, take your
Frolics ticket to Dean Cross In
the IFC office Room 128 Tigert
Hall to be stamped for reserved
seating.
SPEAKER'S BUREAU
Freedom Party requests that
anyone Interested In participat participating
ing participating in a speakers bureau program
for the Negro junior colleges in
Florida sign 19 for an interview
time in Room 102, Building D. The
interviews will take place on
Thursday and Friday afternoons,
1-5 p.m. in the Florida Union
Auditorium, March 4 and 5.
AUTO ENGINEERS
A color movie on Chrysler Cor Corporations
porations Corporations turbine car will be
shown at the meeting of the So Society
ciety Society of Automotive Engineers to tonight
night tonight 7:30 p.m. in Room 319 En Engineering
gineering Engineering Building. This is the
same car the society will have
here for the Engineers Fair March
12, 13 and 14. Visitors are wel welcome.
come. welcome.
CHEERLEADERS
Starting today at 4 p.m. a two twoweek
week twoweek cheerleading clinic will be
conducted at Florida Field. The
actual tryouts will be Friday,
March 12.
REAL ESTATE CLUB
The UF Real Estate Club will
meet tonight 7:30 p.m. in Room
218 Florida Union. M.M. Parrish,
a Gainesville realtor, will speak
on problems in the development
of downtown areas.

Organizations to get querys
Organizations on campus will soon be receiving questionnaires from
the Secretary of Organizations as part of his effort to compile the
Organizations Guide early this year.
Secretary Andy Hall said the Guide is a thorough breakdown of the
scope, budgets, rules and functions of each organization. One specific
use of the Guide is as an aid to Leg Council to better understand an
organization that comes to request money.
In September when freshmen come they have no idea of the scope
of activities and services offered by different organizations,** Hall
said. This is unfortunate and is what the Guide hopes to correct. It
will be given to all freshmen along with forms to fill out to help acquaint
them with what is available according to their interests and talents.**
We also plan to use the Guide to help organizations with similar
problems work more smoothly,** Hall said.

(Continued from Page 1)
What exactly can VISTA do for
America?
Slums come down in the middle
of the city. People are moved
to a new housing project. They
were born in the slums, raised
there, and had most likely re resigned
signed resigned themselves to die there.
In the new area opportunity is
available in many ways. Education
is immediately wanted and needed.
A VISTA representative, work working
ing working as a tenant education teacher,
can make the transition from slum
to civilization by teaching these
people the ways of a new life.
Hundreds of other tasks await
the educated who, through the
Volunteers In Service To America,
are the instruments for waging war
on poverty.
According to CoL Glenn A.
Farris, campus director for the
group, VISTA constitutes a chal challenge
lenge challenge for coUege students who find
it expedient to interrupt their col college
lege college education for a year.**
On Wednesday Miss Sinkln will
return to Washington and discuss
the University of Florida's reac-

REHABILITATION
A meeting to plan the Tampa
field trip will be held by the UF
Rehabilitation Association at noon
tomorrow in the Health Center
cafeteria.
AGRICULTURAL
The American Society of Agri Agricultural
cultural Agricultural Engineers will meet to tonight
night tonight 7 p.m. in Room 15 Agricul Agricultural
tural Agricultural Engineering Building.
DAR WIN ISM
Professor John C. Greene, Uni University
versity University of Kansas, will lecture
on *'Darwinism, Old and New,
8:15 tonight in the Florida Union
Auditorium. The lecture is spon sponsored
sored sponsored by the Public Lecture Ser Series
ies Series Committee and the History
Department.
t-
INTERNATIONAL
The International Womens Club
will meet tonight 8 p.m. at the
University Womens Club. All in international
ternational international women students as well
as wives of the students are in invited.
vited. invited. For information call Mrs.
Boyd FR 2-3247 or Mrs. Farris
FR 2-5830.
GERMAN MOVIE
The Department of Foreign Lan Languages
guages Languages is showing the German
movie Der Hauptmann VonKope VonKopenick
nick VonKopenick tonight 8:15 pm. in the
Health Center Auditorium. This is
a delightful parady of the exag exaggerated
gerated exaggerated deep seated German re respect
spect respect for uniforms and authority.
There are no English subtitles.

VISTA

tion to the program and pass on
her new applications of volunteers
from Florida in the war against
poverty.
Persons interested in VISTA
may attend MissSinkin's meetings,
may apply at the Placement Office
in Building H, or may see Col.
Glenn in Building AE. Groups wish wishing
ing wishing to have Miss Sinkin as a
speaker may contact Col. Farris.
Open house tonight
on new degree
Hie Communication Sciences
Division of the Department of
Speech is sponsoring an open house
for lUC and 2UC students tonight
and tomorrow from 8-10 p.m. in
Building L at the left corner of
Stadium Road and North-South
Drive. Purpose of the open house
is to acquaint students with the
new undergraduate degree pro program
gram program (BA.) in Communication
Sciences. All lUC and 2UC students
are invited to attend the open house
to discuss the academic program,
examine the research facilities
and explore job opportunities in
Communication Sciences.

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 1, 1965

With regret |{W
By EDDIE SEARS
Sports Editor

It is with deep regret I write the following column.
For the past seven weeks the Alligator sports department has
tried to present a comprehensive, intelligent view of the sports
news. I think we have succeeded.
Never before have the varsity sports received so much publicity
and attention. Never before has an entire page been given to a
basketball contest that was a mere nine hours old.
We have made preparations to cover Sebring and the Daytona
Continental. We are trying to give a new type of coverage to
intramurals, but our goals are far from over.
It makes me very unhappy, really then, to announce that personal
problems have forced me to retire as the sports editor. I never
thought the day would come when I should write a column like this,
unless it was a true emergency. And it is.
Therefore I would like to give my best wishes to Andy Moor
the new sports editor.
Andy is a fine reporter and sportsman and will carry on the
goals we have set. Andy returned to school this year after a hitch
in the navy where he put out a service paper single-handed.
So, sports fans, I hope this isnt good-bye, just farewell for a
while. I hope to return to the Alligator in the next couple of years.
Be looking for my spicy, controversial column in the future.
Tennis team opens season;
tough schedule in store

The 1965 edition oftheUF tennis
team opens its bid for a successful
season this afternoon at 2:15 :
against Stetson at the varsity tennis
courts.
Captained by senior Dave
Bonner, the Gators will play 18
matches in 1965, 13 home, in an
attempt to better last years fine
11-4 mark. They warmed up with
a win over the faculty Feb. 20.
Coach Bill Potters crew face
their toughest schedule to date in
1965. The Mike Belkin led Miami
Hurricanes, winners of 137
straight before an upset last year,
and Big Ten champion Indiana
are just two of many which present
formidable opposition for the
Gators.
Consistent performances can be
expected from top man Bonner,
Hick Chace in the number two
slot and Vic Stone (the 5000 year
old man) in fifth position. Bill
Perrin, Ron Fick, and Steve
Gardner round out the top six.
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CHECK THE RECORD

>Xv
1 Golfers lose to Seminoles 1
**** V.|.J
*:*: FSU collected another Gator scalp as the golf team succumbed £*
to the Seminoles by the narrow 10-8 margin. g;:*:
Laurie Hammer and Bob Murphy supplied their usual 1-2
punch for the Gators but the men from Tallahassee took advantage
of superior depth to gain victory in the hotly contested match. gigi
£:*: The loss dropped the golfers log to 2-2 for the season. It was gig:
xg: the 21st consecutive victory for the unbeaten Seminoles. gig giggig:
gig: giggig: Next match for the golfers is against Kentucky March 16 in gig giggggi
gggi giggggi Gainesville. gggi

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Vandy ups SEC Margin

UFs basketball team will
attempt to avenge its worst defeat
of the season when it hosts crest crestfallen
fallen crestfallen Tennessee tonight at 8 p.m.
In their earlier meeting in Knox Knoxville,
ville, Knoxville, the Gators were never in
the game and were routed by the
Vols by a 75-43 count.
Tennessee was knocked out of
the SEC race Saturday when it
suffered a 61-60 loss to Kentucky
at Lexington, dropping two full
games behind Vanderbilt.
Gary Keller showed his best

FSU dunks swimmers;
last dual meet today

Florida concludes its varsity
swimming dual meet season today
at 3 p.m. with a warmup for the
Southeastern 'Conference
Championships next weekend.
The Gators will be looking to
finish the season on a happy note
after absorbing their worst loss of
the season, 72-23, to FSU Saturday
in Tallahassee.
UFs opponent at Florida Pool,
however, could make things mighty
hot before the afternoon is over.
Florida tangles with East Carolina,
second place finishers in last
years NCAA College Division.
East Carolina is currently 6-1
on the season compared with the
Gators 5-4. Leading the way for

GATORS TACKLE TENNESSEE

form of the year Saturday in lead leading
ing leading the Gators to an 83-74 come
from behind win over Georgia at
Athens. KeUer dumped in 26 points
and rebounded consistently.
Georgia jumped into a fast lead
on the shooting of Mike Taylor and
led by as much as 10 points in
the first half. Intermission score
was 42-34.
The Gators came storming back
on the shooting of Keller, Dick
Tomlinson, and Paul Morton to tie
the game midway through the se-

Coach Ray Martinez Carolina
team are sophomore Joel Cygan
(individual medley, free relay),
senior Jim Marasco (individual
medley and breaststroke), captain.
Harry Sober (individual medley and
sprints) and the finest butterfly
man in ECC history, sophomore
Dick Fogle.
FSU dominated the meet from
the outset, winning nine of eleven
events, losing only the 100 yard
freestyle and the 200 yard back backstroke.
stroke. backstroke.
Gator soph Tom Dioguardi was
beaten for the first time this year
in the 50 yard freestyle by the
Seminoles Chuck Robertson. The
time for the event was a not-so not-sofast
fast not-sofast 22.6,
Thursday, Coach Bill Harlans
Gators play host to the 24thannual
Southeastern Conference
Swimming and Diving Champion Championships.
ships. Championships. This meet, which has been
won nine consecutive years by
Florida, rims through Saturday.
This should be one of the finest
conference meets ever held,*
says Harlan. Every team has
some superior swimmers aid the
competition could well be the most
balanced and strenuous yet seen.
Other schools entering full
teams include Alabama, Georgia,
Tulane, Kentucky and Vanderbilt.

cond stanza. UF f s charges
promptly racked off 10 straight
points from there, putting the game
on ice. Tomlinson wound up with a
total of 17 points while Brooks
Henderson, Jeff Ramsey and Mor Morton
ton Morton had 11 each.
Later the same evening, the Bth
ranked Vanderbilt Commodores
coasted to a 75-54 victory over
Alabama. The victory gave Vandy
the big bulge over the Vols and
virtually assured their winning
their first-ever conference
basketball crown.
Vanderbilt, 12-1 in conference
play and 20-3 overall, will be at
Auburn Monday night, then re returns
turns returns home for windup games with
Tulane and LSU. Tennessee, 18-4
overall, is now 10-3 in the SEC
and any combination of two Vandy
wins or Vol losses ends the race.
SEC STANDINGS
Vanderbilt 12 1
Tennessee 10 3
Auburn 10 4
FLORIDA 9 5
Alabama 9 5
Kentucky 9 6
LSU 77
Miss. State 6 10
Georgia 4 11
Tulane 2 12
Mississippi 1 15
Gator miters win
at Mason-Dixon
the Gator mile relay team came
through with a big first at the
Mason-Dixon games in Louisville
this weekend.
Composed by John Anderson,
Dieter Gebhard, Bill Roberts and
Jim Brown, the group ran the dis distance
tance distance in 3:19.8
John Anderson continued to show
his good form with a fourth place
finish in the 70 yard dash. Ander Anderson
son Anderson ran the 70 in 7.1, finishing
three-tenths of a second behind
Mel Pender, who set a world
record for the distance.
Other Gators who placed at the
games were: Jim Brown, fifth in
the 880 yard run and Dave Wester Westerman,
man, Westerman, fourth in the high jump.