Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
NEW FLAVETS GOING UP
..helping soothe the married
housing problem on the UF iflK
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Burns announces probe

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Gov.
Haydon Burns said yesterday that
more than 200 jobs and well in ex excess
cess excess of $200,000 were involved in
an investigation of iroporper hir hiring
ing hiring practices by the Florida In Institute
stitute Institute for Continuing University
Studies.
Burns and the Cabinet kicked

Stiff breezes lift
dresses over kneeses
Spring nas sprungand recoiled.
With winds reported up to 54 m.p.h. yesterday and a low
of 24-30 degrees expected early this morning, Floridas mildest
winter in 16 years received a frostyand windyjolt.
High winds on the UF campus made between-class jogs espe especially
cially especially treacherous for girls with full skirts and bicycle riders.
I was trying to ride against the wind and could hardly go
anywhere at all, said one UF pedaler.
Around the state the cold front dropped temperatures and
brought street flooding rains.
Three freighters anchored in Jacksonville were blown aground
by a strong westerly wind that gusted up to 45 miles an hour.

Cunningham qualifies for Council

Hugh W. Cunningham, associate
professor of journalism, has be become
come become the second UF faculty
member to qualify as a candidate
for the Gainesville City Commis Commission,
sion, Commission,
Cunningham is seeking the re remaining
maining remaining two years of a three-year
term vacated recently by Byron
Winn.
Earlier, Dr. Ralph B. Thompson,
business professor and editor of a
new state businessmans.maga businessmans.magazine,
zine, businessmans.magazine, qualified to run in Group
1 against incumbent Howard Mc-
Kinney and former local NAACP
president Rev. Ardus Alexander.
Competing with Cunningham for
the Group 2 position are Dr. Wal Walter
ter Walter Murphree, a physician and
ex mayor commissioner; Rev.
Thomas A. Wright, current presi president
dent president of the local NAACP; and Wil William
liam William Reynolds, an attorney and
member of the Alachua County

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Vol. 57, No. 103

off the investigation last Tuesday
when they called on the Board of
Regents to take a look into spend spending
ing spending and hiring by FICUS. Funds
slated for casual or temporary
employes were used to hire per permanent
manent permanent personnel.
The governor said quite a
number of administrative workers,

Zoning Commission.
Cunningham, who came to UF
in 1955, said: I am a great
believer in American democracy
and because of that I feel there
are hundreds of men and women
in Gainesville capable of serving on
the commission. I feel at this par particular
ticular particular stage of the citys growth
I am particularly qualified.
He said he believes his years of
experience as a newspaper editor
and of reporting and observing
local government will enable him to
act with good judgment on the
Commission as well as to help
the city interpret its programs
to Gainesville citizens.
A 43-year-old native of Texas,
Cunningham is married and has
three children, ages 18, 11, and
7. He helped his father and mother
operate the family grocery and
See E LE C TION on p. 2

University of Florida, Gainesville

statisticians and clerks were hired
with money that was appropriated
for use in paying professors
to teach off campus classes
throughout the state.
FICUS was created to coordinate
all off-campus educational offer offerings
ings offerings by the universities.
Burns said the investigation in involved
volved involved the complete disregard
of legislative-set maximums for
administrative personnel. The
legislature, which looked closely
at the FICUS organization in 1963
set a maximum of 75 employes for
the agency.
There are over 200 jobs in involved
volved involved in the investigation, Burns
told a news conference. He did not
say in which category all of the
200 jobs were fc ind.
FICUS was not designed to em employ
ploy employ a faculty of its own. But Burns
said apparently salary funds ap appropriated
propriated appropriated to go for administrative
personnel were used to hire pro professors.
fessors. professors. Then, funds appropriated
for use in paying professors for
off campus classes, were used
to hire office workers.

m
CUNNINGHAM

No VD here,
officials say

By BILL LOCKHART
Staff Writer
The UF administration, the di director
rector director of the campus infirmary,
and city and county police offi officials
cials officials have all denied reports that
verereal disease is running ram rampant
pant rampant on campus.
A report circulating on cam campus
pus campus said that as many as 100
students have been receiving treat treatment
ment treatment in the infirmary. Dr. William
A. Hall, director of the infirmary,
however, has denied the report.
We have not had one case of
venereal disease in the infirmary
in the recent past, he said.
UF Vice-President Harry M.
Philpott supported Halls state statement.
ment. statement. Dr. Hall speaks for the
administration. I have no comment
to make, he said.
The wide-spread rumors have
been circulating following reports
of a prostitute working on campus.
Dean of Student Affairs Lester
L. Hale commented, We have had

Sorry, Dr. McCall
The Alligator wlsnes to apologize for any mis-informatlon that
may have occurred as a result of Tuesdays story concerning the
.dismissal from the UF faculty of Ed Richer.
A statement was made that Dr. Wayne C. McCall was vice vicepresident
president vicepresident of Project Alert. McCall is a member of the Board
of Regents and the statement was intended to be a quote from UF
Prof. Marshall Jones, not a statement by The Alligator.
Jones, contacted yesterday said he was in error and that McCall
is not a vice-president of Project Alert, but a subscriber or
director as named in the Articles of Incorporation of Project
Alert.
McCall, reached by phone at his office in Ocala said, I have
never attended any organizational meeting or paid any member membership
ship membership dues to Project Alert.
If my name appears in the membership, or as an officer of
such an organization,it has been used without my consent.

Life Conference begins

Dr. Harry Philpott, UF Vice
President, will head the initial pro program
gram program of the Campus Life Con Conference
ference Conference which opens tonight at
the University Faculty Club.
The program is sponsored by
the University Religious Asso Association
ciation Association in cooperation with the
University Administration and will
bring together student and faculty
leaders to discuss problems of
university and student life.
Dr. Philpott will speak at 8 p.m.
The topic of his address will be
The Changing University .Group
discussions will follow each of the
major speeches, Chairman Tom
Freeman reported.
We want to offer an opportunity
for the Conference participants to
.express their views on the Univer University
sity University and its problems/' Freeman
said. If we can provide a forum
for the intelligent discussion by
the persons involved within the
Campus Life Conference, we feel
that .the University will benefit
significantly. he added.
Tomorrow, the Conference will
reconvene at the Faculty Club at
10 a.m. to hear Dr. Benjamin Bar Barreports

Friday, Feb. 26, 1965

reports Barreports that a woman has been
operating in the area. The inves investigation
tigation investigation is in the hands of the
police. If any tangable evidence is
presented on which the university
can act we will do so with
haste.*'
Gainesville Police Chief William
D. Joiner said, We have picked
up a woman reported to be a
prostitute working on campus. That
is what we are investigating. I
know nothing about a venereal dis disease
ease disease case being investigated at
this time."
Lt. Ronald E. (Ron) Stanley of
the Alachua County Sheriff's De Department
partment Department commented, We have
had a report; it was not an offi official
cial official complaint. No arrest has been
made. Our investigation has not
developed any facts on which to
make an arrest."
Stanley added, We have no
facts on UF students being
involved."
See DISEASE on p. 9

ger, of the Department of Psycho Psychology,
logy, Psychology, speak on The Changing.
Student. Dr. Barger's address
will be followed by a luncheon with
Dr. Delton Scudder presenting the
newly elected officers of the Uni University
versity University Religious Association.
PHILPOTT



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator/ Friday, Feb. 26, 1965

FBK 'discrimination l charged

By KAY HUFFMASTER
Staff Writer
Charges of discrimination*'
were leveled against Florida Blue
Key Speakers* Bureau yesterday by
Dan Harmleing, chairman of Free Freedom
dom Freedom Partys Office of Student Re Recruitment.
cruitment. Recruitment.
Harmeling said the Key Bureau
has refused to send speakers out
to Negro junior colleges in the
state. He said Freedom Partys
Student Recruitment Committee
will expand its program and send
integrated groups into the Negro
junior colleges.

Peel hints at 'fireworks

The New Orange Peel goes on
sale Monday morning amidst con-.
tinuous rumors that fireworks*
abound throughout its latest issue,
according to Editor Don Federman.

WSA planning elections

The Womens Student Associa Associations
tions Associations (WS A) will hold elections
Tuesday, March 2. All single un undergraduate
dergraduate undergraduate women are qualified
to vote.
Polls will be open from 9 a.m.
6 p.m. All hall occupants will
vote in their respective dor dormitories,
mitories, dormitories, sororities in Yulee Area
and off-campus women in the
.vrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrnTTTTTTTTTTrrrt.
! ELECTION 1
£ (Continued from P. 1)
feed store business while growing
up.
I am a product of the free en enterprise
terprise enterprise system,* he says, and
I believe in it 100 per cent.*
Cunningham supervises the work
of student journalists two days
a week on the Gainesville Sun as
part of his duties as a journalism
teacher. In the past, he has served
as editor of the Bryan (Texas)
Dally Eagle and has worked
summers in editorial positions on
the Sun and the Atlanta Journal.
He is a Navy veteran of World
World n, having served as a com communications
munications communications officer aboard a des destroyer
troyer destroyer escort in both the Pacific
and Atlantic.
Cunningham received his
bachelor of arts degree from Trin Trinity
ity Trinity University in Texas with a
major in economics and business
administration. Later, he received
his masters of arts degree in
journalism from the University
of Missouri.
He is co-chairman and secre secretary
tary secretary of the Gainesville Bi-racial
Committee and is an elder in the
First Presbyterian Church.
t rfifoDecfT
Shoe Repair Shop
HEELS ATTACHED
5 Mina.
SOLES ATTACHED
15* Mina.
At Two Locations
CAROLYN PLAZA
FR 6-0315
And
101 N. Main St.
Opp. Ist Nat 1 1 Bank

Harmeling said Negroes in
Florida dont know anything the
UF. They arent sure they can get
scholarships. Some, dont even
know we are integrated.
According to Harry Shorstein,
chairman of FBK Bureau, the
schools which are to be visited
had been contacted early in Decem December.
ber. December. The program had already been
set up when Harmeling brought it
to his (Shorsteins) attention that
no Negro junior colleges had been
included.
Shorstein explained the reason
no Negro junior colleges were
added to the list was because of

SAYS EDITOR FEDERMAN

Federman refused to divulge any
specifics on his latest effort, but
did say to expect several clean,
but spectacular digs at some of
the universitys sacred and not-so-

Florida Union.
The 1965-66 WSA slate includes:
For president: Kay Lundquist
and Meg Sowell.
For vice-president: Judy Hug Huggins
gins Huggins and Kimbrell.
For treasurer: Nancy Calhoun.
For corresponding secretary:
Ginger Jochem and Karen Read.
For recording secretary: Penny
Port.
For senior representative: Jen Jennifer
nifer Jennifer McKinnon.
For junior representative:
Marilyn Shinbaum.
For freshman sophomore re representative,
presentative, representative, vote for 2:
Cindy Cohen, Susan Hart and Kay
Melton.

A profitable summer of study
and recreation...
C.W.POST COLLEGE
OF LONG ISLAND UNIVERSITY
Applications now being accepted for j/vo
TWO 5-WEEK SUMMER SESSIONS
JUNE 21 to JULY 23; JULY 26 to AUGUST 27 JO 1 flf
Day and Evening |
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with a distinguished visiting
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UNDERGRADUATE graduate course sffsriags
In the Graduate Scfeeols es
COURSE offerings Lea* island university
include studies In include studies in Biological
l Ih~r*i Art. .rwl Cri.nr Sciences, Business Administration,
Liberal Arts and sciences, Education, English, Guidance and
Pre-Professional, Counseling, History, Library Science,
"Engineering, Physics, Political Science,
Business and Education. sociology, speech.
Located on the beautiful North Shore Gdjfo
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is just 30 minutes from the Worlds Fair, MBDjBWy
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Enjoy swimming, tennis, riding, bowling, mm. @ humim
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Nearby are famous beaches, sailing summer
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New men's and womens residence halls.
APPLY NOW... Admission open to VISITING STUDENTS
from other accredited colleges.
For additional information, summer bulletin and
application, phono 516 MAyfair 6-1200 or mail coupon
aBUBsmwewa I Doan of Summer School, C. W. Post College, P. 0., Greenvale, L.t., N.Y. 11548 I
| Plaasa sand ma Summer Sessions information bulletin. cp J
I Womens Residence Hall Mans Residence Halt
| Undergraduate Graduate Day Evening
J Name J
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I City State I
l i
If visiting student, from which college?

limiteu .ands. Also, the smallest
white junior college the bureau
is going to is larger than the larg largest
est largest Negro junior college.
All his implications that FBK
Speakers Bureau policies are run
by Dr. Reitz are incorrect. I take
full responsibility for not going to
Negro colleges,* said Shorstein.
We cant send a team of three
speakers to speak to 10--20 per persons
sons persons who might be interested,**
Shorstein said.
The UF does not recruit
anyway. We are very crowded with without
out without recruiting, he further
explained.

sacred cows.
Federman went on to say that
this was his most balanced, most
discriminating, and just plain best
Peel he has ever put out.
Everything improved this time
stories, satire, features, and
especially the women. Even some
of the layout is a bit more ima imaginative,
ginative, imaginative, said Federman.
He added, The cover alone is
worth the price!
On the question of objection objectionable
able objectionable material, Federman said, I
see nothing wrong in the material
or tone of the magazine, but then
one is dealing with a genteel and
righteous administration, so
I dont know what to expect.
The Peel will be sold at the
Campus Club, the Engineering
building, the Hub, Library,
Matherly, the Med Center, and
Peabody. It sells for 25 cents.

New Orange Peel
This is not a Peelmate...
4 vC 3 v ;"/ J // / HP I y -/V^-H

m>'- %&m
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v : ; '-:V:>g& . w .<* > :\- /
This is...
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One of two remarkable women In this PEEL.. .the best yet!
On sole at...
CAMPUS CLUB -LIBRARY
ENGINEERING MATHERIY
/
HUB -MID CENTER
PEABODY
MAKCH 1
*



FINE ARTS DAMES
The Architecture and Fine Arts
Dames will meet Tuesday 8 p.m,
at the University Womens Club.
Officers will be elected and a white
elephant sale will follow the meet meeting.
ing. meeting.
GERMAN MOVIE
The Department of Foreign
Languages is showing the German
movie Der Hauptmann Von
Kopenick Monday 8:15 p.m. in
the Health Center Auditorium. This
is a delightful parody of the
exaggerated deep-seated German
respect for uniforms and authority.
There are no English subtitles.
FBK APPLICATIONS
Applications for Florida Blue
Key, leadership fraternity, may
be picked ig> at the Florida Union
information desk. All completed
applications must be turned in no
later than 5 p.m. Wednesday.

am H
I ''' $ *j* 'VV*i i :*::
jji. fi J : ji
mi'. /- '.
I 19a ILHISiS I
The practiced casualist is up, naturally, in the I
I subject of blazers. Nevertheless, new ideas will 1
be found even for the post-graduate in the 1
I Proprietor's Spring selection of blazer colours. I

BLOOD DONORS
IFC Blood donors, take your
Frolics ticket to Dean Cross in
the IFC office Room 128 Tigert
Hall for stamping for reserved
seating.
PHOTOGRAPHY
Today is the deadline for the
AU-C.impus Student Photography
Show. Information may be found in
Room 315 Florida Union.
ALPHA KAPPA PSI
Alpha Kappa Psi, business
honorary, will hold its winter
trimester initiation banquet
tomorrow 7 p.m. at the University
Inn. The Honorable Millard
Caldwell, Florida Supreme Court
Justice, will address the brothers
and guests. Following his address,
the Four Sounds will provide
the music for an evening of dancing.

wampus news brief si

SPRING FROLICS
. Tickets for IFC Spring Frolics
are on sale at the Information
Booth from 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
The cost is $2 per person.
MARDIGRAS
A Mardi Gras dance will be
held by the Newman Club at the
Catholic Student Center Saturday
8 p.m. midnight. Music will be
by the Four Scores.
EQUAL RIGHTS
Dr. Marshall B. Jones, will
speak on the Civil Rights Move Movement
ment Movement in Gainesville Today Sunday
11 a.m. at a meeting of the Uni Unitarian-Universalist
tarian-Universalist Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship,
1204 NW 10th Ave.
THETA SIGMA PHI
All members and pledges of
Theta Sigma Phi come to a meet meeting
ing meeting Sunday 2:30 p.m. in Room
323 Stadium.
HAYRIDE
Mallory Hall is having a Hay Hayride
ride Hayride tonight 8 p.m. Any couples
interested meet in Mallorys Lobby
at 7:30. Bring blankets, guitars,
etc. Cokes and marshmallows free.
The charge is $1 per couple.

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'||L IBttflK -y % hBl 'An %
alv flwpQe
'*V -i.s>*.: '' '' / ' ; i

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University Food Service Offers
Weekend Gator Specials
LUNCHEON and Dinner
Complete Meal 97C (plus tax) I
Friday FRENCH FRIED FILLET OF FISH WITH TARTAR SAUCE I
Saturday BAKED sugar cured ham with fruit sauce
Wi.nW/fV ROAST young tom turkey, cornbread dressing,
ouniiuy GIBLET gravy & CRANBERRY sauce
§iii§isit Choice of
POTATO or BUTTERED RICE Any 10c or 15? SALAD
and ANY BEVERAGE Any 10? or 15? DESSERT
I other VEGETABLE 2 ROLLS or 2 BREAD SLICES and 2 BUTTER PATS

Friday, Feb. 26, 1965, Hie Florida Alligator,

HILLEL FOUNDATION
The Hillel Foundation will spon sponsor
sor sponsor a hayride tonight 8 p.m. at
the Circle N Ranch. The cost is
$1.50. Transportation will be pro provided
vided provided from Hillel at 8 p.m.
Professor Mary Regan will be
the guest speaker at the Sabbath
services tonight 8 p.m.
WORSHIP SERVICES
The United Church of Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville will hold worship services
Sunday 10 a.m. in the Florida
Union Auditorium.
MILITARY BALL QUEEN
All contestants for military ball
queen are required to meet
Sunday 8:15 p.m. in Room 215
Florida Union. Please bring a pen.
ARCHERY
Anyone associated with the UF,
including families of students,
clerks, handimen, and professors,
are Invited to participate in a
handicapped archery tournament
this Saturday on the Broward ar archery
chery archery Range 10 a.m. noon.

ART EXHIBIT
unly three days are left to see
exhibits by Gabriel Kohn, located
in Bryan Lounge, Florida Union,
and Jake Lee, located in the North
Wing Gallery of the Florida Union.
The exhibits close Feb. 28.
SPACE TOUR
The deadline to sign up the tour
of the John F. Kennedy Space
Center on March 6 is today in
Room 315 Florida Union. The cost
is SB. It is necessary to be a
U. S. citizen to go on the tour.
Additional information may be had
in Room 315, Florida Union.
LIBERAL FORUM
The Concept of Freedom for
Education* will be discussed by
Dr. Roy Ivan Johnson of the Liber Liberal
al Liberal Forum Sunday 7:30 p.m. in
Johnson Lounge of the Florida
Union.
FELLOWSHIP
The Florida Christian Fellow Fellowship
ship Fellowship will meet tomorrow 7 p.m.
Florida Union Room 212. The
subject of the meeting is Christian
growth.

Page 3



, The Florida Alligator, Friday/ Feb. 26, 1965

Page 4

A meekly trice feahtrinp news and views of UF fraternities and sororities

13th annual Panhellenic Sing 8 p.m. tonight

i 9. ItL _jl j
Mrs* B I %
iii i jniif j i
V'JP JR I
JrihSsw --' } i si&tr "'* 1 | j>Nm^B
I 4 B H* i fnnr HL
Hl,' ..
'*- Here sSI i
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OLD CLOTHES DRIVE
Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity wound up their Old Clothes* Drive
last week, according to Tom Rivers, drive chairman. Rivers (right!
presents Salvation Army Capt. Guy Smith and his wife with over 700
articles of clothing. LXAs are competing for the IFC Dan McCarty
Service trophy with this service project.

ZETA TAU ALPHA
On Feb. 5-6 the Zetas held
their annual weekend. Zetas and
their dates enjoyed a buffet dinner
and dance at the Holiday Inn. The
new Zeta Man for 1965, Robert
Mims, was honored.

and at the fraternities:

DELTA TAU DELTA
The pledges of Delta Tau Delta
have chosen MissCarolHenderson
(Delta Gamma) as their pledge
class Sweetheart, with runners-up
Karen Gerlin (Tri-Delt) and Ann
Ropulewis (Kappa Delta) chosen
from 26 girls. The candidates
included two representatives from
each sorority and were presented
with corsages at the sweetheart
social held at the Delt house Feb.
7.
PHI GAMMA DELTA
A group of ten men from Phi
Gamma Delta fraternity will
journey to Live Oak tomorrow to
participate in a service project
at the Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch.
PHI KAPPA TAU
Lending a charming atmosphere
at the Phi Tau house beginning
this trimester are 13 Little Sisters
of the Laurel pledges.
Pledges are Cari Cambell, ADP,
Barbara Rossi, AOP, Jan Jackson,
DDD, Vicki Smith, DDD, Susan
Nicholas DDD, Jane Brady DG,
Babs Harkness, independent, Jane
KirobreU, XO, Gloria Rish, XO,
Pam McCaleb, DDD, Susia Hal Halback,
back, Halback, KAT, Nancy Fath, indepen independent,
dent, independent, and Dale Rubley, KAT.

Heres whats happening in UF sorority houses

DELTA PHI EPSILON
The Delta Phi Epsilon's of SW
9th Avenue finaUy can boast of
a sidewalk in front of their house.
Now they are waiting for that dirt
road to be paved.

PI LAMBDA PHI
Rick Solloway and Mike Segal
are on the UF bowling team which
will compete in Tallahassee, Feb.
26-27.
Solloway has captured the all allcampus
campus allcampus piogpong championship. He
also is a nominee for the Tri-
Delta Man of the Year" honor.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
Sigma Phi Epsilon, has elected
new officers for the winter
trimester. New officers include:
Ross Small, president; A1
Schlegter, vice president; Steve
Shewbrooks, comptroller; Norman
Koestline, recorder; Brad Sawtell
secretary, Rick Clarice, chaplain.
CHI PHI
Last Sunday, Feb. 20, Chi Pfri
held their 30th anniversary,
Brother-Alumni Banquet. New
officers were installed and newly
initiated brothers were welcomed
to the chapter.
TAU KAPPA EPSILON
Tekes Ferrante and Teicher
sent a letter to UF Tekes explaining
that they could not have dinner at
the TKE house because of rushed
schedule when they were
performing at the UF.

TO BE COMPETITIVE FOR FIRST TIME

Six Delta Phi Epsilon members
were just elected to the Florida
Blue Key Speakers Bureau.
. They include Patty Oken, Lynn
Wolly, Maureen Schwartz, Nancy
Weinberg, Hazel Bakst and Eunice
Tall.

ALPHA TAU OMEGA
Alpha Tau Omega held their
Weekend Feb. 14-15. The weekend
included a dinner and dance at the
Golden Hills Turf and Country
Club in Ocala.
The new ATO Sweetheart, Liz
Rothrock, Tri-Delt was crowned
at the dance.
BETA THETA PI
The Betas kicked off their annual
Sweetheart contest last week by
having 20 sorority and independent
girls at the house for a dinner
social.
DELTA CHI
Delta Chi recently initiated
seven new members into the bond.
They were: Don Turk, Tampa;
Bill Pinto, Boston; Craig Sargent,
Tampa; Greg Rowland, Ft. Lauder Lauderdale;
dale; Lauderdale; Larry Schneider, Miami;
Buddy Clark, San Francisco; and
Corky McCallister, Ft. Lau Lauderdale.
derdale. Lauderdale.
DELTA SIGMA PHI
Over 50 per cent of DSP
fraternity has donated blood for
the IFC Blood Drive.
Delta Sig*s top the IFC rolls for
their brothers' scholastic standing
last trimester.

All 13 sororities to compete

The 13th annual Panhellenic Sing
will be held tonight at 8 p.m. in
the University Auditorium.
For the first time sororities
will compete for a trophy. Judging
will be based on originality, talent,
and organization.
All of the thirteen sororities
will present a program. Alpha
Chi Omega will sing Black
Magic; Alpha Delta Pi, Yester Yesterday,
day, Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow; Al Alpha
pha Alpha Epsilon Phi, Hootnanny;
Chi Omega, Around the World
with Music; Zeta Tau Alpha,
Food, Glorious Food; Kappa
Alpha Theta, Teen-aged Tra Tragedy;
gedy; Tragedy; Delta Gamma, Dr.

Pledge sweetheart
Carol Henderson a
sophomore from Ft
Walton Beach, has
been named pledge
sweetheart of Delta 9|K v B
Tau Detta fraternity '^p
Carol is a member
of Delta Gamma
sorority

KAPPA DELTA ]
Kappa Delta placed second in the
Sigma Chi Derby last Saturday and
Jeannie Maynard, KD, was crowned
Sigma Chi Derby Queen for 1965.
KDs will have their spring
weekend this Friday, March 5, and
KD*s will go on a hayride, have
a barbecue and end up with a
barndance with a band at the Circle
M Ranch.
ALPHA OMICRON PI
Alpha Omicron Pi sorority is
in full swing this weekend for its
annual Rose Ball at their chapter
house. After the presentation of
pledges and new initiates, AOIPs
and their dates will be dancing
to the music of the Uniques.
Susie Hunt has just been elected
commander of Angel Flight and
Janet Stoddard was appointed
Secretary of Women's Affairs.
SIGMA KAPPA
Sigma Kappa will hold its annual
tea honoring their housemother,
initiates and new pledges Sunday.
The tea will be held from 2-4
p.m. Sunday at the SK house. It
will also honor SKs Man of the
Year, Jim Steiner, 3BA, from
Pensacola.
KAPPA ALPHA THETA
Susie Hallback and Dale Rubley
were selected Little Sisters of the
Laurel (PKT).
Theta won in basketball over
Alpha Epsilon Phi, 22-3. The
Thetas have kept the Presidents
Intramural Cup for the last two
years and could keep it
permanently by winning it again
this year.

Freud/* Delta Phi Epsilon, The
International Set;** Alpha Omicron
Pi Old College Favorities;
Delta Delta Delta, Flapper Flash Flashback-A
back-A Flashback-A Florida Man Needs an
Introduction, Pi Mu, Sea Seacapades;**
capades;** Seacapades;** and Kappa Delta, Can Candid
did Candid Campus.**
The concert will be emceed by
Alligator staffer Sam Ullman. it
has been coordinated by Susan M,
Levin, Delta Phi Epsilon.
Proceeds from the show will go
to Panhellenic war orphan Teresita
Fajardo in the Phillipines, and to
the Panhellenic scholarship fund.
Tickets are 25 cents and can be
purchased from members of any
sorority.

DELTA DELTA DELTA
Tri Deltas held their annual
Weekend at the Cowboy Ranch
three weeks ago. Paul Gardner
(SX) was named Tri Delt Man of
the Year. Members of the court
were Buddy Goodman (Phi Delt),
Ken Osborne (PKT), Phil Klatt
(ATO), and Jerry Wilson.
Diane Denning was elected Vice
President of Lyceum Council and
Ann Breslauer won a position on
Lyceum Council.
PHI MU
Formal pledging ceremonies of
Phi Mu sorority were held last
week when the rushees exchanged
the rose and white ribbons for their
gold pledge pins.
Winter trimester pledges of Phi
Mu include: Evelyn Smith, Nancy
Aldrich, Sandy Smith, Dee Dee
Duparc, Kathi Blaney, Sandy
Blass, Sandy Hill, Julie Parker
and Elaine Sehrt. Pledge officers
are: Evelyn Smith, president;
Nancy Aldrich, vice president;
Sandy Smith, secretary; Dee Dee
Duparc, treasurer. Cheryl
Erickson is pledge director.
Greeks must sub submit
mit submit news before
Wednesday at 5 p.m
preceeding each Fri Friday's
day's Friday's Greeks Speak
Page to Drex Dob Dobson
son Dobson at The Alligator
offices r*r:



Beauties, beasts
here ia March
Beauties and beasts will invade
campus March 1-6 to raise funds
for the World University Service
(WUS) according to Martin Kenneth
(Skeeter) Wooten, chairman for the
campaign.
Four trophies will be awarded
on the basis of funds collected
by the beauties and beasts. 52
participants from sororities,
fraternities, and dorm areas will
be collecting funds Anyway possi possible,
ble, possible, said Wooten.
The campaign is being sponsored
by the Department of Religion and
the University Religious
Association.
All money raised will go to the
WUS to sponsor its program of
student aid in 48 countries.
The WUS, by means of funds
raised in colleges and universities
throughout the world, builds
housing facilities, cafeterias and
health clinics. The program also
grants scholarships and provides
textbooks for needy students.
UNIVERSITY
Lutheran Church
1826 W. Univ. Ave.
(opp. handball courts)
2 services for student
convenience:
9-9:45 a.m.
11-12 noon
Sunday Evening Stu Student
dent Student

Pick up either Volkswagen
in Europe.
If you have a driving ambition to Sauareback Sedan. (Its just as
see Europe, the cheapest way to genuine, but not so beetle-.sh.)
do the driving is in your own VW. Well attend to the details of
And picking it up in Europe is the purchase, delivery, insurance and
cheapest way to buy one. licensing. And if the car needs
You can get a genuine beetle in servicing after you ship it home,
any of 55 cities in 9 countries. well attend to that, too.
And, if you want a little more room If you think that s a lot to ask of
and a little more power, spend a a total stranger, come in and get
little more money and get our to know us.
Ask for Coleman Brown
4222 NW 13th Street
Telephone 376-*4552
Miller-Brown
Motors ~
WOLLENSAK AND REVERE
Tape Recorders
GAINESVILLE'S
DIRECT FACTORY DEALER
North Central Florida's Largest Selection
Os Recorders Supplies Scotch Tapes
And Accessories
COUCHS 608 N. Main St. FR 6-7171


;.v g,
| CAMPUS cunt I
1
mm,
|fii x
i IflPi
i i
| A pistol packin |
coed
$ Today's Campus Cutle bir-ijjj
(!! thday girl Is Tammy Paxton,!;*:
% a sophomore transfer student
!;!; from FJS.U. whose
s£is today.
A member of Phi Gamma;:-:
Beta Sorority, Tammy
tfias their intramural chairman, ij:
;$ and rush chairman. She has a:*:
S! 3.0 grade average, and plans :|:
:s*:to be a physical education*::
>:*: teacher.
$:: Tammy's home is really the;:*
>!;; outdoors, as swimming,
vj waterskiing, ami caving are-!;
£: her favorite hobbies. She is £
!:: currently active in several of :*:*
>:j: the women's physical educa- !!
:*:: tion athletic teams.
:|:j: Tammy says that she likes!:!:
£ the University of Florida much!;!;
igmore than Florida State. The !*:
!:|: students, especially the men, !;!;
!:|: are much friendlier here, she#
!$ says. !$:
.V ,V.
.NytV.'.VAV.V.V.V.V.'.V.NV* v.V.%

Patterned stockings big news
By DEE WRIGHT
Fashion Editor
Women's patterned stockings are this year's biggest fashion in n mL
news. They are becoming more and more popular with UF coeds,
who are sporting both the casual patterned tights" and the sheer
lacy evening hose.
The spring fashion magazines are dictating these patterned
stockings in pastel and light colors for spring. Again, we turn to
the target of women's fashions, the men, and find out just what an
impact patterned stockings have had: H!
QUESTION: WHAT DO YOU THINK OF WOMENS PATTERNED
STOCKINGS?
Donnie Rou, 2UC -- I don't like them. I think theyre sort
of gaudy.
Charlie Allen, 3AS Theyre great. I think theyre really Jtf
sexy and very attractive. v Jjf
BiU Hardy, 2UC I havent seen any.
Jeff Fawcett, 4AG I think theyre kinda neat for a change.
I wouldnt think theyd be used for church. Id say theyre an
attention getter an appealing campus style.
T. R. Spicer, 2UC I like them. Theyre different and theyre
attractive. I first saw them in North Carolina over Christmas
and liked them.
Joe Goldberg, lUC -- I dont think too much of them, to tell
you the truth.
Mike McCarthy, 4AS On the right girl (a good-looking girl)
anything would look good. If a girl has on heels they look good,
but I dont like them for everyday wear. 7*^
Joe Coudon, 4JM tell you what Id really like to see
I saw a girl in Jacksonville with these on wanted to ask her
out one dark plain stocking and one patternedstocking.lt MILADYS LEGS
really looked cool like one leg had leprosy and the other
didn't. o create comment
Gator Guard, Mitchell Drill Team leaving
today for Mardi Gras celebration

Two Reserve Officer Training
Corps marching units from the UF
will depart for New Orleans, La.,
today to participate in a pair of
parades in the annual Mardi Gras
celebration.
Forty-five cadets from the Gator
Guard, the Army ROTC group,
are scheduled to leave at 5 p.m.
They will stay in quarters on the
campus of Tulane University in
New Orleans. The Air Force
ROTC's Billy Mitchell Drill Team,
with 24 cadets, will leave at 7 p.m.,
bound for Keesler Air Force Base
at Biloxi, Miss.
Both contingents will travel by
chartered bus. Capt. Bill Wood
is advisor to the Gator Guard ami
Capt. Norman Farmer serves in
the same capacity for the Billy
Mitchell Drill Team.
UNITED CHURCH
OF GAINESVILLE
Worship: 10 a.m.
Fla. Union Auditorium
Rev. Pierson P. Harris
Ph. 376-1026

4m k-
Did you know LARRYS
bakes their own pies on the premises?
* j
\ LEMON / Xfe
fy.
BOSTON CREME APPLE BANANA CREME
\y, x?
Open 24 Hours

Friday, Feb. 26/ 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

The two University groups will
be part of the Venus Parade at
11 a.m. Sunday and the King Rex
Parade at 9:30 a.m. next Tuesday,
marching a route through down downtown
town downtown New Orleans as part of one
of the South's most festive events
each year.
The Gator Guard is defending
drill champion of the Venus
Parade and will be making its 11th
Mardi Gras appearance. The Billy
Mitchell unit also has been a
regular visitor to New Orleans
since 1955 with the exception of
last year when the cadets marched

Leather jackets out; helmets in

Leather jackets are out, but hard hats are becoming more popu popular,
lar, popular, said C. D. (Spike) Griffin of the Cyclerama motorcycle shop.
About 95 per cent of the people buying new cycles also buy pro-

tective headgear, he said.
Griffin explained that riding con conditions
ditions conditions in the city largely con controlled
trolled controlled whether or not cycle riders
wear head protection.
I very seldom put mine on
unless I'm going on the road,
he continued, I don't usually wear
my helmet around town.
Assistant Dean of Men Arnold

in the GaspariUa parade at Tampa.
Cadets will be special guests at
the King Rex Ball next Tuesday
evening, accompanied by their coed
sponsors for the gala dance that
caps Mardi Gras week. Diane
Denning of Miami and Ann
Breslauer of Boynton Beach will
be with the Billy Mitchell cadets
and SuzAnn Hull of Ormond Beach
will join the Gator Guard.
Departure back to Gainesville
is planned at 2 a.m. Wednesday
after the King Rex Ball so the
students can resume classes here
next Thursday.

E. Wirt ala said he has reports
in his files from a neuro-sur neuro-surgeon
geon neuro-surgeon that six or eight recent cycle
fatalities were due to head in injuries.
juries. injuries.
Wlrtala said there has been a
large increase in the number of
cycles on campus this year.
We have increased the parking
spaces reserved for cycles and
scooters because the number of
scooters has grown so rapidly,
he said.
Gainesville Police Department
records show 72 scooter and cycle
accidents in 1964 in which 51 per persons
sons persons were injured.
Lt. Vernon K. Holliman said
the campus police records were
not broken down to' show sqpoter
and (fyaftq, accidents separate fr6m
auto accidents, but he said he re remembered
membered remembered a few last year.
Ross Henderson- of the Allstate
Insuraifce Company said, Some Someone
one Someone is Injured in almost every cycle
accident, and all companies resist
insuring cycles.
In fact,*' he added, nobody
writes medical coverage on motor motorcycles.
cycles. motorcycles.
Safety campaigns try to educate
the student body, but there is no
state law that requires protective
headgear, said Wirtalik.
Traffic and parking regulations
of the University of Florida state
that any student may operate and
maintain a motor scooter or
motorcycle, but limits the use of
automobiles to certain groups.

Page 5



y Th Florida Friday Feb. 26, 1965

Page 6

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
served By United Press International

Ernie. LiTz
Editor-In-Chief

LOU FERRE
Editorial Pago Editor

VIEWPOINT
Limited war?
As the war in Viet Nam enlarges to
encompass more territory in North and South
Viet Nam, there is a concurrent increase in
the commitment of the United States
Government.
This commitment has been slightly increased
in terms of arms and men, however for the
most part the U. S. has strengthened its
ideological commitment to the South
Vietnamese. That moral involvement has been
voiced through the arm of U. S. foreign
policy vis-a-vis other pations.
It has been assumed by many Americans
that the support of the U. S. will take the form
of a greater military build-up with perhaps
consequent forays into North Viet Nam on a
large scale.
This move is acclaimed by many as
necessary if the U. S. is to preserve its
image as a strong nation. Os course, there
are those who say it will destroy our image
as the champion of freedom-loving patriots.
Though we do not pretend to be so intimately
conversant with international politics and
foreign policy, we think it is important to
discuss some common sense matters in this
area.
What strikes us as obvious is the idea,
which most people have learned through
experience, that wnen one person is allowed
to prey on the rights, property or liberty
of others, he will ao so until he is met with
a force exceeding his.
The time is past for saying what might
have happened if the Russians were stopped
in Hungary in 1956. The time is also past
for saying what might have happened in Tibet
if the Communist Chinese haa been stopped.
And of course the Western nations have
forfeited their right to aid those countries
it is too late.
But what might have happened is another
story which no one will ever tell. Perhaps
the U. S. has avoided a major war by not
intervening in those situations. But what good
has that done us. Country by country, the
U. S. is losing out to the Russians and the
Red Chinese in the ideological war.
Each year another nation falls to the ideals
of Communism, if not by persuasion then by
force.
If the U. S. must lose the ideological war,
must it lose the hot wars? A stronger
military build-up in Viet Nam may be the
cause of another war of great proportions,
but it may NOT.
Certainly our Cuban blockade did not light
the fuse. Has not the U. S. tried everything
else in the way of diplomacy? Perhaps another
type of support of the South Vietnamese is
called for if the U. S. is to preserve its dignity
and prestige on the world scene.
GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Kay
Huff master, (Correspondents), Yvette Cardoso, Agnes Fowles,
Donita Mathlson, Dan Taylor, Sam Ullman, Selwin H. Ciment,
Jay Foley .Stephen Kanan,
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Kurvin, Ann Carter, Thelma Moss man, Fran Snider, Cynthia
Tunstall, Harvey Wolfson, Karen Vitunac, Jack Zucker, Ami
Saperstein, Carl Brown, Jane Young, Bill Lockhart, Ken Simon,
Drex Dobson, Jeffrey Denkewalter, G. S. Corseri, Eunice Tall,
Linda Cody, Woody Leonard, Jennell Close, Nancy Van Zile.
Hm Florida Alligator rewrm th. right to relate th. typographical tone of all adwtisements and
to revte. or tarn away copy which it eoaaldars objKUoaaM..
NO POC'TION B GUARANTEED, though daetrad position will b. given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of paywwat lor any advertisement involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice is given to toe Advertising Manner within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not bn responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertise mot
schednled to rm several times. Notice* tor correction must be given before neat Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and is
published five times weekly except dutng May, June and July when It Is published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class
matter at the Untied States Poet Office at Gainesville.

JOE CASTE LLO
Executive Editor

STEVE VAUGHN
Managing Editor

ED SEARS
Sports Editor

wet-nam? Neva Htuo o IT.-
Good job, Fred

EDITOR:
I FEEL THAT it would be appropriate to personally
commend Fred Lane, past Student Body Treasurer,
on his outstanding competence in office. Fred has
made many improvements in the treasurer's office
this past year, not only on general office procedure,
but also on financial policies concerning student
government.
IN ADDITION, Fred has spent much of his time
and effort this past week in familiarizing me with

EDITOR:
LAST SJj. elections proved without any doubt
that the trimester system is looked upon by the
majority of the students of this University as an
asset, having none of the qualities imputed to it
by those who talk about the Trimonster. Never Nevertheless,
theless, Nevertheless, we keep listening to people saying that
the system is a failure, etc., etc.
UNDOUBTEDLY THE trimester system can be
improved. But not a single valid reason has been
advanced to prove that the trimester system should
be dropped altogether.

By ANN CARTER
Columnist
Cotton picker, stage hand, pro
football player. .writer, editor,
war correspondent Erskine
Caldwell has been all of these.
His life is as colorful as that
of Claudelle Inglish or Jester
Lester, both literary characters
of his imagination.
Caldwell tones his many pages
about the deep South he's written
about 45 books and short stories storiesfrom
from storiesfrom his experiences in White Oak,
Coweta County, Georgia, where he
was born.
The 61-year-old writer once
said, A novelist without a story
to tell is just as pathetic.. .as a

LfctTER

EDITOR;
The Trimester System
Is Not A Failure
1. WHY DID the Alligator fail
to support the majority of student
opinion regarding Hie trimester
as shown by the election?
2. WHY DOESNT the Admini Administration
stration Administration and the Governor consult
the students as to whether we want
to submit to the waste of time the
other systems offer?

Trimester no monster

Jack of all trades

The trimester.- Not a failure

FOR WOMEN ONLY

rooster with nothing to crow
about.
To Caldwell the life of a writer
is lonely despite the fact that he
communicates with thousands of
people.
In an essay published in
Writer magazine several years
ago, Caldwell said the only time a
writer indulge his
gregarious nature is at a cocktail
party or when he is asked to make
a speech.
Being a writer neither creates
nor tolerates happiness, Caldwell
commented, I am resigned to my
fate.
His fate, however, has been
nothing to scoff at. His book,
God's Little Acre, has sold
well over eight and a half million

WAS .IT Administration
policy to have certain faculty
members during Freshman pre preregistration
registration preregistration ask the parents to
submit letters to their legislators
requesting the abolition of the
trimester?
4. TO CLARIFY for the
Administration, the Alligator and
others the reasons the students
voted for the trimester; why not
have a straw vote (faculty included)
which contains: 1) Favor the
present system, 2) favor semester

the detailed duties and overall responsibilities of
the Treasurer's office.
HE IS truly interested in the welfare of the student
body and is one of the most sincere SG leaders
I have met since entering this university.
THE STUDENT body has indeed benefited from
Fred's efforts in the five years he has worked
in student government.
STEVE CHEESEMAN
Student Body Treasurer

IN FACT, evidence points to the contrary, for
the system is popular among the students as last
S. G. elections proved.
I FINALLY point out that in virtue of the trimester
systems success at the University of Pittsburgh,
the University of Michigan, and that many other
leading universities such as the University of
California are considering adopting it. Perhaps it
is not the system but those who administer it who
are at fault.
PEDRO P. SANCHEZ, 7AS

copies and has been translated into
a dozen or more languages.
Royalties from his writings and
movies bring Caldwell a weekly
income in the four diget column.
He is an intense worker, setting
a six-day, nine to five schedule
for himself. Caldwell, who now
lives in California, says he only
takes about two months off from
work each year to trayel i the
South and outside the United States.
Last night he spoke in
University Auditorium on the topic,
Out of the Caldwell Workshop.
If Caldwell thinks this is one of
the rare opportunities for him to
exercise a gregarious nature,
it certainly is more rare-for those
on the UF campus to share It
with him.

system beginning in August having
exams over before Christmas, or
3) favor regular semester system
or quarter?
5. AS EMERSON said, The
secret of education lies in
respecting the pupil/' Could this
apply to this institution of learning
regarding a change of the trimester
system?
ROBERT L. PLAPP
C.CHARLES COLLINS
E. B. REGISTER



EDITOR:
AS A FORMER editor of the
Alligator (1958-59) and one who
has spent some years in newspaper
work, I was rather amazed at your
editorial of Feb. 23 under the
headline The Whole Picture.
TO PUT IT bluntly, the editorial
was overtly sycophantic or
indicative of a basic ignorance of
the role of a newspaper and its
letters-to-the-editor column.
OF COURSE the university ad administration
ministration administration has its problems,
many of which are not understood
by its critics. So does any
individual or group which must

Letters suppressed

EDITOR:
YOUR EDITORIAL of Feb. 23
leaves me with some doubts. It
seems I am not the only one to
object to the way some things'
are done on campus. To read the
Alligator is to learn little of this.
No doubt the critical letters have
been suppressed due to lack of
space or to the naivete of the
authors as you alleged.
HOWEVER, THE following
criticique, I believe, is not open
to the charge of naivete. It is a
trifle inflamatory having arisen as
the result of two and one half
years of frustration. It may get the
ax on the grounds that it slightly
tarnishes the sterling UF image.
THE UNIVERSITY is in danger
from lack of funds to support
continued growth. We read this in
all newspapers. What we dont read
about is the other danger which
is far more serious. We are losing
our best men. Florida talks much
about achieving greatness yet it
has failed to attract or to keep
the personnel which makes for that
greatness.
SALARY HAS been blamed for
this exodus of qualified academic
personnel. This is not the only
reason. The UF is not a university
at all, but a kind of glorified junior
college with big university football
professionals.
WE SPECIALIZE in technical
training, the teaching ofcourses
which somehow are supposed to
enlighten the student and the

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Le^Te 2

Former Afligator editor speaks out

make or administer public policy.
DOES THE fact that congress congressmen
men congressmen or city councilmen must face
problems and pressures on many
sides problems and pressures
which are not and cannot be fully
understood by the layman mean
that the citizen who is affected by
their policies is unjustified in
criticizing them?
SUCH A position would run con contrary
trary contrary to our basic tradition of
government whfereby the burden of
defense is upon the policymaker,
not upon the critic of policy.
YOUR COMMENT about the
cirteria for deciding which letters
to print was most interesting.

education of politicians and
business men, future recruits to
the small town establishments
which run the state which is an
overcomputerized, overadminis overadministered,
tered, overadministered, pseudo-academic ghetto in
a society which has yet to make its
peace with the 20th century.
SUCH A society is extremely
hostile to learning, it is anti antiintellectual.
intellectual. antiintellectual. No talented
academician will stay in such a
society which threatens his very
existence if conditions are better
elsewhere.
THE ADMINISTRATION in this
context, is not an administration
at all, but a wall which the public
has raised to protect itself from
the heresies which always arise
in an academic community. Thus,
it is extremely sensitive to the
powers outside which have created
it and maintains a stoic
indifference to the needs of the
powerless insiders. In the
interests of the insiders safety,
morality or whatever other
euphorism is used, the ad administration
ministration administration effectively restricts
their freedom.
THE ALLIGATOR by
suppressing critical letters is
falling to reflect student feelings,
a thing which a student newspaper
should not do. Moreover, it is
acting like an arm of the
administration as student govern government
ment government does in submitting to such
voluntary censorship.
ERNEST WILSON, 7AG

Some, you say, are printed because
you think they are valid criti criticisms;
cisms; criticisms; others, you add, are
printed because they point to the
lack of knowledge the author has
of the subject.
I DOUBT if you could find a
self-respecting editor in the
business who prints only letters
which either stqpport, in effect,
the newspapers editorial policy
on the one hand or ridicule the
author on the other.
THE CONCEPT of a letters lettersto-the-editor
to-the-editor lettersto-the-editor column is that of a
public forum in which anyone may
say his piece, limited only by the
boundaries of libel and good taste.
THE EDITORS view as to the
validity of the criticism has no
part in it. An editor, of course,
must be fair to those criticized
through his paper, but this fairness
should be manifested through full
opportunity to reply rather than
through suppression of the original
criticism.
THE JUXTAPOSITION of this
editorial and the letter by Tony
Maingot questioning the apparent

Tom Huck sought scientific excitement
M KJf
Hes finding it at Western Electric

Ohio University conferred a B.S.E.E. degree on
C. T. Huck in 1956. Tom knew of Western Elec Electrics
trics Electrics history of manufacturing development. He
realized, too, that our personnel development pro program
gram program was expanding to meet tomorrows demands.
After graduation, Tom immediately began to
work on the development of electronic switching
systems. Then, in 1958, Tom went to the Bell Tele Telephone
phone Telephone Laboratories on a temporary assignment to
help in the advancement of our national military
capabilities. At their Whippany/New Jersey, labs,
Tom worked with the W.E. development team on
computer circuitry for the Nike Zeus guidance sys system.
tem. system. Tom then moved on to a new assignment at
W.E.'s Columbus, Ohio, Works. There, Tom is work working
ing working on the development of testing circuitry for the
memory phase of electronic switching systems.

Western Electric MANUFACTURING AND SUPPLY UNIT OF THE BELL SYSTEM
AH EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYE*
Principal manufacturing locations in 13 cities Operating centers in many of these same cities plus 36 others throughout the U.S.
Engineering Research Center, Princeton, N.J.DTeletype Corp., Skokie, 111., Little Rock, Ark. General Headquarters, New York City
I I I I I <- |

Fridoy, Feb. 26, 1965, The Florida Al l igator,

policy of racial segregation at
athletic events indicates that the
editorial is an oblique reply to
the letter.
IF SO, it is unfortunate that the
editor did not have the courage to
answer or attack the letter
directly; if not, then the coinci coincidence
dence coincidence itself is unfortunate. The
policy or position of the athletic
department may or may not be
defensible, but an attempt to
remove' the question from the
realm of public debate is certainly
without defense.
IN CLOSING, let me suggest that
if the student body is currently
too ignorant to justifiably criticize
administrative policy the Alligator
could indeed perform a public
service by running a series of
articles on the problems and
people the administration must
cope with.
UNTIL THEN, perhaps a pub published
lished published list of approved topics for
letters to the editor would be
helpful to your readers.
/
LEE FENNELL, 7AS

This constant challenge of the totally new,
combined with advanced training and education
opportunities, make a Western Electric career
enjoyable, stimulating and fruitful. Thousands of
young men will realize this in the next few years.
How about you?
If responsibility and the challenge of the future
appeal to you, and you have the qualifications we
are looking for, talk with us. Opportunities for fast fastmoving
moving fastmoving careers exist now for electrical, mechani mechanical
cal mechanical and industrial engineers, and also for physical
science, liberal arts and business majors. For more
detailed information, get your copy of the Western
Electric Career Opportunities booklet from your
Placement Officer. And be sure to arrange for an
interview when the Bell Svstem recruiting team
visits your campus.

TOPS IN VACATIONSI
fEUBOPt
/jlfKjr
*
Sm Europe's best! Guided
toon or independent Minor*
ones, our export travel coun counselors
selors counselors can help yea got extra
pleasure from each vocation
day and dollar. Wo sell tea
and air tickets, toot, at official
rates.
WORLD
Travel Service
808 W. Unit. Ave. FR 6-4641

Page 7



, The Florida Alligator/ Friday, Feb. 26, 1965

Page 8

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

For Sale
BELL 20 WATT hi-fi amplifier.
$36. C. A. ColUer. Ext. 2121,
Rm. 128 E. & 1. Bldg. (A-102-
3t-c).
5 TYPING CHAIRS SIO.OO each.
6 Dining chairs SIO.OO each. 3
Formica top tables $50.00 each.
Phone 376-3507. (A-101-st-c).
HAVE YOU TRIED the new
VARSITY
Street. Chick Friefd Steak.
Complete Dinners 97?. (A-101-
st-c).
FOR SALE: 1964 LAMBRETTA
125 cc scooter, excellent condition.
Must sell. $250. Phone FR 2-9303.
(A-101-3t-c).
30 GAS RANGE, excellent con condition
dition condition $65. 30 Electric range,
very good, $45. Sofa Bed and chair,
$45. 3/4 bed $25. Call 372-3734
after 5 p.m. (A-100-4t-c).
Wanted
FACULTY MEMBER WANTS TO
BUY or rent second hand 1/2 or
3/4 size string bass. Call 372-
7744. (C-102-3t-c).

Starts lonite*2
ihhtmM EXCLUSIVE FIRST AREA SHOWING
[ 2400 Hawthon* Rood Rt.2o* Hot* FR 6-SOll l OpwCtis Sm As:OS
"Lousy Yanks!". "Damn Japs!"
And suddenly on that by-passed island in the Pacmo
begins the most remarkable adventure of any war.
TECHNICOLOR* PANAVISION*
HONE BUT THE BRAVE
FRANK SINATRA
| GLUT WALKEBTOMMY SANDS
2nd ACTION
' BULLET FOR mDIE
A BADMAN MURPHY
COLOR

Services [
COME TO THE WASH PARTY
where friends meet and romance
blooms. Gator Groomer Coin
Operated Laundry and Dry
Cleaning, next door to University
Post Office. (M-103-ts-c).
APPLICATIONS, portraits, thesis
photos at most reasonable prices.
Call tor app*t. 378-1170 SNEER SNEERINGER
INGER SNEERINGER PHOTOGRAPHY, 1013 1/2
W. University Ave. (M-102-3t-c).
REALTY COURSE. Bert Rodgers
School of Real Estate Law. Evening
class now forming attend first
lecture free. For information
phone George Kirkpatrick. 372-
3472. (M-101-st-c).
INFANT CARE in private home.
References furnished. 378-2583.
237 SW 2nd Place. (M-98-ts-c).
Resl Estate
5, 10, and 20 ACRE LOTS west
of city, with large oak and pine
trees. 5 acre tracts on paved
road. Only S3OO down. Call today
for best choice. W. D. Mason,
c/o Ernest Tew Realty, 6-6461.
(I-100-10t-c).

[Lost & Found |
BLACK WALLET LOST containing
sls-$lB. Notify Ed Fernandez at
372-9315 or 876 South Hall.
Reward. (L-102-st-c).
LOST: ONE PAIR GLASSES in
grey case, Tues. 2/16/65, between
Rawlings and Police Station.
Please contact Tom Shad, SAE
House, 6-9140. (L-102-2t-p).
LOST: MAN'S BLACK WALLET
between Grove, the Hub and the
Military Bldg. Desperately need
identification. You can keep the
money. Contact Bill 2-2114. (L (L---102-3t-c).
--102-3t-c). (L---102-3t-c).
LOST: RED ML-381 NOTEBOOK.
Very important. If found please
contact John Oliva. Phone 372-
7073. $5 Reward. (L-101-3t-c).
For Rent
LARGE ROOMS IN FRIENDLY
Surroundings available to male
students. Reasonable rates;
utilities and maid service included
Convenient to campus and town
See at 104 SW Bth Street or call
372-0243. (B-82-tf-nc).

For Rent
SMALL FURNISHED FRAME
House. Living room, one bedroom,
kitchen, dinette & shower. South
on Ocala Road, Linda Ann Court.
Baby welcome. FR 6-5826. (B (B---103-tf-nc).
--103-tf-nc). (B---103-tf-nc).
PLEASANT 2 ROOM Efficiency
apartment. Private entrance,
central heat, air-condition, all
utilities included. SIOO. At 909
NW 6th Street. Call 372-0300.
(B-102-2t-c).
OCEAN BEACH HOUSE. East End
Grand Bahama. May to Sept. $l5O
per month. W. Cartier, Box 101,
Freeport, Grand Bahama. (B-100-
st-c).
4-BEDROOM, 2-bath available
March 1. 1100 Block SW sth Ave.
Ideal for 4 to 6 students. Central
heat and AC. For appointment call
376-2892. (B-100-st-c).
FOR RENT 3 BEDROOM 2-bath,
kitchen equipped, central-air, $l3O
per month. UF Ext. 2805 or 372-
7535 after 5:30. (B-99-st-c).
$27 DOUBLE $37 for SINGLE
Room, maid service, telephone and
kitchen privileges. 304 NW 15th
Street. (3 blocks from main
Library.) For information call
2-2726. (B-99-st-c).
ROOMS FOR RENT, Central heat,
maid service, everything
furnished. 378-2583. 237 SW 2nd
Place. (B-98-ts-c).
Autos
1956 MERCURY 4-door. $395.
Automatic transmission, power
steering and power brakes, above
average in condition. Phone FR
2-5244. (p-103-st-c).
:*f. x 'raSgia|
' JjK ;
prater Sellers
AnsriKNUM^Ld l
8 TOM JONES new take |

Autos
VOLVO 1959, radio, heater, red
with black interior, 4 speed box,
good tires, flawless engine. S7OO.
Will trade for cycle. 372-7170.
(G-101-3t-c).
1960 VOLKSWAGEN CONVER CONVERTIBLE,
TIBLE, CONVERTIBLE, White, good condition.
SBSO. Call 6-8113 after 5. (G (G---101-3t-c).
--101-3t-c). (G---101-3t-c).
61 RAMBLER; AMERICAN,
custom convertible, red, auto automatic
matic automatic transmission, radio, heater,
power steering, good tires, good
condition. SBOO or best offer. Call
FR 6-1893. (G-101-3t-c).
1962 BUICK SPECIAL
CONVERTIBLE. Radio, heater,
white walls, standard shift, low
mileage. $1495. 372-0601 after 5*
(G-101-st-c).
56 BUICK, low mileage, top
condition, best offer. Apply H. S.
Green 309 Walker or 1101 SW
sth Ave. 2-1452. (G-102-2t-c).
1957 PLYMOUTH STATION
WAGON. Good transportation.
$165. Phone 376-7750. (G-101-
3t-c).
MUST SELL IMMEDIATELY 1963
FORD Galaxy 500, V-8, 4-door,
SS, RH & factory air-condition.
SIOO plus approximate SI4OO
payoff. Call Mrs. King, Ext. 2888.
(G-101-st-c).
jUSEOATOROUSSIFIEDSI
TO FIND IT J
WT TO BUY IT M
k TO SELL IT
#9, Florida
|Qr Call Umv. Ex: 2832 'M
GET WITH THE
"GO-GO" GIRLS %
And Have Yourself
A BALL!
v**
AiSawer- fmSfa
fflfer-fflSr-fRN
Qd&QSSL B



Lob convocations
considered here

I Job convocations may be held
|at the University of Florida start startling
ling startling in November, 1965, according
to Michael G. Malaghan, outgoing
secretary of labor.
I The convocations could include
lany company registered with the
lUF to recruit on campus, said
I Malaghan.
[ DISEASE
i (Continued from Page 1)
In cases of this nature the county
(health department is responsible
[for investigation when venereal
disease is involved. The director
of the department, however, said
he had no comment.
James A. Hauser, president of
the Interfraternity Council denied
[a report that an emergency pre presidents
sidents presidents meeting was called to
warn about venereal disease.
The purpose of the meeting was
in inform the presidents of the re regulations
gulations regulations concerning the anti anticommunist,
communist, anticommunist, anti Negro, anti-
Jewish literature on campus, wo women
men women in fraternity houses, and a
burlesque show, said Hauser.

A Trip To Europe
For Less Than *IOO
Switzerland The International Travel Establishment will locate job
opportunities in Europe for anyone who likes the idea of a fun-filled,
low cost trip to Europe. Jobs are available in all fields throughout
Europe. Interested students should send $2 to Search Dept., ITE, 68
Herrengasse, Vaduz, Liechtenstein (Switzerland) for a complete, do-it do-ityourself
yourself do-ityourself prospectus which includes the key to getting a job in Europe,
the largest European job selection available, instructions, money saving
tips and conclusive information making a trip to Europe (including
transportation) possible for less than SIOO.

MID-TERM MADNESS ?
WHEN U C THE PURPLE BUS DO
NOT PANIC, DO NOT FUSS. JUST GET ON
AND JOIN THE CROWD AND SEE WHERE
IT GOES*... SAT., FEB. 27- SUN., FEB. 28
Shuttle ServiceiGUESS WHERE f
STOP NO. 1 Norman Hall (Parking Lot)
1:30 p.m. 2:30 3:30 5:00 6:00
STOP NO. 2 Broward & Rawlings Halls (Parking Lot)
1:40 p.m. 2:40 3:40 5:10 6:20
STOP NO. 3 Infirmary Parking Area (Lot # 5)
1:50 p.m. 2:50 3:50 5:20 6:30
STOP NO. 4 Military Science Bldg. (Rear Parking Lot)
2:00 p.m. 3:00 4:00 5:30 6:30
LAST BUS BACK TO CAMPUS @ 8:30 PM
* £Pa/m Jlanz\ |||l^
'(Go out NW 13th St. to 23rd Ave., by J.M. Fields.
Turn right, go to Waldo Road, and then turn left.)
SUNDAY
I PM to 6 PM 3 GAMES FOR $1
All Other Times Special Student Rates 40< Per Game
ASK ABOUT OUR 'NAME THE BUS CONTEST

Participating companies would
set up booths in some place like
the gymnasium and answer ques questions
tions questions about job opportunities and
requirements he continued.
If this program works out, we
hope to have 60 to 80 companies
involved, said Malaghan.
Malaghan noted that the Uni University
versity University of Maryland, to the best of
his knowledge, was the only school
with this type of program. He
said aU the information on setting
one up at UF. came from Mary Maryland.
land. Maryland.
Invitations would be sent out
by the Department of Labor for
programs in November and March
of each year, said Malaghan.
Maurice E. Mayberry, UF
placement director, was credited
by Malaghan for originating the
idea on the UF campus.
According to Malaghan, newly
elected Secretary of Labor Doug Douglas
las Douglas H. Thompson Jr. would be
responsible for instituting the job
convocation program.
Malaghan said Bruce Culpepper,
SG president, had endorsed the
idea.

*
W \
Wmmk wut v-w
| |jf & mm Jlgp,
WOMENS TENNIS TEAM
.Tennis teams from all over the southeast will compete Saturday
at Tallahassee. Members of the UF Womens team are: kneeling left
to right: Ronnie Hall, Nat Perlman, Kathy Fulcher. Standing, left to
right: Wynette Rickman, Bonnie Jones, Coach Whiteman, PatTvlalone,
Carola Norcross.

FU offers group to Europe at reduced rate

The Florida Unions Board for
Student Activities is offering UF
students, faculty and staff a re reduced
duced reduced round trip rate for a group
flight to Europe next summer.

Friday, Feb. 26, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Individuals must have been on
campus a minimum of six months
to be eligible. A spouse, depen dependent
dent dependent children or parents may ac accompany
company accompany them.
Total cost is $325 a reduction
of $159.50 from the regular eco economy
nomy economy class fare for the trip.
Children under 12 will be permitted
to travel at half-rate. The flight
will leave for London from New
Yorks Kennedy International Air Airport
port Airport on June 22 and return Aug.
16.
The group will be assigned a re regularly
gularly regularly scheduled DC 8 jet
A deposit of $125 must be made
by March 16 and the remaining
Reds reindicted on
refusal to register
WASHINGTON (UPI)- The U. S.
Commusist party was re-indicted
yesterday on charges of refusing
to register with the government
as an organization controlled by
the Soviet Union.
The indictment handed down here
by a federal grand jury enables
the Justice Department to make
another try at forcing the party
to list its officers and members,
label its publications and submit
a financial accounting.

* raw
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THE SAFE WAY t. stay alert
without harmful stimulants
NoDoz keeps you mentally makes you feel drowsy while
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NoDoz is faster, handier, more with safe, effective NoDoz
reliable. Absolutely not habit- Keep Alert Tablets.
forming. Next time monotony AMtNr fIM product of firev* Latorattrias.

S2OO is due on May 1. There will
be $lO withheld from any refunds.
Deposits should be taken to Room
315 of the Florida Union.
Further information can be ob obtalned
talned obtalned by calling Ext. 2741.
Viet negotiations
ruled out for now
WASHINGTON (UPI)-Secretary
of State Dean Husk Thursday ruled
out any negotiations in the Viet Vietnamese
namese Vietnamese war until such time as
Communist North Viet Nam
reaches a basic decision to end its
aggression in the south.
14 What is still missing, Rusk
told a news conference, is any
indication that Hanoi is prepared
to stop doing what it is doing against
its neighbors.
Rusk called this the crucial
element concerning any negotia negotiations.
tions. negotiations.
Political channels have been
and are open, he said, and a
considerable number of govern-
merits are actively Interested in
keeping them open to explore the
possibilities of a peaceful solution.
But a negotiation aimed at the
acceptance or the confirmation of
aggression is not possible.

Page 9



Page 10

y The Florida Alligator/ Friday, Feb. 26, 1965

jf 11 : i J 1 %?'
X \ I I S I 119 : ; I ,;* fV v
' B |He B PH fw ? >. 1 v

Cars safe as tree sprayers attack moss

A preventive tree-spraying pro program
gram program now in effect on the UF cam campus
pus campus may alarm car owners, but
Calvin C. Greene, director of Phy Physical
sical Physical Plant operations, said theres
now cause for worry.
WEVE STARTED spraying

Off-campus housing often'off for UF coeds

Women students need not apply is fast becoming
the attitude of Gainesville landlords.
The UF coed encounters far more difficulties
in acquiring off-campus housing than do male
students.
The obstacle is not just acquiring advance
permission from the university Housing Office
for off-campus residence for any given term, but
is one of acceptability as tenants.
The Off-Campus Housing Office can act only
as a listing, inspection, advisement and referral
agency, said Carl B. Opp, head, Off-Campus
Housing Office. Other than this, we cannot help
the coed rent and be accepted by the local citizens.
Many rentals specify *no women students, he
said. There just seems to be too many problems
involved when renting to coeds. For example,
women seem to be less stable than men. They will
have a falling-out over things that would never
bother a man. They are also more fussy about
closet space and the like.
Especially in the case of a rooming-in, where
the student lives almost as a member of the

Threat to 'blow up King is made

HOLLYWOOD (UPI) A police
bomb squad was assigned to the
Palladium Thursday shortly before
a speaking appearance by the Rev.
Martin Luther King after an anony anonymous
mous anonymous telephone threat to blow up
that nigger. . with dynamite
stolen yesterday morning.

FRIDAY AII Th Rjh
You Can Eat,
OLD-FASHIONED Hush Puppies,
FISH NIGHT Cole Slaw 97 s
5 PM -9 PM
Fresh Cedar Key Fish
HUMPTY DUMPTY
MJVE4N t KSAUkAMT
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEALS
FR2-5387 3fO M.W. I3tl St.

FROM OUT OF THE SKY COME THE MEN WITH THE HOSE

trees to control Spanish moss as
well as improving their beauty,
Greene explained. This spray
does produce a white, powdery
residue which is harmless to
people and to auto paint finishes.
Greene said University trucks

There was no immediate report
of any unusual finding, and police
said the call-referring to a dyna dynamite
mite dynamite threat-was probably a prank.
Police Sgt. R.G. Ungerecht of
the Hollywood division said A
few extra men also were as assigned
signed assigned an already enlarged detail.

family, women students are not desirable, said
Marna V. Brady, dean of women. The family
does not want the responsibility. We are trying to
show these people that the university does still
regulate these students and that the responsibility
belongs to us.
I have been renting one room, sometimes two
to male students since September, 1963, said Mrs.
Sophie S. Fisher, 3930 S.W. Ist Ave. But I would
not rent to girls.
It is so easy to get involved in the students
problems and with girls, there are problems on
top of problems, she said. You cant help but
feel some personal responsibility towards the girls.
This idea of the landlord acting as a second
set of parents was underlined by Miss Janice
Brewer, UF coed, when she lived off-campus for
two months in 1963 with a local family.
For some reason, they felt they had the right
to comment on my dates, check to see if I had
taken my vitamin pills and other activities as if
they were my parents, said Miss Brewer. Never
again will I live off campus.

are equipped with water tanks so
that cars affected by the residue
can be washed off immediately
after the spraying is concluded.
Most owners wont even know
their car has had any of the sub substance
stance substance on it, Greene added. We
:.S;.V.W.V.V.V.W.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.W.V.V.*.V.V

<7
The glowing light of a diamond is a wonderful
thing, but there*s more to a diamond than the
sparkle. It takes an expert to determine the
| 1 value of diamonds, and integrity to price them
I I right. We have both.
I# Exclusive Dealer for Artcarved Gem Diamonds

101 W. UNIVERSITY AVI. PHoit. PR <-2655

just want to allay and concern that
may crop up.*'
Spraying will be continued
throughout the campus for the next
several months with an aerial
bucket device similar to that used
by electrical companies to repair
damaged power lines.
Viet Cong rebels
cling to vital
supply line
SAIGON (UPI)-U. S. 857 jet
bombers yesterday were reported
to have killed at least 100 Viet
Cong rebels in a single strike
Wednesday.
But the Communists still clung
grimly to control of a vital South
Vietnamese supply line.
The developments on the fighting
north of the massacre by the
Communists of about 90 Viet Vietnamese
namese Vietnamese civilians in reprisal for the
U. S. retaliatory bombings in North
Viet Nam.

Are you still)
wearing
those creasy
kid slacks? J
Get into some wised-up
Post-Grads that know where
a crease should always be and
where it should never be, and
how to keep things that way
The reason is the Koratron
fabric of 65% Dacron*/35%
cotton. No matter how many
itimes you wash and wearthese
[trimly tapered Post-Grad
islacks, theyll stay completely
[neat and make the iron obso obsolete.
lete. obsolete. In tan, clay, black, navy
lor loden, $6.98 in poplin or
gabardine, $7.98 in oxford.
At swinging stores.
Press-Free*
Post-Grad
slacks by
his
DUPONT'S MEO. TM TOM FOLVESTEH FIBEM.
This is the fabric combo
that makes music with
sleek good looks ahd wash washable
able washable durability. And Post-
Grads are the bona fide
authenticsthattrim you up
and, taper you down. Tried Triedand-true
and-true Triedand-true tailored with belt
loops, traditional pockets,
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Only $6.98
The Colon Yo Like .
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B-L Men's W#nr
The Store With More
Gainesville
Shopping Center
Use Your Charge
Open Til 9: P.M.



SPORTS

Feb. 26, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

UF travels to Georgia

ATHENS, Ga. UFs basketball
team takes to the road for the
New records
very likely
at Daytona
DAYTONA BEACH New
records are practically assured in
the upcoming 2000-kilometer
Daytona Continental** road race
over the 3.81-mile Daytona
International Speedway.
Among the top favorites from
the Ferrari stables is the com combination
bination combination of Pedro Rodriguez of
C.\v.X.y*VV.%v.
DATE: Sunday, Feb.
28
TIME: 10 a.m.
FINISH: Approxi Approximately
mately Approximately 10:30 p.m. Sun Sunday
day Sunday
Mexico City and world driving
champion from England, John
Surtees.
Surtees ana Rodriguez will drive
the fastest Ferrari ever produced
by the Modena, Italy firm. It is a
12 cylinder, double overhead cam
machine which is capable of more
than 200 miles per hour.

Ah Spring! The time of hate, hate, hate

By MARQUIS BAESZLER
Sports Writer
Walking across the Plaza of
the Americas, one cant help
noticing some of the sure signs of
spring.
With warmer weather here,

Complete
iJL Luncheon Spcdob
Every Day (Monday thru Sat.)
Kn Luto mu course luncheon
1./V" INCLUDING EEVKAOE
W 67C COMPIfTS I
BS DISCOUNT!
wTm. special discount
LUNCHEON?
llsiO To ALL Stu 2sos *- University Personnel
DlNNlftj * v --------
4*o Just Pr * nt Your Card
tOSpM. To =n,e Cashier
SPECIALS V -
CT | CAFITSRIA
L I 1212 N. Male St.
SrtZto I CAINHVILLI SHOPPING CINTU

LAST ROAD GAME

last time this season when they
meet the Georgia Bulldogs here
Saturday at 8 p.m.
The tilt marks the second time
the Gators (15-7 overall, 8-SSEC)
will play in the new Georgia Coli Coliseum,
seum, Coliseum, which has been dubbed, the
finest indoor sports arena in the
South.**
though it sports-V^ :;;
a mediocre 8 -15|IHr"
log, will he
pushover. The*
Bullodgs have wonjjt jpf' J
four of their last Ip mm
six starts,
ing a big upset i jr
over Auburn. \ fj|
of top-notch* pttTS
guards, senior 10
Jimmy Pitts and
sophomore Dwayne Powell, the
Bulldogs pose a threat to anyone
at home.
Georgia began the 1965 cam campaign
paign campaign with four wins in five clashes
but slumped miserably in mid midseason,
season, midseason, losing 11 of their next
twelve games.
Following Saturdays clash, the
Gators have only two matches re remaining,
maining, remaining, at home against Tennes Tennessee
see Tennessee Monday and Georgia again
Friday.

lovers, like the flowers, spangle
the grass. It makes one smile
with envy to pass the couples
giggling at their lovers jokes and
playing their lovers games.
Now, even the squirrels seem to
pair up and chase one another
across the plaza, completely

Page 11

SAE's drop Pikes
for Orange title

BY EDDIE SEARS
Sports Editor
Three scrappy guards was all
Sigma Alpha Epsilon needed
Thursday night as Pi Kappa Alpha
fell to the SAEs 50-35 for the
Orange League basketball
championship.
Bobby Threatt (14 points), Jimmy
Roberts (6) and substitute Steve
Arthur (6) rode out a strong Pike
zone defense with 30-foot jump
shots and driving lay-ups.
Pike guards Gary Strack and Joe
Saunders, however were not to be
outdone. Strack, substituting for
former All-campus player Jake
Varn, canned 10 points, most of
them from behind the free-throw
line.
The first quarter showed pro promises
mises promises of a close game. Paul Jack Jackson
son Jackson opened the game for the Pikes
with a lay-up and Dawson Brown
(11 points) followed with a free
throw to put PKA ahead 3-0. But
then the SAE guards began click clicking.
ing. clicking. Threatt hit two jumpers and
Roberts added another one to ease
the SAEs into the lead.
The Pikes stuck with their zone
defense forcing even 6-foot 7 La-
Rue Boyd to shoot some from the
outside. Boyd finished the night
with 10 points.
The SAEs opened a nine point
buldge with less than two minutes
left in the half, but had to settle
for a 26-20 halftime lead after
two jumpers from Strack.
Fouls affected the SAE squad
in the second half, but Gordon
Gowen and Will Rogers, the two
tall forwards, began to move inside
for the first time that night. Both
finished with 6 points.
The game was turned into a rout
in the final quarter as fast breaks
and easy lay-ups began to tell the
story.

oblivious to people walking by.
The chase ends up a big tree as
the squirrels disappear into the
entanglement of branches and
moss.
But the disappearance of tne
squirrels doesnt make one forget
k he coming of spring. The branches
of the trees seem to reach out for
a big hug, making one smile at
the prospect of being embraced by
a tree.
there are lovers afl |k
during the
winter, as sure
as there are
trees and squir squirrels.
rels. squirrels. But theres
something about
spring that T*|B. y
makes a person
take notice and
appreciate them, n rc7T pn
The amazing AH oZ LiiiK
thing about spring is, its almost
impossible not to be in love with
someone or something. Its hard
not to have the feeling of rebirth.
Isn't it a strange paradox tnen,
that to the football team, spring
is also a time of dissention, dis disunity,
unity, disunity, and hate. Spring, the time
Swimmers meet
FSU Saturday
TALLAHASSEE The UF
swimming team will meet FSU
here Saturday in their second
encounter this season.
The Seminoles sunk Florida in
the first meet,' but it was thd
final relay event that decided the
meet.

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DAWSON BROWN(4O),LARUE BOYD (SAE) JUMP
SAEs Threatt watches
INSTANT PHOTO BY GERALD JONES


+ UFs talented junior halfback Marquis
Baeszler gives an inside view of the football
players annual hate session, spring practice.


of love and rebirth, is also the
time a football player fights to
make the team.
One aoesn*t make a football team
with love. For two hours a day a
player must hate, hate, hate!!!
At tne end of spring practice a
player usually knows if he will
play the next fall or not. His
performance during spring
dictates the amount he will play,
while fall practice is devoted to
reorganizing and unifying.
A players first hate is the man
(or men) playing in front or behind
him. He has 20 days to learn to
block, tackle, run, pass, or defend
better than the other guy. He can
never slack 19 or he may find
himself on the eighth team and
its a long climb back to the varsity.
1
If a man is on defense, he hates
the offense. A man on offense hates
the defense. How well he performs
against his opposite is the greatest
factor in determining where he
lines up.
This culmination of hate reaches
its climax on March 20. On that
day, the day of the spring game,
the team is split up into teams and
play each other, spending all the
built up hate Lhats left.

Any free time that's felt in the
spring we use doing what one is
supposed to do this time of year yearjust
just yearjust lovin'.
INTRAMURAL I
RESULTS I
Basketball
INDEPENDENT
Unknown* 47
Monks 31
Golf
FRATERNITY
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 119
Theta Chi 136
Gymnastic Club
visits Southern
STATESBORO, Ga. The UF
gymnastics club meets Georgia
Southern here Saturday in the dub
third match of the season.
In their last outing, the club
defeated Dade Junior College
74-54. The club's lone loss also
came at the hands of Dade by a
73-36 count.



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