Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
THE
FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
University of Florida, Gainesville

Vol. 57, No. 102

Former candidate
working for SG
By SHARON KELLEY
SG Beat Chief
For the first time in many moons of UF
political campaigns defeated presidential candi candidate
date candidate has offered his services and part of his
platform to the newly elected Student Body
President, and been accepted.
JIM HARMELING, Freedom party candidate for president has
already begun working out the technicalities involved in carrying out
the plank in his campaign platform that would provide for a tutoring
service to students of lower income families in Alachua County.
The program, dubbed Community Relations, is headed by Harmel Harmeling
ing Harmeling under the administration of the office of Student Government
(SG) Secretary of the Interior.
Secretary Mike Malaghan said it was considered right after the
campaign that some of the Freedom party planks could be used to
expand the scope of SG beyond the UF.
MANY PEOPLE who worked with Harmeling are sincerely inter interested
ested interested in this tutoring service in hopes it will better the community,"
Malaghan said.
Two other groins are presently providing tutors to families in
the lower income brackets, one under the Department of Education
at the UF and the other sponsored by Alachua county.
The SG Community Relations group would work with these other
two organizations tc reach the largest possible number of families,
according to Harmeling.
THE OFFICE of the Interior would handle the administrative functions
while Harmeling coordinates the actual tutoring.
Student Body president Bruce Culpepper stated he is pleased that
Harmeling will be working with his administration.
The Community Relations group is corresponding with other univer universities
sities universities with similar programs to obtain information that will aid in
establishing the program' here.
THE TUTORS will be volunteers," Harmeling said, and we
ask anyone interested to come to the Cabinet office in the Florida
Union."
No requirements have been stipulated as yet, but Malaghan emphasized
that the tutors will not be selected just from among SG workers, but
from all interested factions on campus.
flavets escape fire danger

High winds toppled a television
antenna onto a string of electri electrical
cal electrical wires in Flavet Three last
night, disrupting power in five
Flavets and causing momentary
fire and live wire danger.
The antenna was bent down
across wires from the roof of
Building 148 during a heavy gust
of wind about 10:30 p.m. Sparks
from the fallen wires caused temp temporary
orary temporary fire danger to adjoining
buildings, but were extinguished
when the fuse on the transformer
serving the lines blew.
The Flavet Three Fire Depart Department
ment Department and University power offi officials
cials officials were dispatched to the scene.
They remained working later into
the night.
Despite heavy rains, a large
crowd of onlookers gathered in the
areapotentially dangerous due
to wires spread across the ground.
I heard a crashing sound and
looked out to see a lot of sparks
all over the place," said one
witness. "The sparks stopped
pretty soon, though," he said.
Service was expected to be res restored
tored restored by today.

Thursday, Feb. 25, 1965

DOWNED ANTENNA
...over wires. (Photo
by Nick Arroyo)

Caldwell talks tonight

Erskine Caldwell, American au author,
thor, author, who wrote Gods Little
Acre" and Tobacco Road" will
speak at the University Auditorium
tonight at 8:15.
HIS TOPIC Out of the Cald Caldwell
well Caldwell Workshop" includes his latest
travel impressions of Europe and
America.
Caldwell who is brought to the
UF by the Florida Union Forums
Committee has served as a news newspaper
paper newspaper correspondent in Mexico,
Spain, Czechoslavakia, Russia,
China.

HARMELING
Viel talks
bogged down
WASHINGTON (UPI)- The White
House said yesterday there are
no meaningful proposals for nego negotiation
tiation negotiation that are before our govern government"
ment" government" for ending the fighting in
Viet Nam.
Press Secretary George E.
Reedy told newsmen this when
questioned about United Nations
Secretary General Thants report
that he had contacted interested
parties with respect to East-West
talks on the situation.
ASKED ABOUT this as well as
efforts by other governments to
end the Viet Nam warfare, Reedy
said:
Obviously, there are at var various
ious various times diplomatic contacts go going
ing going on at various diplomatic levels
throughout the world. But from the
standpoint of negotiations, there
are no authorized negotiations go going
ing going on."
Reedy said President Johnson
repeatedly has made the UjS.posi UjS.position
tion UjS.position quite clear."
HE SAID this position was stated
in the joint resolution adopted by
Congress last Aug. 7 endorsing
the Presidents determination...
to take all necessary measures
to repel any armed attack against
the forces of the U. S. and to
prevent further aggression" in
Southeast Asia.
This resolution was adopted
after U. S. warplanes struck back
at North Vietnamese bases fol following
lowing following Communist torpedo boat at attacks
tacks attacks on U. S. destroyers in the
Gulf of Tonkin.
REEDY INSISTED, in response
to repeated questions, that there
is no authorized negotiating going
on" for a Vietnamese settlement.

He now resides in the San
Francisco, California area.
In 1933 the famous author had
his first story Country Full of
Swedes" published in the Yale
Review where it was given the
magazines SI,OOO Award for Fic Fiction.
tion. Fiction.
SOME OF Caldwells other
novels include Georgia Boy,"
A House in the Uplands," and
Claudelle Ingllsh. His latest
book, Around About America,"
published in June 1964, gives his
personal observations on life in the
U.S.A. today.

IFC blood drive
in controversy
By 808 WILCOX
Staff Writer
Whether the Interfraternity Council (IFC)
Blood Drive is still underway has become a
controversy between official sources.
ACCORDING TO Dr. WiUiam Hall, director of the UF Infirmary,
there has been a problem concerning measles on the UF campus.
The infirmary reported the disease to the blood clinics with the
recommendation that they suspend taking donations if they feel it
necessary.
Hall said his statement that the drive had been cancelled upon
the infirmary's recommendation was a misunderstanding. He said
he had only reported the disease to those concerned. It was up to
them to stop the donations.
GREG SEITZ, chairman of the blood drive, said Hall told him
Tuesday he (Hail) was ordering discontinuation of blood donations
for at least a week or two."
Charles Sweat, administrator at Alachua General Hospital, said
that a discussion between Hall and Dr. R. E. Klein led to the termin termination
ation termination of donations at Alachua General.
The hospital has suspended blood donations until further notice.
However, Dr. Reginald M. Lamber, director of the blood clinic
at J. Hillis Miller Medical Center said today that blood will be
taken for the drive until the end of the month."
DUE TO the vagueness of the controversy Seitz said that until he
is again notified he also considers the drive on. Anyone wishing to
donate may do so at the medical center," he said.
So far the blood drive has collected donations froml 05 individuals.
The projected goal of the drive is 150 donations.
Last year 63 pints were taken.
f I
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FLORIDA PLAYERS PERFORM TONIGHT
...at Norman Hall at 7:30 p.m. Above are
Player Bill Gywn, Bill Perley and
draped, Ruth Ann Hellwie. Theyll be seen
in waltz of The Toreadors.

n
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A



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator Thursdsay, Feb. 25, 1965

Reitz praises FBK Speakers Bureau

UF President J. Wayne Reitz
spoke to eighty prospective Flor Florida
ida Florida Blue Key Speakers Sunday and
congratulated the Speakers Bureau
on the public relations work that
they are doing in behalf of the
UF Pres. Reitz told Harry Shor Shorstein,
stein, Shorstein, Chairman of the Speakers
Bureau, his staff and the assem assembled
bled assembled Blue Key Speakers that their
efforts reflect favorably upon the
calibre and quality of theUF stu student
dent student body.
WE ARE proud to have you
represent the University of Flo*

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REITZ SPEAKS TO SPEAKERS
V-*W a y up? l4 a! ? k e P rai sed the Florida Blue Key Speakers Bureau
on their public relations job for the UF. edu
Center is Harry Shorstein and right is Dick Dandurand.

Hospital operating clinic here

The hospital operating suite and how it should
be planned, manned and serviced will be the sub subject
ject subject of an intensive two-day study this week at the
UF Hospital and Clinics,
More than 200 hospital nurses, administrative staff
members and operating and delivery room tech technicians
nicians technicians from Florida hospitals will learn the latest
techniques in their field from nationally-known
specialists today and tom morrow.
One day will be devoted to operating room prob problems
lems problems and the second to the organization of the sterile

I NOTICE I
THE BOARD OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS IS ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS (DATES
INDICATE TIMES INTERVIEWS WILL BE CONDUCTED; DEAD DEADLINES
LINES DEADLINES FOR RECEIVING APPLICATIONS ARE ALSO LISTED):
INTERVIEW POSITIONS OPEN
MARCH 18 Alligator editor and managing editor, 3rd
(Summer) Trimester, 1965
- Alligator editor and managing editor, Ist
and 2nd Trimesters, 1965-66
- DEADLINE for applications: 5 p.m., March 16
MARCH 25 Seminole editor, managing editor, and two
editorial assistants, 1965-66 school year
- DEADLINE for applications: 5 p.m., March 23

APRIL 1- New Orange Peel editor and four section
editors, 1965-66 school year
- DEADLINE for applications: 5 p.m. March 30
Applications may be obtained in Room 9, Florida Union, and must be
returned no later than deadline times indicated above.
I Board of Student Publications

rida before the junior college stu students
dents students of Florida,** Reitz said.
We look forward to the Speakers
Bureau each year to help inform
the people of the State of Florida
about the University.**
At this initial meeting of
the speakers selected for
this year*s Speakers Bureau, Shor Shorstein
stein Shorstein explained that junior colleges
will be the primary object of the
Bureaus efforts. With the num number
ber number of transfer students enrolling
at the University increasing each
year, we feel that junior colleges

supply area which serves surgerys needs.
Sponsored by the educational and research divi divisions
sions divisions of the American Sterilizer Company, the work workshop
shop workshop is one of 20 in-service training sessions planned
this year by the UF Center for Health and Hospital
Administration in cooperation with the Florida Hos Hospital
pital Hospital Association and the Florida Institute for
Continuing University Studies.
The workshop is under the direction of Miss
Margaret Ferris, unit manager in charge of the
University Hospitals surgery floor.

should be the natural object of
a student-oriented public relations
pfogram,** Shorstein said. 4 Junior
college students are especially
interested in hearing about the
University of Florida and so this
year we intend to emphasize
Students speaking to Students,*
Shorstein added.
EACH JUNIOR college will be
provided with a four-man team
of Blue Key Speakers, according
to Brian Ellis, Chairman of the
Selection and Training Com mittee.
For the next ten days each

selected speaker will undergo
additional training by an experi experienced
enced experienced public speaker. Then the
four-roan teams will be scheduled
for trips to the various junior
colleges within the state.
Nick Touchton, in charge of the
dispatch of the speaker teams,
reports that each team will remain
on the campus after the individual
speeches to be available to the
students for interviews and to
answer questions that they might
have. In cases of trips to South
Florida, this may necessitate
overnight trips/* Touchton added.
HERMAN GREENE, Finance
Chairman fer the Bureau, repor reported
ted reported that each speaker would be
compensated for meal and travel
money spent on the engagements.
We can cover modest expenses
of the speakers from the bud budget
get budget of the Bureau/* Greene said.
However, the scope of the pro program
gram program this year may stretch our
budget.**

Counseling cards available

University College students may
pick iq> counseling appointment
cards for mid-term pre-registra pre-registration
tion pre-registration counseling at the appointment
desk outside 204 Tigert during
the weeks of Mar. 1 and Mar.
8. Check the Orange and Blue
buUetin for exact appointment date.
At the time of appointment, a
program will be worked out for
the next term for which the stu student
dent student will be enrolled. Students
going into upper division should

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Xerox Copies As Low As 9$ Each I
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I Acceptable for term papers, thesis etc. I
| plus Tax Where Applicable Quantity Rights Rwerved |

*.y v.
I CAMPUS CUTte I
,v, y.
| Likes bowling
Panama City, Panama is:?
home tor todays Campus:?
:?: Cutie. Kathi Kervin is a:?
>:j: freshman who plans to major:?
?: in French. %
*5 Kathi has traveled all over:?
:j* South America, and spent last?:
:? summer in Europe. ?:
Her favorite hobby, next to!?
studying, is bowling. She ?:
spends her spare time working ?:
with the Florida Players.
Sj; Kathi is a member of the?:
:*: Inter natioal Hostess?:
:?: Committee, and is also active?:
v': in Broward Hall Council. :*

consult an upper division coun counselor.
selor. counselor.
It will be necessary to obtain
an appointment card to be pre precounseled.
counseled. precounseled. Any questions con concerning
cerning concerning pre-registration pro procedure
cedure procedure may be addressed to the re receptionist
ceptionist receptionist at University College,
204 Tigert, extension 2746.
Pre-registration counseling for
terms 111, IHA, mB, or for
Fall Trimester begins Mon Monday,
day, Monday, Mar. 15, at 8:40 am.



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Thursday/ Feb. 25, 19 65, The Florida Alligator,

v.v. !mS
PRESIDENTS DESK j
|Progress report!
>:: v.v.'
BY BRUCE CULPEPPER
Student Body President
Often, how a person starts something is a forecast of how he is
going to continue it. This thought has constantly been on the minds of
all those working in student government (SG), during our initial
week. My beginning hours have been filled with setting up the office,
interviewing future cabinet members, and speaking with various
members of the administration concerning the programs that I wish
to see accomplished during the coming year. My first impression
is that the issues of the campaign pointed out to the administration
that there is a definite break in the process of communication of
student opinion and student needs.
Dr. Reitz, Vice-Pres. Philpott, Vice-Pres. Mautz, and Dean Hale
are as much concerned with the problem of communication as I am.
Now it is up to me to use every means possible to fill this gap
by instilling in SG a realization that the purpose of SG is not to perform
our specific programs, but to be constantly aware of student complaint,
concerning everything from the trimester to stale candy bars. We
should be sure that there is no delay by either ourselves or the
administration in recognizing and being aware of problems.
It is also important to be sure that the campus is currently informed
on what is going on in order to promote expression of opinion and
reaction. Because of this I am going to initiate with the cooperation
of The Alligator, this weekly report by SG. Each week I will ask a
different cabinet member to report on projects that he or she is under*
taking. This will have three major effects.
1) It will allow the cabinet member to show how he is constructively
helping student life, through SG. 2) It will provide a means of recog recognition
nition recognition of the individual for the work that he is doing, and 3) finally,
in might promote some creative thoughts on the part of students
concerning the projects that are reported on.
I am in hopes that with this information students will not hesitate
to express their suggestions either to the cabinet member, (found
in the Student Union, by mail or by personal contact) or myself, or
any member of the legislative Council.
There are a few matters that I would like to discuss at this time:
I. Cabinet
The primary job of the week was appointing the cabinet. I was pleased
to be able to announce the names of these people last Tuesday. This
cabinet has the potential of being one of the most effective ever selected.
They are all working hard at the moment studying the past reports
of their respective offices. These records were left in fine order
by the Kennedy administration and are of great help to us. A cabinet
meeting is set for today where we will discuss the coming year
be certain that each point in the Progress Party platform is being worked
on.
Bill Fleming, my Administrative Assistant, is primarily responsible
for coordinating the cabinet's projects and is doing an excellent
job.
H. Murphree fence
I met with the Traffic and Safety Committee to discuss ways of
keeping that fence open. The committee points out that there have
been 114 accidents in the area and are interested in some type of
safe traffic control involving both pedestrian and automobile. I am
suggesting an enforced school speed limit in that area even though
it is an access to an Interstate highway. A solution has not yet been
worked out. At the moment the fence is open but I want to point out,
that it is not down because vandalism" prevailed but because the
committee has postponed action while we are trying to seek an adequate
solution through cooperation.
At the moment I hope the students in the area will use the street
corner crosswalk, because in the present state of affairs, with no
crosswalk in the middle of the block, that area is dangerous. If there
is a "big city" street in Gainesville-that's it. I am continuing to work
on this and open to suggestions.
HI. Meeting
We are setting up a meeting of the student body presidents of all
of the Florida universities to discuss effective ways of lobbying in
Tallahassee for student needs.
The meeting is proposed for March 6, here on campus. Drew Haslett
has been of particular help to me in working on this.
Space will not permit my discussion of each project at this time
but I assure you we are not being confined to our platform, that every
part of it is being attended to. We are anxious to accomplish as much
as we possibly can in this short year.
My thanks to The Alligtor for their interest. And so we have begun.
Reitz headed to. Brazil for
Higher Education Council

UF President J. Wayne Reitz
has been Invited to Join eight other
college and university presidents
from throughout the United States
lor the conference of the Council
on Higher Education in the Arne*
lean Republics at Sao, Paulo,
Brazil, March 7-12.
Other institutions represented
by their presidents include Neora Neoraska,
ska, Neoraska, Pennsylvania, California and
Minnesota, yniversity of Notre
Dame, Columbia University, the
University of California at Los

Angeles and the Massachusetts In Institute
stitute Institute of Technology.
Mrs. Reitz will accompany the
President to the conference. They
leave Feb. 28.
The agenda tor the six-day
CHEAR Conference includes a dis discussion
cussion discussion of present activities in the
fields of agricultural and teacher
education, publications and schol scholarly
arly scholarly Journals, as will as education
administration, teaching of poli political
tical political science and instruction in
the basic sciences.

Page 3



Page 4

z The Florido Alligator, Thursday, Feb. 25, 1965

UF Prof 6 likes to control men 9

Dr. Charles Crittenden,
UF professor of philosophy,
likes to control men. In fact,
hes a master at the game.
Crittenden has been playing
chess since he was 12 years
old and received the coveted
"master rating in 1959.
ONE CAN receive this
rating after judges observe
your performance in chess
tournaments and grant you the
title, stated Crittenden. He
explained that the deciding
factor is not so much invol involved
ved involved with one's amount of wins,
but with the player's perfor performance.
mance. performance.
Ibis system which includes
three divisionsgrand mas master,
ter, master, senior master, and
master is ruled by the United
States Chess Federation.
As a curious 13 year old,
Crittenden entered his first
tournament in Raleigh North
Carolina, where he placed
last.

Burns nixes Ocala job corps center

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Gov.
Hay don Bums turned thumbs down
yesterday on a tentative proposal
that one of the Job Corps centers
being set iqp under the Economic
Opportunity Act be located near
Ocala.
**l will veto it/* Burns told a
delegation of housewives from
Marion County who called on him
to urge that the youth camp not
be located in the Ocala National
Forest just 26 miles from Ocala.
BURNS SAID he was not op opposed
posed opposed to the program but did not
feel a job camp should be lo located

Lyceum ticket complaints
A number of complaints have been turned into the Lyceum Council
office about the lack of coordination in the ticket distribution for the
Ferrante and Teicher program, according to Reid Poole professor
of music.
**A professional ticket manager is needed, said Poole. This
same thing comes up every time we have a program and better manage management
ment management would reduce the problem.
Students who sign up to work at the booth and then don't show
up are a partial cause of the confusion. Also the student who fails
to use the tickets he has obtained also adds to it, said Poole.

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"INSTEAD OF becoming
discouraged, I studied the
game of chess and practiced
every day for one year,'* added
Crittenden.
At 14 he played again in the
North Carolina State Tourna Tournament,
ment, Tournament, executed the strategies
he had learned and won first
place.
ALREADY A champion in
the field, this determined
player outmatched his
opponents to win the Southern
Intercollegiate Title when he
was a student at the Univer University
sity University of North Carolina.
As one of only 100 chess
masters in the United States,
Crittenden claims that roost
of the good players are from
Russia." Chess is the national
sport there and has as much
audience appeal as baseball
does here.'*
CRITTENDEN, who re received
ceived received his doctorate from

cated located so close to this small town
which did not want it and feared
it could not absorb it.
The law creating the program
specifically provides that the gov governor
ernor governor shall have the power to
veto locations proposed by the
federal government.
Dr. SAM HAND, director of
Florida's participation in the econ economic
omic economic opportunity act aimed at
curbing poverty, explained that
the Marion County location has
been proposed by the UJS. Forest
Service but has not been formally
submitted to Sargeant Shriver who

Cornell, says there is cre creativity
ativity creativity and individuality in the
game of chess.
"Contrary to popular opin opinion
ion opinion chess does not have to be
a slow game,'* commented
this game lover who also
"enjoys playing tennis.
"THE UNIVERSITY Chess
Club for which Crittenden is
faculty advisor conducts five
minute chess matches every
Friday night at the Florida
Union. Each player has five
minutes in which to complete
all moves.
Just as unusual as the five
minute game is "chess by
mail,*' which this master gave
up when he went to college.
"I just didn't have time
to study the game, then.
Ranking 16th in a field of
120 in the United States Open
Championship, Charles Crit Crittenden
tenden Crittenden is one of few men to
have a master in chess and
a doctorate in philosophy.

has the final say at the federal
level on the locations.
"We can save ourselves and
Mr. Shriver some embarrass embarrassment,
ment, embarrassment, Burns told Hand and the
delegation of woman headed by
Mrs. Earl Futch of Ocala.
The women also stressed that
they were not fighting the Job
Corps but merely felt Ocala was
too small a town and too poor
financially to absorb into its vo vocational
cational vocational education evening schools

UNITED CHURCH
OF GAINESVILLE
Worship: 10 a .m.
Fla. Union Auditorium
Rev. Pierson P. Harris
Ph. 376-1026

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QUIET PLEASE
... while the master studies his next move. Above,
Dr. Crittenden gives his undivided attention to the
game to which he has devoted years of study.

youths who might want to take
advantage of some schooling.
HAND SAID this would not pre present
sent present a real problem since the
federal government would probably
operate its own school at the
site.

GATOR ADS
RING A BELL!

Cherbergs beloved |v kJh
blouson ... a "must
have" type of dress that mjOJW
makes you feel feminine,
charming. Wild flowers
blossoming on cool cot- 8
ton lawn create a most j|
interesting pattern. And Jfj
the colors are just what *f§
you r re looking for ... ||
varied combinations of ||
yellow, pink or blue, ft
r Jv . ..V.V.V.V.V.VA*-V.,.
Sizes are right, too . ir *
c
$ 15.9511 '
yVZr
CHERBERG
franklin's
j Bourn*
[ EoUey Shop



HEW cant up loans us prof to run(jSOE researchinci

The Department of Health, Ed Education
ucation Education and Welfare (HEW) recen recently
tly recently informed the UF Foreign
Student Adviser, Glenn A. Farris,
that they could not increase the
$5,000 limit on the loan to Cuban
students,
Presently, Farris explained,
Cuban students borrow $5,000
from the UJS. government at the
rate of SSOO per trimester on
conditions similiar to those pre prescribed
scribed prescribed for American students
under the National Defense Educa Education
tion Education Act.
Each trimester, starting with
the present one, an increased num number
ber number of Cuban students are faced
with the problem that their
loan limit has been reached while
their most important source of
financial assistance is exhaus exhausted,
ted, exhausted, Farris said.
Sickness or academic dif difficulties
ficulties difficulties may cause some students
not to be able to take the required

I University Food Service Offers
Thursday Gator Special
in all cafeterias
LUNCHEON and DINNER Complete Mea
Vi C (Plus TM)
English Meal Loaf IlfiSfif
With Brown Gravy
CHOICE OF POTATO OR BUTTERED RICE
1 other vegetable
Any 10< or 15<: salad
Any 10$ or 15$ dessert
2 rolls or 2 slices bread
and 2 butter pats
915 NORTH MAInTt!
Special Purchase
CAP EZIOS MM
PAPPAGALLO Iff
PEDALGO JM
3 OTHER FAMOUS BRANDS MW
AND 1965 PATTERNS.
\fikk BONES WHITES BLACK £ HHi
PATENTS FLATS AND
EVER POPULAR LITTLE lk
HEELS
SIZES SOLD NATIONALLY IB
4 to io *10.95 to *16.95
AAA-AA-A-B A Pair
Widths in the Gtoup

number of courses per trimester,
in order to complete his degree
before his loan is exhausted,
Farris said.
We must remember, Farris
said, that most of these stu students
dents students have to work to supplement
the loan since they must pay out
of state tuition.
This makes it even harder to
complete long careers like Engin Engineering,
eering, Engineering, within their loan, Farris
said.
A student often within sight of
his degree may Hhus be forced
to withdraw from the university
due to lack funds, Farris
explained.
A parados, Farris said,
is that because of not being able
to complete his degree, a student
is missing an opportunity to earn
a good salary.
But, Farris added, this stu student
dent student is still faced with a $5,000
debt hanging over head.**

for Commission sc hool funds

Ralph B. Thompson, professor
of business administration at UF,
announced this week that he will
be a candidate for the seat on the
Gainesville City Commission now
held by Howard McKinney.
Thompson, a resident of Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville for 10 years, said, I*m
running primarily because the city
commission should provide lead leadership
ership leadership for problems of the city
and its* growth. These problems
should be faced from day to day.**
Currently, Thompson is the
editor of the Business and Econ Economic
omic Economic Dimension, a new journal
published by the Bureau of Econ Economic
omic Economic and Business Research of
UF. He is also a past president
of the local unit of the board of
directors of the Florida Council
on Human Relations.

Thursday, Feb. 25, 1965/ Hie Florida Alligator,

Why some school districts give
more financial support to local
education than others is currently
undergoing research supported by
a $221,674 U. S. Office of Educa Education
tion Education grant.
Designers and co-directors of
the project ai;e Assoc. Prof, of
Educational Administration Ralph
B. Kimbrough and Head of the
Department of Educational Admin Administration,
istration, Administration, Roe L. Johns.
The grant was awarded byUSOE
in September on a competitive
basis. Kimbrough stated perhaps
75% of the projects submitted are
turned down. Completion of the
research is set for September
1967.
The results of this project will
help in the preparation of school
administrators,* stated Dr. Kim Kimbrough,
brough, Kimbrough, and in developing qual quality
ity quality school programs. v
Money for the project is pri primarily
marily primarily spent on salaries, research
assistants to collect information,
office supplies, computer work,
and much will go for travel
experse, aserted Dr. Kimbrough.

URA elects new officers
George Blaha, 3AS, has been elected President of the University
Religious Association, (URA), to succeed outgoing president Bob
Mounts.
Blaha has served this past year as URA Treasurer and as a repre representative
sentative representative from the Gamma Delta Lutheran Group.
Other officers elected include Rob Blue as Vice-President, to succeed
outgoing Vice-President Jean Outler, Liz Henson as Secretary, to
succeed Sherry Allen, and Lois Falck as Treasurer to succeed Blaha.
Blaha said that an emphasis in 1965-66 will be on service, The
URA has performed well in the area of forum s-bringlng speakers
and raising the issues-but now must reevaluate its position in regard
to community and campus service programs," he said.
A specific project being investigated is a paint-up, fix-up, clean-up
campaign by university students in several less fortunate areas of
Gainesville.
Rob Blue has served the URA as Forums Committee Chairman
and is a member of Delta Tau Delta Fraternity. Liz Henson has bee?
on this years Religion-in-Life Committee and is a Trl-Delt. Lois
Falck has been active in the Hlllel Foundation.
'Air meeting today
The UF will host 125 delegates from 12 states today and tomorrow
for its 14th annual Air Conditioning Conference.
The two-day meeting is sponsored jointly by the Universitys De Department
partment Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Engineering and Industrial

Baker inquiry reveals
new information
WASHINGTON(UPI)- President
Johnsons former top assistant told
Senate investigators yesterday an
insurance salesman bought adver advertising
tising advertising time on a Johnson-owned
television station in hopes it would
pay off with a big life insurance
sale.
Walter W. Jenkins, the former
White House aide who resigned last
fall after his arrest on a morals
charge, made the statement
in writing to the Senate Rules
Committee. It was part of the Com Committees
mittees Committees long-running investi investigation
gation investigation of Robert G. Bobby
Baker, former secretary to Senate
Democrats.
insurance man Don B. Reynolds
of Silver Spring, Md., testified last
year that Jenkins-through Baker Bakerpersuaded
persuaded Bakerpersuaded him in 1957 to buy
$1,208 worth of advertising tinfe he
did not need on the Austin, Tex.,
Insurance man Don B. Reynolds
of Silver Spring, Md., testified last
year that Jenkins-through Baker Bakerpersuaded
persuaded Bakerpersuaded him in 1957 to buy
$1,208 worth of advertising time he
did not need on the Austin, Tex.,
television station owned by John Johnson's
son's Johnson's family. He bought it after
writing a SIOO,OOO life insurance
policy on Johnson who then was
Senate Majority Leader.

The four states to be studied
are Florida, Georgia, Kentucky,
and Illinois. These states were
selected on the basis of political
party system, number of school
districts, wealth of state compared
to surrounding states, type
of school system as county opposed
to township-city.
The project is aimed at the urban
districts with 20,000 or more pop population.
ulation. population. Reliable data is not avail available
able available in smaller areas.
Problems that will be viewed by
the project include the impact
of federal aid on the local school
program, educational levels of the
adult population, taxes, rate of
population growth, family income
and size of the district.
Last fall, Dr. Kimbrough com completed
pleted completed a three year $54,000 USOE
project which he coordinated. The
influence of county and school
leaders on education in two
counties was studied.
Kimbrough stated the techniques
and findings of the previous pro-*
ject will aid the current research.

Experiment Station. All sessions
will be in McCarty Auditorium with
the exception of this afternoons
portion of the program, in the
Florida Union Auditorium.
The Arnold Air Society has
changed plans, and now is offering
a free trip to Washington D.C.
to both an Air Force and Army
basic cadet freshmen and soph sophomores,
omores, sophomores, who have bought tickets to
the Military ball.
Tuesdays Alligator article
stated the trip would be offered to
only Air Force basic cadets.
Jim Miles, president of Arnold
Air Society said there will be
a drawing March Bth, from a list,
of numbers corresponding to
numbers on tickets sold, to deter determine
mine determine the lucky winners.
The lucky numbers will be posted
on the bulletin boards in the Mil Military
itary Military Building Marqh "9 and 10.
The winners will accompany
about 15 members of the Arnold
Air Society on tours of the Pen Pentagon,
tagon, Pentagon, Andrews Air Force Base,
and other points of interest in
Washington.
Free transportation and lodging
will be given the winners. They
will leave Friday, Mar. 12, from
the Gainesville Airport and return
via a C-47 on Mar. 14.
Army and Air Force ROTC
Cadets are encouraged to buy
tickets for the Military Ball be before
fore before Mar. 8 if they want to win
a trip to Washington.

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florido Alligator, Thursday, Feb. 25, 1965

\ Jr

ERNIE UTZ
Editor-lit-Chief

LOU FERRIS
Editorial Pace Editor

yjtwntHT
Hats off
THIS WEEK the Gator salutes Dr. Kimball
Wiles, Dean of the College of Education. Dr.
Wiles has written several authorative books
on curriculum and in other areas of general
education. B
Before coming to the University of Florida,
Dr. Wiles was Professor and Associate Pro Professor
fessor Professor at New York University* He was Field
Representative and Director of the School
and College Division for the National Safety
Council, and Training Coordinator and
Training Director for the Sperry Gyroscope
Company.
An assistant professor at University of
Alabama, a Research Assistant at Ohio State,
and a teacher in the public schools in Ohio,
Dr. Wiles brings a wealth of experience to the
University of Florida. He has been a member
of the faculty since 1950.
_ Dr Wiles' is a member of the American
Education Research Association, Phi Delta
Kappa, Kappa Delta Pi, and Phi Beta Kappa.
He is a consultant and lecturer in the field
of secondary education, and is listed in both
Whos Who in America and Contemporary
Authors. J

EDITOR;
EVERY DAY for the last two
weeks, it seems, there has been
an article in the Alligator about
the fence. I cant say that I
really understand the problem. The
fence was erected and the
pedestrian walkways erased by the
State Road Department.
ENT IT AGAINST the law to
destroy State Property? This
isnt University rule, fellas. You
get no prestige points for breaking
a state law.

GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Kay
Huff master, (Correspondents), Yvette Cardoso, Agnes Fowles,
Donita Mathlson, Dan Taylor, Sam Ullman, Selwln H. CimenL
Jay Foley.
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Knrvln, Ann Carter, Thelma Mossman, Fran Snider, Cynthia
Tunstall, Harvey Woifson, Karen titunac, Jack Zucker, Ami
Saperstein, Carl Brown, Jane Young, BUI Lockhart, Ken
Drez Dobson, Jeffrey Deokewalter, G. S. Corseri, Eunice Tall,
Linda Cody, Woody Leonard, JenneU Close, Nancy Van Zile.
1 1
Fknid Alltphir mams the right to refill mo the twomahkal to nr n h.iaa.MM.a. ,\-
to rerlae or tom away copy which it consider. ob jecttoatofe.
MO POSITION B GUARANTEED, though desired position wUI be ftvea wbeoeeer r~w.e
The Florida Alligator U1 tot consider adjustments of paymtot tor any advertisement tuTolrlng typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice is gives to the Adrertlslig Manager within &
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement X
s rbcrielirl to ran several times. Notices tor correction muet be given before neat insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is toe official student newspaper of toe University of Florida and is *1
published five tunes weekly except atotag May, June and July when it Is patollshed semi-weekly. Only &
editorials represent toe official cptotons of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as seconl <-
matter at toe United States Pest Office at GaknesvlUe.
:v

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International

STEVE VAUGHN
Managing Editor

Its the law

JOE CASTE LLO
Executive Editor

ED SEARS
Sports Editor

AS FOR THE Alligator's
coverage of the story, Id like to
know just where you stand. Do
you approve the vandalism? If
not, why not say so? A campus
newspaper is a powerful social
influence, no matter how good
or bad that paper may be.
I AM a UF graduate, and I
keep telling myself that I was
young and used to do crazy, fun
things, but I dont think I was
ever that young.
SUSAN B. EFSTATHION

the GATOR SALUTES *

Dr. Kimball Wiles

EDITOR:
THE DEPARTMENT of Arts
new quarters on the top floor of
the classroom building of the new
Architecture and Fine Arts
complex includes a Teaching
Gallery. The Gallery will present
a series of exhibitions in addition
to student work such as the annual
student exhibition in April.
THE GALLERY opened at the
beginning of this past trimester
and featured a major show of
prints by James McGarrelL The
ALLIGATOR,aIong with other news

Old look prefered by foreign student

EDITOR:
I AM NOT sure if I should write
this letter, but because I am an
ex student and a graduate of this
university I felt an obligation to
criticize your policy of handling
the Alligator.
DURING THE BJ.A. banquet,
one of the speakers made a re remarkable
markable remarkable comment and I quote:
You want to know why your
liberties get burned, you wonder
about your dark image abroad,
well dont blame us, you,
Americans, are responsible for
it and no one else.
TO GIVE an example, we, the
International students, dedicate all
our efforts to bring our cultures,
our politics, our point of view to
you and then we are met with
cold-blooded avoidance of any of
our activities.
INVESTIGATING the reasons
behind this comment I found out
that the Alligator had completely
ignored the International Week, the
Native student body did the same
and the International Speakers, one
of them was a highly respected
Ambassador, came to Gainesville

* An old tale

THERE IS a very old Arab
concerning a man who was
: sitting in a public place writing
: a letter to his girl friend. As he
sat there, he could not help but
notice that the young man at a

COMPLAINT DEPT.*

Lets get with it

sources in the area, was provided
with complete information con concerning
cerning concerning the opening of the Gallery,
the exhibition schedule for the
entire year and the current
exhibition.
THE ALLIGATOR released the
information on the very last day
the exhibition was scheduled. The
current exhibitions have been on
the wall for two weeks and the
Alligator has yet to inform the
students of this fact. Again, the
information was released before
the show opened.
WOULD YOU like to offer

to find out they were telling the
foreign students more about their
own countries.
LEAVING this aside let's
see what your turtle published
instead of covering the
International week. I do not think
or believe that the UF students
walk around the campus with their
eyes fixed on the feet of the other
pedestrians, because that is the
impression I got after reviewing
a whole page full of nothing except
pictures of rotten tennis shoes and
whats left of a pair of feet after
a severe attack of Athletes feet.
I DO NOT know if the UF students
have a dally interest in beauty
contests, after all this university
does not offer a degree in beauty
contests techniques. But after our
week of following your paper, it
seems to me that almost every
coed has been on your pages as a
beauty contestant.
\
ANOTHER thing, the way I
understand it, the student body
is composed mostly of
Independents. After paying my due
respects to our Greek friends,
male and females, if you can tell
them apart, let me remind you that

table behind him was looking over
Ws snoulder in an attempt to read
the letter.
AND so our writer wrote the
following Pjs. in his letter.
I AM quite disturbed to tell
&

suggestions whereby we might
arrive at some method of
publicizing the exhibitions. For the
past two years I have personally
been sending a news release to
the Alligator office.
PERHAPS THERE can be a
weekly Schedule of Exhibitions
on the campus or would it be
possible for me to write an art
review of each exhibition in much
the same manner as the Depart Department
ment Department of Music (Reid Poole)?
EUGENE E. GRISSOM
Head of Dept, of Art

God was not a Greek and he won't
strike you down if you give the
Independents their share of your
newspaper, they pay for it, after
all, including the International
students believe it or not, and your
"turtle" shouldn't be afraternity afraternitysorority
sorority afraternitysorority match-making and Gossip
Paper.
THIS SCHOOL and I'm mighty
proud of it, but you, who ever you
are, you who is in charge of the
"Alligator" you are bringing the
informational level of the students
down to the level of those feet
you so much admired, you are
taking away from us a very dear
thing, the Alligator we used to
know, you are painting the national
image of this school with your
"Pepsi generation" colors.
ONE LAST thing I would like
to tell, a joke a foreign studeitf
told it to me, he said that your
waste basket is the best informed
source on the International
Affairs. Why? Because that is
where all our letters go, where
call the due coverage of
international activities meet its
fate. Maybe we should send your
waste paper basket to a foreign
country! As our Ambassador of
course.
GHUSSOM S. NACHAWI

you, my dear, that there is a roan :j:
sitting here who is looking over
roy shoulder and trying to read
this letter."
AT THAT the young man jumped
up and said, "I am notl"



TOASTMASTERS
The University Toastmasters
[will hold their weekly meeting
1 11:45 a.m. today at the Faculty
Club. Charter membership appli appli[
[ appli[ cations are being accepted now.
GEOGRAPHY CLUB
The Geography Club will sponsor
a luncheon seminar at noon today
in Floyd Room 213. Bring a
sandwich. The program will be
an illustrated sketch of cultural
and physical geography of India.
The seminar will be given by Dr.
N. E. Bingham.
ORIENTATION WEEK
All students interested in
working in the Fall Orientation
program can sign up for an inter interview
view interview between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
from now until next Thursday, in
the South Foyer of the Florida
Union.
ART EXHIBIT
Only four days are left to see
exhibits by Gabriel Kohn, located
in Bryan Lounge, Florida Union
and Jake Lee, located in the North
Wing Gallery of the Florida Union.
The exhibits close Feb. 28.
DEADLINE
The deadline to sign up for the
tour of the John F. Kennedy Space
Center on March 6 is tomorrow
in Room 315 Florida Union. The
cost is SB. It is necessary to be
a U. S. citizen to go on that tour.
Additional information may be had
in Room 315, Florida Union.
EQUAL RIGHTS
The public is invited to hear
Miss Nancy Sinkin, field repre representative
sentative representative for VISTA (Volunteers
in Service to America) speak about
the need for volunteers in this
program, part of the war on
poverty. She will speak Tuesday
8 p.m. in the Florida Union
Auditorium at a meeting sponsored
by the Student Group for Equal
Rights.

See Hew in
The Browse Shop
PERCEPTION Julian Hochberg
DISCRIMINATION .Wallace Mendelson
THE ENTERPRISING AMERICANS...John Chamberlain
POETRY HANDBOOK Babette Deutsch
LEVIATHAN Thomas Hobbes
IRISH FAIRY TALES James Stephens
CARS AT SPEED Robert Daley
TECHNICAL AND REFERENCE
INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS HANDBOOK...CockreII
MODERN DIGITAL CIRCUITS Weber
BASIC ELECTRONICS Marcu!
Coupes Shop A Bookstore

r
wampus news briefs

PANHELLENIC SING
Panhellenic Council presents
Panhellenic Sing Friday 8 p.m. in
the University Auditorium. Each
sorority will present a short song
program.
PHOTOGRAPHERS
The deadline for entry in the
Third Annual All-Campus Student
Photography Show is this Friday
at 5 p.m. Information about the
contest is available in Room 315
Florida Union.
TOURNAMENT
Anyone associated with the UF,
including families of students,
clerks, handimen, and professors,
are invited to participate in a
handicapped archery tournament
this Saturday on the Broward
archery range 10 a.m. l2 noon.
IFC SPEAKERS
All fraternity men interested in
working with the projected IFC
Speakers Bureau, contact Tim
Johnson, 2-9303 or 2-9473, or
come to the organizational meeting
at the Sigma Phi Epsilon house
Monday, 7:30 p.m.
SCHOLARSHIP
Any UF undergraduate women
with a 2.5 average may now apply
for the Panhellenic Scholarship.
Applications may be picked up in
the Dean of Womens office until
March 19.
FBK APPLICATIONS
Applications for Florida Blue
Key, leadership fraternity, maybe
picked up at the Florida Union
Information Desk. All completed
applications must be turned in no
later than 5 p.m., March 3.

ANNUAL MEETING
The annual meeting of the
Florida Anthropological Society
will be Saturday beginning at 9
a.m. The annual banquet will be
at 7 p.m. that evening. Reserva Reservations
tions Reservations should be made before 9
a.m. Saturday at the desk in the
lobby of McCarty Auditorium.
SPRING FROLICS
Tickets for IFC Spring Frolics
are on sale at the Information
Booth from 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
The cost is $2. per person.
YOUNG REPUBLICANS
A brief 15 minute meeting of
the Young Republicans Club will
be held tonight 7:15 p.m. in Florida
Union Room 121.
HAYRIDE--BONFIRE
Hume Hall Council is sponsoring
a hayride-bonfire-dance at Cowboy
Riding Stables tomorrow 7:30 p.m.
Transportation will be provided
from Hume. Deadline for reser reservations
vations reservations is noon today. They maybe
made at Hume Hall office or contact
Elmer Posick, Hume social
chairman.

fY. LADIES SPORTSWEAR
yZjf, MEZZANINE FLOOR
TANTALIZING TINTS
by Country Set, for the
Main Events of your life.
Bluej6nd Tan Solids have
matching silky check blouse.
Skirt $10.98
a Top.. $13.98
ditmnmX-
225 W. University Ave.
Specialists in University Clothing

Thursday y Feb. 25, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

SIGMA ALPHA ETA
Sigma Alpha Eta has scheduled
a business meeting tonight 7:30
p.m. third floor Tigert Hall.
FELLOWSHIP
The Florida Christian
Fellowship will meet tomorrow
7 p.m. Florida Union Room 212.
The subject of the meeting is
Christian growth.
LIBERAL FORUM
The Concept of Freedom for
Education will be discussed by
Dr. Roy Ivan Johnson of the
Liberal Forum Sunday 7:30 p.m.
in Johnson Lounge of the Florida
Union.
GATOR GRAS
Entries for the Gator Gras
Variety Show tryouts will be
accepted from Is p.m. in Room
315 of the Florida Union until
Friday.
NEWMAN CLUB
A Mardi Gras dance will be held
at the Catholic Student Center
Saturday 8 p.m.midnight. Music
will be by the Four Scores.

I YAMAHA BMW 1
Motorcycles
For The Discriminating I
CYCLERAMA
378-2811 21 SE 2nd Place I
OUR
SAM PMLti-£S
Ate FIT
Fo* R AT/a/O AT/a/O---o
--o AT/a/O---o o o o
J^L
Carmanella's
c#> Wat (?
7 clays a week, 11 to 9
706 W. University Ave.

Page 7



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Feb. 25, 1965

Page 8

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

Q Services
APPLICATIONS, portraits, thesis
photos at roost reasonable prices.
Call for appt. 378-1170 SNEER SNEERINGER
INGER SNEERINGER PHOTOGRAPHY, 1013 1/2
W. University Ave. (M-102-3t-c).
STUDY IN GUADALAJARA, MEX MEXICO.
ICO. MEXICO. The Guadalajara Summer
School, a fully accredited
University of Arizona program,
conducted in cooperation with pro professors
fessors professors from Stanford University,
University of California, and
Guadalajara, will offer June 28
to Aug. 7, art, folklore, geography,
history, language and literature
courses. Tuition, board and room
is $265. Write Prof. Juan B. Rael,
P. O. Box 7227, Stanford, Calif,
(M-102-lt-c).
REALTY COURSE. Bert Rodgers
School of Real Estate Law, Evening
class now forming attend first
lecture free. For information
phone George Kirkpatrick. 372-
3472. (M-101-st-c).
INFANT CARE in private home.
References furnished. 378-2583.
237 SW 2nd Place. (M-98-ts-c).
Personal
MURPHOtto will not give ruby ruby-I*ll
-I*ll ruby-I*ll meet him at Gator Gras and
give him payoff.*' Jack. (J (J---102-lt-c).
--102-lt-c). (J---102-lt-c).
& |
r Lasagna Raviola
3 Veal Parmigana
Home Made
Jy Italian Sausage
In Every Town' Or City, You
Will Find One Good Italian
Restaurant j
THIS IS IT! I
Dial 372-4690
2120 Hawthorne Rd.
Near Drive-In Theatre
TONITE! 3 GREAT HITS!
first area run
At 7:00
Hudson \Day/ RaNDaib
W Ssnd Menlo
Jt Powte
TecJUioeCor*
At 8:55
SANDRA DEE y^jtv r
dbbert GOULET Brfy-flfflj
MnWIIUMS miH
At 10:40
| To kill I
I Mockingbird I
I GREGORY PtCK 1
Starts Friday
FRANK SINATRA
"NONE BUT THE BRAVE"

| For Rent |
PLEASANT 2 ROOM Efficiency
apartment. Private entrance,
central heat, air-condition, all
utilities included. SIOO. At 909
NW 6th Street. Call 372-0300.
(B-102-2t-c).

2-BEDROOM, UNFURNISHED
Apartment, no refrigerator.
Central heat and air-condition.
$lO5. Occupy within a week no rent
till April Ist. with lease. Call 372-
7365. (B-101-2t-c).
OCEAN BEACH HOUSE.East End
Grand Bahama. May to Sept. $l5O
per month. W. Cartier, Box 101,
Freeport, Grand Bahama. (B-100-
st-c).
4-BEDROOM, 2-bath available
March 1. 1100 Block SW sth Ave.
Ideal for 4 to 6 students. Central
heat and AC. For appointment call
376-2892. (B-100-st-c).
FOR RENT 3 BEDROOM 2-bath,
kitchen equipped, central-air, $l3O
per month. UF Ext. 2805 or 372-
7535 after 5:30. (B-99-st-c).
$27 DOUBLE $37 for SINGLE
Room, maid service, telephone and
kitchen privileges. 304 NW 15th
Street. (3 blocks from main
Library.) For information call
2-2726. (B-99-st-C>.
ROOMS FOR RENT, Central heat,
maid service, everything
furnished. 378-2583. 237 SW 2nd
Place. (B-98-ts-c).
LARGE ROOMS IN FRIENDLY
Surroundings available to male
students. Reasonable rates;
utilities and maid service included.
Convenient to campus and town.
See at 104 SW Bth Street or call
372-0243. (B-82-tf-nc).
Help Wanted
SECRETARY. Mornings only.
Plant Pathology. FR 6-3261, Ext.
2178. (E-101-3t-c).
BOYS 12 to 16 years old for
established paper routes on and
adjacent to University grounds.
Contact the Gainesville Sun, 378-
1411. (E-98-st-c).
SPORTSMENS
CYCLE CENTER
617 N. Main St.
SUZUKI
Sales & Service

GET WITH THE
ll fmfM ANN-Ma6Rer* frat&
m3ifmms fcffi-iiffiN
ffl 1 PUMUItO
mil ftaae __

I Autos I
VOLVO 1959, radio, heater, red
with black interior, 4 speed box,
good tires, flawless engine. S7OO.
Will trade for cycle. 372-7170.
(G-101-3t-c).
1961 METROPOLITAN. Good
condition. Call FR 8-1488 after
6 p.m. (G-99-4t-c).
1960 PORSCHE 1600 N COUPE and
1964 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE. Both
perfect. Make an offer. Must sell
one. Phone 372-4579 or 376-8160.
(G-99-st-c).
1960 VOLKSWAGEN CONVER CONVERTIBLE,
TIBLE, CONVERTIBLE, White, good condition.
SBSO. Call 6-8113 after 5. (G (G---101-3t-c).
--101-3t-c). (G---101-3t-c).
*6l RAMBLER AMERICAN,
custom convertible, red, auto automatic
matic automatic transmission, radio, heater,
power steering, good tires, good
condition. SBOO or best offer. Call
FR 6-1893. (G-101-3t-c).
1962 BUICK SPECIAL
CONVERTIBLE. Radio, heater,
white walls, standard shift, low
mileage. $1495. 372-0601 after 5.
(G-101-st-c).
1956 dHEVROLET 2-door, 6 cyl.
new tires, must sell now. $l6O.
Call 6-0135 after 5 p.m. (G-102-
3t-c).
- 'y 1 -
*56 BUICK, low mileage, top
condition, best offer. Apply HJS.
Green 309 Walker or 1101 SW
sth Ave. 2-1452. (G-102-2t-c).
1957 PLYMOUTH STATION
WAGON. Good transportation.
$165. Phone 376-7750. (G-101-
3t-c).
MUST SELL IMMEDIATELY 1963
FORD Galaxy 500, V-8, 4-door,
SS, RH & factory air-condition.
SIOO plus approximate SI4OO
payoff. Call Mrs. King, Ext. 2888.
(G-101-st-c).
1960 FORD GALAXY 2-door, V-8,
See at 215 NW 10th Ave. Phone
6-4582 from 8 till 6 p.m. (G (G---97-6t-c).
--97-6t-c). (G---97-6t-c).
Real Estate
5, 10, and 20 ACRE LOTS west
of city, with large oak and pine
trees. 5 acre tracts on paved
road. Only S3OO down. Call today
for best choice. W. D. Mason,
c/o Ernest Tew Realty, 6-6461.
(I-100-10t-c).

1 Lost & Pound
LOST: MAN'S BLACK WALLET
between Grove, the Hub and the
Military Bldg. Desperately need
identification. You can keep the
money. Contact Bill 2-2114. (L (L---102-3t-c).
--102-3t-c). (L---102-3t-c).
LOST: ONE PAIR GLASSES in
grey case, Tues. 2/16/65, between
Rawlings and Police Station.
Please contact Tom Shad, SAE
House, 6-9140. (L-102-2t-p).
LOST: WOMEN'S BLACK
Cardigan sweater, between
Women's Gyro and University Pool.
Reward. Call Mrs. Mullee 372-
7516. (L-102-3t-c).
BLACK WALLET LOST containing
sls-$lB. Notify Ed Fernandez at
372-9315 or 876 South Hall.
Reward. (L-102-st-c).
LOST: MEN'S WRIST WATCH on
fifth floor of Engineering Building
last Saturday. Call Jim, 2-0578.
Reward. (L-101-2t-c).
LOST: RED ML-381 NOTEBOOK.
Very important. If found please
contact John Oliva. Phone 372-
7073. $5 Reward. (L-101-3t-c).
~ 1
Wanted
FACULTY MEMBER WANTS TO
BUY or rent second hand 1/2 or
3/4 size string bass. Call 372-
7744. (C-102-3t-c).
For Sale
BELL 20 WATT hi-fi amplifier.
$36. C. A. CoHier. Ext. 2121,
Rm. 128 E. A I. Bldg. (A-102-
3t-c).
5 TYPING CHAIRS SIO.OO each.
6 Dining chairs SIO.OO each. 3
Formica top tables $50.00 each.
Phone 376-3507. (A-101-st-c).
HAVE YOU TRIED the new
VARSITY Restaurant? 209 NW 13th
Street. Chick Fried Steak.
Complete Dinners 97?. (A-101-
st-c).
FOR SALE: 1964 LA MB RETT A
125 cc scooter, excellent con condition.
dition. condition. Must selL $250. Phone
FR 2-9303. (A-101-3t-c).
30'' GAS RANGE, excellent con condition
dition condition $65. 30'' Electric range,
very good, $45. Sofa Bed and chair,
$45. 3/4 bed $25. Call 372-3734
after 5 p.m. (A-100-4t-c).

wAmmt |l
UtW MARWe ftmfcttowtk* 'faow TmmW
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\



P.K. Yonge applicants have long wait ahead

I Parents who want to enroll their
Ihildren in the P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School almost have to apply for admis admission
sion admission before the child is a year old, ac according
cording according to Principal Charles A. Henderson.
I Henderson said the school has six waiting
lists grouped as follows: 1) children of
Gainesville residents, 2) children of stu-
Idents and teachers of the UF at large,
land 3) children of students and teachers
kn the College of Education. Each of these
groups is divided by sex with an equal
number of boys and girls in each group.
Os the 895 students currently enrolled
in grades kindergarten through 12, 60 per
cent are from the City of Gainesville,
30 per cent are children of students and
teachers of the UF at large, and 10 per
cent are children of students and teachers
in the College of Education.
Each elementary grade has a limited en enrollment

f Mechanical Phd [ coming to engineers

Recent authorization for the UF
to offer the Doctor of Philosophy
degree in mechanical engineering
marked culmination of a 10-year
effort by the College of Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering faculty to provide the program.
The State Board of Regents ap approved
proved approved a proposal from the Depart Department
ment Department of Mechanical Engineering
during its recent meeting here.

Texas court dismisses
suit to stop Rice U.
from admitting Negroes
HOUSTON, Tex. (CPS) A Texas court has dismissed a suit seeking
to prevent Rice University from admitting Negroes and charging
tuition.

The decision upheld the right
the provisions of its charter and
Gras so begin
with banquet
Gator Gras will kick off this
year with the Student Leaders
Banquet on March 25th. Awards
will be given to outstanding stu student
dent student leaders. These awards are
not given to people for having a
well known name, but for outstand outstanding
ing outstanding service in their respective
organizations.
The next event in this years
Gras will be the Carnival on Sat Saturday
urday Saturday the 27th. Booths will be set
up by Fraternities and Sororities
and any other groups interested.
These booths will be broken (town
into three categoriesFraternity,
Sororities and general organiza organizations.
tions. organizations. There will be an award given
hi each category for originality and
a general award for the booth with
the biggest income. The carnival
wHI be held in front of the
University Auditorium and the
committee is attempting to get
the street blocked off and have
a dance also. Not only this, but
OTTo will be there.
THE FINAL event will be the
talent show, also held the 27th.
There will be two showings one
at 7:30 and one at 9:15. The three
queen finalists will be presented
at each showing.
The winner of the queen contest
will be announced after the last
showing of the* talent show
and crowded out on the porch of
the auditorium. There will also
be three prizes tor the talent
show winners and door prizes.
Tickets tor the talent show may
be bought a week in advance of
the show at the Hub information
booth.

rollment enrollment of 60 students, and each secondary
level grade is limited to 90 students, the
principal said.
We make exception to this rule in the
case of foreign students, said Henderson.
All foreign students in this area, most
of whom are children of visiting professors,
are enrolled in the laboratory school,
he said.
Each spring, parents listed on the waiting
lists are invited to enroll their students
in the school, Henderson said.
These invitations are not always accepted,
he Added, because many students have
enrolled in other schools or have moved
from the area.
There are no special qualifications
for enrollment in P. K. Yonge, the prin principal
cipal principal said, except in cases of extreme
mental retardation or extreme psychologi psychological
cal psychological problems.

The initial authorization covers
the presentation of programs in the
thermodynamic sciences area. Ef Efforts
forts Efforts to extend this to include me mechanical
chanical mechanical analysis are now in pro progress.
gress. progress.
Faculty augmentation and initia initiation
tion initiation of adequate research necessary
support this extension is scheduled
for completion during the 1965-66
academic year.

of the private institution to ignore
the terms of the will of its founder.
The university, which has about
1,500 students, has beennominally
integrated since last September.
At that time, Raymond Johnson,
a Negro from Alice, Texas, en enrolled
rolled enrolled as a graduate student in
mathematics.
Unless repeated appeals delay
implementation of the court
decision, next fall Rice will begin
charging a tuition of $1,200 a
year.
Integration in Texas got another
boost when the Panhellenlc Council
at the University of Texas in
Austin decided recently to offer
two Negro sororities associate
membership in the council. The
decision is not a decision of Pan Panhellenic
hellenic Panhellenic per se, but of every active
in every chapter, said Betty Egel Egelhoff,
hoff, Egelhoff, Panhellenlc president.
Alpha Kappa Alpha and Delta
Sigma l Theta, the two groups, post postponed
poned postponed reaction until their soror sororities
ities sororities could meet to discuss the
offer.
Associate membership differs
from regular membership only in
the provisions concerning rush.
KLEAN-A-MATIC
LAUNDRY AND
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QUALITY IS
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exclusive sanitone
PROCESS
1722 W. Univ. Av*.

Trn of the 17 faculty members
in mechanical engineering are mem members
bers members of the University's Graduate
School staff. Eight of those 10 hold
doctorate degrees from five differ different
ent different universitiesPurdue, Illinois,
Michigan, Georgia Tech and Ohio
State.
The department proposes to offer
doctoral programs in the fields of

27c mouse
prompts action

Doctors: the.pencilled letter
from a child to the UF Hospital
said. I would like to be like
you some day. I was sending my
27 cents a month to you, but
something came up and I stopped
in April. I will start again be because
cause because I want to fight cancer. En Enclosed
closed Enclosed is 54 cents. Sincerely, Mar Marcia
cia Marcia LeVan( 4891 Lake Susannah,
Orlando).
The very busy hospital director
(L. R. Jordan) read the note in
the midst of crisp, professional
correspondence. The urgency of
his schedule waned in the light of
questions the letter prompted:
Why 27 cents? (Because, Jordan
learned from Marcia by telephone

At
Humpty
Large Del Monico,
THURSDAY Baked Pofra^ s /
Tossed Salad/
STEAK NIGHT 5-9 P.M. Hot Buttered Rolls
J 1.07
HUMPTY DUMPTY
Drive-In & Restaurant
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEALS
372-5387 310 NW 13th St.

These factors are not based on IQ,
he said.
In addition to providing education for
elementary and high school students, Hend Henderson
erson Henderson said the school provides teacher teachereducation
education teachereducation through observation and con conferences,
ferences, conferences, supervised participation in
classes, and a limited 10-week Intern pro program.
gram. program.
Henderson said the school is also a re research
search research center for the College of Education
and Medicine, the latter in the fields of
psychology and psychiatry.
P. K. Yonge is also a pilot school
for the state at large, said Henderson.
Teachers from other schools in the state
come periodically to study new teaching
methods used here.
P. K. Yonge High School students are
allowed to use the University facilities,
Henderson said. Some of the students enroll

Thursday, Feb. 25, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

heat transfer, high energy fluid dy dynamics,
namics, dynamics, solar energy conversion,
thermodynamics.
The instructional portion for each
student will be infused liberally
with courses from the basic sci sciences
ences sciences of physics, chemistry and
mathematics, as will as graduate
course currently offered in other
engineering departments with PhJ>.
programs.

Cancer Society says 27 cents will
buy a mouse for research.)
What came up that stopped the
payments? (Marcia got busy
with illness in the home).
How old is she? (Age 10, and
above all, she wants to be a sci scientist).
entist). scientist).
Jordan responded to the child's
dedication with first priority
action: he forwarded the fund-a
quarter, a nickel, two dimes and
four pennies- to the University's
College of Medicine for its cancer
research program.
And on crisp, professional sta stationery
tionery stationery he wrote Marcia a thank
youtor her great contribution to
medical science.

in courses at the UF.
We have had very good results with
these students, he said. Four of our
students who enrolled in MS 205 last tri trimester
mester trimester made A's.
Henderson said there are no special
language classes for foreign students who
cannot speak English.
They are placed in regular clas. S and
have adjusted surprisingly well, he said.
P. K. Yonge Laboratory School is not
part of the state public school system,,
the principal said.
A division of the UF College of Educa Education,
tion, Education, the school opened in the summer of
1932 and started its first full year of oper operation
ation operation in 1932.
At that time, it was located in what is
now Norman Hall.
The school moved to its present 40-acre
>location southeast of the UF campus in
1958.

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Page 9



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Feb. 25, 1965

Page 10

New C-3 program now in effect

A new type of lecture series
has been initiated as a part of
C-3 this trimester. The traditional
academic lecture has been
combined with cultural events said
James H, Hodges, C-3 chairman.
Three dates are left open in
the course of the trimester to
allow students to attend certain
programs scheduled on campus
and in the community.
Each student has been provided
with a list of eight events from
which he must select three to com complete
plete complete his obligation to the lecture
series. In addition to these three
selections, the student is required
to attend at least one of the Flor Florida
ida Florida Players 1 productions.
INCLUDED ON the accepted list
are movie, radio, TV, Gainesville
Little Theatre, Fine Arts Commi Committee,
ttee, Committee, Humanities Club, and Lyceum
Council productions.
Hodges said he was pleased with
student acceptance of the new plan.
A C-3 sponsored panel discus discussion

Resources center on way for teachers

Funds have been allocated for a teaching resources center to be
located in the Main Library according to Richard F. Benedict,
chairman of the Teaching Resources Center Committee.
We need only to hire a director before getting the proposed
center out of the talking stages, said Benedict.
The center will be composed of three sections: music, graphics
and equipment.
At the graphics section the faculty will be able to have audio audiovisual
visual audiovisual materials made for them, such as slides that are not available
otherwise, models, charts, graphs and pictures.
Presently, the UF does not have a centralized facility capable
of satisfying the needs of the teaching faculty for materials which
can be used for learning reinforcement, said Benedict.
Benedict added that the equipment section will eventually include
such teaching innovations as the programmed learning machine,

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (CPS)
An experimental undergraduate
college emphasizing independent
study, constant exposure to books,
and frequent dialogues between
students and faculty is being con considered
sidered considered at Florida State Uni University.
versity. University.
Designed for a maximum of 600
students, the college features a
break from the traditions of 55-
minute classes, credit hour
requirements, or grade point
averages carried three digits be beyond
yond beyond the decimal point.* Its goal
is to deal with knowledge as a
continuous, interrelated process
throughout the students career.
The college would consist
of small dormitories surrounding
a library-classroom-lecture hall hallrecreation
recreation hallrecreation area.
Every day will be viewed as a
total learning experience for each
student who will be in daily close
association with several stimulat stimulating
ing stimulating faculty members and will get to

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TRANSMISSION, INC
ESTIMATES GUARANTEED
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* Free pickup and 'elivery
107. DISCOUNT
To oil UF students showing IP's
1409 $. Main St. Ph. 372-5196

FSU sets up experimental college

sion discussion of Fellinis 8 1/2 followed
the movie showing at the State.
Over 750 students came to the
discussion, leaving standing-room
only in Walker Auditorium, he said.
PROGRAMS on the lecture

Nominations are now being
received for Phi Beta Kappas.
Creating Achievement Award.
Harry Kantor, professor of
political science, explained this
award is given by the UFs chapter
of Phi Beta Kappa to the under undergraduate
graduate undergraduate student who has done the
most outstanding creative work in
any branch of the social sciences,
physical sciences, humanities or
mathematics.
Members of the Phi Beta Kappa
honorary fraternity are chosen on

know them intimately, said Pro Professor
fessor Professor R.R. Oglesby, who heads
the small committee which has
been planning the college.
The college will conduct a
program of instruction and dis discussion
cussion discussion which will evolve from a
consideration of orgins of the uni universe
verse universe and the history of mankind
to a focus upon contemporary is issues
sues issues and the problems of the
future, Oglesby continued.
Since the students will be ex expected
pected expected to write and speak exten extensively,
sively, extensively, faculty members will be
engaged in a continuing discourse
with each student.
The initial college is expected
to be devoted to the humanities.
As agreed upon by the faculty
senate, the curriculum would cover
the traditional areas of the human humanities
ities humanities and physical, life, and social
sciences. It would be designed
primarily to meet the needs of
students interested in law,
education, the humanities, or

University College Dean Byron
S. Hollins he ad the new
effort to tie extra cultural activi activities
ties activities into the campus life. It makes
the work of Lyceum Council more
meaningful, he added.

PBK to give award

the basis of high scholastic
achievement, Kantor said.
Kantor, speaking for the UF
chapter said, for this specific
award, a high scholastic average is
waived.
Students eligible for the
Creating Achievement Award are
nominated by the heads of the
different departments at the
university. Then the winner is
chosen by Phi Beta Kappa, UF
chapter, Kantor said.
This is one way, Kantor
explained, in which Phi Beta

which teaches the student through a method of programmed testing.
The plans also provide for a music section in the proposed resources
center. According to Benedict this would involve expanding present
listening facilities.
Benedict said the Teaching Resources Center Committee is
composed of Dr. C. S. Carnell (C-3), Dr. C. A. Collier (Engineering),
Dr. Manning Dauer (Political Science), Dr. Arthur Funk (C-5),
Eugene E. Grissom (Art), Reid Poole (Music), Dr. G. R. Sims
(Business Administration), Dr. Roy E. Tew (Speech) and Jack S.
Funk ho user (C-5).
The committee is now drafting qualifications for a director for
the center.
The center will be a separate entity organizationally. It will be
housed in the library, and the new director will be under the adminis administration
tration administration of the director of the library, Stanley West, said Benedict.

social sciences. It would not be
expected to qualify students for
addition, however, the college
would select the students on a qual qualitative
itative qualitative basis, with special regard
to those who were inquisitive, read
serious books, were articulate,
were inwardly motivated, had ta talents
lents talents or skills in special fields,

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series list included: The Car Carradines-Interludes
radines-Interludes Carradines-Interludes from History
and Fiction" in the Fine Arts
Series, and the Lyceum presenta presentation
tion presentation of Shakespeares Twelfth
Night."

Kappa is trying to help recognize
creativity."
Last years award went to Peter
Dewitt, for outstanding creative
work in music.
The members of the UF chapter
of Phi Beta Kappa who will choose
the winner of this years Creating
Achievement Award are: Turpin
C. Bannister, Dean of the College
of Architecture and Fine Arts;
William M. Jones, Associate
professor of chemistry; Alton C.
Morris, professor of English and
Kantor.

or had demonstrated leadership,
graduate study in science or en engineering.
gineering. engineering.
A cross-section of the student
body would be selected to parti participate
cipate participate in the new college program
and they would be chosen on the
basis of the same objective tests
administered to other students. In

Correction
George E. Marcell us 7ED,
was incorrectly identified in an
Alligator story of bringing
charges of political inter interference
ference interference in the operation of the
Three Press and the Alligator.
George F. Marchelos, 6 AS,
brought the charges.
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Eonfinental hosts
lhampion drivers

DAYTONA BEACH.. .Two more
*) American sports car drivers
Kre added to the long list of
tionally and internationally
Kown ohaffeurs who will compete
the 2000-kilometer Daytona
Intinental field next Sunday when
alt Hansgen and Bob Grossman
Ire chosen to handle factory
lerrari prototypes.
I Both Hansgen and Grossman are
irmer SCCA champions, and both
live raced with success in the
m Hours of Le Mans. They join
lorld champion John Surtees of
England, and Pedro Rodriguez of
Bexico on the formidable Ferrari
learn.
i x t
I The Continental, which covers
243 miles on Daytona Inter-
Jational Speedways 3.81-mile
tack-road course, starts at 10
Lm. It is worth $33,750 in posted
l wards, and carries high points
oward the manufacturers world

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ti\g. £tr,pnm- Zenith FM QC
Model J 727 From
Smartly-styled FM/AM clock radio
has large 6* x4* speaker for full, I nr
rich tone. AFC on FM, line cord C Nf H S 608 N. Main St.
FM. antenna and precision ver-
nier tuning assure clearest possi- ... _
bie reception. Gainesvilles Pioneer FMDealer

ftVOtKSWAOCN OP AMERICA, IWC.~
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IJ^^Wl
;*'" V* ISS9HOBI f
We started with a simple plan.
It all began with the notion that a couldn't just let them sit there in a
wagon should hold a lot, and no notion dark box.
about how it should look. So we cut 21 windows o let he
So when we sat down to design the light in, a b.g hole in back to put the
VW Station Wagon we started by luggdge in, and 4 doors to let the
drawing a big box with 170 cubic feet people out.
of space To make the th,ng 90 P ut the
(Roughly two times the room of an air-cooled Volkswagen engine in back
ordinary station wagon.) And what we ended up with is what
This gave us room to seat 9 people you see in the Picture,
comfortably and 13 pieces of luggage. A sensible wagon that hold, a lot
(13 bags more than you could ever parks easily, and doesn t drink much
9** h nn tK2
Once we got the ;: ople in we What could be simpler than that?
Miller*Brown Motors @
authorized
DEALER

championship.
The entry list for the Continental
bristles with high performance
cars, and ace drivers, of both
Europe and America.
Dan Gurney, winner of the first
Continental, will be on the line in
a Lotus 19 J. Roger McCluskey
and Lloyd Ruby, veteran Indy 500
drivers, wiU drive a Maserati and
a Cobra, respectively. Ritchie
Ginther, former Grand Prix driver
for Ferrari and BRM, will co codrive
drive codrive a Cobra, as will Ken Miles,
Bob Bondurant, and Joe Schlesser
of France.
Herbert Linge and Ben Pon will
drive one of the Porsche factory
entries, and Peter Clark of England
will drive a Ferrari.
Other makes that will be on the
starting grid are Lancia, Jaguar,
Alfa Romeo, Alpine of France,
Austin Healey, Sunbeam, Corvette,
Plymouth Belvedere, Mustang, and
Lotus Ford Cortina.

Tennis season begins Monday
* V ". .r/ A. v
TOP GATOR RETURNS VOLLEY
...Senior Captain Dave Bonner(abovel leads
the 1965 edition of the UF tennis team.
The club will open its season Monday against
Stetson.' During the season the Gators take
on such stalwarts as Miami and Indiana;

INTRAMURAL
RESULTS
Golf
Sigma Nu 121
Delta Tau Delta 134

Thursdoy, Feb. 25, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Black Muslims nixed
by Cassius mother

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (UPI) The
mother of heavyweight boxing
champion Cassius Clay Tuesday
appealed to him to leave the black
Muslim movement.
Mrs. Cassius Clay Sr. said she
had been worried sick about
Cassius safety ever since the
assassination of Malcolm X in
New York Sunday afternoon.
Cassius should not be in the
Black Muslims, Mrs. Clay said.
Its just not the type of thing for
a boy like him to belong to. He
was never the type to advocate

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violence.
Mrs. Clay said she would
telephone Cassius soon and try
to convince him he should reject
the Black Muslims.
But I seriously doubt that he
will, she said. He has never
given any indication in the past
that he would leave.
Malcolm X was a former Black
Muslim leader and heir apparent
to Elijah Muhammad until he was
expelled from the Muslims
following remarks he made about
the assassination of President
Kennedy.

Page 11



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Feb. 25, 1965

UFs recruiting is complex procedure

High school football players
must make the grade if they
expect to participate in this sport
at UF.
Making the grade with the uni university
versity university registrar is not enough;
each student-athlete must also
pass a stringent evaluation by the
coaching staff.
According to coach Charles H.
(Rabbit) Smith, head football
recruiter, every athlete recruited
by Florida falls into one of four
categories. The highest rated and
most sought after boy is the blue
chipper.
Very few boys fall under this
classification, said Smith. They
are the complete, well rounded
football players, who should have
no trouble making the grade in
college. We are lucky to see two
or three like this a year, he con continued.
tinued. continued.
Larry Smith, Tampa Robinson
halfback who recently signed with
Florida, was cited as an example
of a blue chipper.
The next category is a number
one. These are, according to Coach
Smith, potentially great athletes.
Any question of a boys ability in
this class is minor, Smith said.
Boys of this caliber form the
bulk of each years freshmen
team, he continued.
A number two is, in general, a
good athlete but is lacking in
'some quality such as size, speed,
or grades. We keep our eyes on
boys like this to see if they over overcome
come overcome their deficiencies or if their
combined good points out-weigh
their bad ones, stated Smith.
Some number two athletes are
signed despite a weak point on the
assumption that, with age and
experience, they may develop into
outstanding ball players.
No grant-in-aids are offered to
number three prospects, the last
classification level. Records are
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kept on these boys but this is
usually the only consideration
given them.
We usually start our recruiting
season with approximately 200
names on file but through elimin elimination,
ation, elimination, both by the university and
us, the number is cut to roughly
100, said Smith. Os this number,
only 35 or so are signed each
year.
The standard procedure for
recruiting is to send a form letter
to all coaches within the recruiting
area asking them to foreward the
names of the best players in their
vicinity.
A letter is then sent to the boy

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expressing the universitys
interest in him. He is asked to send
his high school transcript to the
Orange finals
on tap tonight
Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Pi
Kappa Alpha fraternities square
off tonight at 9 p.m. in the gym
for the basketball championship
of the Orange League.
To gain the finals, the SAEs
dumped Pi Lambda Phi Monday
night by a 39-26 count. The Pikes
gained their finals berth by edging
Sigma Nu in a thriller, 32-31,
in double overtime.

registrar. The registrar, in turn,
evaluates the students grades and
recommendation is sent to the
athletic department saying that the
boy is a good academic risk,
doubtful, or undesirable.
Once the coaches decide on the
most desirable prospects they visit
the boy and try to sell him on
Florida. But the boy is never
directly contacted.
Our policy, states Smith, is
to go to the boys high school
principal and ask to see the coach.
The coach will usually send for the
boy. By doing this we try to avoid
any misunderstandings with school
personnel.

A desired prospect is invited
to visit the university to Observe
the football program. We can invite
a boy for one official visit, which
is limited to 24 hours, and we r.an
spend $5 a day on him, said
Smith.
However, a prospect can .then
visit the school on his own or with
alumni but not at the expense of the
athletic department.