Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Building not worth
'gambling peoples lives

"It's not worth gambling peoples lives when this
building has so much distress, stated Zone Architect
D. Neil Webb yesterday concerning the recent move-
ment of classes from condemned Benton Hall.
THE HEAVY tile root is pushing the north and
south walls outward, asserted Webb. The south wall
was repaired within the last two years but the north
wall is getting worse, Webb said. The building is
unsafe.
Webb said the building has been under surveilance
for several years. The building never had any

Richer to take dismissal to U.S. Commission

By CYNTHIA TUNS TALL
Staff Writer
Edward J. Richer, UF Human Humanities
ities Humanities instructor, stated he will
attempt to bring in the United
States Civil Rights Commission in
an effort to force the University
administration to show cause for
his dismissal from the faculty.
RICHER CLAIMS he is being dis dismissed
missed dismissed on unethical and political
grounds for his activities in civil
rights organizations.
Wk P "A g
Hir
JJ!
8k
COME UP AND SEE
ME SOMETIME
Perry,
IUC, seems to be say saying.
ing. saying. He was modeling
at the Sigma Chi Derby
last Saturday.

FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Vol. 57, No. 100,

If substantiated this would con constitute
stitute constitute a violation of rights as
set forth in the Bill of Rights of
the United States Constitution, he
said.
RICHER HAS been active in the
Student Group for Equal Rights,
Student Peace Union, and served
as faculty advisor to Freedom
Party.
While faculty advisor to the Stu Student
dent Student Group for Equal Rights,
Richer and three other UF faculty
members, Austin Creel, MarshaU
F. Jones, and David Sheehan, were
arrested on charges of breach of
the peace during integration
picketing activities in Ocala, in
Dec. 1963.
Charges were dropped when the
Civil Rights Bill became law.
Richer claims that a member
of the Board of Regents, Dr. Wayne
McCall, who lives in Ocala, de demanded
manded demanded that action be taken when t
the four University faculty mem members
bers members were arrested.
SOMEWHERE ALONG the line
I think Dr. McCall's attitude has
influenced the decision to dismiss
me, Richer said.
McCall was former Vice Pres,
of Project Alert, which according
to MarshaU Jones, also arrested
in Ocala, is a right wing group
which originated in Pensacola and

Controversial sheet blasted

By FRAN SNIDER
Staff Writer
Everything from flouride tooth toothpaste
paste toothpaste to Negro rapists was hit by
the Christian Youth Corps litera literature
ture literature spread around the UF campus
last week.
THE MATERIAL talks of a
Jew Communist Conspiracy*
and strikes at the Jews in a man manner
ner manner somewhat reminiscent of Nazi
Germany.
The editor of the National Chris Christian
tian Christian News, which calls itself The
nations fastest growing anti-com anti-communist
munist anti-communist paper/' is a retired army
colonel and self ordained reverend,
Oren Fenton Potito of St. Peters Petersburg.
burg. Petersburg.
The material has been published
for several yearsinSt.Peters yearsinSt.Petersburg.
burg. yearsinSt.Petersburg. John Conness, 3AS, said the
material was often stuck on cars
outside the junior college he at attended
tended attended in St. Petersburg.
LARRY GORDON, 2UC, said that
he first came into contact with the
material three years ago in Braden Bradenton
ton Bradenton where he went to high school.

Tuesday, Feb. 23, 1965

horizontal ties. These ties are necessary, he
explained, to hold the walls together.
WEBB IS the central Florida architect supervising
the architecture of major buildings on UF campus.
Policy for the zone architect is set by State Board of
Regents.
Due to the tremendous cost that would be involved
Webb recommended that the building not be repaired,
Because of the central location the space would well
g ee BUILDING on p. 6

is represented in other Florida
cities. Project Alert according
to Jones, recommends publications
of the John Birch Society.
Jones has published several
articles on Project Alert.
Robert B. Mautz, vice president
in charge of Academic Affairs
stated I positively contradict this
statement.
HE (McCALL) did not make
any suggestion as to any action.
McCall has maintained a hands off'
attitude in regards as a policy
maker.
Retired justice
Frankfurter dies
WASHINGTON (UPI) Retired
Justice Felix Frankfurter, the son
of an Austrian Rabbi who became
the needling conscience of the
U.S. Supreme Court, died
yesterday of an acute heart attack.
He was 82.
Frankfurter died at 5:05 p.m.
EST at George Washington Uni University
versity University Hospital. He was taken
there Sunday after the last of a
series of heart ailments that forced
his reluctant retirement from the
court Aug. 28, 1962.

His father wrote the anti-defama anti-defamation
tion anti-defamation league of B'nai Brith in Miami.
They wrote and said they knew
about the organization and were
keeping an eye on it.
They have meetings one day a
week in St. Petersburg/' Gordon
explained. The meetings are al almost
most almost always attended by outsiders
including members of B'nai Brith.
Walter A. Rosenbaum, assistant
professor of political science,
said, This kind of trash has been
around for a long time. These guys
always hang around any large cam campus.
pus. campus.
THEY'RE POOR propogan propogandlsts.
dlsts. propogandlsts. They ask you to do things
which are unacceptable. If there
I Today in history J
| . 1914, Little |
$ Wanda Weir %
v v.
g becomes eighth S
| Wanda of the world g

;.V.V.V.V.%V.V.V.%V.%V.V.V/.V.V.V.VtV.V.V.V.VtV.-...V.Vt.V.V.V.-....-0 *,V
jij i|
! Heres new SG cabinet l
* : : : : :
Student Body Pres, Bruce Culpepper announced the following
cabinet appointments yesterday. Three positions are still un- :j:<
:j: filled: Secretary of Interuniversity Affairs, Secretary of School
Traditions, a post that replaces the Morale Commission and *:
the Cabinet Secretary.
:j: Administrative Assistant: Bill Fleming, 2UC, Phi Kappa Tau £::
Secretary of Finance: Tom Backmayer, 2UC, Phi Gamma Delta
Secretary of Organizations: Andy Hall, 4AS, Alpha Epsilon Pi
v. Secretary of Legislative Affairs: George Blaha, 2UC, Inde- $
pendent
Secretary of the Interior: Mike Malaghan, 3BA, Delta Sigma Phi
£ Secretary of Labor, Doug Thompson: 4BA, Sigma Alpha Epsilon £
Secretary of Student Activities: Tom Lang, 3AS, Kappa Sigma
Secretary of Academic Affairs: Lee Borden, 2UC, Tau Epsilon
I phi £
j:j: Secretary of Public Relations: Jim Kincaid, 2UC, Theta Chi £:
Secretary of Housing : Cliff Davis, 2 UC, Independent £:
Secretary of Mens Affairs: Dave Waldrop, 3JM, Independent £:
Secretary of Womens Affairs: Janet Stoddard, 2UC, Alpha
Omicron Pi
S Secretary of Alumni Affairs: Frank Ferguson, 2UC, Pi Kappa
| Alpha &
Secretary of Traffic and Parking: Mack Rudlsill, 2UC, Sigma :j:j:
Alpha Epsilon
:v Secretary of Married Students* Affairs: Bill Ryals, ILW, :£:
Phi Kappa Tau. i£
Secretary of International Affairs: Alberto Molina, 2UC, Inde- &
pendent :£
:£ Secretary of Athletics: Paul Widby, lUC, Lambda Chi Alpha

Creel, professor of Religion,
and Jones, professor of Psy Psychiatry,
chiatry, Psychiatry, stated they have not been
subject to any disciplinary action.
Sheehan is doing graduate work at
another university.
I'm more vulnerable because
I'm directly under the authority of
Tigert Hall, Richer stated.
The Dept, of Humanities is under
the jurisdiction of University Col College,
lege, College, whose offices are located in
Tigert Hall.
A PETITION, signed byicher's
colleagues, asking for recon reconsideration
sideration reconsideration of the decision to dis dismiss
miss dismiss Richer, was sent to Pres.
Reitz, Vice Pres. Harry M. Phil Philpott,
pott, Philpott, Byron S. Holllnshead, Dean
of University College, and Robert
B. Mautz, Vice Pres, in charge
of Academic Affairs.
I cannot comment on a per personnel
sonnel personnel matter regarding a specific
faculty member, Philpott said.
Mautz termed the petition Ab Abnormal.
normal. Abnormal.
Byron S. Holllnshead, Dean of
University College stated that it is
University policy that instructors
may not be promoted or given
tenure (an assistant professorship
or granting of full professorship)
unless they are planning or in the
process of getting a doctorate
degree.

was no enemy, they'd create one.
Rosenbaum said he didn't take
the publications seriously in the
sense that anyone would believe
them. But he said, People like
this have seized government be before.
fore. before. It happened in Germany in
1932.
You get a big enough pack of
rats and they can chew a man
apart.
ROSENBAUM STRESSED the
fact that branding someone a
lunatic cannot make him any less
dangerous. There is no rational
basis to the paper, but it is
plausible to the people who wrote
it.
I'm sure they believe they will
get their way. They really believe
that there is an army of 10,000
people ready to fight the 'Jew-
Communist Conspiracy'.
FRANK T. ADAMS, dean of men,
said that by the time the adminis administration
tration administration found out about the distri distribution
bution distribution of these papers, the people
had flown in and flown out.
See YOUTH CORPS p. 2

Mr. Rlchers contract is not
being renewed because he is not
pursuing a regular program for a
doctorate degree, it has nothing to
do with his political activity,*
Hollinshead stated.
There is no public (written)
rule in the UF constitution stating
that an instructor must pursue
another degree to be retained,
said Richer.
ACCORDING TO the University
Constitution, Article Five, sec section
tion section five, Termination of Faculty
Appointment The President
may, at his discretion, terminate
the employment of a non-tenured
faculty member.. .The Presi President
dent President shall terminate the employ employment
ment employment of any eligible faculty mem member
ber member who has not been granted tenure
at the close of the fifth year of
continuous employment....
Richer received notice of dis dismissal
missal dismissal at the end of his third year
of employment, March, 1964.
I stated in my Academic Bio Biography
graphy Biography (statement of personal and
professional information) that I had
no plans to work for a PhJD
Richer said.
See RICHER on p. 2
UF student
not charged
in accident
Tracey Fielding, a second
grader at Stephen Foster Elemen Elementary
tary Elementary School at 19th Lane and 13th
Street was struck by an auto yes yesterday
terday yesterday afternoon.
Steven Edward Uebel, 2UC, the
driver of the auto is not being
charged.
Edward Teston of the Utility
Department said that the traffic
light t 19th Lane and 13th Street
is timed so that during school
starting and dismissal hours it
functions as a regular stop and
go light. At other times, Teston
said, the light blinks yellow.
Uebel said that when he reached
19th Lane the light evidently
started to turn red and that a
young girl ran out to cross the
street, Uebel said he immediately
put on brakes and was almost at
a stop when the car hit her.
Tracey is the daughter of Mrs,
Guytha Fielding of Gainesville.
Mrs. Fielding said that her daugh daughter
ter daughter was not seriously hurt but that
X-rays had not yet been taken.



, The Florida Alligator/ Tuesday/ Feb. 23, 1965

Page 2

By MAUREEN COLLINS
Staff Writer
Miss Marilyn Noble, former coordinating secretary
for the Free Speech Movement (FSM) at the University
of California Berkely campus cited ineptitude of the
administration and refusal to take student demands
seriously as being the prim ary reasons for the founding
of FSM on the campus last fall.
MISS NOBLE spoke last night to a small audience
in the Florida Union auditorium. Her talk was spon sponsored
sored sponsored by the Liberal Forum and Freedom Party.
She detailed the history of student protest at Cal
Berkely, which began late in the 19305. It came into
full force in 1949, she said, when the California State
Board of Regents issued an edict stating that all
professors in the state university system would have
to sign a loyalty oath.
THE FREE SPEECH Movement was formed speci specifically
fically specifically to oppose the university's administrative ban
on free public speech on campus issues last fall.
The movement, as an actual organization, has
disbanded now, but the spirit will continue as long
as there is need, Miss Noble said.
Eight hundred students were arrested in last fall's
rioting. FSM is paying the legal cost of all these

(Continued from Page 1)
He said they had brought this to
the attention of the proper au authorities.
thorities. authorities.
The city police and the campus
police have descriptions of him
and his car.
Adams said of the newspapers,
I think it's the most dastardly
thing anyone could do.

(Continued from Page 1)
An academic biobraphy is sub submitted
mitted submitted to the university before a
prospective faculty member is
hired.
QUOTED FROM the biography
My fondest hope is that as I
am, I can make a significant con contribution
tribution contribution to some community of
scholars, my academic growth to
be measured by standards other
than the 'arbitrary' requirement of
a PhJ>.
Dr. Clarence Derrick, Head of
the Dept, of Humanities, notified
Richer by letter of his dismissal.
Derrick, refused to comment,
stating This matter of Mr.
Richer's contract is not a subject
which should be discussed in a stu student
dent student newspaper."
DERRICK ADDED that what he
said in the letter of dismissal
still stands.
You and I have both under understood
stood understood that your activities in the
civil rights movement and other
programs. .cannot be allowed to
interfere with your classroom
teaching and course responsibili responsibilities.
ties. responsibilities. I have received no complaints
from students that you have been
neglecting your responsibilities,"
Derrick said in the letter.
Education aid
is increased
NEW YORK(UPI)- A survey of
selected American colleges and
universities indicate that private
financial support of higher educa education
tion education increased 11.3 per cent in
the academic year of 1963-64 over
giving in 1962-63.
The survey, conducted by the
John Price Jones Company since
1920-21, reported that contri contributions
butions contributions from Individuals accounted
for 39.3 per cent of the total
giving last year, 33.1 per cent
from foundations, 10.7 per cent
from corporations, and 16.9 per
cent from bequests.
Harvard topped the list of the
59 colleges in the survey with
gifts of $38,812,000. The institu institutions
tions institutions reported a total received of
$373,446,000 compared with $335,-
456,000 the previous year.
r

Noble cites Cal 'ineptitude

RICHER

CHRISTIAN YOUTH CORPS

I abhor any organization that
would stand for any publication of
this kind."
If the UF caught anyone actual actually
ly actually distributing the literature the
only action that would probably be
taken would be a cease and
desist" action according to Adams.
Lester L. Hale, dean of student

Richer has taught C-3, C-5, and
C-11.
SINCE YOU are making no pro progress
gress progress toward a doctorate I have
been asked, in keeping with the
administrative policies of the Uni University,
versity, University, to say that it is not
expected that you will be given a
promotion, or tenure and therefore
this coming academic year, 1964-
65, shall be considered a terminat terminating
ing terminating one," the letter concluded.
RICHER STATED that prior to
receiving the letter Derrick had
told him he (Derrick) was re requesting
questing requesting a three hundred and fifty
dollar a year raise for Richer.
Richer stated he was not angry
about his dismissal.
I am ashamed of them. I pity
them because they must pose as
agents of a community of scholars
but in fact they take their orders
from people who are hostile to the
best interests of our academic
community.

NOTICE
THE BOARD OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS IS ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS (DATES
INDICATE TIMES INTERVIEWS WILL BE CONDUCTED; DEAD DEADLINES
LINES DEADLINES FOR RECEIVING APPLICATIONS ARE ALSO LISTED):
INTERVIEW POSITIONS OPEN
MARCH 18 Alligator editor and managing editor, 3rd
(Summer) Trimester, 1965
- Alligator editor and managing editor, Ist
and 2nd Trimesters, 1965-66
- DEADLINE for applications: 5 p.m., March 16
MARCH 25 Seminole editor, managing editor, and two
editorial assistants, 1965-66 school year
- DEADLINE for applications: 5 p.m., March 23
APRIL 1- New Orange Peel editor and four section
editors, 1965-66 school year
- DEADLINE for applications: sp.m. March 30
Applications may be obtained in Room 9, Florida Union, and must be
returned no later than deadline times indicated above.
Board of Student Plantations

V ik
NOBLES

affairs, said that distribution of
pamphlets is not permitted on
campus.
UNDER FLORIDA statutes we
are given power to set UF policy.
We have established a policy that
handbills are not to be distributed
on campus," said Hale.

Did you know LARRYS I
bakes their own pies on the premises?
o'\
fZ<
BOSTON CREME APPLE BANANA CREME
\y,
o / cherry
Open 24 Hours

students. Miss Noble estimated it will cost approxi approximately
mately approximately $500,000 to pay court costs. The money comes
from donations to the movement and from free time
given by California lawyers.
MISS NOBLE said the movement became stable
when graduate students and teaching assistants joined
in November. Although the grad students provided
stability, FSM was lead by a 22-year old undergraduate,
Mario Savio.
She described Savio as a charasmaticpersonality.
Mario is an intense young man, a brilliant student.
Really, I think he's a genius. He's a philosophy ma major
jor major when he's not majoring in physics. He can't quite
make up his mind."
Miss Nobel described the "rebellion" as one of
the strangest she had ever heard about.
"THIS IS the only rebellion where people were
asked to spend half an hour a day filling out
questionaires."
She left California in December after being hos hospitalized
pitalized hospitalized for complete exhaustion. She is now working
as a childrens maid in Miami, but plans to return
to complete her masters degree in sociology in
August.

The Gainesville FBI said that
there was nothing illegal about the
paper, but that they were going to
check on it.
This is not the first time the
organization has passed out liter literature
ature literature on campus.

§ CAMPUS CUTIE |
| Likes cooking
$? Our Campus Cutie for today--:
:*:is Linda Gehris, a freshman#
Sfrom Pennsylvania who likes £
water skiing and cooking but:*:;
£ dislikes white socks. :£
Linda is a member of Alpha:-:
:j: Omicron Pi sorority and a Little ::
gSister of the Laurel of Phix
£ Kappa Tau. A French major,:j:
Ijishe toured Europe in theij:
of 1963. .#
Winners named
Winners of the student talent
put on by the Board of Student
Activities Friday night were an-*
nounced by Carlos Piedra, show
director.
Tehani Rowell, Miami, won first
prize to single acts for a Tahitian
dance; Roberto Menendez,Puerto
Rico, and AdrianSaballos, Nicara Nicaragua,
gua, Nicaragua, won first prize to groups
for guitar and voice melodies; and
the India Club won first prize to
clubs for Indian dances and a
snake charmer skit.
UNDERWEAR
FOR MEN!
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Naturally Tapered
The TRIM SIR T and Boxer are truly
"a mans" underwear . designed
expressly for wear with the tradl*
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And thanks to Stedman s exclusive
taper-tailoring in both garments...
if excess bulk is eliminated. Get
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B-L Men's Wear
The Store With More
Gainesville
Shopping Center
1 Use Your Charge



City Loan Fund drive on

The Gainesville Scholarship and
Loan Fund is conducting its annual
drive this week in an effort to
obtain financial assistance from
local merchants and businessmen,
according to Dr. M. L. Ahrens,
assistant dean in the College of
Education and president of the
organization.
AS PART OF their chapter ser service
vice service project Delta Delta Delta

Whats New ia
tar(/~-a>
The Browse Shop
1965 SUMMER EMPLOYMENT DIRECTORY
OF TIME AND THE RIVER.Thomas Wolfe
L ,s
PLAYING THE GUITAR ....Frederick Noad
THE ETERNAL NOW Paul Tillich
THE STRANGER Albert Camus
MESON PHYSICS Robert Marshak
V
SOUTHERN POLITICS V.O. Key Jr.
FREEDOM VS. ORGANIZATION... Bertrand Russell
TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
QUANTUM THEORY OF MOLECULES & SOLIDS,
VOLUMES 1 & 2 John C. Slater
FUNCTIONS OF COMPLEX VARIABLES
.. .Philip Franklin
PRINCIPLES OF OPTIC ....Bom & Wolf
Compos Shop l Bookstore
9
by A rtcajrvedT
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K joys. Artcarveds newest engagement ring sparkles
I \ with a million flickering lights. Why not know the
beauty of Nocturne Star forever?
1/ Gainesvilles Quality Jewelers
University Ave.

sorority will contact business
owners to obtain aid for worthy,
capable, and needy graduates of
Alachua County high schools to
attend college next fall.
We are particularly interested
in those high school students who
fall just below national scholar scholarship
ship scholarship levels. The winners should
have scores between 50 and 90
percentile on the Senior Placement

Examination, stated Ahrens.
Above all, they must be in
financial need.
AN ESTIMATED S3OO grant will
be awarded each recipient after a
selection committee made up of
high school principals and other
community people determine the
winners.
2 UF profs chosen
to exhibit paintings
Hiram Williams and Hollis
Holbrook, professors of art in the
UF CoUege of Architecture and
Fine Arts, have been chosen to
exhibit works in the 29th Biennial
Exhibition of Contemporary
American Painting at Washington,
D. C., Feb. 26-April 1.
Williams and Holbrook were
among a select group of 46 painters
from throughout the United States
who were picked from an original
list of 4,000 entries.

Staff changes delay NOP

The Valentine issue of the New Orange Peel
never hit the press because of lack of material
and staff changes, Don Federman, NOP editor,
said.
Federman had announced at the beginning of
this trimester that he would have a Valentine
issue of the magazl~e.
He said he has been unable to fulfill his
promise because of the permanent loss of
staffer Pam Grossman, injured in an automobile
accident, the re-definition of the status of
Gerald Jones, his former humor editor and
chief idea man, and the staff's need of more
time to produce high quality material.
There just wasn't enough time to re-organize
my staff and get all the material I needed so
the magazine could come out by Valentine's
Day," said Federman.

Burns calls for education support

WINTER PARK, Fla. (UPI)
All Floridians should give strong
support to the role of private in institutions
stitutions institutions of higher education in the
total educational program of
Florida, Gov. Haydon Burns said
yesterday.
BURNS, SPEAKING at a special
convocation commemorating the
80th Anniversary of Rollins Col College,
lege, College, said Florida must rely on its
private, as well as public, insti institutions
tutions institutions of higher learning if it is

I University Food Service Offers 1
I Tuesday Gator Special (
1 in all cafeterias 1
1 LUNCHEON and DINNER I
I 97C (plus tax) Complete Meal 1
I wmmmmmm m I
| Golden Fried Chicken I
( CHOICE OF POTATO OR BUTTERED RICE I
I Any 10< or 15c? SALAD J
I Any 10< or 15<; DESSERT &F I
/ 2 ROLLS (or bread slices) V

Tuesday, Feb. 23, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Cadet gets point 9
\\ ;X
:j:j Marty Clumsy Berlanstein, lUC, got the point Thursday g:
&: while attempting a maneuver < called a triple spin at Gator Guard £:
| Drill.
THE POINT Berlanstein got happened to be on the end of a $:
$: bayonet which happened to be on his rifle. £:
The bayonet went through his boot, two pairs of socks and into
:> his foot. The wound was not very serious and was treated at the $
Infirmary.
$: Berlanstein said, at least they excused me from the rest of
the drill. :$
iv HE WAS interested in finding out how he could spit shine the :j:|
hole in his boot too. :£
It only hurts when I walk, he said as he hobbled away, jjj:
:x*xv:x:*x*x-x-xxx*xxx-x<*x*x<<*x-x*xvx;x'xvxv:s£x:x:x%vx-x*x-x'x*x\vx*:*x:
Art director to speak

Dr. Wilhelmus B. Bryan, director
of the Atlanta Art Association will
be guest speaker at the formal
dedication of the UF's new Gallery
of Art on March 1.
Dr. Bryan's 8 p.m. talk will pin pinpoint
point pinpoint the place of an art gallery

to meet its obligations.
A great and unique strength
of American higher education
stems from the historic coexis coexistence
tence coexistence of strong private institutions
and strong public institutions,"
Burns said.
THE GOVERNOR said both pri private
vate private and public Institutions face a
great need for increased funds.
Here in Florida, financial sup support
port support from all available sources,
public and private, must be greatly
increased. Our objectives can be

Federman said that an even better replace replacement
ment replacement for the Valentine Peel had gone to press.
It will be distributed on campus March 1.
The cover of this issue alone is worth the
quarter for the whole issue, said Federman.
A lot more verbal satire and humor was
planned for this issue. It will also contain two
full page pin-ups of girls and more informative
feature articles than have previously appeared.
The charter governing the contents of the
Peel designates that only 40 per cent of the
magazine may be devoted to humor. Federman
has been warned by the Board of Student
Publications that he has failed to follow this
regulation.
He said that the March 1 issue is full of
surprises, even though it adheres closely to
the charter.

in a university community.
DR, BRYAN formerly directed
the Minneapolis School of Art and
is a past president of the National
Association of Schools of Art. He
currently chairmans the Georgia
Art Commission.

achieved only through vigorous,
sustained and united effort based
upon a deeper general under understanding
standing understanding of the purposes and aspi aspirations
rations aspirations of American higher educa education,
tion, education, he said.
BURNS SAID the enrollment in
higher institutions in Florida will
almost double by 1970.
Never before has Florida, nor
has any other state throughout this
nation, faced such pressures for
funds to support higher educa education,
tion, education, the governor said.

Page 3



Page 4

# The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Feb. 23, 1965

ERNIE LiTZ
Editor* in- Chief

LOU FERRIS
Editorial Page Editor

l/]£w>OtNT
The whole picture
Every day we receive letters-to-the-editor
which castigate, chastize and vilify the
administration of this university. Sometimes
we print a few of these letters.
Some of the letters are printed because
we think that they are valid criticisms of
UF administrative policy. Other letters are
printed because they point to the lack of
knowledge of the author on the subject which
he discusses.
And all the time the administration stoically
takes such criticism whether it be valid or
not. The UF administrators do not dictate
our editorial policy, nor do they interfere
with the workings of this paper. For that we
are grateful.
But it is obvious that many letters we
receive are written without muoh thought
given to all sides of the problem to which they
address themselves.
Few, if any. of those writers have the faintest
conception of what problems and people the
administration must cope with.
Os course the student does not have to face
the Board of Regents, the state legislature,
the public officials, parents and others who
hold the administration responsible for every everything
thing everything which occurs at this university.
If a highly inflamatory editorial is run
in this paper, Dr. Reitz must answer to the
people outside of the university who object
to that sort of writing. He must also explain
away riots, panty raids, obscene humor
magazines and other matters which embarrass
the university.
We havent the space to enumerate the
problems and parties which the administration
must cope with and satisfy.
But we do have a few lines of space left
to say that if the students expect such very
high standards of fairness of the administration
in dealing with student problems and gripes,
then the administration has the right to expect
the same fairness, thought and consideration
of the students before they go off half-cocked
in discussing a problem of which they have
little or no knowledge of the complexity thereof.
GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Kay
Huffmaster, (Correspondents), Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles,
Donita Mathison, Dan Taylor, Sam Uliman, Selwin H. Ciment,
Jay Foley.
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Kurvin, Ann Carter, Thelma Moss man, Fran Snider, Cynthia
Tunstall, Harvey Wolfson, Karen Vitunac, Jack Zucker, Ami
Saperstein, Carl Brown, Jane Young, Bill Lockhart, Ken Simon,
Drex Dobson, Jeffrey Denkewalter, G. S. Corserl, Eunice Tall,
Linda Cody, Woody Leonard, Jennell Close, Nancy Van Zile.
, Th *J; k,rtda Alligator rtiems the ritf* to r*pilte tbm tone of all advertisements and
to revise or turn away copy which It consider* objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment tor any advertisement involvliw typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1; one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible tor more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices tor correction must be given before next insertion
IH E .? l f >IaDA ALUGATOR u * owe**! stud.nl newspaper of the University of Florida and is
published five times weekly except dulng May, June and July when it is published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class
matter at the United States Poet Office at GainestUle. is entered as second class

THE FLORIDA
ALUGATOR
Served By United Press International

JOE CASTE LLO
Executive Editor

STEVE VAUGHN
Managing Editor

ED SEARS
Sports Editor

FREEMAN FORMULATES
t
PROFS SPEAK OUT mmmmmmmmmmt
| |
Distinction without difference

(ED. NOTE: This is the second and last part of
a letter to the UF Athletic Department from a
graduate student.)
EDITOR:
I CAME to the University of Florida when it was
still a segregated, white southern school. At that
time there was a suit pending by a Negro who sought >
to enter Law School. That suit continued for some something
thing something like 10 years before another Negro entered
the University.
Contrary to the fears of the upholders of
segregation and contrary to the attempts of an
extremely small number to make the situation
difficult, that Negro graduated and is today a proud
alumni of the University. Since then I have been
able to feel the pride of seeing this institution grow
from a segregated, white southern university to a
truly American institution of higher learning.
THIS PROCESS has been slow and probably
painful to both the Negro student who had, and still
has, to cope with the unwritten codes of campus
social behavior as well as to the Southerner whose
traditional values were Infringed upon. Having seen
this process I have been able to defend with a clear
conscience the reputation of my Alma Mater in the
other institutions where I have since done graduate
studies.
THE REPUTATION of the University is growing,
I discovered, but has not yet been able to discard
fully the stigma of "segregated, white southern
university." This will take time, but we are on our
way.
THE MORAL of this story is that all during this
experience it was my Impression that the men who
make the decisions affecting the institution as a
whole have constantly underrated the quality of the
student body; they seem constantly to underestimate
the maturity and level of responsibility of the
students and their capacity to undergo change and
accept changes in their social and academic
environment.
BUT THE FACT is that the students really
needed no protection from the inevitable changes.
The student has reacted without any help from the
We want to know
EDITOR:
IT HAS JUST been brought to our attention that
this year's commencement convocation has been
changed from Sunday, April 25th, to Monday, April
26th. Assuming that our information is correct
we wish to know why no official notice of such a
change has been issued by the Administration.
SECONDLY, WE would like to know the reason
for such a change. It is our opinion that it would
be inconvenient or impossible for many people
to attend graduation exercises on a Monday. Most
parents do work during the week.
WE WOULD appreciate an answer from the
Administration as well as the views of other students
taking part in commencement exercises;
MANUEL RUBIO, 4AS*
R. MICHAEL WYMAN, 7BA

traditionally meek student government or other
"civic-minded" organizations.
OBSERVING THE behavior of the majority of
the students in the dorms, the Hub, at football
games, led me to believe, as I still do, that there is
a tremendous potential and depth in this student
body, a latent energy that if, or better, when,
liberated is going to signify great changes both for
the University and for this State. Meanwhile, I
continue to see the decision-makers underestimate
the student.
I WOULD suggest that the Athletic Department
is, perhaps, still operating under the misconception
that integrated sports will offend the student. If this
is indeed so, then my feeling is that a new pers perspective
pective perspective on their part is long overdue!
DO NOT underestimate your student spectators.
Do not underestimate their ability and desire to
see and experience good clean sportsmanship based
on the ability and excellence that is a result of
discipline, clean living and trainingnot on the color
of the skin.
BUT ABOVE ALL, Mr. Athletic Directors, do not
underestimate the desire of your own athletes to
compete with a team that has produced many
outstanding athletes including one trackman who
brought honor and glory to his country and state
at Tokyo.
I BELIEVE, Mr. Directors, that you owe an
explanation to the students of the University of
Florida in general and to us sports fans in particular
concerning your quite unexplainable proceeding in
this affair. I can assure you that should Florida
A&M compete, they will be cheered or not cheered
according to their performance, just like any other
team, by the student-spectators.
JUST SO THIS matter does not die with this
letter, I am stating, with all due humility yet quite
candidly, that I am personally waiting for a public
statement from you on this matter.
TONY MAINGOT
Research Assistant
It werent us!
EDITOR:
Say, this new Coed Calendar is really tuff.
I didn't know Florida had sach chick women!
Congrats to the editor.
JACK MORRIS, 2UC
(ED. NOTE: Thanx for the compliment, bet we
had nothing to do with the Coed Calendar.)
The Alligator gladly accepts letters lettersto-the-editor
to-the-editor lettersto-the-editor from all students and
luce res ted non-students in the UF
commumty. All we ask is that all letters
be signed and that a telephone number
be included, so that letters may be
verified if some question should arise.



GREEKS
All presidents and publicity
chairmen of campus social frater fraternities
nities fraternities are requested to see Drex
Dobson, Greek editor, at the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator office, Room 8 Florida Union
this afternoon from 2:30-4 p.m.
CHEERLEADERS
Starting March 1, 4 "p.m., at
Florida Field, a two-week cheer cheerleading
leading cheerleading clinic will be conducted.
The actual tryouts will be Fri Friday,
day, Friday, March 12.
FBK APPLICATIONS
Applications for Florida Blue
Key, leadership iraternity, may
be picked up at the Florida Union
Information desk. All completed
applications must be turned in no
later than 5 p.m. Wednesday,
March 3.
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
University College students
seeking admission to an upper
division college for the 1965 spring
trimester must file an applica application
tion application to change colleges in the
Office of the Registrar, Room
34, Tigert Hall, before March 26.
No students having fewer than 64
semester hours at the end of
this trimester need apply.
GATOR GRAS
Individual and group acts are
encouraged to sign up for the gator
gras variety show try-outs today-
Friday, 1-5 p.m. in Room 315
Florida Union.
ARTS CLASSES
Art Classes, sponsored by the
Florida Union Fine Arts Commi Committee
ttee Committee will meet every Thursday
7:30 p.m. from Feb. 25-April 1
in Room 215 Florida Union. The
classes will be taught by Mrs.
Marian V. Davis, art instructor
at P. K. Yonge Laboratory school.
Cost of the six lessons will be
$5.00 per person. Sign in Room
315 Florida Union.
AGRICULTURE
The Agricultural Council will
hold election of officers tomorrow
5 p.m. in Room 130 McCarty Hall.
PANHELLENIC SING
Panhellenic Council presents
Panhellenic Sing Friday 8 p.m.
in the University Auditorium. Each
sorority will present a short song
program.
HULLS
BRAKE
SERVICE
& SUPPLY
* COMPLETE BRAKE
SERVICE ON ALL
AMERICAN AND
FOREIGN CARS.
* 10,000-MILE OR
ONE-YEAR GUA GUARANTEE,
RANTEE, GUARANTEE,
* WHEEL BALANCING.
* REBUILT GENERA GENERATORS
TORS GENERATORS & STARTERS.
* EXPERT TRAINED
MECHANICS HERE
TO SERVE YOU.
Member of
Independent Garage
Owners of America, Inc.
1314 So Main St
Ph. 3721497

campus news briefs\

SPEECH TESTS
Appointments for speech
screening tests for students ex expecting
pecting expecting to enter the College of
Business Administration may be
made in Room 214 Matherly Hall.
Students who have not satisfied
this requirement should make an
appointment immediately.
AG ECONOMICS
The Agricultural Economics
Club will meet tonight 7 p.m.
in Room 160 McCarty Hall. Dr.
H. B. Clark will speak on Eco Economic
nomic Economic Development in Southeast
Asia.
CIRCLE K
There will be no Circle K meet meeting
ing meeting tonight because of the bas basketball
ketball basketball game. Members interested
in attending the District Convention
in Cocoa should contact George
Stuart as soon as possible.

| It 9 s -jmasL
' Larrys
Large Del Monico,
TUESDAYS Baked Potatoes
Tossed Salad'
STEAK NIGHT 5-9 P.M. Hot Buttered Rolls
$1.07

JUST 1/2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS
LARRY'S
RESTAURANT
1225 W. University Ave.
DIAMOND rings
W/A Kvl
s§)) ao6et£*oo
gem OKBBSSM33SB^O^
211 W. University Ave. 372-8658

DANCE CHAIRMAN
Applications for chairman of the
Florida Union Dance Committee
will be accepted until 3 p.m. to tomorrow.
morrow. tomorrow. Interviews will be held
at that time.
PHI ALPHA THETA
Phi Alpha Theta, history honor honorfraternity,
fraternity, honorfraternity, will initiate its new
members at a closed ceremony at
7 p.m. tomorrow in Room 212
Florida Union. At 8 p.m. Dr.
Marvin Entner will speak on
Russo-Persian Commercial Re Relations,
lations, Relations, 1828-1914: Some Prob Problems
lems Problems of Interpretation.** Dr.
Entner*s speech is open to the
public.
EMPLOYMENT
The Department of Labors Em Employment
ployment Employment Service will be closed
until 1:30 p.m. tomorrow.

Tuesday/ Feb, 23, 1965/ The Florida Alligator,

New Orange Peel
/*** I ':V I -.-C'"' I I I 1
S ip
v
*\; %'& he&'
* v'f H| m H J| . ] HL *% Hr
>*
V : M
ft ,<> '* > IHr It tv ? :> 3k*
;_:Pf SmuML jaalL .._
#-\\ v.jflftftu
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" mm? ,/. M'*Jl
~gg*s£S^lH H
; :. .. .' ,, J J w. ::;: f;-:v-- '" ' t^of*' : ^W.
|^iNMlkr , /
These people are on the* Board of Student Publications.
PRETEND they have just seen the March 1 issue of the
New Orange Peel. Such alarm can only mean one
thingthe Peel outdid itself and outdoed the Admini Administration.
stration. Administration. Now, if you are not too indignant or moral morally
ly morally uppity or afraid to laugh at human foibles, then
take the great leap forward and read)!!
MARCH 1

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator/ Tuesday Feb. 23, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

Autos
1955 PLYMOUTH, exceUent
mechanical condition. Good trans transportation.
portation. transportation. $125. Phone 2-1565.(G 2-1565.(G---100-lt-c).
--100-lt-c). 2-1565.(G---100-lt-c).
WANT A GOOD DEPENDABLE
FAMILY CAR? 1961 Rambler
Ambassador. Top condition
throughout. $625. Call 376-8863
alter 5:30. (G-100-st-c).
1959 FIAT. 50 miles per gallon,
good condition. New battery. $225.
Call FR 2-2597 or 2-2598. (G (G---99-3t-c).
--99-3t-c). (G---99-3t-c).
57 OLDSMOBILE, 4-door, white
wall tires, all power, clean and
excellent condition. Low mileage.
$550. 372-0447 before sor 2-
5106. Dorothy McDonald. (G-99-
3t-c).
1961 METROPOLITAN. Good
condition. Call FR 8-1488 after
6 p.m. (G-99-4t-c).
1954 PLYMOUTH 4-door hardtop,
good condition, new tires. S2OO.
Call 8-2911 after 6:00.(G-99-3t-c).
1960 PORSCHE 1600 N COUPE and
1964 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE. Both
perfect. Make an offer. Must sell
one. Phone 372-4579 or 376-8160.
(G-99-st-c).
1960 FORD GALAXY 2-door, V-8,
See at 215 NW 10th Ave. Phone
6-4582 from 8 till 6 p.m. (G (G---97-6t-c).
--97-6t-c). (G---97-6t-c).
*63 WHITE VW, radio, whitewalls,
*64 tag, excellent condition; no
maintenance needed. $1395. Bank
will finance SI,OOO. Call Coach
Ellenson, Ext. 2131-home 6-9768.
(G-97-st-c).
COnQRAtS
FROM AXA TO TKE
FOR A GREAT GAME!
AXA
SPORTSMENS
CYCLE CENTER
617 N. Main St.
SUZUKI
Sales & Sendee
TONITE! 3 GREAT HITS!
FIRST AREA RUN
At 7:00
u Roeft\Dp/ TOW
Hudson \Day/BaNDat
4jm Ssno Menlo
cf PoHteRS^L./
~lecAnfloCo^ ,,
At 8:55
smdra DEE wSusnlm
mar GOULET M&fWm
miwuinb HHHI
At 10:40
l To kill I
I Mockingbird I
Igregobypeck I
Starts Friday
FRANK SINATRA
"NONE BUT THE BRAVE

| For Rent
NEW, MODERN, 1-bedroom apart apartment,
ment, apartment, furnished, central heat and
air-condition, private enclosed
patio, 421 SE Bth Street. Call 372-
3576. (B-100-st-c).
OCEAN BEACH HOUSE. East End
Grand Bahama. May to Sept. $l5O
per month. W. Cartier, Box 101,
Freeport, Grand Bahama. (B-100-
st-c).
4-BEDROOM, 2-bath available
March 1. 1100 Block SW sth Ave.
Ideal for 4 to 6 students. Central
heat and AC. For appointment call
- 376-2892. (B-100-st-c).
FOR RENT 3 BEDROOM 2-bath,
kitchen equipped, central-air, $l3O
per month. UF Ext. 2805 or 372-
7535 after 5:30. (B-99-st-c).
$27 DOUBLE $37 for SINGLE
Room, maid service, telephone and
kitchen privileges. 304 NW 15th
Street. (3 blocks from main
Library.) For information call
2- (B-99-st-c).
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY
3- bedroom, 2-bath home with
garbage disposal and dishwasher,
attached carport, large private
back yard. $125 per month. Contact
Mr. Eddy manager of the Main
Cafeteria Ext. 2561 or phone 376-
5831. (B-98-3t-c).
ROOMS FOR RENT, Central heat,
maid service, everything
furnished. 378-2583. 237 SW 2nd
Place. (B-98-ts-c).
LARGE ROOMS IN FRIENDLY
Surroundings available to male
students. Reasonable rates;
utilities and maid service included.
Convenient to campus and town.
See at 104 SW Bth Street or call
372-0243. (B-82-tf-nc).
Help Wanted
BOYS 12 to 16 years old for
established paper routes on and
adjacent to University grounds.
Contact the Gainesville Sun, 376-
1411. (E-98-st-c).
Personal
THANKS TO THE MEN in
Murphree Area who helped the girl
in the Vintage VolVi.(J-100-lt-p).
JACK Otto has Delong Ruby*
-Double-crossed us Get him
at Gator Gras Murph. (J-100-
lt-c).
"TELL US ABOUT IT." ||
.. .OK we wiU.. .First it is
so fine we arent even going H
to run a pictorial ad* 1 ... On H
what?*
"FOUR DAYS OF I
NAPLES" What else. I
with JEAN SOREL I
. .Best since OPEN CITY
and PAISAM . .Time
Magatlnp C
. .Likely to be the mo6t I
talked about Italian production If
since LA DOLCE VITA. ..
sx
1:25 3:55 6:80 9:00 §|

For Sale
INNERSPRING MATTRESS and
regular springs for double bed.
Good condition. Reasonable. Phone
376-7266. (A-100-lt-c).
30 GAS RANGE, exceUent con condition
dition condition $65. 30 Electric range,
very good, $45. Sofa Bed and chair,
$45. 3/4 bed $25. Call 372-3734
after 5 p.m. (A-100-4t-c).
BEAUTIFUL FORMAL Wedding
gown. Silk organza with alencon
lace appUques. Size sto 7 worn
once. Call FR 8-1520 after 5:00,
(A-100-3t-p).
FURNISHED, 1- BEDROOM 8x32
aluminum House Trailer, 20x12
cabana, fenced yard. $950. 17
ADMIRAL Portable TV, $35. FR
6-0964 after 5. (A-99-3t-p).
Real Estate
5, 10, and 20 ACRE LOTS west
of city, with large oak and pine
trees. 5 acre tracts on paved
road. Only S3OO down. Call today
for best choice. W. D. Mason,
c/o Ernest Tew Realty, 6-6461.
(I-100-10t-c).
Services
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ID
CARD for discounts in USA and 28
countries. STUDENT SHIPS to
Europe, CHARTER FLIGHTS
within Europe. Write: Dept. CP,
UJS. National Student Association,
265 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y.
10016. (M-98-4t-c).
INFANT CARE in private home.
References furnished. 378-2583.
237 SW 2nd Place. (M-98-ts-c).
Lost & Found
LOST: ELGIN SPORTSMAN
WATCH lost Tuesday night, 2/16/
65, somewhere between Tigert Hall
and Gator Pond. Reward. Inquire
at Fiji bouse. (L-100-2t-p).
UraL VRHMU9
HOW ID
W Mwm
TEMmOTrsUNTH) ARTISTS
FLORIDA j

Malcolm X died
by his preaching
CHICAGO (UPI) Black Muslim leader Elijah Muhammad said yes yesterday
terday yesterday his assassinated former lieutenant, Malcolm X, preached war
and violence and died according to his preaching.**
The diminutive Muhammad said his Negro supremacy sect was innocent
of the slaying of Malcolm, a bitter defector from Muslim ranks, and
that he had no idea who shot him.
SPEAKING AT a rare news conference heavily guarded by police
and Muslim bodyguards, Muhammad said he was not disturbed by
reports that avengers might be en route from New York to Chicago to
exact retribution for Malcolms death.
Muhammad, sitting in the lavish living room of his three threestory,
story, threestory, 19-room South Side mansion, told newsmen that Malcom X died
by the same violence that he preached.
He seems to have taken weapons as his god. Therefore, we couldnt
tolerate a man like that.
He preached war. We preach peace. Were forbidden to do that
preach God himself.
Muhammad said he did not expect war to break out between the
Negro militants who defected with Malcolm X and the Black Muslims,
which he extimated at between 200,000 and 300,000.
Muhammad was asked his reaction to reports, heard by Chicago
police, that two of Malcolms followers were headed to Chicago,
possibly to avenge their leaders death.
I DONT feel in any way disturbed about that in the least, Muhammad
said. We are innocent of his death. Therefore I dont care whether
600 or 6,000 are on their way here to get revenge. It is an unjust thing
even to think about.*
Several times Muhammad emphasized, we are innocent.**

Nik living in Moscow

MOSCOW (UPI) lormer Pre Premier
mier Premier NikitaS. Khrushchev has been
assigned a new apartment in Mos Moscow
cow Moscow where he intends to spend a
few days each week, informed
sources said yesterday.
THE DISCREDITED Soviet
statesman now maintains two resi residences,
dences, residences, the sources saidone at
his country retreat in the village
of Usovo and the other in the
capital.

BUILDING
(Continued from Page 1)
be used for new classroom buildings, explained Webb.
VICE PRES. Harry M. Philpott stated, As a
safety precaution heavy class traffic has been moved
off the second and third floors of Benton. A few
graduate students and instructor's offices are still
open on these floors, included Philpott. Further
reports will be received this week before more ac action
tion action will be taken.
ASST. REGISTRAR Thomas A. Graham, Jr. in charge
of moving the classes stated, the majority of the
classes are now meeting in building K. Apparently
they will meet their for the rest of the trimester.
WHIP^
BUT FIRST
m HAVE A
K.C. Strip Steak
AMira Large X4arge
$1.45 $1.75 $2.15
Served with French Fries, Mashed, or
Baked (with sour cream or butter), Tossed
Green Salad, and Hot Rolls and Butter
LARRY'S WOHDERHOUSE
14 S.W. First St. (Behind Sears)
10:30 a.m. 8 p.m.
SECOND COFFEE, TEA ALWAYS FREE
ALSO TAKEOUT 372-2405

He has been visiting Moscow
occasionally in the past few weeks
to see his children and grand grandchildren.
children. grandchildren. He spends the nights at
the new apartment in the midtown
area a few minutes ride from the
Kremlin.
KHRUSHCHEVS new town resi residence
dence residence is neither on Ulitza Grano Granovskogo,
vskogo, Granovskogo, where he has lived in the
past few years, nor at the official
mansion on Lenin Hills.



Tuesday/ Feb, 23, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Gators look for revenge
against tough FSU squad

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Sports Writer
UF's basketball team will be
nursing some old wounds and look looking
ing looking for revenge when they meet
FSU's Seminoles at Florida Gym
tonight at 8 p.m.
The Gators have suffered nothing
but hardship at the hands of the
men from Tallahassee this year,
losing to them in football,
swimming and basketball. They
have yet to hand the Seminoles
a defeat in anything this academic
year.
The FSU cagers handed the
Gators their first loss on Dec. 9
in the capital city by a score
of 51-50. Center Gary Schull was
SAE, PKA gain
Orange finals;
TKE wins Blue
By EDDIE SEARS
Sports Editor
Forward Will Rogers poured in
!1 points to lead Sigma Alpha Ep Epsilon
silon Epsilon to a sluggish 39-26 Orange
League gasketball victory over
Pi Lambda Phi Monday night.
Guard Bobby Threatt canned the
first two points for the SAEs who
were never behind in the contest.
George Bantwas the high man for
Pi Lambda Phi with 10 points.
The SAEs will meet Pi Kappa
Alpha in the finals Thursday at
9 p.m. The Pikes earned their
finals berth with a 32-31 double
overtime win over Sigma Nu. A
free throw by Jake Varn with 20
seconds remaining was decisive.
Tau Kappa Epsilon rolled over
Lambda Chi Alpha 40-28 to capture
the Blue League crown. Wes
Watson and Charlie Evans led
the Tekes with 17 and 13 points
respectively. This was the Tekes
first league title in basketball and
elevated them to second place in
the overall loop standings.
Independent action found the Lab
Jacks topping English 20-14 while
the Monks downed the Cats 32-26.
UF swimmers
wallop Miami
Tom Dioguardi copped two firsts
in leading the UF swimmers to
a 61-34 win over Miami in a dual
meet Monday afternoon at Florida
Pool.
The out manned Hurricanes were
never in the match and won only
three of eleven events in the com competition,
petition, competition, the diving, 500 yard free freestyle
style freestyle and 200 yard individual.
The victory marked the 16th
straight win over a ten year period
for the Gator tankers in dual meet
competition with Miami.
Dioguardi coasted home in both
the 50 and 100 yard freestyle
events, not threatening his school
records for either distance. His
times were 22.5 and 51.0 seconds,
respectively.
In the freshmen competition,
the Gators bowed to the Hurri Hurricanes
canes Hurricanes in a thriller, 49-46.
Going into the last event, the
freestyle relay, the UF charges led
by a 46-42 count, making the relay
decisive.
The race was touch and go all
the way with Miami holding a two
yard lead when the anchormen hit
the waters. Leon Ranch put on a
burst of speed to pull almost even,
but couldn't hold his pace for the
last 100 yards.

wi-ftiiN^-i-i -.vi.-i--i

fouled in the final seconds and
sank a free throw to account for
the one point margin of difference.
Only seconds earlier, Gator Tom
Baxley narrowly missed a jump
shot that would have broken a
50-50 tie.
Seminole Coach Bud Kennedy
will probably start with a first
unit consisting of Schull at center,
Jerry Shirley and Bill Peacock at
forward, with Pete Gonzalez and
Bobby Lovell in the backcourt.
For mentor Kennedy, this is his
seventeenth year as head basket basketball
ball basketball coach at the Tallahassee
institution.

Ford Motor
Company is:
vitality
B Critical importance and vigor are fused into this
one meaningful word, vitality. What does this
mean to you?a graduate about to make the
major decision of career selection. By selecting a
company with vitality, youll find more challeng challenging
ing challenging and rewarding work. Ford Motor Company is
At our Company, youll have the advantages and
resources of a large corporation, along with the
high degree of personal responsibility youd expect
Robert Bowen in a small one. For our Company is composed of
8.5., Nortkweetern Unit. ...
m.b.a., Harvard Unit. many small management teams, each with respon responsibility
sibility responsibility for a specific activity. Activities so vital,
they can affect hundreds of jobs and involve millions of dollars. You play in
the big leaguesearlyat Ford Motor Company. An example: Bob Bowens
experiences in marketing.
Early in Bobs career, he helped prepare comprehensive reviews of our
current and planned marketing activities. He also studied special problems
in market representation. Later, he was assigned to one of our Product
Planning Offices. Here, future vehicle concepts are explored with accom accompanying
panying accompanying financial, marketing and production factors. Market research is
conducted to determine trends in customer preferences. Critical data like this
led to the design and development of the highly successful Mustang.
Maybe vitality is what youve been seeking in a positionand in an
employer, too. We also offer the opportunity for early responsibility and
the pay that goes with it. See our representative for the complete story
when he visits your campus.
THERES A FUTURE FOR YOU WITH... MOTOR COMPANY
The American Road, Dearborn. Michigan
An equal opportunity employer
- .t.j.uil

Page 7

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Page 8

¥¥ MEET THE GATORS **
Course, You Donlp Thinking spring?
" > Has* Yow Soidwick I
I W* new Milter 1 madras pullover lljlj
wich Shop in person.... TA /? i
1 1 /
you see how
how inspiring they
In fact, he likes J &
1,1. K 1 $ bring out
and it won t hurt you to X lts vilest At
more. Alan '&
a * Because
to meet some the & LADYBUGsare just like
folks who hove been tele- \
customers H * Junior
Drop In. call. Those MI)D 0A W
famously big sandwiches jf U I \ K fl Y
taste great either way. mmmM
ALAN S MISTER 1 ! I are the people at
SANDWICH SHOP A Donigans
FR6-1252 FRB-1230 l 1123 W. University Avenue
Cross Country Shoes Q \
fi n
Poles HHHHHHIIHK^aMHnBIHiHHHHIIIIHIIii
;:;: ed poore hHEL
Spikes for Track Shoes This Knoxville, Tenn., native has the capabilities to
become a solid performer for the Gators. Last year
he saw action in 19 games, and showed promise for an
inexperienced sophomore. S
This year after spending the first of the season on
Hf the sidelines, Poore answered Coach Norman Sloans
yffll call to action admirably. Poore has played in all of |H^H^Bl^^Hfp^H|
.... i^.4.,.^k the Gators past five games and come up with big plays
when the nhips were down. fS&L -*
Poore has a good pair of hands and hits very well
JF7 VW all with jump shots from the corner. He also likes to drive.
As a f re shman, Poore averaged 12.7 points per game R r'^Qi^ v
llrrVliwMiffl and proved to be a big surprise for the Baby Gators
auly/jf w tth a big finish for the season.
M§¥ Baseball Softball l/pn r\ 0
i^r^ G b V M Gloves & Miffs jpjll^^
by McGregor & Nokoma Balls
mMsm Bts Bats
Balls Jerseys Although brown was never out of the style picture,
IpW Caps Socks Caps i 4 certainl y is more popular today than for a BrOWII is
ttf Shoes Shoes 11 long time ne reflection of this is sae in the rich bflck jn Sftlrt
m by McGregor Socks M custom antit l ued brown ieathers whicb Jarman
v has fashioned into congenial footwear companions WaraiOuS .
WE ARE TEAM gX: for your spring apparel. In addition to the
OUTFITTERS! gx? classic slip-on shown here^Jwith hand-sewn moc $15*99
RRHHHHHBI !%> : seams) we carry several other handsome
Jarman custom-antiqued styles.
Jimoiie Hughes Sporting Goods g r Mitchells
1113 W. University Avenue 1 Block Host of Campus | meet m w> Univ> Av#>

> The Florida Alligator/ Tuesday, Feb. 23/ 1963