Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Trimester up to presidents

FERRANTE, TEICHER-SATURDAY
:'
*: > 9, :.
# .;, v dj^Hr^^Hp |r 'BB
Piano team sold out

By KAREN VITUNAC
Staff Writer
It's a complete sellout for the
duo-piano team, Louis Ferrante
and Arthur Teicher who will ap appear
pear appear at 8:15 p.m. in Florida gym
tomorrow night.
The event is sponsored by the
Lyceum Council.
"We had 5500 tickets and they'
all gone,** said Barry Diamond,
Lyceum president.
Both men taught music before
beginning their team in 1948. Since
they began performing they have
traveled throughout the U.S. and
Europe. Their records "Theme

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Competing in the Sigma Chi Derby Queen contest for tomorrows
Derby are from left to right: Susie Hunt, A O Pi; Suzanne Queen,
A D Pi; Pamela Dormany, Sigma Kappa; Pat Cornwell, Z T A; Sue
Ehrhardt, A X Omega; Jeanie Maynard, K D; Sheryl Rothberg, D Phi
E; Suzan Hull, D D D; Pam Connell, Chi Omega; and Betty Wendt,
Delta Gamma,

FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Vol. 57, No. 98

from the Apartment* and Theme
from Exodus are million sellers
and their, albums Peoples Choice
and Concert for Lovers have
been tops on the selling charts
for five years.
Both Ferrante and Teiche Teichestarted
started Teichestarted their music careers as
child prodigies at the Julliard
School of Music. Telcher began
before he was six years old, and
finished at 15-one of the youngest
students ever * graduate from Jul Julliard.
liard. Julliard. Ferrante, who does most
of the arrangements, received a
scholarship to Julliard at the age
of six and before graduating won
every award the school offered.

Friday, Feb. 19, 1965

Gov. Haydon Burns said yes yesterday
terday yesterday he will let the presidents
of Floridas universities make the
decision on whether pf not to abol abolish
ish abolish the trimester system and will
be bound by their decision.
Burns campaigned for the gover governorship
norship governorship on a promise to get rid
of the trimester system.
Burns decision to allow the pre presidents
sidents presidents to make the choice between
the trimester system and an anotheras
otheras anotheras yet undecided came
after watching a TV program on
which UF president J. Wayne Reitz
and Dr. John Allen, USF presi president,
dent, president, appeared.
Burns made his announcement
yesterday when the State Board
of Education asked for a study of
the trimester system.
Results of the study will be made
available before the state legis legislature
lature legislature meets April 6 in Talla Tallahassee.
hassee. Tallahassee.
Last night, at a meeting of the
UF chapter of the American
Association of University Profes Professors,
sors, Professors, Robert B. Mautz, vice-pres.
for academic affairs, presented a
report on the problems involved in
shifting from a trimester system
to another type.
Mautzs report included sections
on the trimester system, the sem semester
ester semester system, and the quarter sys system.
tem. system.
An additional report will be
given by Prof. Darwin Smith chair chairman
man chairman of the chapters committee
on professional relations, on con considerations
siderations considerations involved in the choice
of an academic calendar.
Mautz said yesterday that his
report was not controversial, ra rather
ther rather just a report.
As AAUP members will also
hear a nominating committee re report
port report on officers for the coming
year.
I will not have any reccomen reccomendatlons
datlons reccomendatlons with respect to a year round
calender operation until a speci specific
fic specific plan or plans, which may be con considered,
sidered, considered, have been throughly re reviewed
viewed reviewed on this campus and ap approved
proved approved by the University Senate,
UF President J. Wayne Reitz sta stated
ted stated yesterday.

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CULPE PPER, RIGHT, SWORN IN
. .by Honor Court Chancellor Joel Sachs
(Photo by BUI Blitch)
New SG officers
sworn in at banquet
By SHARON KELLEY
Staff Writer
The top 5 officers of the 1964-65 Student Government (SG)
administration were inaugurated Wednesday night at the annual
SG banquet at the Holiday Inn.
Sworn in were Bruce Culpepper as President V Uu Student
Body, Dick Thompson as Vice-President, Steve Cheeseman,
Treasurer, Sid Stubbs as Chancellor of the Honor Court and Bob
Segal as the new Clerk of the Honor Court.
In attendance were the heads of most of the departments of
the UF administration including Vice-Pres. Harry M. Philpott
and his wife, plus the outgoing members of former Pres. Ken
Kennedy's administration.
Pres. J. Wayne Reitz was unable to attend due to a prior com commitment
mitment commitment in Pensacola.
Vice-Pres. Philpott, guest speaker for the occasion cited Ken Kennedy's
nedy's Kennedy's administration as one of the finest in the history of SG.
From every standpoint, future generations will classify this
past year as one of the most important in SG at the UF, M Philpott
said. We (the administration) are indeed privileged to say to you,
thank you for a Job exceedingly well done."
Philpott compared the Job of an administrator to that of a
Juggler trying to keep 7 or 8 balls in the air without having one
bounce against the other. He warned the new SG president,
Bruce Culpepper that his Job will resemble that of a Juggler also.
See 'BANQUET' p. 4

No increase in loans slated

The UF will not take advan advantage
tage advantage of the increase in National
Defense loans for graduate stu students,
dents, students, according to Mac G. Grig Grigsby,
sby, Grigsby, assistant to the Dean of Student
Affairs.
Under the new program, gra graduate
duate graduate students could receive up
to $2500 Instead of the SIOOO
that is available presently.
Grigsby said that the decision
not to increase the amount of
money was based on a policy de decision
cision decision as to the most effective
use of the UFs program.
Our policy is to bridge the
differences between the traditional
support of education and the real
expenses. We have never assumed
complete responsibility for a stu student's
dent's student's expenses.
We're not sure there is really
a need to go over SIOOO here,
Grisgby said. He explained that
the land grant colleges have a
large built-in scholarship in state
appropriations.
Some high-priced schools can
use the SIOOO for tuition alone.

The State land grant colleges only
charge fees and the money goes
a lot further,'* he said.
There is a statement in the
application for a National Defense
loan that says the proceeds should
only go for payment of tuition
and fees, board and room, and
similar living expenses and for in institutional
stitutional institutional equipment, materials
Free speaker
here Sunday
Marilyn Nobles, former coordi coordinating
nating coordinating secretary of the Free Speech
Movement on the University of
California campus at Berkely, will
speak Sunday at 7:30 p.m. in the
Florida Union Auditorium.
Miss Nobles, a graduate student
in sociology, said she was in on
it from the first.'* She said she
left the movement at the end of
December to come to Florida for
what she describes as rest and re recuperation
cuperation recuperation from 32-hour days.
In a telephone interview, Miss
See NOBLES* on p. 9



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Friday/ Feb. 19 / 1965

DONATING BLOOD
.. .Tom Babington, left, and Neil Kropoff
Delta Tau Delta
Sororities battle
tomorrow in SX derby
By DREX DOBSON afternoon, while the sororities bat-
Staff Writer tie in the 17th annual Sigma Chi
(SX) Derby at Broward Field at
Thirteen UF sorority houses 2 p.m.
will probably be vacant tomorrow
H The sororities bro brobrothers
brothers brobrothers in a parade at the Up Uppe**
pe** Uppe** Drill field at 1:30 p.m. and
proceed to the Derbys compe competitive
titive competitive events and beauty contest.
Competition is going to be
a little stiffer in e events,
vents, events, Paul Gardner, Derby
, v -\ .*'', --.' " *'-(', '! j| chairman, sa id All of the sor sor,v-\
,v-\ sor,v-\ .-\,
weeks.
Sigma Chi sponsors the event
v to promote competitive spirit be beflBHR
flBHR beflBHR v : tween sororities. Thesesporting
events do just that.
f \
WBBBm It takes all of a sororitys
'BEm- * brawn, brains, and prowess to
emerge the victor over the other
iMBr M groups.
HHF JHH The sporting* events include
WBB Jmfm a chicken chase, potato sack race,
. > I bunting poker chips in a bin of
§£s!&& | Hour, a daring debut and among
IlSf# # Others, two events kept a secret
11l / I 9 until the Derby.
We expect to see some fat
chickens, too! SX Charlie Allen
SUE SMITH, DG~ said.
SPECIAL ON SPRING FASHIONS
DRESSES, SUITS, ENSEMBLES
WERE S2O NOW sls
S3O $24
$45 $35
WASHINGTON BIRTHDAY SPECIAL
NYLON BRIEFS values to $2 each
NOW 3/32.50
See our new selection ot two twopiece
piece twopiece swimsuits starting at $9.95
CENTRAL FREE
CHARGE / / PARKING
*Uu^ 5
AND 313 N. W. 13th STREET

Blood drive donations lag

As the IFC Blood Drive goes
into its fourth week only 45 pints
of blood have been donated thus
far.
This lag is not unusual said
Greg Seitz, IFC Blood Drive
Chairman, as last years drive
received its biggest boost during
the last two days of the drive.
The KAs donated 31 of the 65
pints received during the final
two days of the 1964 drive.
The TKEs won the percentage
trophy last year.
Thirty one members of Delta
Tau Delta fraternity donated this
past Wednesday evening. The
SAEs, ATOs, KAs,AGRs,XPs,
DX*s, TKE's, and 6PE*s, have
promised strong support to uus

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If your automobile ;
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115 S E 2nd. STREET Phone 372-1481

years drive.
Trophids for the most blood do donated
nated donated and highest percentage of do donors
nors donors based on IFC Chapter rolls
will be awarded at Johnny Mathiss
performance at Spring Frolics on
March 6th.
Murphree officers
Election of officers and the pre presentation
sentation presentation of awards were held re recently
cently recently by the Murphree Hall Coun Council.
cil. Council.
Officers elected for the coming
trimester are:
Michael Walker, president; Rob
Blue, vice president; Roger Buck Buckwaiter,
waiter, Buckwaiter, secretary; and Frank Snell,
treasurer.

*cS
| Lose somethin g?|
It looked like an early Eas-
ix ter yesterday afternoon at the ijii
fewest end of the Tigert areafe
fe: parking lot.
fe: At one time as many as 18 fe
V [V
fe people were crouched downfe
fe and looking intently at the#
;jfe macadam surface. Students*:
and even a secretary In high- fe
fe heels and a sheath dress duck-fe
fe: walked gingerly around the fe
area. fe
fe A campus policeman dir-ife
:feected traffic away from andfe:
fe around the group. fe
fei Near the center, perhaps::-:
fe: searching more diligently than jij:
feithe rest, was an unidentified fe
:fe student who had lost one of jij:
fe: his contact lenses. fe



Visitors invited to
Army reserve drill
Local young men wanting a closeup look at the UJS. Army Reserve
in action will get a couple of all-day chances this weekend.
Members of the 3396th Reception Station (USAR) will gather
at the Gainesville Armory, 1125 N.E. Eight Ave,. for a Saturday
and Sunday of drill. Interested Reserve prospects are invited to visit
the meetings and receive a special welcome.
Bill Fleming, director of the University Alumni Association and
officer in charge of the 3396ths special recruiting section, will
be on hand to acquaint visitors with the unique unit which is one of
only two in the entire Third Army area comprising the southeastern
United States.
Taking note of the current world situation, Fleming said that
with the crisis in southeast Asia, this is a good way for a young
man to fulfill his military obligation without worrying about selective
service.**
Fleming said the 3396th is particularly interested in talking with
young men in the 17-25 1/2 age bracket who are faced with a six sixyear
year sixyear military obligation and would like to get off with as little as
four months active duty, and no more than 10.
But he said former reservists are also invited to come out and
look over the approximately 20 vacancies in the unit, many of them
in the E-5 and E-6 pay brackets.
Hie unit is continuing with plans for its annual two-week summer
camp at Fort Jackson, S.C., in early August, Immediately after the
the University of Florida's summer trimester. The 3396th made
up largely of UF students and staff membersclosely aligns its
training schedule with the University. Fleming pointed out for ex example,
ample, example, that a young man could enter on active duty after the end
of the winter trimester and still be back in time to resume school
in September.
Visitors this weekend can contact Capt. Fleming in Room 10 of
the armory. Those needing transporatlon should call the armory
327-2578 and ask for Mr. Fussell.
A more extensive open bouse** type meeting is planned next month.

I

ki
University Food Service Offers
Weekend Gator Specials
LUNCHEON and Dinner
Complete Meal 97C (plus tax)
Friday FRENCH FRIED FILLET OF FISH WITH TARTAR SAUCE
Saturday BAKED SUGAR CURED HAM WITH FRUIT SAUCE
Cnn/Z/iV ROAST YOUNG TOM TURKEY, CORNBREAD DRESSING,
OUIMUj GIBLET GRAVY 4 CRANBERRY SAUCE
mmsmmmmm choice of mmmmmmmm
POTATO or BUTTERED RICE Any 10c or 15$ SALAD
and ANY BEVERAGE Any 10$ or 15$ DESSERT
I other VEGETABLE 2 ROLLS or 2 BREAD SIICES and 2 BUTTER PATS

New editors chosen
for Coedikette
Becky Bearden, 3JM has been
chosen as editor of the new
Coedikette. >
Other staffers include: assistant
Editor, Barbara Sands, 2UC;
Business Manager, Susan Werner,
3JM; Art Editor, Jan Baldwin,
lUC; Assistant Art Editor, Susan
Williams, lUC; and staff writers:
Eunice Tall, 2UC; Judy Miller,
lUC; Judy Marx, lUC; typists:
Sue Nichols, lUC; Susan Owens,
lUC; and proofreaders: Rose Rosemary
mary Rosemary Maynard, lUC; Carolyn Watt,
3JM.
The editor reports Coed Coedikette
ikette Coedikette will take on a more informal,
you-attitude style.
Art profs chosen
to display works
Michael Stack, a graduate
teaching assistant in the
Department of Art at the UF, has
received a SSOO Award of Merit
for his oil painting, The Red
Stripe,** entered in the Florida
State Fair fine arts exhibition
at Tampa.
Stack is currently working on a
master's degree in art here.
A second artist, James E. Wing
Jr. of Gainesville, was selected
for one of the four SIOO crafts
awards and also received an
honorable mention citation for a
second work.

Friday / Feb. 19/ 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

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BOY MEETS GIRL
Miss Becky Bearden army sweetheart
passes up no prospects in selling tickets
to the 1965 Military Ball.
Miss Bearden met the lucky pup while
selling tickets at the price of two dollars
a couple to cadets at drill. The hall mil
be March 20 from 8:30 till 1:00 a.m.
Over one hundred dollars worth of door
prizes will be given away and the renowned
NORAD band will play during the Ball.

College of Engineering
observes National Week

In observance of National
Engineers* Week, an exhibition
will be open to the public on the
ground floor of the Florida Na National
tional National Bank Building from 1-5
pan. Sunday through Friday, Feb.
26, and from 9 a.m. 5 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 27. The exhibition
is being sponsored by the North
Central Florida Chapter of the
Florida Engineering Society, an
organization of registered pro professional
fessional professional engineers. UF chapters
of Sigma Tau Fraternity and Tau
Beta Pi Association, national
engineering honorary societies,
are coordinating the exhibition.
Exhibits from engineering firms
throughout the city and state will

Jewel Tea Co., Inc
...WILL BE INTERVIEWING
March 3 (Wednesday)
on campns
for
Sommer Franchise Operators
(Arrange an appointment in the University
Placement Office, Building H.)
GRADUATES IN MARKETING, GENERAI.
BUSINESS AND THE LIBERAL ARTS
LOCATIONS IN FLORIDA & GEORGIA

be displayed. A wide variety of
films depicting engineering
achievements will be shown
continuously.
Next Tuesday, from 1:30 3:30
p.m., at the exhibition, a special
"Engineering Career Day** pro program
gram program will be presented for Alachua
County high school students
interested in engineering as a
career. Six high schools from the
Gainesville area will participate.
A panel consisting of professional
engineers from industry and the
UF College of Engineering will
present brief talks on each branch
of engineering and conduct a
question and answer session.

Page 3



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb, 19, 1965

Page 4

BANQUET
(Cont*d from Page 1)
Speaking to the new SG ad administration
ministration administration Philpott said, It
is my. hope that we will face
the problems that come before
us with a real and genuine
spirit of humility." He quoted
an old Indian addage saying,
He has a right to c.riticize
who has a heart to help.
Criticism with the desire to
assist is a great help, Phil Philpott
pott Philpott said.
The UF vice-president
asked that the new regime con consider
sider consider the long-range conse consequences
quences consequences of any decisions it
may make. He said that a
person has a real knowledge
of life who plants a shade tree
knowing he'll never sit under
it.
It is my hope that the in incoming
coming incoming administration will
busy itself with the planting of
trees under the shade of which
it knows it will never sit,"
Philpott said.
Danny O'Connell, master of
ceremonies, introduced out outgoing
going outgoing president, Ken Kennedy,
who gave his farewell address
to the cabinet and presented
presidential awards and certi certificates
ficates certificates of appreciation.
Wednesday night brought to
a close not only Kennedy's
campus political career, but
his academic career also. He
graduated from Law School in
Dec. and begins work next
week.
He thanked his cabinet for
its spirit of spontaneity and
enthusiasm and said, We
have dared to tackle the
largest inherent problem in
SG continuity. We have
planted shade trees."
Kennedy said he regrets
having to leave the UF citing
the numerous memories and
experiences he has accumula accumulated
ted accumulated here, the most important
of which occuredduring his
year as president.
Speaking to Culpepper, Ken Kennedy
nedy Kennedy said, The two happiest
night of my life were the night
when I was elected and tonight,
when I am being relieved."
Kennedy thanked those who
worked with him during his
campaign and throughout his
administration noting that
Each person at this banquet
has contributed to make this
university just a little better."
The retiring president dis distributed
tributed distributed eleven awards of re recognition
cognition recognition for outstanding to the

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at 111 NW 13th St., just
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j **
.

. .retires &
MRMHIIHHIi
1111 if i| if if |
I tit wIH T7i JW
c
|U|I 1111, If:
frill' J 111
m.
*** W-y.
11 IHHHHpP I
DR. PHILPOTT |
.speaker :$
x*
student body. Included among j-j*
the recipients were: Bill Me- jjj:
Bride, 2UC, chairman of the ijij
Dollars for Scholars; Bob De :j:j
Loach, Sec. of Labor; Meg :j:j
Sowell, Sec. of Women's As- :j:j:
fairs; Carlos Piedra, Sec. of ijij:
Internationa Affairs; Drew ijiji
Haslett, Sec. of Student Acti- ijiji
vities; Marty Schwartz, Sec. jijij
of the Interior; Fred Lane, ijiji
outgoing treasurer and Dick jig
Gober, Kennedy's vice presl- jig
dent. jig
Bruce Culpepper, as his jig
first official act as Student jijij
Body president, dedicated the jig
efforts of his administration ijiji
to the memory of John Michael ijiji
Stratton, one of two UF stu- igi
dents killed in an auto acci- ijiji
dent over the weekend. isi
aVi

' FRIED CHICKEN /tn
SPECIAL
1/2 FRIED CHICKEN WITH FRENCH FRIES,
TOSSED SALAD, AND HOT ROLLS & BUTTER
$1.19 Child's Plate 79$
SATURDAYS FROM 5 P.M. TO 9 P.M.
STUDENTS WELCOME
f
"Motto* (leiiau/icait"
adj: Motto* Motel
Dessert Idea: DELICIOUS APPLE PIE
with CINNAMON ICE CREAM
OUR SPECIALTY: Ribs and
Charco^^ro^^Sueaks
'U.S.ftUUI NoJilk Qaittaiuille, fyLi.
ACROSS FROM J.M. FIELDS

'Festival of Nations' week ends

By AGNES FOWLES
Staff Writer
Over 76,000 foreign students are
now attending colleges across the
UJS. Attention is being drawn toward
these students as the Festival
of Nations" is celebrated this week.
The UF has approximately 600 for foreign
eign foreign students participating in its
educational programs. These stu students
dents students come from around the globe,
with the greatest number from La Latin
tin Latin America.
This great influx to UJS. insti institutions
tutions institutions of higher learning is at attributed
tributed attributed in part to the role of the
UJS. during World War H, and its
compassion toward people after the
war.
t Since the war, the UJS. has set
up aid programs to educate inter international
national international students in agriculture, ec economics,
onomics, economics, science, and other fields.
Col. Glenn Farris, UF advisor to
foreign students, cited goals in the
field of international education on the
individual, national, and internation international
al international levels.
First, we hope to foster the
general advancement of knowledge
for its own sake and for the ben benefit
efit benefit of mankind," he said. The
educational program is designed to
help each individual achieve through
education his fullest potential."
To increase international under understanding
standing understanding through both scholarly ef effort
fort effort and through association in an
international community ofscho ofschoars,
ars, ofschoars, and to contribute to the de development
velopment development of other n&fbns through
the education of their scholars are
some of our goals," Farris said.
He sees the program also as a
fulfillment of the obligation to co cooperate
operate cooperate with UjS. government and
other influential national agencies
and private foundations in their
international goals.
Foreign students also aid in fil filling
ling filling faculty needs, such as students
assistants to professors and re research
search research scholars, which may be di difficult
fficult difficult to meet from U.Ssources,
Farris added.
Many services for foreign stud students
ents students here are provided by the UF
International Student Center (ISC).
Almost 15,000 overseas air-mail
letters are handled by them each
year.
Before a formal admission appli application
cation application has been submitted to UF,
the ISC sees that adequate infor information
mation information is sent ot each student.

All applicants are screened for fin financial
ancial financial ability and English language.
One of the most important ser services
vices services that UF offers for foreign
students is provided by the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union International Host Com Committee.
mittee. Committee. Each foreign student is pro provided
vided provided with a host for his first tri trimester
mester trimester here. Often he is met upon
arrival in Gainesville by his host
and helped during the initial period
of confusion and anxiety.
The foreign student is beset by
many problems upon his arrival.
Housing is often a problem. The food
is different. There is a language
barrier.
The housing situation is usually
taken care of first. Some students,
sush as Manuel Jiminez of San
Jose, Costa Rica, are here without
their families. They usually make
quick adjustments to dorm living.
Enrique Herrarte of Guatemala
finds the change from his huge el eleven-room
even-room eleven-room house to a one-room
domicile rather interesting. The
off-campus housing office arms each
foreign student with a map and a
list of available living quarters.
University food may be an ob obstacle
stacle obstacle in a foreign student's adjust adjustment
ment adjustment to the new country. His re religion
ligion religion may prohibit the consumption
of some foods while other foods
may be unfamilier.
For example, Moslem students on
campus such as Bilal Yardimci of
Turkey are now observing the month
of hamazan. They fast for 30 days
only being able to eat one meal
when the sun is down. Parviz Kar Karbassi
bassi Karbassi of Iran is not observing this
holiday because he finds it, very
difficult to awaken at 3:00 a.m.
to eat, after studying many hours."
Many strict Moslems do not eat
pork. Fawzi Aladasani of Kuwait
strictly observes his dietary laws
although he has been in the UJS.
for almost two years. However, most
students (as American students do)
learn to eat UF food.
Language is made a problem be because

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Fridoy, Feb. 19, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

:] SPEAKERS BUREAU
/
I
For persons accepted as Blue
Key Speakers, there will he an
important organizational meeting
r Sunday 1:30 p.m. in Room 324
$ Florida Union.

MATH CLUB
j: Dr. ILS. Green will address the
University Math Club on Malhe Malheijmatical
ijmatical Malheijmatical Music** Monday 7:30 p.m.
: Room 205 Peabody Hall.
JHILLEL FOUNDATION
: A cultural exchange speaker
: from Israel will speak after the
: services at 8 p.m. tonight at the
if Hillel Foundation. Sendees will be
:j conducted by the members of Phi
Epsilon Pi fraternity in honor of
§ their parents* weekend.

'Flu/ 'grippe/ 'cold/ chief UF diseases

Sickness at the UF knows no fairer sex.** It strikes coeds**
and male students in about equal doses, according to Dr. W. A.
Hall, director of the UF infirmary.
Illness does, however, seem to effect the younger said Hall.
The infirmary treats more freshmen and sophomores than upper upperclassmen,**
classmen,** upperclassmen,** he said.
As a student becomes more mature, he realizes that staying
healthy requires personal concern and effort, Hall said. By the time
a student moves into upper division, continued Hall, he has learned,
sometimes from trial and error, that proper diet, sufficient sleep
and ample exercise are necessary to discourage disease.
The UF student is plagued mainly with upper respiratory diseases,
more commonly known as the flu, grippe/* and the cold.**
In the 1962-63 school year, UF students made 63,000 visits to the
university infirmary, about four per person.
Most of these trips were made by male students, but in proportion,
UF coeds** visited the doctor** more frequently. Hall attributes
this higher incidence of female visits to sociological reasons.**
UF males would rather take care of the problem themselves con continued
tinued continued Hall.
Proportionately, visitors to the infirmary will more often be

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PI SIGMA ALPHA

The deadline for applying tor
membership in Pi Sigma Alpha,
national political science
honorary, is today. Applications
are available at the political sci science
ence science department office.
LIBERAL FORUM
The coordinating secretary of
the Free Speech Movement, Mari Marilyn
lyn Marilyn Noble, will speak on the Free Freedom
dom Freedom of Speech and the Academic
Situation at Berkely** at the Liberal
Forum Sunday 7:30 p.m. in the
Florida Union Auditorium.
I.E.E.E.
The student chapter of I.EJEJS.
' will meet Monday 7 p.m. in Bless
Auditorium.

Page 5

campus news briefs m

Stu Bowers, local disc jockey,
will host a dance given by the
Florida Union Dance Committee
tonight 8 p.m. in the Florida Union
basement.
FELLOWSHIP
Is Christ Relevant Today?**
is the subject of the Florida Chris Christian
tian Christian Fellowship meeting tonight
7 p.m. at 2042 NW 7th Lane. For
transportation meet in front of
the Florida Union at 6:45 p.m.
SIGMA THETA TAU
Sigma Theta Tau, national nur nursing
sing nursing honorary will meet tonight
7:30 p.m. in Room 112 of the Med Medical
ical Medical Science Building.

DANCE

unmarried, campus residents. Many students come to the infirmary
to get some uninterrupted rest; rest that is Impossible in the dormi dormitories
tories dormitories because meals must be taken outside the dormitory.
Married and off-campus students do not have this problem.
Yearly, the number of student visits to the infirmary increases,
but in recent years there has been an increase in the number of
out-patients.** Out-patients,** explained Hall, are patients being
treated by the infirmary but not confined to the infirmary.*
Increasing the number of out-patients** means more students
are physically able to attend class more often. Hall praises the
expanding Interest in the field of ** campus health tor this contribution.
The infirmary looks for its* largest inflow of patients during the
colder months. Hall noted that the infirmary does a capacity business
during the pressure periods** around exam time. The students
leave themselves wide-open for flu** and colds** by staying up
studying, and by not eating regularly, said Hall.
The approximately 200 patients that visit the infirmary daily
are treated by a staff of seven full-time physicians headed by Hall.
This amounts to a doctor for every 2,000 UF students, or just about
in keeping with the national average said Hall.

TAU KAPPA E PSILON

Tau Kappa Epsilon invites all
independent men to a smoker Mon Monday
day Monday 6:309 p.m. at 1245 NW Ist
Ave. Following the smoker all are
invited to watch Tau Kappa Epsilon
play in the Blue League finals in
basketbalL
KAPPA PSI
The *65 winter trimester pledge
class tor Kappa Psi pharmaceu pharmaceutical
tical pharmaceutical fraternity are G ary Sutherby,
Bob Greenburg, ButchFawley,si
Eldridge McCormick, Burt Mc-S:
Conald, Bob Morgan, James M.>:i
Carter. 8
FRESHMAN COUNCILS
Miracle on 13th Street,** a;:*:
film, will be shown Monday 7:30:;:
p.m. to the Freshman Council in
Room 324 of the Florida Union, ft:
_ .. w-t-.

ART CLASSES
Art classes, sponsored by the
Florida Union Fine Arts Com Committee,
mittee, Committee, will meet every Thursday
7:30 pan. from Feb. 25 April
1 in Room 215 of Florida Union.
The classes will be taught by
Mrs. Marian V. Davis, art instruc instructor
tor instructor at P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School. Cost of the six lessons
will be $5 per person. Sign up
in Room 315 Florida Union.

>V*v.vyivv,>v*v.yTOyiViWv>wia}
Folk dancing group
small but loyal
One of the least known activities
sponsored by the Florida Union is
folk dancing, which has several
years been attracting a small but
loyal grow> of devotees.
This group is now attempting to
expand the number of folk dance
addicts on campus by offering
instruction Wednesday evenings at
8 p.m. in the Social Room of the
FU.
Dances taught at the Union will
samply many countries; Maylm
from Israel, Mlserlou from
Greece, Troika from Russia,
Kreuz Koeniz from Germany, Road
to the Isles from Scotland, Doud Doudlebska
lebska Doudlebska Polska from
Czechoslovakia, schottlshes from
Scandinavia, landlers from
Bavaria and many more.
The dances will be taught by
Betty Korel and Willa Selfridge,
who will be sharing what they have
learned from groups in many parts
of this country and in Europe.
Sign up for instruction in Room
315 of the Florida Union. $1 for
the 10 weeks series will be
charged to help pay for records.



Page 6

> The Florida Alligator/ Friday, Feb. 19, 1965

THE FLORIDA
I ALUGATOR
/ served By United Press International
ERNIE UTZ STEVE VAUGHN JOE CASTE LLO
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor Executive Editor
LOU FERRIS ED SEARS
Editorial Page Editor Sports Editor
, /

(ED. NOTE: Ibis is the first part of a series and
this letter was written by an American girl who is
taking her junior year of college in France. The
letter is addressed to an American girl studying at
the UF, a former schoolmate. The last portion of
the letter was personal and therefore deleted.
Tbe rest of this letter will follow next week.)
6 Fevrier (Feb. 6, 1965)
THIS WILL be a missionary letter, because this
is the story of Berlin and my Christmas vacation.
This is the story of what is wrong with the world.
I AND TWO gals from the Institute got on the
train in Marseille at 10 p.m. Dec. 22, rode all night
to Frankfurt, Germany, spent eight hours there
walking and looking and eating pork chops and
sausages and saurkraut, and beginning to love the
German people, got back on the train at 10 p.m.
and rode all night to Berlin.
WE SPENT five days in Berlin. It wasnt enough.
1 cant tell the story adequately, but here goes.
The train was packed. West Germans were allowed
to go into East Germany during the Christmas
season and to Berlin. We stood in the aisle.
MOST EUROPEAN trains are built with compart compartments,
ments, compartments, eight people in each, sealed off from the
aisle, which is on the side. The aisle is maybe
two and one-half feet wide, and I can attest from
experience that it is not especially made for traveling.
I sat down sideways on my suitcase, so I wouldnt
have to move every time someone went by, leaned
my head against the wall, and fell asleep.
WE KNEW we would cross the East German
border, about one or two a.m., and we were a little
nervous about the cowboys and Indians game we
expected with our passports. Suddenly I felt two
hands on my shoulders, shaking me awake, and heard
a gruff German voice.
NOT UNDERSTANDING any German at all, being
sleepy and nervous, I almost jumped out of my
skin. My first thought was Its all overl*. But
this turned out to be one of the many nice-things nice-thingsfrom-people
from-people nice-thingsfrom-people that happened to us. The customs
officials* compartment was empty and there was
room to sit down.
THERE WE met a Tunisian boy who had studied
engineering in East Germany, was doing apprentice apprenticeship
ship apprenticeship in France and West Germany, spoke French
and German, and was going to visit friends over the
holidays.
AND A German boy from West Berlin who only
spoke German. We had some real conversations.
The boarder guards came through. Passport checks
and declarations of money carried and purchase
of the $2.50 visa that gives an alien the right to go
into Berlin.
THINK ON that a little. A piece of paper can
make the difference in whether you can go from
one city to another or not. About 7 a.m. we got to
Pottsdam, outside Berlin, and from that point on,
the train rolled through a corridor lined on both
sides with barbed wire. And then we were in Berlin.

GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Ctftooolrt), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Kay
Hdfnutir, (Correspondents), Yvette Csrdozo, Agnes Fowles,
Dootta Math Ison, Dan Taylor, Sam UUman, Selwin H. Ciment.
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Kotlb, Ann Carter, Evan Langbetn, Ira Liebsfeld, Thelma Mossman,
Fran Snider, Cynthia Tunstall, Harvey Wolfson, John Shiplett,
Chip Sharon, Karen Vltunac, Jack Zucker, David Ropes, Ami
Saps retain, Carl Brown, Jane Young, Bill Lockhart, Ken Simon,
and Dias Dobson, Jeffrey Denkewalter, GJS. Corseri, Eunice Tall.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements and
to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement Involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless notice Is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must he given before next Insertion,
j THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and Is
published five times weekly except dulng May, June and July when It Is published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class
matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

A point of view

To tell a story

FREEMAN FORMULATES
f
"IF YOU ACT REAL QUICK, KID, I COULD RENT YOU ONE
OF MY APARTMENTS FOR S9O A MONTH."

(ED. NOTE: The editors note
which should have run over the
Letters to the Editor section
yesterday, was inadvertantly
omitted. With reference to the
political letters in yesterdays
section, we should have stated that

Thanks gator.
EDITOR:
On behalf of Alpha Lambda Delta, I would like
to thank the ALLIGATOR for a fine coverage of
our activities. Dean Jackson, our Administrative
Advisor, has expressed the opinion that this year
your stories about our organization have been
excellent.
Because the publicity we have received in the
ALLIGATOR has helped us achieve our major goal goalrecognition
recognition goalrecognition of outstanding freshmen women we
extend our sincere thanks.
J:
MARGARET LEE
President, Alpha Lambda Delta
What I meant...
EDITOR:
SOME UNFORTUNATE inferences have been drawn
from a statement made during the final debate*
between the Student Governmental presidential candi candidates.
dates. candidates.
IAM referring to a quote in the Alligator, .. .tear
the damn thing down, which I (Freedom Party
candidate) made in reference to the fence which
prevented direct access from the Murphree area
dorms to the Gold Coast shops.
TAKEN OUT of context and seriously, the statement
gives the impression that I was advocating nr
endorsing vandalism (and anarchy!). I wasnt. Nor
do I wish to, . .take a place in history along
side Harvey Oswald and A. Hitler!
THE QUOTE was taken from some introductory
remarks in which I was humorously discussing the
hasty efforts by the two major political parties to
include Murphree area fence planks in their
platforms.
BELIEVEING THIS to be yet another attempt to
con votes with irrelevancies, I jokingly lauded the
acts of vandalism which had precluded this effort
to cloud and sidestep what I considered to be real
issues.
LIKEWISE, I expected that my comments wouldnt
be taken seriously when I suggested that, .. .should
Student Government ever get around tohavingthe
fence removed, (provided that they had the
opportunity), the infamous pfize would no doubt
be carted up to the third floor of the Florida Union
(S.G. offices) with the fence committee(s) members
dividing up the spoils* and perhaps wearing fence
links as status symbols, a la Florida Blue Keys!*
BUT, SUCH is the fate of comic relief when
serious problems (e. g. religious and racial dis-

Le T TeR 2

those letters were sent in during
the campaign and were not printed
at that time. It is quite likely
that the authors of those letters
would not have wanted them printed
out of the context of the campaign.)

Are we?
EDITOR:
Are college students second-class citizens?
Are they the only group not allowed by society
to organize in order to represent the views of their
group?
Theres the A.M.A., the A.D.A., the American
Association of University Professors.
Let us set aside the stands of the National Students
Association and just consider the principle of any
group of citizens having the right to manifest its
views.
Views on what problems? First, who is to say
that a group with an average level of education
much higher than the national average represented
by duly elected leaders cannot even voice opinions
on education?
Are they not capable of making judgement of
educational conditions and needs of today. Or does
Prof. Moore teach down to his students and deem
them inferior, incapable?
Is this his definition of college student? Does
he believe they become cognizant of the world around
them the day they receive a diploma or only when
they reach age 30? Should only those over thirty
be electors?
And they are the largest group of citizens with
a majority having a background in Political Science.
They read more magazines and newspapers than
the average voter and are more up on the news,
national and international problems and pros and
cons of policies.
If those in Student Government around the country
are voters who can deny them the right to express
ideas on public policy as a group?
Students around the world look down upon oui
supposed student apathy.
Do they not have a right to give their opinions on
national, state and local education programs and
policies? And political issues too?
Im sure that if the ideas expressed by the
NSA were similar to those of Prof. Moore hed
be all for their expressing them.
JOSEPH WEISS, 7AG
crimination, hometown poverty corps, and academic
freedom) are considered outside the realm of Student
Government; i. e. a farce assumes an authentic
nature by default.
NOT THAT I wish to completely disparage the
Berlin Wall protest. Despite the failure to abide
by certain principles of civil disobedience (the fence
could have been carefully dislodged in a public and
loving manner, with the willingness to accept the
consequences of such an act!), I must admit a slight
degree of secret admiration for those students who
addressed themselves directly to the problem.
MIGHT THE anonymous appearance of the fence,
and the absurd reactions of the political parties
also be considered crimes in some sense?
JIM HARMEUNG



i mH ? |
Hfen^_
i tMBP
1 SB# SV 9
| flafir 9
A pH^J
BARGER

Campus Life
Conference set

Tom Freeman Chairman of the
Campus Life Conference, has an announced
nounced announced that Dr. Harry Philpott,
Dr. Benjamin Garger and Dr.
Charles McCoy will be the fea featured
tured featured speakers of the conference
February 26 and 27.
The program has been finalized
with the acceptance of our invi invitation
tation invitation to participate in this student
faculty conference by these dis distinguished
tinguished distinguished men, Freeman said.
They are well recognized author authorities
ities authorities within their individual fields
and will lend significant depth to
our program.
Dr. Harry Philpott has been
Vice President of the UF since
1957 and is responsible for the
administrative affairs of the uni university.
versity. university. Dr. Philpotts topic The
Changing University will be pre presented
sented presented Friday evening, February
26, at the University Faculty Club.
Dr. Benjamin Barger of the De Department
partment Department of Psychology, isthe
Project Director of a grant from
the National Institute of Mental
Health and has been teaching psy psychologist
chologist psychologist for 14 years. Dr. Bar Barger,
ger, Barger, who has made significant stu studies
dies studies of the mental attitudes of
university students, will speak on
TTie Changing Student at 10 a.m.,
i urday, February 27.
Dr. Charles McCoy is presently
a professor in the Department of
Religion at the Pacific School of
Religion, Berkley, California. Dr.
McCoy was formerly a professor
of religion at the University of
Florida and served for several
years as faculty advisor to the Uni University
versity University Religion Association. Dr.

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PHILPOTT

McCoy will speak on new Trends
in Religion and Higher Education**
at 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 27 at
the University Faculty Club.
The purpose of the Campus Life
Conference is to bring together
student leaders and selected
members of the faculty to discuss
university and student problems,**
Freeman said. Most of the student
leaders of the UF campus have been
invited to participate in the dis discussion
cussion discussion with members of the fa faculty.**
culty.** faculty.**
Hie Campus Life Conference is
to be held Friday evening and
Saturday morning and afternoon at
the University Faculty Club, which
is the Old Gainesville Country
Club. The new University Reli Religious
gious Religious Association officers will be
installed at a luncheon scheduled
for Saturday noon at the Confer Conference.
ence. Conference. Dr. Delton Scudder, Uf* Pro Professor
fessor Professor of Religion, will preside at
the installation and recognition
ceremonies.
The Conference will conclude
Saturday afternoon with a panel
discussion of the student life on
the University campus. Members
of the panel will feature Dr. Ro Robert
bert Robert Spivey, Chaplain, Florida
State University; Dr. Austin Creel,
Associate Professor of Religion;
Dr. Emmanuel Gitlin, Professor of
Humanities; Rev. William Lilly
Croft, Episcopal University Cen Center;
ter; Center; Rev. John Touchberry, Chap Chaplain,
lain, Chaplain, Georgia Seagle Hall; Mr. Bob
Mounts, President, U.R.A. and
Mr. Vernon Swartzel, Chairman,
Religion-in-Life Week.

UF Mortar Board
ready to tap
If, in the next few weeks, you should see a group of black robed
singers gliding across campusdon*t be surprised. The University
Choir is not on retreat, but Mortar Board is tapping.
It is a tradition for the outgoing members to tap while serenading
through the Womens Housing Areas. The old members wear black
mortar boards and gowns while carrying lanterns to light their way.
The tappees are required to wear similar caps and gowns to all
of their classes the following week. In this way, the campus can
recognize and congratulate its outstanding senior women.
Mortar Board began its career as the first and only National Honor
Organization for women in 1918. Since this founding, 47 years ago,
it has grown to 109 chapters. The need for such a society and its
undoubted usefulness in American collegiate life is now firmly es established.
tablished. established. >
The purpose of the organization is to recognize and develop out outstanding
standing outstanding leadership, scholarship, and service. To this end, its
college chapters strive to maintain a membership which is repre representative
sentative representative of all phases of campus life open to women.
Mortar Board was chartered at the UF in 1960. At this time the
National Organization incorporated the existing local honorary,
Trianon. This parae has been preserved to distinguish the chapter.
Trianon of Mortar Board ff.rT that it serves the University iidlr iidlr-3ctly
3ctly iidlr-3ctly as a sounding board Trom which its members gain insight
through sharing individual experiences in leadership. In addition to
this inter-directed service, the group sponsors an annual Ladys
Buffet at Homecoming, and the Campus Christmas Tree Lighting
each December. Also they engage in a yearly project to aid Dollars
for Scholars. This year they plan a rummage sale in April.


John Lauritzen wanted further knowledge
m § t
1 Bp*
m B Jgm:
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w" A .*wjAk
Hr jK:; I Jf
SR UmmSrn I
Hes finding it at Western Electric
When the University of Nevada awarded John System's revolutionary electronic telephone switch*
Lauritzen his B.S.E.E. in 1961, it was only the first ing system.
big step in the learning program he envisions for If you set the highest standards for yourself, both
himself. This led him to Western Electric. For WE educationally and professionally, we should talk,
agrees that ever-increasing knowledge is essential Western Electrics vast communications job as
to the development of its engineersand is help- manufacturing unit of the Bell System provides
ing John in furthering his education. many opportunities for fast-moving careers for
John attended one of Western Electrics three electrical, mechanical and industrial engineers,
Graduate Engineering Training Centers and gradu- as well as for physical science, liberal arts and
ated with honors. Now, through the Company-paid business majors. Get your copy of the Western
Tuition Refund Plan, John is working toward his Electric Career Opportunities booklet from your
Masters in Industrial Management at Brooklyn Placement Officer. And be sure to arrange for an
Polytechnic Institute. He is currently a planning interview when the Bell System recruiting team
engineer developing test equipment for the Bell visits your campus.
Western Electric manufacturing and supply unit of the bell system Hm)
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
Principal manufacturing locations in 13 citiesDOperating centers in many of these same cities plus 36 others throughout the U.S.
Engineering Research Center, Princeton, N.J.DTeletype Corp., Skokie, 111., Little Rock, Ark.DGeneral Headquarters, New York City

Friday, Feb. 19, 1965, The Florida Alligator, I

LOANS
Continued From Page 1
and books."
Grigsby agreed that SIOOO does
not cover all the expenses a student
has. He said, "Those with fami families
lies families need more money, but there is
more money in assistants hips and
fellowships.
Also, they (the government)
changed their requirement for par participation
ticipation participation to less than full time.
The student can attend half to full
time now."
Grigsby explained that if the
amount of money per student was
increased, that the number of stu students
dents students receiving loans would have
to drop. "Our aim is to help as
many as we can," he said.
The National Defense Loan pro program
gram program is based on a matching
system of funds by the UF and the
government. The government gives
the UF nine dollars for every one
dollar the UF can raise.
The successful"Dollarsfor
Scholars" drive last trimester was
part of this matching program.

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator/ Friday, Feb. 19, 1965

Page 8

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

Services
STUDY IN GUADALJARA,
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Summer School, a fully accredited
University of Arizona program,
conducted in cooperation with
professors from Stanford Univer University,
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history, language and literature
courses. Tuition, board and room
is $265. Write Prof. Juan B. Rael,
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(M-98-lt-c).
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ID
CARD for discounts in USA and 28
countries. STUDENT SHIPS to
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I 2400 Hawthorn* Road Rt. 20 Hoi* FR 6-5011 1
STARTS TONiTE 3 Great Hits
Exclusive First Area Shewing
two .Men too .Many for the
giri who can afford anything 9
ROBERT^:I:/ ANDY
MAUHCEa^^nM|^7
chevalier wJmmM
as PHILIP OULAINE COLOR,
SHOWN FIRST AT 7:00
Rock has Doris... where she
Jmt : ,. v>
Rock Hudson doris tkvm
. iDNyaNoafr. w
iOND MO NO FUJMBRS
3rd Hit at 10:40
THE PULITZER
PRIZE NOVEL {s*£ a
Kuanum mnneri \ Mockingbird (
BEST ACTOR, cmomr fox A I *- /
iww_ I GREGORY PECK
KST MI BMCnOM JL

Por Rent
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY
3-bedroom, 2-bath home with
garbage disposal and dishwasher,
attached carport, large private
back yard. $125 per month. Contact
Mr. Eddy manager of the Main
Cafeteria Ext. 2561 or phone 376-
5831. (B-98-3t-c).
ROOMS FOR RENT, Central heat,
maid service, everything
furnished. 378-2583. 237 SW 2nd
Place. (B-98-ts-c).
FEBRUARY FREE! Your private
room In 2-bedroom house with 2.
other students. Move in nowpay
S4O per month starting March!
FR 8-1002 anytime. (B-96-3t-c).
NEW, ONE- BEDROOM,
FURNISHED Apartment. Twin
beds, wall to wall carpet, air airconditioned,
conditioned, airconditioned, private entrance, and
patio. 217-A NW 3rd Ave. 6-3179
or FR 2-0565. (B-96-3t-c). |
LARGE ROOMS IN FRIENDLY
Surroundings available to male
students. Reasonable rates;
utilities and maid service included.
Convenient to campus and town.
See at 104 SW Bth Street or call
372-0243. (B-82-tf-nc).
&

Por Sale
SMITH CORONA PORTABLE
TYPEWRITER Sterling Model.
Excellent condition. Call 376-0358
after 6 p.m. (A-95-st-c).
ZENITH TV. 21, good condition,
S3O. CAP AND GOWN, very good
condition, $25. Phone 376-8042.
(A-97-3t-c).
FOR SALE OR RENT *56
All aluminum TRAILER HOME,
8x36, one bedroom, twin beds,
gas heat, large living room. On
lot. Owner will be at trailer from
10 till 4 on Sunday. Progress
Trailer Park, North on 441. Call
376-9864 or 372-3890^A-97-2t-c).
BEAUTIFUL RED WOOL Lilli Ann
Suit with detachable fox collar. Size
10. Also red silk chiffon short
formal size 9. COMPLETE set of
4 Famous Artist Course Books.
SIOO.OO. Call 2-0528 after 6. (A (A---96-3t-c).
--96-3t-c). (A---96-3t-c).
STEREOPHONIC TAPE RECORD RECORDER.
ER. RECORDER. Monophonic record player.
Call FR 6-1901 week days
9 pjn. (A-96-3t-p).
1964 HONDA-90 for sale. Only
used 7 months. Price $285. Call
Bob, 376-8157, apt. 104 Colonial
Manor Apartments. (A-96-3t-c).
1959 AIR CONDITIONED '2
bedroom house trailer. Built-in
washer, 10x20 cabana, large fenced
yard. Call 372-1868 after 5:30
p.m. weekdays. (A-94-10t-c).
Personal
THE SUNK DIDN'T FORGET;
Happy Birthday to the big Z.
(J-98-lt-p).
!
Help Wanted
BOYS 12 to 16 years old for
established paper routes on and
adjacent to University grounds.
Contact the Gainesville Sun, 378-
1411. (E-98-st-c).
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmummmma
iSBHpI
, SUKWN ,
SoftfcX- I
1 foOftV IS
kO|t£ ARtAtts
. Jkxe l\ MQRte 'tb v.mu |

4
Autos
1962 MG MIDGET ROAD6TER,
radio, heater, white side wall tires,
top and interior excellent. Me Mechanically
chanically Mechanically perfect. Can be
financed. Call 376-8883. (G-98-
lt-c).
MILK TRUCK, nationally famous,
attractive pink paint job, racing
stripe, 4 speed stick, carries 15
comfortably, never raced. S2OO.
376-8756. (G-97-2t-c).
1960 FORD GALAXY 2-door, V-8,
See at 215 NW 10th Ave. Phone
6-4582 from 8 till 6 p.m. (G-97-
6t-c).
63 WHITE VW, radio, white walls,
*64 tag, excellent condition; no
maintenance needed. $1395. Bank
will finance SI,OOO. Call Coach
Ellenson, Ext. 2131 home 6-9768.
(G-97-st-c).
*
NEED MONEY? So do I! *57
MGA Roadster, new top, seats,
paint, great engine with extras
wire wheels. $650. Call Steve
Brewer 2-7170 or see on ATO
lawn. (G-97-2t-c).
*6l AUSTIN HEALY SPRITE.
Excellent condition. $1095. Easy
payments. See or call Terry Moran
Rm. 1081 Hume Hall, 372-9460.
(G-97-3t-c).
.1961 WHITE CORVAIR, radio, ww,
heater. S6OO. Call FR 2-2369.
(G-96-3t-c).
ll 11 1 1 11
1955 PLYMOUTH BELVEDERE 2-
door hardtop. Reliable transpor transportation.
tation. transportation. $l5O. Phone FR 6-9998
after 6 p.m. (G-96-3t-c).
*57 CHEVY 2-door Bel Air, sedan.
$250 call 8-1330. (G-95-st-c).
ALFA ROMEO 1961 Help! the
bank has got roe! The Alfa is
yours for only SI2OO. See at Florida
National Bank or call Bo Cook
372-9363. (G-94-ts-c).
Lost & Pound
LOST: SATURDAY NIGHT at SAE
Party two pairs prescription
glasses in Madras cases. Please
call Claudlne Laabs at Rawlings
FR 2-3621. (L-96-3t-p).
Situations
BABY WANTED. Our maid now
available to care for your baby in
my home; weekly at the regular
rates. 254-A Flavet 3. FR 2-3788.
(F-98-st-c).

jfIEK mimm N
WZSS. WBMLJSI
'HOW 10 MURDER KBOR WIFE*
UWTEDiUmSTS
1

Wanted
GRADUATE STUDENT wants
roommate to share large 2-
bedroom trailer plus living room.
Everything $ 30/mo. Call morning
or midnight 2-1914. (C-98-lt-c).
WANTED CYCLE OR SCOOTER.
Will use for trips to Orlando.
Can pay approx. $l5O. Call Skip
Hardy at FR 2-9220. (C-98-2t-p).
ONE FEMALE ROOMMATE to
share modern furnished, air airconditioned,
conditioned, airconditioned, apartment; close to
campus. Call 378-2249. (C-97-
2t-c).
WANTED TO RENT beginning Sept.
Ist, by visiting researcher, 3 or
4 bedroom house, unfurnished or
furnished. In Finley School area.
376-2570. (C-96-3t-c).
* -.
WANTED ONE FEMALE
Roommate to share modern split
level apartment, 3 blocks from
campus. Immediate occupancy.
Phone 372-1219. (C-96-3t-c).
Israeli lawyer
and commentator
to speak here
Mrs. Shulamith Aloni, Israli law lawyer
yer lawyer and radio commentator will
speak this week to student groups
on the UF campus and at the Bnai
B'rith Hlllel foundation.
Mrs. Aloni, who broadcasts over
the Israel Radio Network, will speak
at the Law building, Feb. 19 on
Israeli Law and Burocracy; the
religion department, Feb. 19 on Is Israeli
raeli Israeli and the Jew; and the Hlllel
Foundation, Feb. 19 and 21 on Po Political
litical Political trends among Israeli Youth
litical trends among Israeli Youth
and What Israelis Can Learn From
Americans.
A graduate of the Hebrew Univer University
sity University Law School in 1956, Mrs. Al Aloni
oni Aloni has lectured extensively to stu students
dents students on civics and political sci science.
ence. science. She has published 150 articles
and six books.
Mrs. Aloni is currently on a three threemonth
month threemonth tour of college campuses
on the East Coast. Her appearance
on the UF campus is sponsored
by B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
and the United Jewish Appeal under
a cultural interchange program.
-



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SMATHERS VISITS HERE
Sen George Smothers visited the WUFT
studios Tuesday to videotape a special half halfhour
hour halfhour TV program, Senator Smothers: Senator
From Florida, which will be telecast tonight
at 8:30 over WUFT -TV Channel 5. Producer
host Mark Damen (left helps Smothers with
his neck mike before air time During the
special taping they discuss U.S policy in South
Viet Nam and the consequences of using nuclear
weapons They reflect on the problems of
Communism, the problem of Cuba and the rela relationship
tionship relationship between the USSR and China

GATOR SYMPHONIC ON WHIRLWIND
TOUR OF STATE THIS WEEKEND

The UF Gator Symphonic Band
will present tour concerts in three
days this weekend during a whirl whirlwind
wind whirlwind tour of Florida.
The itinerary includes stops in
Lakeland, Cocoa Beach, Miami
Beach and Orlando.
Richard W. Bowles, whose
compositions are playedf
throughout the nation, directs the
symphonic band most advanced in
the family of musical groups at

Humpty
Oumpty
FRIDAY AII Rsh
You Con Eat,
OLD-FASHIONED Hush Puppies,
FISH NIGHT Cole Slow 97 s
, SPM- 9PM
Fresh Cedar Key Rsh
HUM PTY DUMPTY
MUVf-M t KSAUKAMT
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEALS
FR2-5387 3K>M.W.l3ttSt.

the University. Others include the
concert, military, marching and
variety bands.
The trip opens at Lakeland
Junior High School Auditorium
tonight.
Two concerts are on tap
Saturday at Cocoa Beach High
School at 10:30 am. and at Miami
Beach's North Shore Community
Center at 8:15 p.m.

NOBLES
(Continued From Page 1)
Nobles said she did not actually
demonstrate during the riots. She
had orders not to become physi physically
cally physically involved; instead, she co coordinated
ordinated coordinated jail releases.
The significance of the Berkely
sit-ins is something all serious
students must think about. Basi Basically
cally Basically during my talk I will con constantly
stantly constantly raise the question What
does this mean to you?
She indicated that when she re returns
turns returns to school in August she does
not know whether she will stay with
the Free Speech Movement or not.
I dont know whether or not
well be in existence then, she
said.
I think the ball will be carried
by a student political party called
'Slate/ whose members come from
the composite groups which made
up the Free Speech Movement.
She said in recent student
government elections at the Cal
Berkley campus, members of the
free speech movement ran on Slate
party tickets and won clear
across the board/
Miss Nobles estimated one-third
on the student governmental
Berkely is involved in the Free
Speech Movement.
She indicated some of the
material she will use is that
which didn't hit the headlines/
This material will be partly an
analysis of what happened and
partly behind-the-scenes action.
Miss Nobles, from Claremont,
Calif., said she does not intend
particularly to speak of Mario
Savio, head of the movement,as
I'm not particularly dealing in
personalities/
However, she did say she felt
students here were interested in
him, and she would speak of him
to some small extent.
Charles Schultz Jr., project co coordinator,
ordinator, coordinator, said it was arranged to
have her speak here through a
personal acquaintance.

I
ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITIES
for Seniors and Graduates in mechanical,
AERONAUTICAL, CHEMICAL,
ELECTRICAL,
and METALLURGICAL
ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING MECHANICS
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
PHYSICS and
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
I MON. & TUES., FEB. 22, 23
Appointments should be made
in advance through your
College Placement Office
Pratt & jj
Whitney division Os cum*.
Aircraft P
| An Equal Opportunity Employer t
SPECIALISTS IN POWER POWER FOA PROPULSION POWER FOR AUXILIARY SYSTEMS.
CURRENT UTILIZATIONS INCLUDE AIRCRAFT, MISSILES. SPACE VEHICLES, MARINE AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS
_ m j :

Friday, Feb. 19, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

I campus cum §
g: :g
iUr
$ 1I |
Laurie hails
iV, **
from Nassau
X .v
:: Today's Campus Cutie $;
:: claims Nassau, Bahamas,
:: as her home. Laurie-Star *
% Lynn is a Freshman who :£
&: plans on majoring in :§
$ English. :£
Scuba diving is her >:
*: favorite sport, but sports
car racing ranks close
behind. She says that *:
reading horror stories is
her favorite hobby.
She is a member of Delta [:;
Delta Delta sorority.
Laurie is a resident of £:
$ Mallory Hall, where she £:
says she is the most
$: mischievous girl on her
$ floor. ; :£

Opportunity program
planned by Council
The Florida Educational Research
and Development Councilformed
last December by Us and county
school officials is mapping a spe special
cial special program in the field of equal
education opportunities.
The Council has proposed the es establishment
tablishment establishment of summer and winter
institutes, bringing together educa educational
tional educational leaders and county consul consultants
tants consultants on the equal education pro
blero.
With the passage of the 1964
Civil Rights Act, the equal educa educational
tional educational opportunity clause has dir directly
ectly directly affected the state's county
school systems. Each of the coun counties
ties counties plans to hire or use a con consultant
sultant consultant to find a local solution.
We hope to have the consultants
attend the institutes if it can be
arranged," explained Dr. J. B.
White, executive secretary of the
Council.

Political leans of
foreign countries
hard to predict
When you try and interpret
another country's culture, it is not
possible to tell by their values
whether they are going commun communistic,
istic, communistic, socialistic or demorcatic,"
Associate Professor Harry W.
Hutchinson said Wednesday at the
Latin American Colloglum
Hutchinson is an anthropologist
in the department of psychiarty in
the College of Medicine. He wrote
the article Cultural Change in
Brazil.''
In speaking on the topic Values:
North and South America;*' he
related the values of South Am America
erica America to the people of Brazil,
Dr. Hutchinson spent eight years
in Brazil studying and writing.
He stated that the main im impetus
petus impetus for writing the article was
the feeling that the television com commentators
mentators commentators and journalists were
giving a lopsided view as to what
was happening in So. America.
Whatever he read was incomplete
and inform aton was left out.
Everyone seemed to think that
Americans were at a certain level
and that Brazilians were at a lower
level, working their way up. This
was supposed on all levels, econ*
omically, politically, socially and
culturally," Dr. Hutchinson said.
Brazilians have a strong feeling
of personalism. They admire the
uniqueness of the individual. They
do not consider they are like
anyone else, he said. This might
indicate the lack of community
spirit in Brazilian cities and show
why it may be so strong in the
American cities. Americans tend
towards conformity.
UNIVERSITY
Lutheran Church
1826 W. Univ. Ave.
(opp. handball courts)
2 services for student
convenience:
9-9:45 a.m.
11-12 noon
Sunday Evening Stu Student
dent Student

Page 9



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 19, 1965

A regime ends: Kennedy out, Culpepper in

The new has re replaced
placed replaced the old and ma machinery
chinery machinery of a new UF
student government is
now inoperation In

De LOACH
MILES

this first of a two part
series officers of Ken
Kennedy* s regeime
examine their offices
and what they did The
series will he con concluded
cluded concluded Monday
Overcoming the initial problems
caused by the lack of records of
the accomplishments of former
Student Government (SG) adminis administrations,
trations, administrations, the 1964-65 SG cabinet
officially went out of office
Wednesday.
The absence of any permanent
references to procedure, contacts,
attempted projects and basic*
ground rules proved a definite
handicap to last year's cabinet and
as they left office, they predicted
that the incoming administration
should not encounter the same
difficulties.
Under the administration of
President Wallace W. (Ken)
Kennedy, each cabinet officer
turned in a mid-year report of
his activities, a Standard Operating
Procedure manual and a final
report. Files have been organized
for each office and suggestions
left for the incoming secretaries.
The lack of office administra administration
tion administration hindered the initiation of
platform projects set down by
what was Gator Party, and Kennedy
insisted that his cabinet keep
accurate files, not only to oil the
hinges of his administration, but
to insure more continuity in SG
itself.
Under the apt direction of two
Air society offers
Washington trips
The Arnold Air Society is of offering
fering offering two expense-paid trips to
Washington D.C., March U, 12
and 13 to the two lucky cadets
who have purchase
The winners of a raffle will be
their guests during a March 20
tour of Washington D.C. which will
include the Pentagon, The Cap Capital,
ital, Capital, Washington and Lincoln Mon Monuments,
uments, Monuments, the White House, Tomb
of the Unknown Soldier at Arling Arlington
ton Arlington Memorial Cemetary and other
points of interest. Arnold Air So Society
ciety Society members and their two guests
will be staying at the Visiting Of Offler's
fler's Offler's Quarters at Andrew AFR.
Over SIOO worth of additional
prizes will be raffled off at the
military balL
As of yesterday only one entry
had been received. Entree fee is
s7JEntrees must be full time UF
studetns. Checks should be made
payable to the Advanced Officer's
Club.

MALAGAN
SOWELL

ABSENCE OF PERMANENT RECORDS WAS PROBLEM a

capable Administrative Assistants,
Steve Freedman and Bob DeLoach,
the Kennedy administration strove
to fulfill as many feasible planks
of the old Gator party platform
as possible, plus lay the ground groundwork
work groundwork for completion of projected
endeavors to be continued by the
incoming administration of
president-elect Bruce Culpepper.
The 18 cabinet offices, filled
primarily by appointment by the
party and its leaders, encompass
nearly every phase of student
activity on campus. The Student
Body Constitution, before being
revised, stipulated, in general
terms, what each office consisted
of and the duties of each secretary.
The secretaries devote from
3-18 hours each week carrying out
ideas suggested in the party
platform, plus helpful hints from
interested students. They work
closely with their respective
counterparts or contacts in the UF
administration to obtain necessary
sanction and funds for their various'
projects.
Probably the most productive
secretariat, with the most direct
contact with the student body was
that of the Secretary of Labor.
Bob De Loach, SEG, who has since
replaced Steve Freedman as
Kennedy's Administrative
Assistant, took over a run-down,

HAS LETT
Bp
. j J
%
HjH mu,
SCHWARTZ

almost non-existent Labor office
and, with the help of his under undersecretary,
secretary, undersecretary, Mike Malaghan, 3BA,
turned it in to a center of student
employment that equals none in the
past. Malaghan replaced De Loach
when the latter was promoted.
Notable accomplishments of the
active group in the Labor office
include a wage survey of salaries
paid UF students on and off campus
that led to toe recent up in hourly
wages from 75 cents to a dollar.
The survey showed that students
working off campus earned an
average of $1.31 per hour and those
working on campus averaged $1.06
per hour.
A similar survey was made of
one hundred universities and
colleges around the country and it
was found that only 23 per cent of
the schools contacted paid students
less than the UF.
Some 400 UF students worked at
the New York World's Fair last
summer with the help of the Labor
office and Malaghan reported some
500 applications are being
processed for jobs this summer at
the Fair.
The Labor office guides students
to vacation jobs all over the state.
The largest number of positions
available is in the area of camp
counselling.
Another service provided by the
Labor office is the coordinating of
toddler care. Almost 80 per cent
of all babysitting requests were
filled, according to Malaghan.
Recommendations for the
incoming Secretary of Labor from
the retiring secretary included the
establishment of a general em employment
ployment employment convocation similar to
one sponsored at the University
of Maryland. The convocation con consists
sists consists of inviting representatives

WILLIS
Bp. .:**** *lm,
Up
: : It' ** jsgSggSoffifr
mm*.
B :
EDWARD 6

of all major industries and the
professions to campus for informal
informational sessions with
students. It would be set up in the
Florida Gym and would enable
students to go from booth to booth
and ask questions of the different
representatives concerning
experience, training, outside
activities, etc. necessary for the
many fields of employment.
Malaghan also suggested the new
secretary set up better summer
jobs for students stressing avail availability
ability availability of positions in students'
career areas.
Kincaid said the Alumni
Association sponsored a program
which brought prospective students
to local clubs. At these meetings
students from the university and
alumni discussed the advantages
of the university with prospective
students.
A significant improvement listed
by Kincaid is the creation of a
Student Alumni Committee on
Campus Problems. Kincaid said
that this committee will listen to
student problems and work to solve
them through the association.
Kincaid said his office sponsored
a banquet of student leaders in
which the Alumni Association
presented its program. Kincaid
believes the idea has improved
relations among student leaders
and the Alumni Association.
Outgoing-Secretary of Traffic
and Parking, Bill Barker, said his
most important improvement was
the compilation of the number of
cars and motor scooters on
campus.
Barker said that such a list
had not been made in the past and
it was impossible to make
recommendations concerning
traffic and safety programs without
this information.
A questionnaire is being
circulated by Barker which will
gather the needed information.
Barker said his office had
conducted a safety campaign during
Thanksgiving which encouraged
students to practice safety. In
addition, Barker investigated the
possibility of replacing the buses
which provide campus transpor transportation
tation transportation with trains" which have
been adopted by other universities.
This program will effect the new
secretary according to Barker.
Cal Reichell, outgoing secretary
of athletics, listed the formation
of an Intramural Dormitory
Council as the most significant
improvement he has made during
his term of office.
The council was created to
coordinate the intramurals of the
different dorm areas and to
establish a working relationship
with the intramurals department.
The council is composed of one
member from each dorm area,
moOen
Shoe Repair Shop
HEELS ATTACHED
5 Mins.
SOLES ATTACHED
15 Mins.
At Two Locations!
CAROLYN PLAZA I
FR 6-0315 I
And 1
101 N. Main St. §
Opp, Ist Nat'l Bank
FR 6-5211 I

the head of the intramurals de depart
part depart me nt, the secretary of
athletics, and the President of the
Student Body as an ex officio
member.
Reichelle said the council has
helped solve the problems of
coordinating intramural activities
and has provided a better program.
Reichelle said 4 Womens Student
Collegiate Athletic Association
golf tournament will being out outstanding
standing outstanding women golfers to campus
in the future and will effect the
new secretary.
Drew Haslett, secretary of
student activities, said the most
significant program in his office
is the long range development of
Camp Wauburg.
Haslett said the plans include
the development of facilities for
conferences, meetings, and other
activities on the 75- acre site owned
by the university. This program
will continue over a period of
years and will directly effect the
new secretary.
Other activities listed by Haslett
include: the continuation of "Gator
Days" from this year's beginning,
the creation of aStudent-Merchant
Complaint Bureau, and the
development of a faculty-student
coffee shop.
Haslett said his office is working
to secure approval of the
Legislative Council for the
university to join the Associated
Student Government organization.
Haslett said his office is
presently working to form a state
wide group of four-year

WE HAVE
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14 Secretary swivel chairs, 0n1y,... sls each
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universities to lobby with the
Florida Legislature.
Haslett added that six dorm
dances were monitarily sponsored
by student government. The
dormitory councils provided the
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Are you still |
wearing
those creasy
ilr
(59
/ I /
f J/j I I w
W ! f
r*-"*# i jo
/TI !
I I
Hn
ij ii
ill
Get into some wised-up
Post-Grads that know where
a crease should always be and
where it should never be, and
how to keep things that way
The reason is the Koratron*
fabric of 65% Dacron*/35%
cotton. No matter how many manytimes
times manytimes you wash andwearthese
trimly tapered Post-Grad
slacks, theyll stay completely
neat and make tne iron obso obsolete.
lete. obsolete. In tan, clav, black, navy
or loden, $6.98 in poplin or
gabardine, $7.98 in oxford, j
At swinging stores.
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UF musFstop Varidys Lee to win

NASHVILLE, Tenn. Hie Gator
basketball team faces Vanderbilt
here Saturday night in one of their
roughest games of the season.
Vandy boasts an overall mark
of 17-3 with 9-1 record in SEC
play. The Commodores, ranked No.
8 nationally by AP are unbeaten In
Nashville this season.
In order to beat the Commo Commodores,
dores, Commodores, the Gators will have to

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stop center Clyde Lee, the SECs
top scorer and rebounder and All-
America candidate and flashy
guard, John Ed Miller. Both Lee
and Miller had big games Tuesday
night against Kentucky scoring 33
and 30 points respectively in
Vandy*s 91-90 win over the Wild Wildcats.
cats. Wildcats.
The chore of guarding Lee will
go to sophomore center Jeff Ram-

SPORTS

Friday, Feb. 19, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

sey, who has shown marked impro improvement
vement improvement of late. Ramsey has the ad advantage
vantage advantage in size over Lee both in
height and weight. Brooks Hen Henderson
derson Henderson will attempt to 'put the
skids' to Miller.
Lee has set numerous confer conference
ence conference and school records while
averaging more than 22 points per
game. His largest output of the
campaign came in an earlier match
with Kentucky when he dumped in
41, the most ever scored against
a Wildcat team.
Kentucky's loss to Vandy Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday upped the Gators Into a fourth
place tie in the conference with
the WUdcats. Both clubs sport 8-4
SEC logs.
The game will be broadcast
locally over WRUF starting at 8
p.m. (EST).

GOLFERS IN ACTION
Swimmers clash today

ATHENS, Ga. The Florida
swimming team will face nine
schools here today at the Uni University
versity University of Georgia pool in the
Southern Intercollegiate
Invitational meet.
Both fresh freshmen
men freshmen and varsity
squads will see
action according Florida
to UF Coach BUI
Harlan. SDOrtS
Florida State 9 r gr,
will be favored
in the meet with scene
superior depth.
However both
UF and Miami
have chances of
overhauling the Seminole
swimmers.
Tom Dioguardi is Harlan's big
gun in the meet. The Miami
sophomore will be entered In five
events, the 40, 100, and 200-yard
freestyle races* and the medley
and freestyle relay.
Blanchard Tual also is a bright
spot for the Gators in the
backstroke.
In other UF spring sport news:
* *
Florida's golf team, led by
Laurie Hamer, takes on FSU
Saturday here at the University
Golf Club.
Hammer is No. 1 man, while
the others in the top four are Lloyd
Watts, Bob Murphy and Wally
Armstrong. Sophomore Bob Jewett
is fifth roan and Coach Buster
Bishop 1s uncertain who will play
in the sixth slot.
Florida takes on FSU again one
week from Saturday at
Tallahassee.
* *
The UF will be represented by
16 men at the United States Track

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.%)yyyvyvvvv//o%*tVv T
| Henderson paces |
Gator scoring |
$: Brooks Henderson and Dick g
Tomlinson are high-point men g
g: for the Gators with 252 points g
each. Gary Keller IS just 10 g
g: behind with 242 points and a g
iv 12.1 average. $:
Jeff Ramsey moved into
g fourth spot with 203 points and &:
g leads the team in field goal :):
g percentage with a .598 norm. g:
Henderson leads the team g
g in free throw percentage with :§
>:: a .810 average.
$ JUST A REMINDERFSU g
$ INVADES THE GYM NEXT g
| TUESDAY. g

and Field Federation Indoor Meet
in Chattanooga,Tenn. this weekend.
This will be the first time the
UF has participated in this meet.
Entered in the events are: 60-
yard dash, John Anderson, Celwyn
Chalker, Jimmy Richeson; 600-
yd. dash, Jimmy Brown, Bill
Roberts; 60-yd. high hurdles, Scott
Hager; 1000-yd. dash, Dieter
Gebhard, Danny Wells; 200-yd.
sprint shuttle relay, John Ander Anderson,
son, Anderson, Celwyn Chalker, Jimmy
Richeson, Jimmy Brown; high
jump, David Westerman, Bill
Crawford, Mike Docsh, Mike
Shumm, Dan Garvy; pole vault,
Scott Hager, Ed Vehling; one mile
run, David Wilson, Austin Funk.
intramural]
RESULTS I
Basketball
BLUE LEAGUE
Phi Gamma Delta 37
Ch Phi 22
Delta Upsilon 45
Phi Epsilon Pi 24
Delta Chi 22
Alpha Gamma Rho 21
AGRICULTURE
Instructors 40
Agriculture Students 31

Page 11



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929 East University Avenue
376-3701 or 376-6506

REMEMBER THE F$U GAME
|fgy TUESDAY Cmon By The 01"C.1.' daily specials
* UB run COFFEE SHOP & SODA FOUNTAIN
SUNDRIES if 0 Cl. STEAK
, U uc School supplies Sandwich
/ ffl YOUR SCHOOL NAME j||i| Health & Beauty rCf
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Yir Choice es Urge DELMONICO or CLUK STEAK

SERVED WITH BAKED POTATO OR FRENCH FRIES, TOSSED OR LETTUCE LETTUCETOMATO
TOMATO LETTUCETOMATO SALAD, HOT ROLLS WITH BUTTER, OR GARLIC BREAD,

Player of the week

tc
gap " . s s ' IW3SB& *|
jinvHni
Player of the Week award this time goes to 6-9 sophomore forward
Gary Keller.
Keller, who played his high school basketball with Florida center
Jeff Ramsey at Dixie Hollins of St. Petersburg, is currently the team's
leading rebounder with 195.
Playing with a cast on his right wrist, Keller led the Gator scoring
attack against the Rebels of Ole Miss here Monday night by scoring 18
points.
After 20 games, he is Florida's third best scorer hitting for 242
points, ten points back of team leaders Brooks Henderson and Dick
Tomlinson, both tied a 252.
Keller has hit on 91 out of 191 shot attempts for a 47.6% field goal
mark. He has also connected on 60 of 90 foul shots for a 66.7%.
For a big man, Keller shows a fine pair of hands and good moves.
He was held out last year because of illness, but has been a starter
for the Gators all year.
He came to Florida as one of the most highly-sought high school
basketball players in the country. Twice he led Dixie Hollins High
School to the class AA state championship and in his senior year he
averaged 32 points a game.
As a freshman, he averaged 13 points a game and was one of the
team's leading rebounders.
In addition to helping the Gators on offense this season, Keller
has also been a big boost to the Florida defense. He twice drew the
assignment this year of guarding all-America Rick Barry, the nation's
leading scorer.

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