Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Adams knocks Burns, Regents, Court

TALLAHASSEE, Flau(UPI)-A state cabinet offi official
cial official criticized Gov. Haydon Burns and the Florida
Supreme Court for their part in the political
turmoil surrounding the University Board of Regents.
Secretary of State Tom Adams, who also is a
member of the State Board of Education, said the
Southern Association of colleges and universities
was very disturbed about political meddling* in
Florida universities.
He recalled that the Public University System of
Georgia was disaccredited by the association in
the 1940*s because of political interference by the
governor of Georgia.
There too, said Adams,*the governor directly
involved himself in a political tug of war with the
legally established Board of Regents.**
In a direct attack on the court Adams said the
reasoning by which the seven justices reached their
unanimous decision that the present board expired
at the adjournament of the next Senate session and
could be replaced by Burns is totally beyond my
comprehension.
The Secretary of State, a former state senator,
helped draft the legislation that established the
Board of Regents, effective Jan. 1 of this year, and
said the legislative intent to set up a board that

Two UF students, Mike Stratton
and David Stokes, were killed in
a two-car collision early yesterday
morning on State Road 301.
The two were reportedly en route
back to school after spending the
weekend at home in Callahan when
the fatal accident occurred.
John Micheal Stratton,l9, son of
State Senator Harry O. Stratton
of Callahan, was reported dead

Cotroversial paper distributed

A newspaper, The National
Christian News, and aflyer, The
Christian Youth Corps, attacking
Negroes, Jews and Communists,
was distributed illegally Sunday
night to a number of dorms and
fraternity houses.
Its against the law to pass
£ :$
;$ r Steve loves Sue s
s %
*: A 3 by 20 foot sign, reading g:
:£Steve Loves Sue, with two :j:
iglarge red hearts, graced the ;:*
Sfront yard of Broward Hall yes yesigyerday
igyerday yesigyerday morning.
£ I simply forgot Valentines £
igDay, said Steven Horowitz, £
:£2UC, explaining his,extra large:;!:
£valentine. card to S.ue Fink,:;!;
£l uc. &
;!| Horowitz said he made the ;!;
£slgn from oilcloth left over from
£the recent student
Selections. !$
£ Extremism in the pursuit g
:!;sof happiness is no vice,';!;!
Equipped Horowitz. £

Two UF students killed in auto crash

at the scene, and David Stuart
Stokes, 18, was dead on arrival
at St. Lukes Hospital in Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, according to Nassau
County Deputy Colon Sikes.
The driver of the other car
involved, identified as Luther
Del Mare Osborne, 24, of Calla Callahan,
han, Callahan, was taken to St. Lukes Hos Hospital
pital Hospital and transferred to the Duval
Medical Center in Jacksonville.

out pamphlets on University prop property
erty property without permission from the
administration, said Officer J. H.
Lassiter of the UF Police De Department.
partment. Department.
The distribution was first
reported to University Police from
the Tau Epsilon Phi (TEP), The Theta
ta Theta Chi (TX) and Sigma Chi(SX)
fraternity houses, and from
Jennings Hall.
See PAPERS p. 3

Students appeal denied

A transfer student from Pensa Pensacola
cola Pensacola lost an appeal to the Board
of Regents to be readmitted to
the UF College of Architecture and
Fine Arts Friday.
The student, Oscar Woody, ap appealed
pealed appealed to the Board after being
denied readmission by a faculty
disciplinary committee.
Woody was refused admission
to the college on the grounds he
had failed to register for a course
recommended by his counselor.

Tuition hike to
t ..
-
go to students
The majority of the proposed un undergraduate
dergraduate undergraduate tuition increase will
go to student activities, according
to William E. Elmore, associate
UF Business Manager.
The chart above shows the com comparitive
paritive comparitive breakdown of expenses
between the present tuition and the
tuition proposed by the Board of
Regents last Friday.
The Student Activity fee will be
raised sll with the second largest
increase for the health fee.
Graduate students will have
their largest expense in a $20.50
matriculation fee and will also
pay all other increased fees.
Student activities Includes the
Florida Union, Intercollegiate Ath Athletics
letics Athletics and Student Government.

could not be controlled by any one governor was
plain and clear.

fITHF
n§lx JH IlLi
FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
University of Florida, Gainesville

Vol. 57, No. 95

Officers said Osborne suffered
mostly facial lacerations.
Micheal Stratton, third-year
Arts and Sciences student, was
active in student politics as a mem member
ber member of the Legislative Council,
Union Board, and was assistant
independent chairman of Progress
Party. He served as majority party
whii in the legislative council
last year and had worked in or orientation
ientation orientation activities. Micheal was a
section advisor in Hurre Hall.
David Stokes, first-year Univer University
sity University College student, was majoring
in chemical engineering and was
a member of the Gator Raiders.

Alpha Gamma Rho
Fraternity mil hold
memorial services for
David Stokes at the
Baptist Student Union
today at 7 p.m.

He said Dean T.C. Bannister and
faculty members of the college
based their refusal to allow him
to remain as an art student on
generalized charges concerning
his conduct.
Woody was counseled by Eugene
Grissom, professor of art, to take
Art 207.
He said he thought he had al already
ready already taken the equivalent of this
course, and so he received per permission
mission permission from another faculty

Tuesday, Feb. 16, 1965

He was a member of Alpha Gamma
Rho fraternity. David lived in Tol Tolbert
bert Tolbert Hall.
j
President-elect Bruce Cul Culpepper,
pepper, Culpepper, with whom Micheal had
worked very closely in the recent
campaign, voiced feelings felt by
all students who knew him. Mi Micheal
cheal Micheal was in line for a major
cabinet position and his loss comes
as a loss to us all, both to the

yr \ Health £523.00 X
X \service feuilding
/$25.50 \ /Fee \
/ Student \ / \
I Activity \ / |
I \| | *:
mM
\ Ivla tri cula ti o n-A,c ade mi c and /:|
\ Administrative X
PROPOSED TUITION
$l3O PER TRIMESTER

**UPI News Bulletin**
Justice Douglas Lost

ALBUQUERQUE, N.
Supreme Court Justice William
O. Douglas was reported trapped
Monday evening by heavy snov
drifts and darkness in his way down
a six-mile mountain trail near
Albuquerque.

member to take a different course.
When officials discovered Woody
had changed his schedule, he was
prevented from completeing regis registration.
tration. registration.
Dean Bannister later told him he
could not be admitted as an art
student.
Pres. J. Wayne Reitz upheld
the recommendation of a faculty
disciplinary committee that Woody
not be readmitted.

How the legislature, using the English language,
could have been any more specific as to its intent
is beyond me," he said.
Adams said the legislature very deliberately made
the appointments of the first board fall under the
outgoing governor so that no lncumbert governor
could control a majority. For this same reason,
he said, the terms of the first members varied from
one to nine years.
"While some may sympathize with Governor
Burns' desire that he should have been given a
hand in appointing the first regents," Adams said,
"the law intentionally prescribed otherwise."
"Such an approach would defeat the very purpose
of the regents concept.
Adams suggested that the Senate might want to
make its part in confirmation of certain state
officials, Including the regents, more meaningful.
Under the court's interpretation, he said, a governor
can either fail to send up appointments he thinks
the Senate might not approve or even if he submits
them and the Senate disapproves, as soon as the
legislature adjourns he can turn around and reappoint
them.
"I do not think that was the intent of the law,"
he said.

party and to the university as a
whole. Mlcheal's loss gives us all
a tremendous feeling of shock.**
Byron Groves, independent
chairman for Progress Party, also
expressed a feeling of shock and
loss for a student who showed
tremendous promise based onpast
accomplishments for the student
body.
See STUDENTS p. 3

A spokesman for the Forest
Service said there appears to be
no danger, but that horses were
sent in to the mountains to bring
out Douglas and four other hikers
in his party.

! v
Council
£
meets tonight
.. i
: The Legislative Council will g
meet tonight in the
Union Auditorium at 8 p.m.g
The Council will canvass theg
recent student body election:::
returns. Also on the agenda;:;
is presentation of the consti- *:
jtution of the Associated
Governments of America for;:;
[possible ratification. :



, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 1965

Page 2

? Plm
1 w
i / ''il

CAMPUS CUTIE
Today's Campus Cutie is :
Dixie Hardman, a Junior from ;
Jacksonville, Dixie majors in ;
Business Administration.
This cute Miss serves as
: Pledge Trainer of Chi Omega |
: sorority. She was Chi o*s j
. rush chairman last trimester.
Dixie was recently elected :
irush cahirman of Little Sis- :
: ters of Minerva, of Sigma Al- :
j pha Epsilon fraternity.
Medium rare steak is a
i
: definite favorite ofthisCam- :
: pus Cutie. Among her hobbies $
; may be found poetry writing.-:
v.v.w.rAv.y.r.T.v.v.v.v.v.v.vl

A new campus parking program that would pro provide
vide provide a large on-campus parking lot for dormitory
residents has been suggested by Lt. V.K. Holliman i
of the campus police.
His plan would be to build parking facilities for
dorm students to park their cars on during the
week. Then, the students could get them out on
weekends or other times when they are needed.
*Parking these cars away from campus would
leave the present dorm parking area free for
commuter use,*' Holliman said, and would solve
the parking problem/'
Prof. Donald B. Wilcox, chairman of the university
committee on traffic and parking, had no comment
on Holliman's plan except to say that the committee
was not working on any such program at the
present time.

i
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Are FIT
For R /c7a/6-
o o o o
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QUO.
fly IMltf
Car man el la's
loader
7 Jays a week, 11 to 9
706 W, University Ave.

Still no relief
in parking problem

'Air causes Ed. College to re-plan

When the cost of air condition conditioning
ing conditioning went up, the College of Edu Education
cation Education had to scrap some of its
remodeling plans.
According to Kimball Wiles,
dean of the College of Education,
The period of time when money
was requested until the grant was
made was so long that the price
of air conditioning went up, forc forcing
ing forcing us to scrap some of our re remodeling
modeling remodeling plans.'*

Off-campus housing may not be adequate

Housing facilities may not be adequate to meet projected enrol enrollment
lment enrollment increases, according to Carl B. Opp, head of off-campus
housing.
The University doesn't plan to house more than 65 percent of
students, which leaves off-campus housing 35 percent of the stu students
dents students to place in suitable accomodations, in addition to faculty and
staff placement,said Opp.
Opp noted that in the span between 1962 and 1972, in addition
to University housing increases, about 2,000 more spaces or 200
a year will need to be provided by the off-campus housing depart department.
ment. department. We aren't reaching this average of 200 a year now," said

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He did acknowledge a problem however. We
are doing some work toward the future solutio
of the overall problem of traffic on campus," he
said. But right now there is no official plan."
Wilcox said that plans had been made in the
past for new parking lots, but the state ran out
of money and plans are still on the drawing board.
But,*' Wilcox said, the parking problem is
getting worse."
New buildings like the graduate library are
going up," he said, making the problem worse
by destroying the few parking places that are now
on campus."
Expanding on his plan, Holliman suggested that
students be used in maintaining the area as watchmen,
to collect fees, and to take care of other details.

At the present, the College of
Education is undergoing a $250,-
000 partial renovation. Because of
delays, about half of the original
renovation plans had to be junked.
By April 1, the air conditioning
will be installed and some remod remodeling
eling remodeling will be complete.
Dean Wiles said that the re renovations
novations renovations were supposed to be
completed by December 1, 1964,

but could not give reasons for the
delay.
When partial remodeling is com complete,
plete, complete, each staff member should
have his own office. Over 40 new
offices have been added due to the
renovations.
Even after the renovation crews
leave there is much to be done
according to Dean Wiles. The
building will need a thorough paint painting

Opp, even though construction of apartments is on the upswing
in the Gainesville area.
According to Opp this figure is also based on the assumption
that present off-campus housing facilities will continue to be usable.
This is no a valid assumption, said Opp.
Opp and his office staff of 5 people interviewed over 2,800 people
seeking accomodations from May through September of 1964. How However,
ever, However, said Opp, this office has no record of the number of students
kept out of school because no housing could be provided.
Although there have been no precise statistics available for 4
years, roughtly 50 percent of the students presently enrolled are
living off-campus said Opp.
According to William E. Neylans, assistant director of Housing,
a new dorm, which will house 800 students, should alleviate the pro problem.
blem. problem. A preliminary application for funds has been made and if
all goes well, constructionshouldbegin within ayear, added Neylans.
Neylans noted that the University has plans to reach a certain
maximum enrollment, which will depend on an increased faculty
and classroom capacity.
I would like to think that if the University secures additional
faculty and educational buildings, enrollment would approach the planned
maximum, regardless of housing facilities, said Neylans.
%
Vi
Correction on Fla. Players
X 'X
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Performances of Florida Players production of Waltz of $
$ the Toreadors are Feb. 18, 19, 20, and 25,26, 27. Performance £
times are 7:30 p.m. on Thursdays and 8 p.m. on Fridays and
Saturdays.
:£ Students will be admitted free by presenting student identi- £
fication cards. General admission price is S.BO. Reservations
*: may be made be calling extensions 2144 or 2671.
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/ Gainesvilles Quality Jewelers

ing painting but that because of the delays
of going through the state legig.
lature for funds, we will try and
go through the University to get
the job done by University painters.
In the future, the College of Edu Education
cation Education hopes to add a new build building
ing building or wing to house a library
and research center. There is a
proposal pending for federal aid
for this project.



ASG constitution up
to council tonight

The constitution of the Associated Student Governments of America
(ASG) comes up for possible ratiflcaton by the Legislative Coun Council
cil Council tonight.
Drew Haslett, UF representative to the ASG convention in Okla Oklahoma
homa Oklahoma last November cited reasons Ken Kennedys SG administra administration
tion administration feels ASG membership would benefit the UF student government.

ASG is a-polltical and we feel
it rightfully ought to be a-poli a-political,
tical, a-political, Haslett said* The group
association is primarily interested
in the technical workings of SG
and by the nature of its conven conventions,
tions, conventions, is forced to stick to this
a-political format.
Last years convention, which
e UF attended as observers only,
lasted four days and was held dur during
ing during the Thnaksglving holidays.
Haslett agreed with Associate
Professor of Religion. Richard
Graeffe to speak
on Persians tonight
Dr. A. DidlerGraieffe will speak
tonight on The Persians and the
Origin of Good and Evil*' at 7
p.m* in Room 324 of the Florida
Union.
At 9 p.m. a panel of Cuban
Students will discuss Cubas Des Destiny
tiny Destiny and the American Continent*'
after a refreshment break at 8:30
p.ro.
The forums this evening are pre presented
sented presented in connection with Inter International
national International week at the UF.
Sunday night His Excellency, Dr.
Adnan Pachacki, ambassador of the
Iran Republic to the United Nations
addressed the international group
at the Festival of Nations supper.
Dr. Pachacki discussed the
problems of the General Assem Assembly
bly Assembly as they pertain to the Arab
nations.

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H. Hiers who criticized UF in interest
terest interest in an a-political organiza organization
tion organization in a recent letter to The
Alligator. Hiers said, The big,
bad world outside campus does
not go away just because we pre pretend
tend pretend it is not there. He ques questioned
tioned questioned the responsibility of SG
if it is only interested in campus
or Florida politics and ignores
national and international quest questions.
ions. questions.
I am in complete agreement
with Prof. Hiers that students
should not be protected from the
big bad world outside campus of
which we are soon to be a part,
Haslett said.
Haslett explained further that
the convention he attended was
scheduled purposely for the
Thanksgiving holidays to give
time-poor students a chance to
attend and exchange ideas.
In the four days it lasted,
there was not time in formal dis discussion
cussion discussion for political issues to be
brought up, Haslett said.
He said political matters were
discussed in informal sessions,
however.
Haslett said he felt the UF should
definitely associate Itself with ASG
to benefit from the exchange of
purely student-government ore in intad
tad intad ideas, programs and opinions.
He was in favor at the same time
of sending representatives from
the UF as observors to the Na National
tional National Students Association (NSA),

Demand resignation
of Minn. U. prexy
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (CPS)-The ouster of University of
Minnesota President O. Meredith Wilson was demanded by a
St. Paul city official last week after Wilson defended the exis existence
tence existence of radical groups on the Minnesota campus.
Wilsons remarks came as he and other University officials
appeared before the State House Appropriations Committee to
present the University request for funds to finance research
projects.
In response to a statement about undesirable groups on
campus, Wilson said that University officers should not give
young radicals an administrative wall against which to bounce
their ball.
The rational pattern of the Universtiy*s student body is the
best control I know, he continued.
The discussion began when Rep. Walter Klaus read a pre prepared
pared prepared statement which set forth what he called apprehensions
about allowing...children to attend a school where they are
exposed to indoctrination of the violent overthrow of the govern government.
ment. government.
Klaus asked if the W.E.B. Duois Club, blacklisted by the
U.S. Attorney General, has a group on campus. Wilson replied
that the Duois Club does not have a group on campus. But
continuing that it would be better for me to continue this
discussion, he asknowledged that a Young Socialist Alliance
(YSA) group does exist there.
The most active members of the organization have found
they cant get a response on campus when there is no resis resistance,
tance, resistance, he said. They cant get a crowd on campus so they
move their meetings downtown.
The call for Wilson's removal came from Milton Rosen,
St. Paul Public Works Commissioner. Rosen said that Wilson
should leave the University if he can't control things there.
In a St. Paul television interview Rosen continued his attack,
saying, Wilson should be pushed out.. I don't think he is
qualified to be the head of that fine University.
Last year Rosen called for the removal of Mulford Sibley
after the political science professor outlined his position on
academic freedom in a Dec. 3, 1963 letter to the Minnesota Dally.
Rosen sent a letter to the Board of Regents urging that they
dismiss Sibley.
After an executive meeting, the Regents released a statement
on academic freedom which was Interpreted as a support of
academic freedom and Sibley.
When questioned by Klaus about Sibley at the meeting of
the Appropriations Committee, Wilson said Sibley is a very
profitable member of the academic community. I don't apologize
for having him on the staff. I'm proud of having him on the
staff.
Rosen added that Wilsons defense of Sibley before the Ap Appropriations
propriations Appropriations Committee was an insult to every decent fam family
ily family in Minnesota.

(Continued From Page 1)
I was standing in the hall,
said Dave Levine (TEP), 2UC,
when this man entered carrying
A small stack of papers. He said
he was going to leave some dopies
of the Christian paper for the
brothers to read.

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Tuesday, Feb. 16, 1965, The Florida Alligator

PAPERS

Levine said he told the man
only to leave a few copies be because
cause because TEP is a predominantly
Jewish fraternity.
The roan answered, lt's a
shame you fellows back comm communism/
unism/ communism/ and by the time I realized
what the man was passing out,
he had gone/* said Levine.

STUDENTS
(Continued From Page 1)
Both students were members of
the Callahan Baptist Church and
both had graduated from Callahan
High School.
Funeral services for Micheal
Stratton will be held at 2 p.m.
tomorrow at the Callahan Baptist
Church with Rev. Willlard A.
Brown officiating.
Burial will be in Evergreen
Cemetery in Jacksonville.
Survivors include his parents,
Senator and Mrs. Harry O. Stokes,
two brothers Harry O. Stokes and
Joel Mark Stokes, and three sis sisters
ters sisters Miss Mary Stokes, Miss
Paula Stokes and Miss Lisa Stokes,
all of Callahan; three aunts, Mrs.
AJ3.Conner and Mrs. E JN.McGurn,
both of Callahan and Mrs. C.A.
Foster of Jacksonville.
Funeral arrangements for David
Stokes are Incomplete. The funeral
will be held at Callahan Baptist
Church with Rev. Willlard A.
Brown officiating.
Burial will be in Folkston, Ga.
Survivors include his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Wilton C. Stokes,
and one sister, Miss Faye Stokes,
all of Callahan; three brothers,
Jimmy Stokes and Danny Stokes
both of Callahan, and Wilton C.
Stokes Jr. with the U.S. Army in
Germany; his maternal grand grandparents,
parents, grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. A.J. Brooks
of Avtity, Ga.; and his paternal
grandfather, Mr. LJS. Stokes of
Folkston, Ga.
*
\ yfjN I

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florido Alligator, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 1965

TRYOUTS
Tryouts for Max Frischs
The Fire Bugs will be today
3:30 p.m. in Room 239 Tigert.

(JF prof
continues
Jupiter studies
UF physics professor Alex G.
Smith, who received national pub publicity
licity publicity eight months ago in announc announcing
ing announcing the planet Jupiter had slowed
its speed, is now involved in a
supplementary research project
dealing with the same planet.
The study for the National Aer Aeronautics
onautics Aeronautics and Space Administration
is designed to analyze radio sig signals
nals signals emitted from Jupiter.
Dr. Smith is developing instur insturmentation
mentation insturmentation for a radio satellite to
be used in Operations OGO (Or (Orbiting
biting (Orbiting Geophysical Observatory)
and EGO (Eccentric Geophysical
Observatory).
The work fits in with research
he has been conducting on Jup Jupiter
iter Jupiter since 1956.
Both OGO and EGO are con concerned
cerned concerned with utilizing satellites for for
- for scientific purposes. A
number of experiments by scien scientists
tists scientists with NASA grants are in included
cluded included in the overall program.
Dr. Smith launched the project
last June and expects the satel satellite
lite satellite to be operational in about
two years at an estimated cost
of $250,000. Dr. Smith is being
assisted by Dr. George Lebo and
Dr. Frank Sixboth doing post postdoctoral
doctoral postdoctoral researchand Wilbur
Block.
The instrumentation includes a
receiver and antenna to pick up
the radio frequencies. A contract
already has been awarded for con construction
struction construction of a prototype model.
When it is completed and ap approved
proved approved by NASA officials, Dr.
Smith and his associates will for formulate
mulate formulate plans for the command
circuitry to be used in the flight
model.
Becuase Jupiters signals are in
the low frequency range, it is eas easier
ier easier to record them in the air than
on the ground. Low frequency sig signals
nals signals can be received for a long longer
er longer period of time and are stronger
above the ionospheresome 60 to
250 miles above the earth.
Signals from the satellite will
be compared to ones received from
an observation post in the Andes
Mountains in Chile.
Another program coinciding with
OGO and EGO is S-66, an effort
to discover what happens to radio
signals in the ionospheric layer.
UF student
gets award
Michael Lima, senior engineer engineering
ing engineering student at the UF from Largo,
has been awarded a SIOO scholar scholarship
ship scholarship by the Florida West Coast
Chapter of the American Insti Institute
tute Institute of Industrial Engineers.
Lima, son of Joseph M. Lima,
202 Live Oak Lane, Largo, was
judged the most inproved indus industrial
trial industrial engineering student in line
with receipt of the financial aid
for one trimester.
Iven H. Wheeler of Honeywell,
Inc., St. Petersburg, presented
the scholarship check to Lima
during a recent AHE meeting. Also
present were Gary Peterson of
Honeywell, Sid Carter of Inter International
national International Mineral and Chemical
Corporation, Bartow, and Don Wil Williams
liams Williams of the International Resis Resistance
tance Resistance Company, St. Petersburg.

ALPHA ZETA
Alpha Zeta will hold a smoker
in Johnsons Lounge of the FU
v 7 p.m. Faculty and
members are invited.
i*
l PRE-LAW SOCIETY
*
Joe Wilcox will talk on the
: Personal Experiences of a
5 Lawyer** tonight 8:30 p.m. in
: the Law School Courtroom.
r
\ WUFT-TV
: Conrad Hunt will be the guest
: on In the Margin of Culture
: tonight 8 p.ro. on WUFT-TV,
|i; Channel 5. Hunt, a native of
$ Barbados Island, is one of the
£ worlds five best cricket
£ players as well as being a
£ leader in the Moral Re-arm a a:
: a: ment Movement.
ECONOMICS
: Dr. R.L.A. Sterba wiU speak
£ on Russian economics at the
PropeUer Club meeting Thurs Thurs:j
:j Thurs:j day 7:30 p.m. in Room 18 Math Math£
£ Math£ erly Hall.
ji PERSIAN CLUB
£ Dr. A. Didier Graeffe will
: speak on The Persians and Or Or:
: Or: igin of Good and Evil tonight
: 7 p.m. at the Persian Club
Forum in Room 324 FU.
*
jj INTERNATIONAL
:j As a part of International
: Week, the Wesley Foundation
ij invites all foreign student to a
: social in the lounge from 7:30-
: 10 p.m. tomorrow.
CONCERT
: Sigma Alpha lota and Phi
£ Mu Alpha will present a com com£
£ com£ bined concert tonight 8:15 in
: the University Auditorium.
£
ALPHA KAPPA PSI
The officers of Alpha Kappa
:j Psi, professional business fra frail
il frail ternity, for the winter trimester
: are Bob Moore, president; Stu Stu:j
:j Stu:j art Shull, Ist vice-president; :
: Andy Hadji an, 2nd vice-presi-i
£ dent; Mike Russell, recording:
£ secretary; George Collins, cor-
: responding secretary; Charles;
£ Stumm, Treasurer; Dennis!
: Driscoll, master of ritual.

AS FLAVOR SAYS, YOU-ALL COME I
FOR THE
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14 S.W. First St. (Behind Sears)
10:30 a.m. 8 p.m.
SECOND COFFEE TEA ALWAYS FREE
ALSO TAKEOUT 372-2405

campus news briefs***

CRAFT SHIP
The Craft Shop of the FU
is offering special instruction in
silver each Thursday evening.
The instructor is Mrs. Amy
Berner. All work will be on
an individual bajis. The Craft
Shop is open Monday-Friday,
2-5 p.m. and Sunday-Thursday,
7-10 p.m.
INAUGURAL
Tickets for the innaugural ban banquet
quet banquet are available until tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow 5 p.m. to Legislative Coun Council
cil Council members, Honor Court Jus Justices,
tices, Justices, the presidents council
members, student body officers
and anyone with an interest in
student government and their
dates. The cost is $2.75.
i
INTRAMURAL
OFFICIALS NEEDED
Anyone who would like to earn
a little spending money for
working about an hour every
Monday and Wednesday, please
contact Room 229 Florida Gym.
Officials are needed for the
dormitory softball leagues
starting Wednesday from 4:30-
5:30 p.m.
COLLOQUIUM
Values: South and North
American is the topic to be
discussed by Professor Harry
W. Hutchinson, associate pro professor
fessor professor of psychiatry and an anthropology,
thropology, anthropology, at the Latin Amer American
ican American CoUoquium tomorrow 8
p.m. in the Oak Room of the
Florida Union.
CHEMICAL
ENGINEERS
A guest from General Foods
will speak at a meeting of the
American Institute of Chemical
Engineers tonight 7:30 p.m.
Room 334 of the Engineering
building.

I YAMAHA BMW
Motorcycles
For The Discriminating 1
CYCLERAMA I
378-2811 21 SE 2nd Place I

DEBATE SOCIETY
The weekly meeting of the De Debate
bate Debate Society will be tonight
7:30 in Room 331 Tigert Hall.

flood loohd
to dtafl y in
U23M sul
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S 4
Fara Press..,
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Theyre ironing while
theyre drying TM
Get permanent color as well as /
permanent press in a luxurious I
weave of double-plied, yarn-dyed /
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kind always neat, always right
for on-campus and off! f
Look expensive yet only $798 ?!

CIRCLE K
Circle K will meet tonight
7:30 p.ro. in Room 123 of the
Florida Union.



At lastlights!
Broward courts now lit

After a number of years of ef effort
fort effort by student government, the
lights are up and lit on the ten tennis
nis tennis courts in front of Broward
Hall.
The Legislative Council first
passed a bill authorizing the lights
during the former Student Body
President Bill Trickel's adminis administration
tration administration and amended it during Paul
Hendrick's time. The lights were
bought with Student Government
(SG) funds* in spite of the red
tape and shuffle in the changing of
SG admisistrations, through Uni University
versity University Purchasing for $5,533.
John Ostrow, SG Secretary of
Housing, said SG has agreed to
pay the electricity bills on the
lights and provide supervision for
the courts should such supervi supervision
sion supervision become necessary. He said
SG has allotted one thousand dol dollars
lars dollars for the electric bill and will
give the Intramural Department

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S4OO per year to be put into a
special fund for the maintenance
and repair of the lights in the
future.
Hie newly lit courts are to
be open only to students, faculty,
and student wives, Ostrow said.
The lights go off each night just
before curfew.
"An electric timer has been
installed to turn the lights on and
off," Ostrow said.
There are manual switches on
the west side of the courts to turn
the lights on and off between the
hours of 7 and 10 p.m. I urge
students to turn off the lights after
playing because its their money
that's paying for the electricity.*
He said the College of Physi Physical
cal Physical Education and Health will con continue
tinue continue to set policies and proce procedures
dures procedures for the courts as they do
on all other courts on campus.

PRESIDENT KEN KENNEDY (VIES WITH VICE-PRES.) DICK GOBER
as SG officials play to dedicate lights on Broward
tennis courts.

'TOO FAR TO GO TO EAT
Prof says no to LBJ

Too far to go to eat.''
That's what Social Science Prof. William E.
Baringer replied to his invitation to a luncheon
at the White House with Pres, and Mrs. Lyndon
Johnson last Friday.
The Lincoln's birthday luncheon brought together
a group of noted Lincoln scholars and devotees in
honor of the great man. Baringers invitation came
by telegram from the White House social secre secretary.
tary. secretary.
Baringer, who has taught C-l and history at the
UF since 1947, took a leave of absence six years
ago to go to Washington for a year and a half
to be executive director of the Lincoln Sesquicen Sesquicentennial
tennial Sesquicentennial Commission.

Attack prompts inquiry

The lighting situation for the
sidewalk between the new Archi Architecture
tecture Architecture and Fine Arts building
will be re-evaluated,'' stated Cal Calvin
vin Calvin C. Green of Plants and Grounds.
Green said that up until the at attack
tack attack of the couple returning from
their date the other night, he wasn't
aware of the insufficient lighting
problem. We will do what is nec necessary
essary necessary to make sure that area
is well lighted,*' said Green.

i ' V
' M
Jewel Tea Co., Inc.
...WILL BE INTERVIEWING
March 3 (Wednesday)
on compos
for
Sommor Franchise Operators
(Arrange an appointment in the University
Placement Office, Building H.)
GRADUATES IN MARKETING, GENERAL
BUSINESS AND THE LIBERAL ARTS
LOCATIONS IN FLORIDA & GEORGIA

Tuesday/ Feb, 16, 1965/ The Florida Alligator,

Lt. Holliman of the Campus
Police Department said that he is
keeping this area under closer
watch, but there wasn't a great
deal that he could do. Holliman
said that he felt the lights re reflecting
flecting reflecting off the new Architecture
and Fine Arts building provided
sufficient lighting. But that be because
cause because of the low hanging trees,
maybe lights could be installed
from Grove Hall or attached to
the trees.

Baringer*s interest in Lincoln began while he
was a student at the University of Illinois. While
there, he was a student of the late James G. Ran Randall
dall Randall one of the greatest of Lincoln scholars. In
his office, Baringer has established a great man
corner*' which includes pictures of Lincoln, John Johnson,
son, Johnson, John F. Kennedy, and his former professor,
Randall.
After pondering the luncheon situation, Baringer
recalled a similar set of circumstances involving
William Faulkner. Faulkner, who was in Virginia,
declined the invitation, saying it was too far
to go to eat.*'
And,"said Baringer in his reply to the pres president,
ident, president, he was substantially nearer than I."

Holliman said the only other
incident that he remembered in that
area next to Grove Hall was last
year. He said a girl was knocked
down there on the sidewalk.
Miss Patricia McCullough, re resident
sident resident counselor of Reid Hall, said
she had received some complaints
from dorm residents that this
area was scary." Miss McCul McCullough
lough McCullough said that she personally knew
this sidewalk was badly lighted.

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Page 5



Page 6

, The Florido Alligator, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 1965

ERNIE UTZ
Editor-In-Chief

LOU FERRIS
Editorial Page Editor

GUEST EDITORIAL
Snitching
(ED. NOTE: This editorial was printed in The Cavalier Daily, at
the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. We think it is particularly
appropriate in view of the upcoming progress tests.)
*****************
As a result of the recent Air Force Academy cheating scandal,
the nation's attention has focused on the concept of collegiate honor
systems. The flagrant violations of a code to which these cadets
had subscribed has raised two dominant questions: first, a squeeze squeezeplay
play squeezeplay on the academically ill-equipped athletes? and second, how many
of the basic tenets of an honor system are valid today?
Because of the uniform entrance requirements and standard academic
regulations at the University, the question of athletic pressures does
not have to be reviewed here at this time. The second point, however,
demands discussion.
Whenever the vitality or instrumentality of any honor system is
questioned, reflections are unavoidably cast on our concept of honor.
The code of the Air Force Academy is controlled by the administration,
not the students, as is of course the case at the University. But aside
from this basic difference, the two systems are very similar. Each
covers basically the same areas of lying, cheating, and stealing.
Each, also, requires that any student knowing of a violation must
report the offender. And this is the point which has stirred so much
controversy during the past several weeks.
Newspaper columnists, television commentators, and parents of
the dismissed cadets have been very vocal in their denunciation of
"snitching" or "tattling." They say that we are taught from earliest
childhood that being a "stool pigeon" is wrong. Those people who
expound these arguments seem to be unaware of the significance
of their loose charges on one of the major strengths of honor systems.
They are judging the systems on the basis of an eroded sense of duty
and loyalty.
At the University honor is not simply aflag to be waved to advertise
the school: it is away of life. Honor is the norm at Virginia and its
concept is subscribed to by every student. They system covers all
phases of academic work and personal honor. To be effective it must
enjoy the allegiance of every student.
Because of the scope and influence of the system on our lives, those
who will not abide by it must be purged from the University com community.
munity. community. To report a violator is not "snitching," it is giving loyalty
to a concept which guides every student personally and affects the
meaningfulness of his degree.
Loyalty to our system of honor must be maintained. While many
people have praised the University's system during the renewed
interest in collegiate codes, we must not rest on this praise. We
must continue to guard our honor system against the cries of "im "impractical"
practical" "impractical" and "unworkable." We know that the system at the
University "works" now we must keep striving to insure the
continuing loyalty of all those who owe allegiance to it.
GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Kay
Huffmaster, (Correspondents), Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles,
Dooita Mathison, Dan Taylor, Sam.UUman, Selwin H. Ciment.
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Knnrin, Ann Carter, Evan Langbein, Ira Liebsfeld, Thelma Mossman,
Fran Snider, Cynthia TunstaU, Harvey Wolfson, John Shiplett,
Chip Sharon, Karen Vitunac, Jack Zucker, David Ropes, Ami
Saperstein, Sari Brown, Jane Young, Bill Lockhart, Ken Simon,
end Drex Dobson, Jeffrey Denkewalter, GjS. Corseri.
lIMI Florida Alligator rvscrv.* th. right to refulat. th. typogrphlcJ too. of all advertisements and
to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
NO PO6ITION V GUARANTEED, though desired position will be riven whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator wUI not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement Involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice Is given to the Advert Is li* Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement
> scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before neat Insertion,
t THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and is
published five times weekly except duing May, June and July when It Is published seml-wwekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator Is entered as second class
matter at the United States Post Office at GalnssvUle.

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International

STEVE VAUGHN
Managing E.ditor

JOE CASTE LLO
Executive Editor

ED SEARS
Sports Editor

EDITOR:
THIS IS in reference to the
article on Infectious Mononucleosis
appearing in The Alligator on Feb.
9, 1965. When the author of this
piece interviewed me, he was asked
to bring his copy to me for review
prior to publication.
THIS IS standard procedure with
us and is very necessary because
of the complexity of medical
matters and language and the
serious effects on student opinion
and health that mistakes may
engender. The copy was not
returned as promised and the
article contains a number of errors
and misquotes.
INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS
is not a self-inflicting disease
and there is no such entity as a
self-inflicting disease. The impli implication

Dis-Missed
EDITOR:
In reply to Name Withheld,** you may not
think the ROTC initiation was good sportsmanship
but, I think it was great fun.
THE DRILL teams are essentially military units
with the main objective being display, which makes
necessary strict discipline.
THEREFORE, all members should expect
strictness and not casual fraternism as coming first.
As the Military says, when somebody knows he is
a well-functioning member of a precise unit he
then develops a sense of fitting which produces
a strong fraternal feeling among that unit.
HOWEVER, should anyone find that the strict
discipline of a drill team is too much for him,
he may transfer back to a regular flight with no
effect on his record or grade in ROTC.
SHOULD HE choose to stay he can receive
vital training in the discipline necessary for a
future military career.
I ENJOY being on the team because of the above
mentioned reasons and many others. In that it is
a part of the University it should have some controls
by it. However, it is a military unit also and the
basis of its existence is discipline.
AS SUCH, discipline should be mostly a military
function. I am proud of the team and feel that
this discipline is good sportsmanship because it
does what the UF*s objective is, prepare us for a
future life.
LESLY KENDALL SPIVEY, lUC
New initiate, BMDJ

FREEMAN FORMULATES
?

Le T TeR 2
OOOPS

cation implication of this term is that a student
brings it upon himself, and this is
certainly not the case.
THE DISEASE is considered self
limited because it usually heals
whether or not it is treated.
CONCLUSIVE EVIDENCE that
the disease is not contagious as
is stated in the article, does not
exist. The cause of the disease
is unknown at present.
DURING MY COLLEGE days
some twenty years ago, there were
very few studies on the disease
and I cant imagine where your
reporter discovered this
nonexistent recollection of mine.
I KNOW of no case of the disease
in a four month old child as is
stated in the article. The usual
age range is fourteen to twenty
four years.
YOUR REPORTER makes the

Growing Up
EDITOR:
I NOTED with some consternation in a letter
to the Editor this morning what appeared to be an
urging on the part of one of my colleagues
for a more active student participation in national
and international affairs.
WHEN I put down the Alligator and picked up
the Times-Union, I noted .a front-page article
which starts off with the following; Nearly 1,000
screaming, sign-waving students marched on the UJS.
Embassy today, smashed windows and splattered
walls with ink to protest American air strikes in
North Viet Nam*
HERE WE have real red-blooded students in
action, and the political activists** of this and other
campuses must be real proud of the Russian students.
I SUPPOSE I am somewhat naive and old-fashioned,
but I always had the idea that students came to a
university to obtain an educationpresumably from
people who know slightly more about education than
the students do.
IN CASE there are any Mario Savlos on the campus
who think they know more about how to run this
University than the present Administration, I think
this fact should. be made known to the Board of
Control or Regents (whichever is the governing body
of the University/ and possibly a switch can be
made if their point is substantiated!
In the meantime, I suggest that the students gc
back to their studies not to be ignorant of what
is going on around them in the world but at least
wait until they have graduated.
THEN (!) if they want to start a world revolution,
they will at least be adults and responsible to no
one but themselves for the outcome. And I might
add that sometimes world revolutions are desirable.
INCIDENTALLY, however, havent I beard recently
many complaints about the students being over overworked**
worked** overworked** under our trimester system!
j. T. MOORE
Department of Mathematics

point that Infectious Mononucleosis
occasions a great deal of needless
apprehension among the student
population.
THIS IS entirely correct, and I
think it is very important that
your readers fce given the benefit
of lucid, scrupulously accurate
reporting and spared the ambiguity
which can result from inadequate
material of the sort in subject
article.
PERHAPS YOU will agree with
Disraeli that, the care of the
public health is the first duty of
the statesman, and will wish to
exert the power of your segment
of the fourth estate in this good
purpose.
WILLIAM A. HALL, M.D,
Director of
Department of Student Health



Unbearable

EDITOR:
I CAN stand it no longer.
I FEEL I must speak out concerning some of
the events that have marked this campaign. As
an unaligned independent, with friends in all four
parties, I would be obliged to the Alligator for
the chance to speak out on the things I have noticed.
MY THANKS in advance for printing this letter.
TO BEGIN with, one of the major parties has
passed out door signs asking the candidates to
please keep out. How can they encourage such an
attitude?
AT THE one time of the year when the politicians
are going to the dorms, and finding out what the
students want, one of the parties has directed its
efforts toward seeing that the voice of the students
is not heard.
WITH ALL your emphasis on fair play, I expected
you to take a stand on this. Yet you kept silent.
BUT THE most difficult burden for the impartial
onlooker in this campaign to bear has been your
coverage. The degree to which your neutral policy
has failed has been noticed by everyone on campus,
except, it seems, yourselves.
IN MONDAYS paper you devoted your entire
front page to a story of little newsworthiness, for
the blatant reason of favoring one of the parties.
THOUGH I am not a member of any party, I
dont like to see one get preference over another,
such as has been the case.
I DONT believe the validity of these charges
can in any way be refuted, as no story this year
has rated that much front page coverage, not even
Churchills death or Johnsons election.
INDEED, I cant even understand what you got
so excited about. The masthead on the piece of poop
in question was clearly a quotation, as the date
shows.
I HAVE yet to meet anyone who thought otherwise.
Thus I resent the fact that your editorial policy of
thin skinned egotism has led you to pursue a type
of journalism so yellow it might better be termed
jaundiced.
I REPEAT, I am an unaligned independent, and I
firmly believe all my criticisms are just. I stand
respectfully yours,
J. BRYAN DaNESE, 3AS

@ DIAMONO RINGS
PRELUDE
211 W. University Are. 372-8658

LETTERS ON POLI..CS, PARTIES AND PEOPLE

(ED. NOTE: The letters that appear herein were
received during the campus campaign and for
obvious reasons were not*printed. However, we print
them now so as not to deprive their authors or our
readers of their merit.)

Padding
EDITOR:
BROWARD Hall had an Action
Party Rally and a Progress Party
Rally for the girls of Broward
who were interested in meeting
and hearing the candidates of each
party.
ACTION Party was interested
in addressing the girls. They did
not pad the crowd with cheering
pledges.
IT WAS encouraging to see a
group able to stand alone before
us. They didnt need moral support
from stage props.
M. J. CARTIER
Tally-Ho

(Reprint from Tallahassee Democrat, Jan. 25, 1965)
FSU COED who has accepted an invitation for
the Peace Corps training says that she is willing
to be sent anywhere in the world except to be
trained at the University of Florida.

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Tuesday, Feb. 16, 1965/ The Florida Alligator,

TO THE MOB
THE MOB was strong, they never waive red,
The cause was vague, but stiU they labored.
They desired that and this, but yet know not what
They denied, they granted, but for what purpose?
My mind is sane, yet I am detatched,
The tribunal is chosen, but for what purpose?
Their ranks were strong, their means were daring,
Dissenters were cursed, their cause expunged,
For the mob must rule, the position is sacred.
01 What is right? Or, dare I query?
For the mob knows not morality, only expediency.
lam spent my cause is expended,
The mob has spoken, they have suppressed
All which I hoped to see fulfilled.
Instead, they instill what always prevails,
With loath for the new, and vengeance for the
innovator,
Yet, O! Mob, I cannot forsake you
You are but a child, a poor fool!
You know nothing other than what you are commanded,
The tribunals wrath controls your destiny,
You must be helped for you are sick.
I believe the tribunals panacea is, in actuality,
witchcraft,
Yet they are Almighty, they are dextrous physicians,
Their stuff is words, words, words,
Their vocation is fakery, deceitful, miscalculated
fakery.
But, they are victors in your name,
And, I am cast aside merely to begin anew,
A struggle against a calculating machine
Whose Words Speak Louder Than Action!!
RICHARD N. SHERMAN, lUC
NOTE: Ernie Litz, do you have the fortitude
to put this in print?

Mobbery

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator/ Tuesday, Feb. 16/1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

Wanted
NEED RIDERS TO ATLANTA!
Leaving Thursday afternoon and
will return Sunday, Call David
376-8829. (C-95-lt-p).
FEMALE ROOMMATE TO share
apartment in S7O to SBO range.
Close to campus-or will share your
apt. Call Stephanie McNulty before
5 6-3261, ext. 2792 after 5
8-1074. (C-93-st-c).
WANTED 1950-1955 FORDS
and CHEVROLETS. A1 Herndons
Service Station, 916 S. E, 4th
Street. (C-75-20t-c).
ONE MALE ROOMMATE IN
furnished split level, air-cond.
apt. 2 blocks from campus. SIOO
for balance of trimester plus $lO
to sl2 per month for utilities.
Call Dave Tanner 2-9371. (C-92-
4t-c).
Help Wanted
DEPENDABLE GIRL TO CARE
for 2 children, ages 6 & 7, from
2 to 6 p.m., M-W-F and some
evenings. Own transportation. A
few light housekeeping tasks. 1720
NW 7th Place. Phone 2-3763. (E (E---95-3t-c).
--95-3t-c). (E---95-3t-c).
BOY 12 to 16 years old fcv
established paper routes adjacent
to University grounds. Contact the
Gainesville Sun, 378-1411. (E-91-
st-c).
T- ",
TONITE! 3 TOP HITS!
* FIRST AREA RUN
At 7:00
the story of
1 1 .. n THE IMMORTAL
1 V HANK WILLIAMS
HAMILTON Shsan OLIVER
BUTTONS Arthui OCONNELI
totsr
/ v ~
(v,- pwow set mu* pmouctkm gYJyZ
HOMBWCbH
_ HCdfelL rs^f\
ROhERT mcf RObERT Ml
OWWMORSE I .MMIWt.MWMII I
, At 10:15
llfe
STARTS FRIDAY
SANDRA DEE
"I'D RATHER BE RICH"
.

Autos
*57 CHEVY 2-door Bel Air, sedan.
$250 call 8-1330. (G-95-st-c).
1954 OLDS 2-door, good condition,
automatic, good tires, radio. Call
372-6840 or 372-7961
WHITE 1960 MERCURY 8. All
power, excellent condition, SBOO.
Call Mrs. Fant, Ext. 2906 or FR
2-6788 after 5. (G-94-2t-c).
ALFA ROMEO 1961 Help!! the
bank has got roe! The Alfa is
yours for only SI2OO. See at Florida
National Bank or call Bo Cook
372-9363. (G-94-ts-c).
62 MG MIDGET ROADSTER,
mechanically perfect, good tires,
body & interior excellent. $llOO.
Call 376-8883. (G-94-st-c).
1960 RENAULT Electric shift,
35 to 40 miles per gallon, $295.
Contact Catlln at Ext. 2564. (G (G---94-3t-c).
--94-3t-c). (G---94-3t-c).
SELL OR TRADE S-90 PORSCHE
1961. S3OO over bank value. See
at 107 NE Bth St. Call 372-6998
after 5. (G-94-3t-p).
1961 SUNBEAM ALPINE, BLACK
W/W tires, wire wheels, tonneau
cover, good condition, reasonably
pricedF 6-3084 afternoons. (G (G---94-3t-p).
--94-3t-p). (G---94-3t-p).
1955 FORD. Excellent condition.
Call 6-2966 after 5:15 p.m. Can
be seen anytime behind Grove
Hall. (G-92-st-c),
PERFECT CONDITION, only 8,000
miles. 1964 FAIRLANE 500, 4-dr.
A.T., radio. Bought new in August.
Call 486-2121, Bronson. (G-93-
3t-c).
FOUR DOOR PLYMOUTH 1960,
straight shift, heater, good
condition. Best offer. See at 1106
NE 9th Ave. or call 372-1646.
(G-92-st-c).
1953 MG, TD-2 ROADSTER. In
good running condition. Reduced
from SSOO to $350. Call after 5
p.m. 6-8543. (G-91-st-c).
SPORTSMENS
CYCLE CENTER
617 N. Main St.
SUZUKI
Scles & Service
K LEAN-A-M ATIC
LAUNDRY AND
DRY CLEANING
QUALITY IS
OUR SPECIALTY
EXCLUSIVE SANITONE
PROCESS
1722 W. UnW. Ava.

For Sale
22 CAL. POCKET Automatic.
Excellent. Very reasonable. Will
trade for another pistol, preferably
45 auto. 472-2378 M-W-F after
6 p.m., T-Th. allday.(A-95-lt-p).
SMITH CORONA TYPEWRITER
Perfect; like new condition. $35.00.
Joe Reda 1614 NW 3rd Place.
M-W-F after 12, T-Th after 3 p.m.
(A-95-lt-c).
2 STOVES (30 elect. & 30 gas),
sofa bed and chair $55.00. three
quarter bed $25, 4 dining room
chairs, utility cart (like new). Call
2-3734 after 5 p.m. (A-95-lt-p).
SMITH CORONA PORTABLE
TYPEWRITER Sterling model.
Excellent condition. Call 376-0358
after 6 p.m. (A-95-st-c).
1959 AIR CONDITIONED 2
bedroom house trailer. Built-in
washer, 10x20 cabana, large fenced
yard. Call 372-1868 after 5:30
p.m. weekdays. (A-94-10t-c).
56 All aluminum TRAILER HOME.
8x36, one bedrrom, twin beds, gas
heat, large living room. On lot.
Call before 2 p.m. or after 11:30
p.m. 376-9864 or see at Progress
Trailer Park, North on 441. (A (A---94-4t-c).
--94-4t-c). (A---94-4t-c).
LAFAYETTE' SHORT WAVE
Receiver Model KT 200, 550 kc
to 30 me, 4 bands, BFO, band
spread, S-Meter, IF gain control.
PICKET SLIDE RULE. 2-1624.
(A-94-10t-c).
A HEAVY DUTY FAN, 2 speed
can handle a large space. $20.00.
Call 6-2905. (A-93-3t-c).
GIBSON SINGLE PICK UP
Electric Guitar. Thin line,
body with cherry red finish and
Gibson model GA 18 amplifier
with 3 jack input capacity, and
TREMELO with optional foot pedal
control. Call 372-4209 ask for Jim.
(A-93-3t-c).
MO-PED 1962, good condition.
Best offer. See at 1106 NE 9th
Avenue or call 372-1646. (A-92-
st-c).
ZENITH TRANS- OCEANIC
short wave receiving radio.
Perfect. $65. Call after 5:00 p.m.
372-3863. (A-91-st-c).
"It's Fun & Easy To Ride"
RENTA
MOTOR BIKE
at 111 NW 13th St., just
one block from campus
By Hour,
1 '2 Day
Or Day
ALL NEW BIKES
NO SHIFTING
Mid-America Rentals Inc.
11l NW 13th St.

Lost & Pound
LOST: 65 UF CLASS RING.
Initials J.C.M. Call 6-3851 before
6 p.m., 2-1265 after 6 p.m. Ask
for Chip. Reward. (L-95-2t-c).
SLIDE RULE: Found in 11 Pea.,
noon Wed. Identify and pay for ad.
Call L. Herman 2-9319. (L-94-
2t-p).
LOST: GOLD CHARM BRACELET
Vicinity of SW 2nd Ave. and Tigert
Hall. Sentimental value. Generous
Reward. Please call Pat Miko,
Ext. 2425 or after 5, 376-9008.
(L934t-c).
For Rent
LARGE ROOMS IN FRIENDLY
Surroundings available to male
students. Reasonable rates;
utilities and maid service included.
Convenient to campus and town.
See at 104 SW Bth St. or call
372-0243. (B-82-tf-nc).
NEW, CENTRAL AIR-COND. and
Heating, one bedroom, furnished
apartment. $95 per month. 2014
NW 4th Street. Call 372-5911
after 5. (B-93-st-c).
Personal
GIFT. ATTRACTIVELY BOUND,
hardback NEW' TESTAMENTS,
available free to foreign students
from the office of Prof. Emmanuel
Gitlin, Humanities, Bldg. D, Room
103. (J-92-st-c).
WANTED RIDER TO ATLANTA.
$lO per round trip, leaving
Thursday night. Return Sunday
morning. 'Call Don 2-3380. (J-95-
2t-c).
XT GIRL 15
LIKE WE SAID
COUPLES
Will Be Admitted For
The Price Os One Ticket
All Day Today...
Cupid Ain't Got
Nothing On Us... ffight?
IMONKEY ini
, WINTER
[ Jean Gabin
Features 1 ,2,5,7,9
Out at 10:4C
Viva St Valentine

Services
LOVE AND CARE FOR your
toddler in my home. $lO weekly.
Call 376-0972. (M-95-2t-c).
S. Vietnamese
fire on mob
SAIGON(UPI)-South Vietnamese
troops fired Monday into an anti antigovernment
government antigovernment mob of 2,000 persons
that stormed a district headquar headquarters
ters headquarters near the big northern base
of Da Nang, reports reaching here
said.
The reported mob action coin coincided
cided coincided with a sudden upsurge of
Communist military activity. Red
guerrillas launched at least three
major attacks north of Saigon, kill killing
ing killing 25 government soldiers and
wounding two Americans.
Three other Americans were
injured in a helicopter crash. Se Se,
, Se, venty government militiamen van van>
> van> ished in one clash.
At the same time, Dr. Phan
Huy Qual, a physician and vet veteran
eran veteran Vietnamese politician, an announced
nounced announced he had been approved by
the armed forces to become South
Viet Nam's new premier.
Dr. Quat received the vital as assurance
surance assurance of support at a plenary
session of the armed forces coun council,
cil, council, an advisory body headed by
strongman Lt. Gen. Nguyen Khanh.
He said he wants to create a cer certain
tain certain unity among different poli political
tical political views.
The new Communist pressure
coincided with a Saigon government
report charging that 20,000 Comm Communist-trained
unist-trained Communist-trained officers have infil infiltrated
trated infiltrated South Viet Nam since 1-959.
The report said the Communists
were armed with weapons made in
Russia and Red China. U. S. in intelligence
telligence intelligence officials confirmed the
South Vietnamese report. They
said the figure of Red infiltrators
over the last six years may be
closer to 34,000.
get base
Vientiane, Laos(UPI)- Laotian
and North Vietnamese Communist
forces have captured the last right rightwing
wing rightwing stronghold in northeastern
Laos. A Laotian army high com command
mand command spokesman said that Houa
Muong, 165 miles northeast of
Vientiane, fell before an attack
by a combined Communist force
estimated at six battalions.
The Communists were supported
by heavy artillery and broiht
anti-aircraft weapons with them
for defense against Laotian air
force T2Bs that have been making
daily attacks on the advance
Red forces, the spokesman said.
The mixed North and
Pathet Lao Communist Battalions
made twin attacks from the south
and northeast on Houa Muoi.
An army spokesman said the
defenders of Houa Muong, follow following
ing following their withdrawal, were moving
westward through the mountains
and would continue to fight. But
new Communist reinforcements
were reported moving into the
northeast area.
Casualty figures from the battle
were not available.



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NEW FAIRCHILD COMPUTER IS DEMONSTRATED
...as Dr. Selfridge of MIT explains operation to UF graduate medical
student Bruce Fairchild.
Rawlings home in survey

The home of the late Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
lere has been selected for listing in the National
?ark Service's Historical American Buildings sur survey.
vey. survey.
Documentary drawings of the home, now owned
)y the UF Foundation, will be deposited in the ar archives
chives archives of the Library of Congress as soon as they
are completed. The drawings are already under
way by a UF architecture professor and three
advanced architecture students.
The National Survey, begun in 1933, is today one
of the largest collections of historical architec architecture
ture architecture ever assembled. Architectural interest and
merit, as well as historical significance, are basic
criteria for selection by the Survey.
The drawings are under the direction of Blair
Reeves, associate professor of architecutre, and

LXAs busy with service projects

tur the past few weeks the men
of Lambda Chi Alpha have been
busy with community service pro projects.
jects. projects.
The most important to the Lamb Lambda
da Lambda Chi's according to vice vicepresident

Delta Theta Phi pledges 17;
elects officers for trimester

The brothers of the Delta Theta
Phi legal fraternity held their
formal pledging ceremony for neo neophytes
phytes neophytes on Monday in the Court Courtroom
room Courtroom at the College of Law.
The new pledges are Andrew
Baboulis, Wilson Bell, James But Butler,
ler, Butler, Nolan Carter, Michael Col Colodny,
odny, Colodny, Daniel Curtin, John DeVault,
David Ewing, Lou Ferris, John
Gerken, Robert Mounts, Wm. Mer Merita,
ita, Merita, Charles Mitchell, Wm. B.

...in the classic tradition
i iililip 11111 m From the Arrow Cum Laude Collection comes
IS the perfect example of authentic traditional
Wk mm m lIMIHI Styling. This luxury oxford is offered in
JjjM liliill w PlillilHPl subtle British stripings tailored with button button||p
||p button||p Hil |jj||gipW down collar and box pleat. Whites and
IP' l
r 1 1302 morth main street

president vicepresident Tommy Rivers, was a
visit to Gumwood Cottage at Sun Sunland
land Sunland Training Center for the men mentally
tally mentally retarded.
For two years the Lambda Chis
have sponsored the cottage and

Monroe, James Nixon, Maurice
Plumb, and James Ryder.
Elections for the current tri trimester
mester trimester were also held* The new
officiers are as follows: Dean,
Abbott Herring; Vice-Dean, Ronald
Rudolph; Clerk of the Rolls; Rob Robert
ert Robert Cochonour; Exchequer, Ferrel
Spence; Master of the Ritual, Al Allison
lison Allison Folds; Bailiff, L, W* (Bar (Barney)
ney) (Barney) Barnard U.S.N. Ret.; and Tri Tribune,
bune, Tribune, Dan Rasmussen*

will include location, floor plan, elevations and
a few selected details of architectural intersst.
Reeves said, The Rawlings home is a good ex example
ample example of the typical Florida cracker farmhouse
in the late 19th century. The fact that it belonged
to Mrs. Rawlings makes it particularly signifi significant."
cant." significant."
Mrs. Rawlings, winner of the Pulitzer Prize
for literature in 1939 for her book, The Yearling,"
moved to the Cross Creek home in 1928. She be bequeathed
queathed bequeathed the home to the University when she died
in 1955.
The UF Foundation is planning a modest res restoration
toration restoration program for the home and grounds.
Students working on the survey with Reeves are:
Tom Peacock, Marianna; Chris Benninger, Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, and Ed Popko, Miami.

make trips twice monthly to visit
with the boys.
L. C. Crook, coordinator of
special services at Sunland,
praised the men saying the Lamb Lambda
da Lambda Chis have been a 11 regular
and good influence toward a more
normal life for these boys.
In addition to the S uni and pro project
ject project the Lambda Chis have been
helping the Local Salvation Army.
They are currently conducting a
campaign to gather old and un unwanted
wanted unwanted clothes for the organiza organization.
tion. organization.
Rivers urges any persons who
have any clothes they dont need
to call the fraternity house, 372-
9371, and some one will come to
pick them up.
The next project is a song pro program
gram program in a local home for the
elderly. This will be on Feb. 27.

Tuesday, Feb. 16, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Computer couples
will dance Mar 12
Eeh gad! My dates a gorilla. Ive been matched by that computer
with a gorilla!
That computer wont match anyone up with a gorilla, says
Bob Young whose brilliant idea was to match couples for a dance
to be held March 12, at Broward Hall.
That computer is the R W 300 Digital Process Control Com Computer.
puter. Computer. It used to be owned by the National Aeronautics and Space
Administration (NASA) but now the RW 300, all $247,000 worth,
is part of the Systems Labortory in the Engineering Building.
Young, 5 EG, is section advisor of Tolbert 11, said he got the
idea and called up O.K. Hearne who is one of the top RW 300 com computer
puter computer programers on campus, and a good friend of Youngs.
Hearne told Young that a proper set of questions was needed with
yes no answers. On hearing this the whole Tolbert n floor
set off to write questions.
Some of the questions are:
A. I am basically (1) conservative (0) liberal
B. Do you own a pair of rah-rahs? (1) yes (0) no
C. Does your day start (1) before 6 p.m. (o) after 6 p.m.
Young said that a total of (2) Bor 256 could be programmed and
as of now only about 75 have applied.
We are certainly pleased by the cooperation of the girls in Broward.
Oh yes, the R W 300 will be on display at the Engineering Fair
March 12, 13, and 14. added Young.
1. Ive been weighing the 2. With graduation drawing near
possibility of becoming a I realized how much more
perpetual student. there was for me to learn.
Last week you said you You didnt also
were considering the realize, did you,
merits of mink farming. that when you graduate
your dad will cut
off your allowance?
3.1 must admit the thought 4. What about my thirst for
did enter my mind. knowledge?
Has the thought ever Just because you work
entered your mind doesnt mean you have
that you might get a to stop learning,
job and make a career
for yourself?
5. You mean eam while learning? 6. But what do I know about
insurance?
Right. And you can
do it at Equitable. With your thirst for
They'll pay 100% of knowledge, Im sure
your tuition toward youll be the star
a qualified graduate of their development
degree. At the same program,
time, the work is
challenging, the pay
is good, and I hear
you move up fast.
For complete information about career opportunities at Equitable, see your
Placement Officer, or write to Edward D. McDougal, Manager,
Manpower Development Division.
The EQUITABLE Life Assurance Society of the United States
Home Office: 1283 Avc. of the Americas, New York, N.Y 10019 C Equitable 1985
An Equal Opportunity Employer

Page 9



SPORTS

Page 10

, The Florida Alligator,Tuesday, Feb. 16

All-SEC team
will contain
height, ability

With the Southeastern Conference basketball season coming to
a close, the coaches around the league are beginning to point
to their super-stars* for the AU-SEC check list.
There are several players around the conference who also
have good chances of making various All-America polls around
the nation. Although there are none who will make first team,
a number have shots at the lower teams. But whats the diff difference?
erence? difference? After all, All-American is All-American.

LEE

Ramsey and Brooks Henderson. Gary Keller would have been
a good selection before he broke his wrist.
Other members of the team will be: Bob Andrews (Alabama),
A1 Andrews (Tulane), Louie Dampier (Kentucky), Dick Maile
(LSU), Lee DeFore (Auburn), and Jimmy Pitts (Georgia).
Going out on a limb here is my selection (sort of a pre-season
end, pre-SEC team).
CenterClyde Lee (Vanderbilt)
ForwardsBob Andrews (Alabama) and A. W. Davis (Tennessee)
GuardsLouie Dampier (Kentuckv) and Jimmy Pitts (Georgia).
007 to visit UF gym
Here's an interesting little note. Something worth thinking
about when the girls from the North invade our gym next Tuesday.
Gary Schull, the second leading scorer (12.9)
£ ,J and leading rebounder on the team thinks hes
! 007.
11l Thats the news from up there. His team team'll
'll team'll mates say he is an avid fan of lan Flemings
E| and thinks hes James Bond.
Well, some one had better inform James
W that he might well be bumped off next Tuesday
SCHULL when 1113 undercover agents invade the gym.
It 9 s
Stea>k
KTAght Milk
at
Larrys CSSSi
Large Del Monico,
TUESDAYS Baked Potatoes
Tossed Salad-
STEAK NIGHT 5-9 P.M. Hot Buttered Rolls
$1.07
JUST 1/2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS
LARRY'S
RESTAURANT
1225 W. University Ave.
*v

CHECK THE RECORD

By EDDIE SEARS
Sports Editor

Clyde Lee of Vanderbilt is a sure-bet on
the All-SEC team. Lee is averaging 22.8 points
per game and is pulling down rebounds at a
15.5 average. Lee, a 6 foot-9 center had an
18.8 norm last year when he led the Commo Commodores
dores Commodores with 471 points. He has already scored
434 this year and seven games remain to be
played.
Another player who will make the team is
Tennessees talented A. W. Davis. The 6-foot-7
forward has scored 383 points this year for
a 10.1 average and led the Volunteers in the
upset over Vanderbilt last week.
Floridas best shots at All-SEC will be Jeff

SAEs, TKEs play tonight

Fraternity and independent
basketball games begin again
tonight after a week of little action.
Carnes uses
new method
for training
Jimmy Carnes, head track coach,
hopes his MIFH training system
will be the key to a successful
1965 track season.
The MIFH (Marathon, Interval,
Fartlek, Holistic) training system
developed by Carnes is his answer
to training coUege distance
runners.
In search of a method to train
our dedicated runners,* said
Carnes,** I have combined the
training programs of many of the
outstanding runners of the world,
using an integrated part of each
system to develop our runners.**
These methods are Marathon
training, the method used in
training Peter Snell, the world
record holder in the mile. Carnes
explains that Marathon running is
running seven days a week for 52
weeks. The runner drills until the
runner has developed the ability
to run down the road for two hours
and turning around and coming
back.
Interval training is a system
of repeated efforts in which a
distance is run alternately with
measured recovery periods of low
activity.
Fartlek, said Carnes, is
really speed play. The runner is
on his own, with no coach to dictate
his movements. He just runs as he
feels.
Holistic training considers the
whole situation and all the factors
that make a practical difference
in the performance of the runner,*
said Carnes. home
environment, girl friends, jobs
and general interest are
considered in the Holistic
system,** stated Carnes.

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IN INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL

The big fraternity game will
begin at 9 p.m. when the undefeated
Sigma Alpha Epsilon squad clashes
with Phi Delta Theta. If the SAEs
win the game they will be the
bracket 3 winners in the Orange
League.
The SAEs boast one of the
tallest teams in the league with
giants Gordon Gowen and Will
Rogers in the forward posts. Play Playmaker
maker Playmaker guard Bobby Threatt will
also see heavy duty.
In other Orange League games
Sigma Nu will play Phi Kappa Tau
at 5 p.m. for bracket 4 honors;
Tau Epsilon Phi will meet Pi
Lambda Phi at 9 to determine the
bracket 1 winner and the Sigma
Chis meet Kappa Sigma also at 9.

Swimmers head for'big one;
Dioguardi enters five events

Sophomore Tom Dioguardi leads
the Gator swim chargers to Athens,
Ga. this weekend for competition
in the Southern IntercoUegiate In Invitational
vitational Invitational Meet.
Both fresh freshmen
men freshmen and varsity
competition I
slated for the Mil
meet which sea-r;;
tures competi-Pli
tion among nine 11 f
schools. **
Dioguardi is if A, K
slated to swim
in five events, PP
the 50, 100 "'***
200-yard free- HARLAN
style races and
the medley and freestyle relays.
This would not be possible in a
dual meet since competition is re restricted
stricted restricted to three events and a
relay.
Fencers hold
annual tourney
The University Fencing Club
will feature its annual Invitational
Foil Tournament Saturday at 10
a.m. in Norman Hall Gymnasium.
Admission is free and the public
is invited.

Phi Kappa Alpha has already won
the bracket 2 title.
In an important 7:30 clash in
Blue League action, undefeated Tau
Kappa Epsilon will face Pi Kappa
Phi. The TKEs are averaging 48
points a game and have a scorer
with a 16.0 average In Wes Watson.
The TKEs smashed Alpha
Gamma Rho 49-6 in their last
contest. The winner of the other
Blue League bracket is Lambda
Chi Alpha.
In independent action, Electrical
will face Chemical at 8 p.m. to
determine the bracket winner. In
another independent game, the Lab
J acks will play Hillel at 9in
Norman Gym. All other games will
be played in the Florida Gym.

Florida State is favored to gar garner
ner garner their second consecutive
championship with UF. considered
to have the best chance of over overtaking
taking overtaking the Seminoles.
Our biggest problem is
battling the tremendous depth of
FSU, said UF Coach BUI Har Harlan.
lan. Harlan. The Seminoles have a 30-
man varsity against our 15. Depth
cost us last years Southern as
we had eight firsts to FSUs
three, but they had enough seconds,
thirds and fourths to best us by
some 25 points.
In the freshmen competition,
the Seminoles outnumber the
Gators 44-14, but Harlan is hope hopeful
ful hopeful that the gigantic Miami squad
will take away FSUs medals.
Other schools participating are:
Georgia Tech, Georgia, Emory,
Alabama, Sewanee and Vanderbilt.



1 Gators rout hapless Ole Miss, 85-53

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GATORS KELLER (31), MORTON (23) AND STANLEY CHASE BALL
...UF got the ball and the ballgame

Photos by Ron Sherman,
UF Photo Service
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KELLER, TOMLINSON, MORTON PILE UP
...Stanley, Kreilein flank Gators
*

w OFFICIAL BOX SCORE W

Field Goals Free Throws Rebounds Total
MISSISSIPPI
Kreilein 1-6 2-2 3 4
Megginson 4-8 0-0 2 8
Stanley 4 15 5 5 2. 13
Robbins 1-3 0-0 4 2
Dunn 5-7 1-3 3 11
Strlnhart 2-7 2-5 3 6
Partridge 0-4 3-3 3 3
Poland 1-2 0-1 l 2
Bobe 1-2 2-3 0 4
Huffstatler 0-1 0-0 2 0
TOTALS 19-55 15-22 23 53
FLORIDA
Tomlinson 4-14 1-1 10 9
Keller 7 -12 4-6 12 18
Ramsey 4-6 8-8 13 16
Baxley l-6 0-0 4 2
Henderson 1- 5 0-2 3 2
Higley 2-4 0-0 2 4
Morton 1-4 1-2 5 3
Poore 4-6 2-2 2 10
Hoffman 1-5 0-1 17 2
Koss 3-3 3-4 1 g
Mahoney 3-4 4-4 3 10
TOTALS 31-69 2*-30 60 85

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TOMLINSONS ALL FIRED UP
...Partridge guards him close

Tuesday February 16, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Keller, Ramsey top scorers;
Subs shine in second stanza

By ANDY MOOR
Assistant Sports Editor
Gary Keller returned to form
(cast and all) and led the Gators
to an 85-53 romp over Mis si-
H- s, ,VV> H v / ; v .<;'? I H

MISS PEGGY BELL
.adds something

ssippi Monday night.
The game was marked with the
same violence that went with the
earlier match between the clubs
and saw Dick Tomlinson leave the
second with a four-inch gash
on his arm.
Keller scored 18 points and cen center
ter center Jeff Ramsey had 16 as the St.
Petersburg sophomore-duo con controlled
trolled controlled the boards throughout the
game.
The Gators started off at their
characteristic slow pace and
picked up steam near intermission
when Edd Poore entered the game
to score six points and set up
four more. UF led at the half
by a 37-28 margin.
The real excitement came in the
second half, however, as Poore
continued to show his tremendous
late form and subs Ed Mahoney
and Bill Koss went wild.
Poore brought the crowd to its
feet when he stole the basketball
from an Ole Miss guard midway
through the second half, drove to
the basket and dunked the ball
with a defender hanging on his neck.
He broke loose under the basket
again later to finish the night
with 10 points.
As the score mounted, Coach
Norm Sloan put in senior Koss

POORE

..subs go wild
who immediately got into the act
sinking a field goal and three
free throws in a space of two min minutes.
utes. minutes.
With five minutes remaining,
the crowd began to chant, We
want Mahoney. The yelling be became
came became louder and louder until Sloan
obliged.
Mahoney was not to let his fans
down as he hit two quick 25-foot 25-footers
ers 25-footers and stuffed in a layup. Mah Mahoney
oney Mahoney was fouled twice and sunk
four shots from the charity stripe
winding up with 10 points, his finest
output of the campaign.
For the fans who did not leave
early, there was more in store as
Koss sank an over the shoulder
tip-in and a 20-foot hook shot
in the last minute. He finished
with his top total for the year, 9.
Rebounding again was the major
difference in the game as the Ga Gators
tors Gators outdid the Rebels under the
boards by a 60-23 count.
UF (8-4 in SEC play ami 14-
6 overall) next travels to Nash Nashville
ville Nashville to meet the nationally ranked
Vanderbilt Commodores Saturday
night.
Remaining games:
Saturday, February 20,
Vanderbilt (a)*
Tuesday, February 23,
Florida State (h)
Saturday, February 27,
Georgia (a)*
Monday, March. 1,
Tenessee (h)*
F riday, March 5,
Georgia (h)*
SEC game

Page 11

MAHONEY



Page 12

Â¥"Â¥ MEET THE GATORS + +
I* 4,rs, < To* #, *l Fiaol Clearance [T = 7 = ~*"T
- JsLKPtl a " to 1 om9 " ss ,#rtlw,,,r ir^b
'JnS^^fL ..gf!
- IMTf/' ?1
AJf I /f,.\ Alon won't mtnd || HI M / \ Hj MmS
t / Cjllu if you decide to come j§|J| L i.. 3 IIM;
. / VW* b y h 's new Mister Sand- .. A Ms
| wich Shop in person.... ;jiSj Dresses Shirts Skirts Sweaters J%|| OlltfiT W6QT
g I | 1/2 OFF
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA I Suits & Sport Coats
In fact, he likes HEAD BASKETBALL COACH
and it won't hurt you to . .. .
get out more. Alan would NORMAN SLOAN SW6flt6l*S /2 to 1/3 OFF
like to meet some of the
r_|L e L_.l_ i_i_ Norman Sloan, the dynamic University of Florida Head Basketball Coach
TOIKS wno nave Deen reie- is quickly establishing himself as one of the respected coaches in the South Southphone
phone Southphone customers for years. eastern Conference. C nAr t RWW
. .. L, n just four years, Sloan has taken the Gators from the depths of the jpUIT ,W*
Drop in. .or call. Those Southeastern Conference and has built a program the University of Florida r
famously big sandwiches can be proud of and watch grow. SHiftS
taste great either way. VjJTf
AIANC UICTCP 1 r
J fflln#* l fl at Florida finished in fourth place /Bj f- i \
* __ _ in the rugged SEC standings, a po- 3forslo.oo pi
X A MllUllr U sition the Gators had never been
Ww I Vll Jflwl '\i able to attain before Sloan came on TV }
IN THE CAROLYN PLAZA |f'. V I JH in JJOlllgailS
FR6-1252 FRB-1230 s figure to I JJ23 W. University Avenue
I and the whole state of Florida can >j(jfew
V I '^j|B|Bf^B& : be proud of," the personable Sloan
Irark declared. W
B 1 M%lt "Our players are fine men, with B-. U
character leadership and excellent
Cross Country Shoes athletic ability. The University of ) U|t m
n Florida is solidly behind the basket- ) B ]*B^B&
Discus ball players wearing the Orange and B
Shot Put BIUe Bu,ld.ng a Sloan
Vaulting Poles trademark. When he came to Florida I
Batons
Timers
Spikes for Track Shoes after the 1959-1960 season, the Gators had just completed a 6-16 record
for a last place spot in the SEC. In just one short season, Sloan gave the
University of Florida a winning basketball team. His first club (1960-61) djBBJjBE
posted a 15-11 record and finished fourth in the SEC. It was also undefeated
P Three years ago, after getting off to a very slow start the Gators picked up
the winning pace and Sloan guided the team to a 12-11 mark, including eight
SEC victories and another fourth place finish.
Sloan had four sophomores in the starting line-up, and only two seniors
were on the team. The Gator team went 12-14 but came up with some big M -nlr
victories during the season (including a 21-point victory over top-ranked
Mississippi State) and showed that they had the potential to become another HH
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f McGregor Socks
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1113 W. University Avenue 1 Block East of Campus $$ ,
ft* Where educated feet meet 1127 W. Univ. Ave.
ft*

/ The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 1965