Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
UF tuition
hike set

FROM sll3 TO $l3O PER TRIMESTER

Student tuition will be raised
from sll3 to $l3O a trimester if
the state legislature accepts a
recommendation passed here
Friday by the state Board of Re Regents.
gents. Regents.
The raise will go into effect
Sept. 1.
Fees for out-of-state students
will jump from the present $175
to S2OO a trimester.
Graduate students face a hike
of s37up to $l5O from the pre present
sent present sll3.
These new tuition regulations, if
passes, will effect all state uni universities
versities universities except Florida A&M.
Tuition there will be raised from
S9O to SIOO for undergraduate
and to slls for graduate students.

BUT FROSH QUOTA FILLED

No undergrad
quota set yet

No quota for next year has been
set yet for entering undergraduate
transfer students according to UF
Assistant Director of Admissions

Boy longs 1
for girlfriend
jv EVERETT, Wash. (UPI)-A |:
young lady in San Jose, Calif. *:
may get a surprise when she *:
opens her mail today-500 feet §
x of tickertape with I love you"
:& stamped on it 10,000 times. £:
ijij Its creator, Dan Patzer, 19, *;
:£ calls it the worlds widest :*
*: valentine.**
He mailed it Saturday to Mar Marilyn
ilyn Marilyn Lessard, a freshman at:*
tfSan Jose State College. ::
*: Patzer said he was a little:*
late getting it in the mail be- :£
cause he*s been busy with mid- S
£:term exams at the University S
|* of Washington in Seattle where*:
* he is a freshman in pre-medi- $
cine.

Ferrante Teicher top Festival week

The second week of the UF's
Fourth Annual Fine Arts Festival

Whats going on here?

FERRANTE TEICHER HERE SATURDAY

A Board of Regents staff offi officer
cer officer said the increased fees are
necessary to finance expanded stu student
dent student health facilities and other
services and to improve the fis fiscal
cal fiscal soundness of funds set up for
repayment of certain bond issues.
Part of the fund increase will
be used to finance general opera operations
tions operations at all the universities.
The Board also approved a pro proposal
posal proposal to build permanent bleachers
on the east side of Florida Field
after next falls football season.
The new bleachers will seat
8,000 students.
A new doctoral program in
mechanical engineering was ap approved
proved approved at the meeting.

W. J. Langer.
Applications for undergraduate
transfer and junior college trans transfer
fer transfer students are still being
accepted, he said.
The quota of 2,800 for entering
UF freshmen, however, has been
filled by an unprecedented number
of applications already received.
Applications for entering fresh freshmen
men freshmen are no longer being accepted,
the Office of Admissions
announced.
THE ANNOUNCEMENT came
nearly two months earlier than the
1964 closing date. This is the third
straight year the UF has curtailed
the entering freshman enrollment
to a specific number.
Limited instructional space,
faculty for freshmen, and jiousing
facilities are primary reasons for
the earlier cutoff date.
A statement requesting forms
by Feb. 1, was included in the
reply letter to applicants. The
possibility of reaching the
maximum of applicants early this
year was anticipated.

brings several varied events to the
campus.

UF tuition: no longer this:
BUT THIS..

1 l 'm liJife X 7,. '7, f
r r Ji fy 7* I
| wEjm
j Jt 7 w$
Mr wr Tl
m wK 7 %
£. > Wm Hr
| "WL m \ s

What will undoubtedly be the
most popular single event of the
Fine Arts Festival is the appear appearance
ance appearance Saturday night of the duo duopiano
piano duopiano team, Ferrante and Teicher,
who are riding a crest of national
popularity bordering on the sen sensational.
sational. sensational. These two gentlemen are
extremely talented; they began
their careers as child prodigies
and have had the top-flight legi legitimate
timate legitimate musical training of fine
concert artists. In recent years,
however, they have devoted their
talents to pleasing large audiences
and selling millions of records. In
addition to all this, they have a
low-keyed humor which is charm charming
ing charming and disarming. They appear
in Florida Gymnasium, Saturday
at 8:15 p.m.
Jose Molina and his Bailes Es Espanoles
panoles Espanoles appear in University Audi Auditorium,
torium, Auditorium, tonight at 8:15 p.m., under
the auspices of the Lyceum
Council. Molina and his troupe
are a fast-rising group, enjoying
sky-rocketing national and inter international
national international attention. Their presen presentation
tation presentation includes many varied
See ART* p. 2

FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Vo 1.57, No. 94

'FIXIN THE* CHIKIN, .
Sig Ep chicken dinner
boosts heart fund drive

. . axsl> TAKING IT OUT andy
Andrews, left, and A1 Schlecter

Monday, Feb. 15, 1965

Sign. \ Phi Epsilon fraternity;:;
held its annual * chicken fry**v
yesterday to aid the Alachua*
County heart fund drive despite £
grey skies and rain.
*<
A chicken dinner was pre-:*:
pared, containing three pieces:*:
of chicken cole slaw, french ;ji
fries and rolls. The drive was S
held between noon and 8 p.m.:*;
V
The Sig Eps reported they*
were hurt by the rain since
many church-goers could notv
attend the meal. It had been*
planned that they could eat on*
the large lawn in front of the;:*
house.
The heart fund drive is an:j
annual feature, one of many in->:
dividual drives by different UF>:
fraternities.


One of the celebreties pre-:*
sent was Assistant Dean of Men, :j
William G. Cross, ami advisor:*
to UF fraternities, also a Sig-:
E P. j;
The dinners weredeliveredby:;i
pledges and brothers of the fra-:*:
ternity to those who had called: 1 :
in. $



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Monday, Feb. 15, 1965

telephone commny.. somebody goofed

fm!

Spanish dances with traditional
music and colorful costumes.
Sigma Alpha lota, women's mus music
ic music honorary, and Phi Mu Alpha
Sinfonia, men's music honorary,
combine in a student recital pro programmed
grammed programmed and prepared by the stu students
dents students themselves, in University
Auditorium tomorrow at 8:15. Per Performers
formers Performers include Patricia Mitchell,
of Gainesville, organist; Kenneth
Jones, from Jacksonville, French
horn; Daniel Bowles of Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, trumpet; Ann Johnson, so soprano;
prano; soprano; Marshall Thomas, baritone;
Elizabeth Francis, of Gainesville,
pianist; and Mary Beth Booher, of
Ocala, pianist. The recital in includes
cludes includes compositions by Bach,
Mozart, Schumann, Persichetti,
Copland, and Shostakovitch.
Starting in the middle of the
week, drama assumes the Fine
Arts spotlight. The National
Players return to the campus in
their first appearance here since
1962 with a production of Shake Shakespeare's
speare's Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night," Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday in the University Audi Auditorium,
torium, Auditorium, also under the sponsor sponsorship
ship sponsorship of the Student Government
and the Lyceum Council. See below
for ticket information.
Jean Anouilh's "Waltz of the
Toreadors" is the Florida
Players' production which begins
Thursday in Norman Hall. Per Performances
formances Performances are scheduled for
Thursdays, Fridays, and Satur Saturdays,
days, Saturdays, February 18, 19, 20, 25,
26, 27 in Norman Hall Auditor Auditorium.
ium. Auditorium. The Thursday performances
begin at 7:30 p.m. and the Friday
and Saturday performances begin
at 8 p.m.
Directed by Henry Swanson, the
production stars Bill Gwynn as
General St. Pe, Ruth Ann Helwig
as Madame St. Pe, Mimi Carr as
Mile, de Ste.-Euverte, and Bill
Perley as Gaton, the secretary.
U.S. 'fully
responsible'
TOKYO (UP I) Communist
North Viet Nam said yesterday
the United States would be held
"fully responsible" for the conse consequences
quences consequences of its retaliatory air raids
on Hanoi positions.
The warning was issued by the
North Viet Nam Foreign Ministry
and distributed by the official New
China News Agency, monitored
here.
It said the air raids and UJS.
decisions to possibly beef up its
forces in South Viet Nam with
Marines and more plans were "ex "extremely
tremely "extremely serious acts of aggression
...and posed a grave threat to
peace and security of the people
in this part of the world."
The statement said the United
States had been punished for its
"war acts" against North Viet
Nam.
"However," it added, "it is
clear that the war-like and aggres aggressive
sive aggressive UJS. imperialists still obstin obstinately
ately obstinately refuse to abandon their cri criminal
minal criminal designs, and are frenziedly
intensifying their war acts against
the democratic republic of Viet
Nam...
"The UJS. wiU be held fully
responsible for all consequences
arising therefrom."

Among the mass of wires and circuits of the
Gainesville phone company something goofed.
The result was that male students trying to call
the girls' dorms last week and getting a busy signal
would suddenly find themselves talking to someone
else. Although the busy signal would continue to sound,
the two students would be able to carry on an audible
conversation:
"Where are you calling?"

UF students may obtain tickets
for these attractions on their ID
cards, daily at the Information
Booth, across the street from the
HUB, from 10:30 p.m. 12:30
p.m. and 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.
For the general public, tickets
for Jose Molina, Shakespeare's
"Twelfth Night" by the National
Players, and Ferrante and Tei Teicher,
cher, Teicher, are available at the Record
Bar, 923 West University Avenue.
All tickets are $2.
UF faculty may obtain tickets at
a 50 per cent discount or sl. per
ticket, at the Information Booth,

Ford Motor
Company is:
t..
stimulation
,3th What does it take to spark" a man to his very
J* to bring out the fullest expression of his
S Jl ability and training? At Ford Motor Company
** we are conv i n ced that an invigorating business
v*** an d professional climate is one essential. A prime
W ingredient of this climate is the stimulation that
comes from working with the top people in a
field . such as Dr. James Mercereau.
am ercereau joined our Scientific Laboratory
mKmm in 1962. Recently, he headed a team of physicists
who verified of the Quantum Theory by
creating a giant, observable quantum effect in
superconductors. This outstanding achievement
was the major reason the U. S. Junior Chamber of Commerce selected
Dr. Mercereau as one of Americas Ten Outstanding Young Men of 1964."
Your area of interest may be far different from Dr. Mercereaus; however,
you will come in contact with outstanding men in all fields at Ford
Motor Company.
We believe the coupling of top experience and talent with youth and
enthusiasm is stimulating to all concerned. College graduates who join
Ford Motor Company find themselves very much a part of this kind of
team. If you are interested in a career that provides the stimulation of
working with the best, see our representative when he visits your campus.
We tWnk youU be imprest by the things he can tell you aLt warL*
at Ford Motor Company.
THERE'S A FUTURE FOR YOU WITH... MOTOR COMPANY
The American Road, Dearborn, Michigan
An equal opportunity employer

FINE ARTS FESTIVAL

across the street from the HUB,
daily from 4 to 5 p.m.

Tickets will also be available
at the door for the performance
of the evening.
The Fourth Annual Fine Arts
Festival also includes ten art ex exhibits
hibits exhibits at various locations on the
University campus. For a complete
list of events of the Festival and
the exhibits, drop a postcard or
call the University of Florida De Department
partment Department of Music.
Sunday afternoon, February 21,
at 4 p.m. in the Medical Center
Auditorium, there will be a fa faculty
culty faculty concert made up entirely of

"Third floor Broward."
"How 'bout that. I'm trying to get the Tri-Delt
House."
At times there seemed to be three or four different
voices all carrying on a conversation among
themselves and all trying to call different numbers.
W.E. Clardy, Southern Bell's Local Manager, re revealed
vealed revealed that such a situation is not apt to occur often.
He said it happened last week due to two groups of
circuits being out of order.

compositions by University of
Florida faculty composers. The
program will include works by

Ball Game Reservations
New Restaurant Good Food
HOLIDAY MOTEL
& RESTAURANT
Jet. of Alt. U.S. 27 Phone
And State Road 24 486-2121
BRONSON, FLA.

W/ /
vft

Russell Danburg, Willard Brask,
Didier Graeffe, Richard Bowles,
and Reid Poole.



OLD^dLOTHES
Any persons having old or un unwanted
wanted unwanted clothes to be given to the
Salvation Army, call the Lambda
Chi Alpha house, 372-9371, and
someone will be glad to pick them
up.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS
A guest from General Foods will
speak at a meeting of the American
Institute of Chemical Engineers
tomorrow 7:30 p.m, Room 334 of
the Engineering Building.
TRYOUTS
Tryouts for Max. Frisch's The
Fire Bugs** will be today 3:30
5:30 p.m. in Room 332 Tigert
and 7 9 p.m. in Room 239 Tigert.
Tomorrow the tryouts will be at
3:30 p.m. Room 239 Tigert.
UC STUDENTS
, University College students
seeking admission to an upper upperdivision
division upperdivision college for the 1965 spring
trimester must file an application
to change colleges in the Office
of the Registrar, Tigert Hall 34,
before March 26. No students
having fewer than 64 semester
hours credit at the end of this
trimester need apply.
WORLDSITAIR
Any UF student who is a resi resident
dent resident of Illinois is elllgible to work
at the Illinois Pavilion at the New
York World's Fair. For further
information, go to the Employment
Office, Room 309, Florida Union.
mm
1378-2244~|
1121 W. University
Aw.
Caralyn Plaza

I
Monday Gator Special
in all Cafeterias
LUNCHEON and DINNER
Complete Meal
Q7c
JS 4 (plus tax)
Italian Spaghetti
with Meat Sauce llgP'
w^Wmm
CHOICE OF: POTATO or BUTTERED RICE
AND
1 other vegatable r
Any 10$ or 15$ Salad Jm
Any 10$ or 15$ DESSERT
2 ROLLS or 2 Bread Slices
and 2 Butter Pats
Any BEVERAGE

UF FACULTY CLUB
The UF Faculty Club now fea features
tures features daily luncheons 11:30 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. for members and guests.
Free private dining rooms are
available through Food Service,
extension 2561, for committees or
meeting.
Special family night buffet din dinners
ners dinners every Thursday from 6 p.m.-
7:30 p.m. feature foreign foods.
Italian food will be featured this
Thursday.
INAUGURAL BANQUET
Tickets for the innaugural ban banquet
quet banquet are available through Wed. at
5 p.m. to Legislative Council mem members,
bers, members, Honor Court Justices, the
President's Council members,
student body officers and anyone
with an interest in student govern government
ment government and their dates. The cost
is $2.75.
CIVIL ENGINEERS
Lt. G.E. Shank of the UJS. Naval
Bureau of Yards and Docks will
speak on the construction of the
Atlantic Underseas Test and Eva Evaluation
luation Evaluation Center in the Bahamas at
the meeting of the American So Society
ciety Society of Civil Engineers tonight
7:30 p.m. in Room 328 of the
Engineering Building.
AUTO ENGINEERS
The Society of Automotive En Engineers
gineers Engineers will meet tonight 7:30
p.m. in Room 319 of the Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering Building. Guest speaker is E.
J. Meeker of Jacksonville who will
give an illustrated talk on rims
and wheels.
SAE LITTLE SISTERS
Officers for the .Little Sisters
of Minerva are Nancy Dee Wil Williams,
liams, Williams, president; Elaine Taylor,
vice-president; Mary Finley, se secretary-treasurer;
cretary-treasurer; secretary-treasurer; Beth Brunson,
corresponding secretary; Mary
Ann Neff, historian and Dixie Hard Hardman,
man, Hardman, rush chairman.
AIAA
The American Institute of Aero Aeronautics
nautics Aeronautics and Astronautics will meet
tonight 7:30 p.m. in Room 9 ROTC
Building. R. A. Thompson from
ARO, Inc. will speak and show
slides on Advanced Propulsion
Systems Testing."
IFC BLOOD DRIVE
F raternity men are encouraged
to donate blood to the IFC col collective
lective collective accounts at the J. Hill is
Miller Health Center and the Ala Alachua
chua Alachua General Hospital Blood Cen Center.
ter. Center. Donor hours are Monday
through Sat. 8 a.m. 9 p.m.

t campus news briefs $

ROTC COMMISSION
Attention, veterans and trans transfer
fer transfer students! If you want a com commission
mission commission in either the Army or
Air Force, the new ROTC Vitali Vitalization
zation Vitalization Act of 1964 permits you
to become a lieutenant in two
years. See the professor of mili military
tary military science or professor of aero aerospace
space aerospace studies in the Military Build Building
ing Building for further information.

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MAN IN THE HALL (MMMM, WELL SAY)
... and apparently not minding attention a bit is Jim Phillips as he
makes his way through No Mans Land during Sunday afternoon open
house in Jennings Hall. Admiring residents are (from left) Tammy
Gordon, Paula Naughton, Maxine Jacobs and Helen Cooper.

ERS

Monday, Feb. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

ENGINEERING DAMES
Dr. Taylor H. Kirby will be the
guest of the Engineering Dames at
a meeting Wednesday 8 p.m. in
the University Women's Club.
MEDICAL CLUB
The Medical Technology Club
(Lambda Tau) will meet tonight
at 7 p.m. in M-601 of the Medi Medical
cal Medical Science Building.

Jewel Tea Co., Inc.
...WILL BE INTERVIEWING
March 3 (Wednesday)
on campus
for
Summer Franchise Operators
(Arrange an appointment in the University
Placement Office, Building H.)
GRADUATES IN MARKETING, GENERAL
BUSINESS AND THE LIBERAL ARTS
LOCATIONS IN FLORIDA & GEORGIA

REAL ESTATE CLUB
Ernest Tew will speak on pro property
perty property exchanges and syndicates
tonight at a Real Estate Club
meeting 7:30 p.m. in Room 218
of the Florida Union.
PRE-LAW SOCIETY
Joe Wilcox will talk on the
Personal Experiences of a Law Lawyer"
yer" Lawyer" tomorrow 8:30 p.m. in the
Law School Courtroom#

Page 3



Page 4

v The Florida Alligator, Monday, Feb. 15, 1965

ERNIE UTZ
Editor-in-Chief

LOU FERRIS
Editorial Page Editor

Editor:
We address ourselves to the content of the letter
of Feb. 10, 1965 by Assistant Professor Hiers.
He maligns Student Government's enthusiasm the
new ASG (Associated Student Government of the
usy*
He implies that SG should align itself with the
National Student Association because NS A is truly
concerned with great world problems such as the
admission of Red China to the UN.
Mr. Hiers forgets to explain that NSA*s quite
radical opinion is that we should admit Red China
to the UN. This sentiment is maintained in the face
of recent statements by Red China to this effect:
Since our friend, Indonesia, has left the UN we
wouldn't go in that imperialist organization for
slavery even if we were invited.''
This is only a sample of NSA's stated views.
It is not our intention, however, to pick a fight
over the leftist blubberings of the National Student
Association. Our concern is with the real scope
and function of any campus student government.
Mr. Hiers, should Student Government really main maintain
tain maintain a stated position on affairs of international,
national, state or county-wide concern? We think
not.
For Student Government to call for the admission
or non-admission of Red China to the UN would
be roughly equivalent to the Gainesville City
Commission's making official comments on the
national budget or on DeGaulle and the Common
Market. Pretty silly picture isn't it?
Granted, Mr. Hiers, there is a ...big bad world
outside the campus...*', to which mess we shall
all graduate one day.
But Student Government is neither designed nor
equipped to right any state, federal or other wrong
which may exist outside its legitimate domain.
It will save itself much foolishness by not aspiring
to do so.
We agree that every thinking student should be
actively concerned with the great political and social
problems of our day. Students should join groups
formed to examine all sides of these problems,
and aimed at promoting solutions to them.
Like it or not, Mr. Hiers, the University is only
a small segment in the broad field of human
society. It has unique problems which cannot be
solved in Washington, in Tallahassee, in the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville City Hall, or even in Tigert Hall. These are
the only problems to which Student Government
may properly address itself.
Again we grant you, our problems are Mickey
Mouse'' (since that epithet pleases you) when viewed
in the framework of international movement. But
again, they are Mickey Mouse'* in the nation of
a $495,000 SG budget compared to a SIOO million
Federal budget. Let*s keep it that way.
Its hard enough to get an agreement on how to
solve just these teensy problems.
G. K. McClung
2UC

GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Kay
Huffmaster, (Correspondents), Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles,
Donita Mathison, Dan Taylor, Sam Ullman, Selwin H. Clment.
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Kurvin, Ann Carter, Evan Langbein, Ira Liebsfeld, Thelma Mossman,
Fran Snider, Cynthia Tunstall, Harvey Wolfson, John Shlplett,
Chip Sharon, Karen Vltunac, Jack Zucker, David Ropes, Ami
Saperstoln, Carl Brown, Jane Young, Bill Lockhart, Ken Simon,
and Drex Dobson, Jeffrey Denkewalter, GjS. Corseri,
TTie" Rorida right to regulate 1 the typographical tone of aU advertisements*!!? k
to revise or turn away copy which it considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect Insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices tor correction must be given before next insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR U the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and Is
published five Umes weekly except duing May, June and July when It Is published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator is entered as second class
matter at the United States Poat Office at Gainesville.


THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International

STEVE VAUGHN
Managing Editor

L e T TeR 2
Touche

JOE CASTE LLO
Executive Editor

ED SEARS
Sports Editor

" It's a great idea! The next kid who touches the fence gets 30,000 volts!"

Editor:
I am dissatisfied with the voting procedures on
this campus. A recent experience indicates that
some people may be voting several times.
At 5 p.m. Wednesday, on the eve of the election,
one of my neighbors in the dorm came into my
room and asked if I intended to vote. I said that I
did. He asked who I would vote for. He seemed
dissatisfied with my answer.
When I asked him why he wanted to know, he
said that he wanted my I. D. card. I again asked

EDITOR:
LARGE UNIVERSITIES are essential to World
Peace.
I REFER to the Friday, Jan. 22, Alligator, Student
No. 007* by Lynn Hedy Farber lUC and say that
large universities are essential and are one of the
important fundamentals of world peace. Numbers are
necessary.
IF WE LOOK at every large organization today
they are obliged to use numbers, for control numbers
have important value i ft all parts of life. Every
moment we are in contact with numbers; for example,
we have a number for bank accounts, social security,
and military service.
SO IN A large university, it is more efficient to
use numbers than names. The important thing is
organizing and managing the university.
FORTUNATELY, here, they pay more attention
to these problems.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
first of two articles by former
Alligator Editor Jim Moorhead
concerning Student Government
and the recent student election.
It also marks the resumption of
his column, Thinking Out Loud,
domant since December.)
BY JIM MOORHEAD
Alligator Editor, 1960-61
Cleanest election in five years?
Well, could be. At least Secre Secretary
tary Secretary of the Interior Marty Schwartz
thinks so, as quoted in Thursday's
Alligator. The comparison is al alalways
always alalways made yearly; someone
allows as how this year's shen shenanigans
anigans shenanigans didn't reach the magni magnitude
tude magnitude of campaigns gone by. It
makes good copy. Notoriety always
does.
But it seems a shame that stu student
dent student government's annual process
to sustain itself is ultimately sub subjected
jected subjected to analysis through not-so not-socolored
colored not-socolored glasses.
The reason it Is, of course,
is that campaign history on this
campus invites a little compara comparative
tive comparative muckracking after the current

Aftermath

Numbers

THINKING OUT LOUD

Reminiscence

ballyhoo has come down to the
final day. There have been some
pretty infamous deeds pulled off
over the years.
The 1965 campaign was fairly
clean. The underhanded methods
of days gone by helped produced
this phenomeneon, by inadvertently
spawning additional election laws
which made unethical tactics sub subject
ject subject to penalty. And, as Secre Secretary
tary Secretary Schwartz pointed out, the un unusually
usually unusually high number of active par parties
ties parties made for that many more
watchdogs on each other.
So, from the standpoint of dirt,
it wasn't an especially interesting
campaign. No Alligator Extras,"
no poop-gooning of much propor proportion,
tion, proportion, no absurd stunts like the one
in 1960 when one candidate's broth brother,
er, brother, a fraternity man, was abor abortively
tively abortively exposed" in a yearbook
picture as the candidate himself,
in an effort to tag the candidate
with Greek affiliation when he was
an Independent of about 11 years'
standing. Ah, those were the days.
But, this year's campaign did
have one interesting aspect which
possibly was overlooked by a
great many people. In what might

why, and he said that he was collecting them. I
was sure that he wanted to vote several times.
Later that evening, I heard him tell a friend to
get the I.D. cards of everyone who was not going
to vote.
In order to avoid cries of politics' and mud
slinging', I will not mention the party he was
supporting. However, I urge the Alligator to bring
all possible pressure on the new student government
in order to make stuffing the ballot box more
difficult.
Name Withheld

I REMEMBER the first night I arrived in
Gainesville it was 11 p.m. I called Mr. Harry Wise,
my counselor, at his home. He came and met me at
the bus station and arranged my room and program.
I REALIZED that everything was under control
and I will never forget this kindness.
I SAID earlier that large universities are the
basis of peace in the world. Here, in a large
university, are students of other countries. We
discover the problems of each, and we learn how
to adjust to the social life.
WE LIKE to be friends. From these societies the
United Nations will be stronger. I hope one day
we will see no borders on earth and that it will
become possible for everyone to go everywhere
freely. So' these are some of the advantages of a
large university with its numbers.
PARVIZ KARBASSI, D 4126

loosely be construed as a Kennedy
style move, Bruce Culpepper
picked up the torch which faltered
in the hands of an older brother
six years before.
Brother Blair, who likp Bruce
was a Sigma Chi and a varsity
football player, ran for the student
body presidency in the spring of
1959. It came as a great sur surprise
prise surprise to plenty of observers when
the glamorous Blair went down to
defeat at the hands of a young
Jacksonville man named Joe Rip Ripleybookish-looking,
leybookish-looking, Ripleybookish-looking, conserva conservative
tive conservative and a nephew of Duval County
state legislator Wayne Ripley.
Now, Bruce has vindicated the
earlier loss of his brother.
From at least one standpoint,
it's fortunate Bruce won the day.
Had he become the second brother
to receive rejection from his fel fellow
low fellow students, a serious and fami family-wide
ly-wide family-wide complex might have set
in about the acceptability of the
Culpepper name hereabouts..a
sort of antithesis of the Kennedy
magic, which seems to always spell
victory.
Well, that's politics.



f campus curie I
&)
I
k :):):
I
iv
' v
|
1 Susan the
| skateboarder
Today's Campus Cutie Is*:-:
))):Susan Starling, a junior major-$
Sing in Elementary Education.):!:
SSusan plans to teach fourth):):
:):) grade after graduation. ):):
& 8
:):) She has served her sorority, ):))
x'-Zeta Tau Alpha, both as social :):)
and ritual chairman. :$
;X
>:) Susan hails from Kissimmee,):):
):)where whe is skateboard cham- )):
):)pion. Previously from Ocala, ft
:)Susan says that she misses):)*
£big city life. :):)
:):) Susan is a stickler for neat-.):)
:):)ness and is a real perfectionist.:):)
Shops disagree on
jazz popularity
Jazz has taken a nose-dive.
So says Bob Novogroski, mana manager
ger manager of the Top Times Record Shop,
discussing current UF student
taste in music.
Novogroski rates the sale of
rock n* roll records at about
35 per cent of total sales.
He claims that Classical and
folk music each account for 25
per cent of total sales.
But the sale of jazz records is
below 1 per cent.
You can count the number of
currently popular jazz performers
on one hand, said Novogroski.
This feeling that jazz is losing
its appeal to UF students is not
shared two blocks away at the Re Record
cord Record Bar.
Manager Chuck Ansell said that
although rock *n roll was bigger,
jazz still is a very big seller
in his store.
Ansell said that UF students
comprise over 70 per cent of his
customers and of this number about
60 per cent buy rock n roll
records.
Novogroski said that his biggest
competition, other than the Record
Bar, is everyone who has eight
feet of floor space. They will put
in a record rack.

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See Europe's best I Guided
tours or independent itiner itineraries,
aries, itineraries, our expert travel coun counselors
selors counselors can help yen get extra
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day and dollar. We sell sea
and air tickets, too, at official
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Travel Service
808 W. Univ. Ave. FR 6-4641
1

'Waltz reservations open

Ticket reservations for the next
Florida Players production, The
Waltz of the Toreadors, will be
taken beginning today. Students
wishing to reserve tickets are
asked to call extension 2144 or
2671 between noon and 5 p.m.
today through Feb. 20 and Feb.
22 Feb. 27.
Waltz of the Toreadors will
be performed at Norman Hall Au Auditorium
ditorium Auditorium Feb. 18,19,and 20 and
Feb. 26, and 27.
According to Florida Players
House Manager, R. Denman
Strahan, students will be admitted
on their student IJD.cards and
student wives will be admitted on
student wife I.D. cards. General
admission tickets cost 80 cents
and high school admission tickets
are 55 cents.
Denman Strahan said the reser reservations
vations reservations should be phoned in as

Papers accused of interference

The Board of Student Publica Publications
tions Publications heard accusations of poli political
tical political interference in the publica publication
tion publication of two student newspapers,
the Flavet Three Press and the
Florida Alligator but postponed
action until the board members
could study the problem more
thoroughly.
Two students, George E. Mar Marcellus,
cellus, Marcellus, 7ED, and Armand M. Opitz,
7ED, brought charges of political
interference in the operation of the
Three Press and the Alligator.
Tax clinic
Students who need help on their
tax returns are urged to come to
the Tax Clinic being sponsored by
Beta Alpha Psi, the accounting
honorary.
The Clinic will be held every
Tuesday until April 6 in Room 13
Matherly Hall from 1-3:30 p.m.
According to LaVerne Hinson,
president of Beta Alpha Psi, ac accounting
counting accounting majors who have had or
are taking a tax course will be
there to give advice about de deductions
ductions deductions and filling out the re returns.
turns. returns.

PROGRESS PARTY
ana I woula like to thank you
for your faith in us and our iaeas.
We are looking forward to a great year
of working so withyou.

BRUCE CULPEPPER
President-elect

REHEARSAL ACTIVITY

viPSilpJ >
W i I

early as possible. If reservations
need to be changed, students should
call the reservation extension as
soon as possible. He emphasized
it will be impossible to obtain
additional tickets on the night of
performance, once a reservation

According to Opitz, the issue of
free speech is involved because
he requested Alligator reporters
to be present at the controversial
Flavet HI commission meeting Jan.
25.
There were no reporters pre present,
sent, present, Opitz said. He attributed
this to political interference and
said the story was suppressed
for three days until Jan. 28.
Joe Castello, executive-editor
of the Alligator, said there had
been a mix-up with reporters but
the story had been published after
enough backgrounding had been
done to run a competent story.
This included contacting the editor
of the Flavet Three Press, Phil
Geyer, and the mayor of Flavet
HI, Andy Baboulis, Castello said.
Opitz said he had submitted a
letter to the editor of the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator which was also suppressed.
The letter implied political moti motivation
vation motivation in an effort to remove
Phil Geyer editor of the Three
Press.
Castello defended The Alligator
by saying 14 letters had been re received
ceived received by the editors concerning
campus politics.

Mondoy, Feb. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

has been made.
Denman Strahan said reserva reservations
tions reservations can be picked up only on the
day of the performance, and only
at the Norman Hall Box Office
between 6 p.m. and twenty minutes
before curtain time.

It was the policy of the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator to refuse to print these.
Opitz* letter was among those not
printed.
George Marcellus charged
Mayor Baboulis had attempted to
control news in the Flavet Three
Press. Marcellus said Bob De-
Loach, administrative assistant to
Pres. Ken Kennedy had attempted
to suppress the story concerning
editor Geyer.
The board took no action.
Iff l
Don't stumble through the literary
classics. CLIFFS NOTES will help
you make better grades! These
study aids give you a clear, concise
summary and explanation, chapter
by chapter. CLIFFS NOTES are now
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Local artists
named winners
Two Gainesville artists have
been awarded cash prizes in the
Florida State Fair Fine Arts ex exhibition.
hibition. exhibition.
Michael Stack, UF art teaching
assistant, won SSOO for his oil
painting The Red Stripe. The
award was one of five given in the
painting and sculpture category.
James E. Wing, Jr., 1604 NW
7th Ave., received SIOO for crafts
work and honorable mention for a
second work.
Other Gainesville artists in the
exhibition are: Alan Greenfield,
Keith Hatcher, Susan Permut, Vin Vincent
cent Vincent Pisani, Stuart R. Purser,
Dian Lee Shelley, Emily Wenner Wennerholm
holm Wennerholm and Olive S. Briggs.
nffir
MILDNESS
yours with
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BOLE YELLOBOLE
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No matter what you smoke youll
like Yello-Bole. The new formula,
honey lining insures Instant Mild Mildness;
ness; Mildness; protects the imported briar
bowl so completely, its guaran guaranteed
teed guaranteed against burn out for life. Why
not change your smoking habits
the easy way the Yello-Bole
way. $2.50 to $6.95.
Spartan ff Checker ff Thorn M
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Official Pipes New York World's Fair
Free Booklet tells how to smoke a pipe;
shows shapes, wrrte: YELLO-BOLE
PIPES, INC N Y. 22. N Y., Dept 100
By the makers of KAYWOODIE

Page 5



, The Florido Alligator, Monday, Feb. 15, 1965

Page 6

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

fVr.n. r~ -- -
%
For Sale
1959 AIR-CONDITIONED 2-
bedroom house trailer. Built in
washer, 10 x 20 cabana, large
fenced yard. Call 372-13J8 after
5:30 p.m. weekdays. (A-94-3t-c).
*56 all aluminum TRAILER HOME.
8 X 36, one bedroom twin beds,
gas heat, large living room. On
lot. Call before 2pm or after
11:30 pm 376-9864 or see at Pro Progress
gress Progress Trailer Park, North on 441.
(A-94-4t-c).
LAFAYETTER SHORT- WA7E Re Receiver
ceiver Receiver Model KT 200, 550 kc to
30 me, 4 bands. BFO, band spread,
s-Meter, IF gain control. PICK PICKETT
ETT PICKETT SLIDE RULE. 2-1624.
(A-94-IQ-c)
A HEAVY DUTY FAN, 2-speed
can handle a large space. $20.00.
MAYTAG washing machine(large).
Good condition. $35.00. Call 6-
2905. (A-93-3t-c).
GIBSON SINGLE PICK UP
Electric Guitar. Thin line, hallow
body with cherry red finish and
Gibson model GA 18 amplifier
with 3 jack unput capacity, and
TREMELO with optional foot
pedal control. Call 372-4209 ask
for Jim. (A-93-3t-c).
MO-PED 1962, good condition.
Best offer. See at 1106 NE 9th
Avenue or call 372-1646. (A (A---92-st-c).
--92-st-c). (A---92-st-c).
ZENITH TRANS- OCEANIC
short wave receiving radio.
Perfect. $65. Call after 5:00 p.m.
372-3863. (A-91-st-p).
' 1 J 1 1 1
Personal
GIFT. ATTRACTIVELY BOUND,
hardback NEW TESTAMENTS,
available free to foreign students
from the office of Prof. Emmanuel
Gitlln, Humanities, Bldg* D,Room
103. (J-92-st-c).
SPORTSMENS
. CYCLE CENTER
617 N. Main St.
SUZUKI
Spies & Service
rajgmt
TONITE! 3 TOP HITS!
* FIRST AREA RUN
At 7: Q 0
THE STORY OF
Wi fXK ..... THE IMMORTAL
llV4j) HANK WILLIAMS
jfegr
raSnSoige HAMILTON Susan OLIVER
BUTTONS Arthur 0 CONNELL
AfikStr
YTK.'
WRORO S KNMH PROOUCTKS WlVi
HONEYMOON
HOTEL
RObEKT NBMY RObBRT
.PMHWSIW w KTROCOIOB
IwigSi
Billi
STARTS FRIDAY
SANDRA DEE
"ID RATHER BE RICH"

Autos
WHITE 1960 MERCURY 8 all
power, excellent condition, SBOO.
Call Mrs. Fant Ext. 2906 or FR
2-6788 after 5. (G-P3-2t-c)
ALFA ROMEO 1961Help!! the
bank has got me! The Alfa is
yours for only $ 1200. See at
Florida National Bank or call Bo
Cook 372-9363. (G-93-ts-c)
62 MG MIDGET ROADSTER,
mechanically perfect, good tires,
body & interior excellent. $llOO.
Call 376-8883. (G-93-st-c).
1960 RENAULTElectric shift,
35 to 40 miles per gallon, $295.
Contact Catlin at Ext. 2564. (G (G---94-3t-c).
--94-3t-c). (G---94-3t-c).
SELL OR TRADE S-90 PORSCHE
1961. S3OO over bank value. See
at 107 NE 8 St. Call 372-6998
after 5. (G-94-3t-p).
1961 SUNBEAM ALPINE, BLACK
w/w tires, wires wheels, tonneau
cover, good condition, reasonably
pricedF 6-3084 after noons. (G (G---94-3t-p).
--94-3t-p). (G---94-3t-p).
1955 FORD. Excellent condition.
Call 6-2966 after 5:15 p.m. Can
be seen anytime behind Grove
Hall. (G-92-st-c).
PERFECT CONDITION, only 8,000
miles. 1964 FAIRLANE 500, 4-dr.
A.T., radio. Bought new in August.
Call 486-2121, Bronson. (G-93-
3t-c).
FOUR DOOR PLYMOUTH 1960,
straight shift, heater, good
condition. Best offer. See at 1106
NE 9th Ave. or call 372-1646.
(G-92-st-c).
62 OLDS 88, 4-door Spt. Sed.
Fully equipped, A/C and other
extras. Excellent condition. $1695.
Call evenings 372-8221. (G-91-
3t-p).
MUST SELL 1956 BUICK V-8,
automatic transmission a real
clean car, good mechanical con condition.
dition. condition. Only $175. Contact Tom
Galloway 376-1025. (G-91-3t-c).
55 CHEVY, excellent condition,
6 cylinder, standard shift, new
brakes and clutch. Make offer.
See after 5:15 p.m. and weekends.
Room 4, 424 NE 6th St. (G-89-
st-c).
1953 MG, TD-2 ROADSTER. In
good running condition. Reduced
from SSOO to $350. Call after 5
p.m. 6-8543. (G-91-st-c).
THE WAY*!.'

Wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE TO share
apartment in S7O to SBO range.
Close to campus-or will share your
apt. Call Stephenie McNulty before
5. -6-3261, ext. 2792 after 5
8-1074. (C-93-st-c).
WANTED 1950 1955 FORDS
and CHEVROLETS. A1 Herndons
Service Station, 916 S. E. 4th
Street. (C-75-20t-c).
V
ONE MALE ROOMMATE IN
furnished split level air-cond.
apt. 2 blocks from campus. SIOO
for balance of trimester plus $lO
to sl2 per month for utilities.
Call Dave Tanner 2-9371. (C-92-
4t-c).
WANTED: RETURN OF BOOK
Stylistic Devices in Stephen
Cranes Prose, taken from *55
PLY. Wagon, to 560 Murphree Hall.
(C-92-3t-c).
Help Wanted
* #- 1
WAITER NEEDED PART time. 4
til 8 p.m., 5 days. Apply in person
Larrys Wonderhouse Rest. 14 SW
Ist St. Behind Sears. (E-92-3t-c).
NEWSPAPER SOLICITORS, male
or female, work evenings with
excellent commission. Odd hours
possible. Gainesville Independent,
18 SW 2nd Street. Call 372-7500.
(E-92-3t-c).
BOY 12 to 16 years old for
established paper routes adjacent
to University grounds. Contact the
Gainesville Sun, 378-1411. (E-91-
st-c).
For Rent
LARGE ROOMS IN FRIENDLY
Surroundings available to male
students. Reasonable rates;
utilities and maid service included.
Convenient to campus and town.
See at 104 SW Bth St. or call
372-0243. (B-82-tf-nc).
NEW, CENTRAL AIR-COND. &
Heating, one bedroom furnished
apartment. $95 per month. 2014
NW 4th Street. Call 372-5911
after 5. (B-93-st-c).
GARAGE APARTMENT. Quiet Quiet-2
-2 Quiet-2 blocks from campus. Couple
preferred. 1020 SW 3rd Avenue.
Phone 372-9884 after 5 p.m. (B (B---92-3t-p).
--92-3t-p). (B---92-3t-p).
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE
double room with full separate
unit. Kitchen, study room, linen
and maid service. 231 SE 2nd
Street. (B-86-ts-c).
j \

Lost Sc Found
SLIDE RULE: Found in 11 Pea.,
noon Wed. Identify and pay for ad.
Call L. Herman 2-9319. (L-93-
2t-p).
URGENTLY NEED RETURNED
beige and orange Florida Spiral
notebook, containing C-53 notes.
Call Lisa, 8-2358. (L-94-3t-c).
LOST: GOLD CHARM BRACELET
Vicinity of SW 2nd Ave. and Tigert
Hall. Sentimental value. Reward.
Please call Pat Miko Ext. 2425
or after 5, 376-9008.(L-93-2t-c).
LOST: 5 MONTH OLD COLLIE
Male, brown with white neck and
paws, chain collar. Answers to
Hercules or Herk. Reward. Call
376-1844. (L-92-3t-c).
CrSo* \
\
LIKE WE SAID
Will Be Admitted For
The Price Os One Ticket
All Day Today...
Cupid Aint Got
Nothing On Us... Right?
(MONKEY ml
i WINTER
* Jeon Gcbin
Features 1,3,5,7,9
Out at 10:4C
Viva St. Valentine

Real Estate
HOUSE AND NINE ACRESLarge
2 bedroom home in excellent con condition
dition condition overlooking lake off Archer
Road. Beautiful oak trees. Only
4 miles from UF Med. Center.
$16,500.00. Call Charlie Mayo,
Mary Moeller, Realtor, FR6-4471.
(I-90-st-c).
China no first
rate power
HONG Kong (UPl)Communist
China, despite its nuclear advances
and tough talk of intervention in
Viet Nam, is not a first rate
military power today.
Although it has an army of about
2.6 million men, the Red Chinese
ability to make an effective mili military
tary military response to the American
bombing of North Viet Nam is
severely limited.
The only direct response China
is capable of making is a Korea Koreatype
type Koreatype human wave ground action.
Even then any response likely
to bring China into direct con conflict
flict conflict with the United States would
almost certainly have it be con contingent
tingent contingent upon Soviet willingness to
provide support or protection, or
both.
The question of Soviet support
is of paramount importance in at attempting
tempting attempting to determine either the
capability or likelihood of a large largescale
scale largescale military action by China in
Southeast Asia.
There are many variables and
uncertainties involved in assessing
China's military capabilities. But
it can be stated with certainty that
China's main military strength is
defensive.
The Chinese strategy and tac tactical
tical tactical training has been based on
defense.
China's capability for a major
sustained combat effort beyond its
own borders against a first rate
military power-meaning the United
States-is extremely low.
Against any of its Asian neigh neighbors
bors neighbors it is a different story.
Alone, and unopposed by a first
rate military power,*' explained
one of the best informed sources
on Red Chinese military affairs
in Hong Kong, China is capable
of overrunning any country in
Southeast Asia.''
11 It's Fun & Easy To Ride"
RENT A
MOTOR BIKE
at 111 NW 13th St., just
one block from campus
By Hour,
I f 2 Day
Or Day
ALL NEW BIKES
NO SHIFTING
Mid-America Rentals Inc.
11l NW 13th St.



Here s complete spring SG election results:
I ** **
I Over 8,000 voters turn out; Culpepper, Progress Party get the nod

Binal results of Thursdays Stu Stufftt
fftt Stufftt Government election show
ogress party swept 53 of 69
ssible positions, including the
Hire upper slate through Lyceum
fluncil vice-president.
Action Party won several Leg Legative
ative Legative Council and Honor Court
Bstice spots, while Chris Bennin Benninmr
mr Benninmr bacame Freedom Partys sole
Acted officer by taking the Archi-
Atnre Legislative Council repre-
Aitative slot.
The line-up in this trimesters
Agislative Council will be: 29
A Progress, 10 for Action, and
He for Freedom.
Closest race was for Nursings
nor Court Justice where Ac Acns
ns Acns Judy Sharon edged out Pro-
Hess Elka Freeman 25-24.
Ballotting on the New Constitu-
Hn was 4,029-644 in favor: and
Id trimester was supported by
Ipular referendum 3,192-2,507.
I RESIDENT AND VICE-PRESI-
Ident OF THE STUDENT BODY
Im Harmeling (F)
Imes C. Dacey 879
ruce Culpepper (P)
lick Thompson 3,756
lugust Schildbach (C)
ill Ott 241
red Lane (A)
lloyd Price 3,307
I TREASURER OF THE
I STUDENT BODY
loke S. Griffin (F) 626
Iteve Cheeseman (P) 4,209
lathy Pierce (A) 3,193
CHANCELLOR OF THE
HONOR COURT
id Stubbs (P) 4,020
ack Nichols (A) 3,506
CLERK OF THE
HONOR COURT
2d Iglehart (F) 644
Robert Segal (P) 3,717
r red Breeze (A) 3,423
LYCEUM COUNCIL PRESIDENT
mily Benson (P) 3,713
nn Johnson (A) 3,534
LYCEUM COUNCIL VICE VICEPRESIDENT
PRESIDENT VICEPRESIDENT
lane Denning (P) 3,896
ean Eagleson (A) 3,362
LYCEUM COUNCIL MEMBERS
(Vote for 4)
Llui Breslauer (P) 4,172
ally Sitar (P) 4,067
Jlane Blacker (A) 3,724
red Didier (A) 3,666
udy Elms (A) 3,848
Me MBE RS OF THE BOARD OF
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
(Vote for 3)
ton Federman (F) 1,599
largaret Blanchard (P) 3,310
II Leonard (P) 3,427
ton Spencer (P) 3,804

THE ELECTION AT A GLANCE:
: v
Progress Party wins 53 of 69 positions. Sweeping upper
g slate. In Leg Council, Progress controls 29 seats, Action 10 I
:? $
$ seats, and Freedom 1 seat.

Rick Schuster (A) 3,280
Sam Ulman (A) 3,221
Bill Wall (A) 2,968
NEW CONSTITUTION
YES 4,029 NO 644
I FAVOR THE TRIMESTER
YES 3,192 NO 2,507
SOPHOMORE HONOR
COURT JUSTICE
(Vote for 2)
Susan Lockhart (F) 314
Marilyn Sokolof (F) 192
D. Wayne Dodge (P) 866
Elizabeth White (P) 905
J.B. Phillips (A) 757
Wayne Thomas (A) 789
SOPHOMORE LEGISLATIVE
COUNCIL
(Vote for 9)
FREEDOM:
Carol Ann Giardina 191
Judi Harman 176
Walter S. McVoy 156
Mr. Carrol Ttiuiardson 178
Marie Robinson 180
Susan Scanland 188
Bob Shipman 196
PROGRESS:
Jackie Braun 896
Gail Cox 927
Clif Davis 925
Les Hardy 899
Fred Hellinger 935
BUI Lichter 954
Bing Michael 885
Mark Springer 913
Honey Zipper 900
ACTION:
Lee Alexander 815
John Healy, Jr. 766
NelUe Johnston 756
John Jones 787
Martin Lawson 709
Julie McCready 807
Jane Palmour 838
Leon PohUl 719
David Vosloh 726
FRESHMAN HONOR COURT
JUSTICE
(Vote for 2)
Kay Melton (P) 1,068
George Stuart (P) 1,100
Robert E. Crown (A) 943
Barry Diamond (A) 974
FRESHMAN LEGISLATIVE
COUNCIL
FREEDOM:
Jane Harmeling 288
David Horne 142
Michael B. Sherfield 137
Samuel W. Taylor 140
PROGRESS:
Louis Fred Brown 1,023
Jack Burris 983
Carol Marcus 1,064
Gene Peek 1,078

Frank Shepherd 1,018
Paul Siegel 1,120
David Stokes 924
Jim Valentine 1,048
ACTION:
Isabel C. Barten 895
Julie Colomitz 903
Jane Cook 961
Malou Koch 850
Ann Lavender 974
Glade M. Liggett 855
John Shipley 1,009
Beau Smith 838
ARTS AND SCIENCES HONOR
COURT JUSTICES
(Vote for 1)
Jim Fine (F) 251
George Garcia (P) 321
A1 W. Clark (A) 327
ARTS AND SCIENCES
LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL
(Vote for 4)
FREEDOM:
Mel Black 244
Dan Harmeling 293
Paul Newman 260
Terry Nugent 240
PROGRESS:
Bob Bolt 315
Tom Kiefer 319
Bill Sadowski 317
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ACTION:
Joyce Grass man 335
BUI Herring 322
Kay Lundquist 365
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EDUCATION HONOR COURT
JUSTICE
(Vote for 1)
Suzanne HUliker (P) 190
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EDUCATION LEGISLATIVE
* COUNCIL
(Vote for 3)
Susan Bartley (P) 180
Frederick A. Shenkman (P) 187
Donna Thompson (P) 189
Diane Cueny (A) 191
Maxine Jacobs (A) 178
ENGINEERING HONOR COURT
JUSTICE
(Vote for 1)
Jeff Raney (P) 362
Carl Heishman (A) 206
ENGINEERING LEGISLATIVE
COUNCIL
(Vote for 3)
John Mixon (P) 339
Tom Richmond (P) 307
EUer C. Roqueta (P) 289
Louis Friedheim (A) 206
John Paul (A) 254
Dave Webster (A) 241

Monday, Feb. 15, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
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Jim Wyatt (P) 237
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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
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Dennis Wightman (P) 229
Chuck Wohlust (P) 216
Jim Carleto (A) 177
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LAW HONOR COURT JUS TICE
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Kip March man (P) 188
Sam HoUand (A) 138
LAW LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL
(Vote for 2)
A.J. I vie (P) 151
Bud Robison (P) 210
Leo P. Rock, Jr. (A) 166
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(Vote for 1)
WilUe Veal (P) 98
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Ricardo Dysli (P) 113
George Lewis (A) 65
NURSING HONOR COURT
JUSTICE
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Elka Freeman (P) 24
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Lynn Hampton (P) 27
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Ron Cyre (A) 32
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Ira C. Robinson (F) 27
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MEDICINE HONOR COURT
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(Vote for 1)
Peskin 1
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(Vote for 1)
Jack Bartlett (P) 50
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(Vote for 1)
Jack Kenworthy (P) 28
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Page 7



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PAUL MORTON GRABS THE REBOUND
. . Ramsey (40), Posey (34), Biggs (55) there
BASKETBALL PHOTOS BY 808 ELLISON
I k
B B
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p
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K* f?
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SKIP HIGLEYS ALL ALONE
. drops it in for two easy points

ROLUNS, STETSON FALL

Golfers open season with win

Senior captain Laurie Hammer
fired an even par 144 to lead the
UF golf team to a 20 stroke win
over Rollins and Stetson Friday.
The triangular meet was first
scheduled as a pair of dual meets
to be held on Friday and Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday.
UF golfers totaled 591 points to
Rollins* 612 and Stetsons 648.
Lloyd Watts was the second low
man for the Gators with a 147
total. Walt Armstrong (149) and
Bob Murphy (151) finished out the
UFs top tour.
Harold Bishop led the freshmen
golfers to an easy victory. Bishops
146 total was a two-over-par per performance.
formance. performance.
The golfers host FSU next Sat Saturday.
urday. Saturday.

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Rebels next on menu

Gators pin
6851 loss
on Bulldogs
By ANDY MOOR
Assistant Sports Editor
UFs basketball team tackles
Mississippi here at 8 tonight alter
breaking its three game losing
streak Saturday night against
Mississippi State by a 68-51 count.
The Rebels come here with a
mere 4-17 record, but Coach Nor Norman
man Norman Sloan warns that, **They*ll
be loose and shooting since they
have nothing to lose and are not
expected to win. The Rebels
are smarting after a 22 point de defeat
feat defeat at the hands of Georgia at
Athens Saturday.
The Rebels, who have but one
win in twelve SEC outings, will
be led by the team's high-scorer,
Eddie Dunn.
Saturday night started out to be
anything but a reversal of the
Gators recent losing form. Miss
State jumped to an early lead which
they carried into the second half.
Florida failed to score a field
until nearly five minutes had
elapsed. The Gators field goal

Conference Overall
W L Pet. W L Pet.
Tennessee 9 1 .900 17 2 .895
Vanderbilt 8 1 .889 16 3 .842
Kentucky 8 3 .727 13 7 .650
Auburn 8 3 .727 13 6 .684
Florida 7 4 .636 13 6 .684
Alabama 6 4 .600 14 6 .700
LSU 4 6 .400 8 11 .421
Mississippi State 4 8 .333 8 14 .364
Georgia 3 9 .250 6 13 .316
Tulane 1 9 .100 2 17 .105
Mississippi 1 11 .083 4 17 .190

Gators cop third
in SEC track meet

MONTGOMERY, Ala.-The Gator
track team finished third in the
indoor meet here Saturday.
Tennessee, as expected, domi dominated
nated dominated the competition, winning
nearly all the events and scoring
50 points. IiJU was a distant second
with 15.
for their 14 points, UF scored
three seconds, two thirds and a
fourth. The one and two mile re relay
lay relay teams each finished second as
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SEC STANDINGS

SPORTS

, The Florida Alligator, Feb. 15, 1965

Page 8

percentage lagged below 20 per
cent until late in the half. They
trailed at intermission by 30-27.
The Gators began the second half
nearly as slowly as they had the
first, but State started just as
slowly. The game remained close
usii.l Skip Higley and Edd Poore
began to hit with about 10 minutes
left. Jeff Ramsey then joined in
the basket barrage, sinking two
jumpers and a host of free throws.
In three minutes the lead grew
to 12 points for the Gators.
The second half defense had to
be the best put up by the Gators
all season. It took State nearly
13 minutes to get its first goal
of the second half as Higley and
Poore continued to harass the
Bulldogs outside while Ramsey
kept the middle closed tight and
repeatedly blocked shots.
State wound up with three basket 1
in the second stanza, all on long

did Dave Westerman in the high
jump.
Other finishers in order were:
Mississippi State and Auburn, 13,
Alabama, 9, Kentucky, Tulane and
Georgia, 5 each, and Vanderbilt,
3. Mississippi failed to score.

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Ramsey tied his previous high
for the season with 19 points.
Jeff copped 16 rebounds, just two
less than the entire Mississippi
State squad.
I've never been prouder of Jeff
than I was tonight. He really came
through for us from both the field
and the free throw line, said
Sloan.
Frosh swimmers
top Dade Junioi
The UF freshmen swimming
team trimmed Dade Junior CoUege
here Friday 55-40.
The freshmen captured first
place in nine of the 11 events,
but set only one meet record.
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