Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Regents may raise UF tuition

I More election
V. V.
|stories, photos |
V
| on pages 3,7 |

CULPEPPER WINS BY 449

jftHf y
t I

Photos by Ron Sherman
and Gerry J ones


Progress sweeps
top slate
Progress party swept to victory last
night and captured all campus wide offices.
In addidtien to the presidential and vice vicepresidential
presidential vicepresidential races, Progress won offices
for treasurer, honor court chancellor, Ly Lyceum
ceum Lyceum Council president, Lyceum vice vicepresident.
president. vicepresident.
Steve Cheesman, Progress candidate for
treasurer, won over Cathy Pierce (Action)
and Hoke Griffin (Freedom).
Official totals in this race were: Cheese Cheeseman4,2o9;
man4,2o9; Cheeseman4,2o9; Pierce3,l93; Griffin626.
Sid Stubbs, candidate for chancellor of
the Honor Court on the Progress ticket,
beat Action candidate Jack Nichols 4,020
to 3,506.
Official results in the race for clerk
of the Honor Court showed Progress party
t =4 candidate Bob Segal had won.
' Vote totals were: Segal- 3,717; Fred
Breeze
dom)-641.
In the race for Lyceum Council presi president,
dent, president, Progress party candidate Emily Ben Benson
son Benson won over Action candidate Ann Johnson Johnson-3,737
-3,737 Johnson-3,737 to 3,534.
Progress candidate for Lyceum Coun Council
cil Council vice-president Diane Denning beat Ac Action's
tion's Action's Jean Eagle son 3,896 to 3,362.
Progress continued with a sweep of the
Board of Student Publications. Results were:
Spencer (P), 3,804; Leonard (P), 3,427;
Blanchard (P), 3,310; Schuster (A) 3,280;
Ullroan (A), 3,221; Wall (A), 1,968; and
Federman (F), 1959.

FLORIDA
57, No. 93

I THE VOTE...
I THE COUNT...

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Downs Lane
3,75 6 to 3,307

8,183 votes set new UF record

BY DREX DOBSON
Staff Writer
Bruce Culpepper swept over his
three other opponents last night to
win the 1965-66 Student Govern Government
ment Government presidential election and
placed Progress Party in the SGs
drivers seat for next year.
Progress Party garnered the top
five SG positions as a record
Official returns showed Cul Culpepper
pepper Culpepper leading the all-campus
vote with 3,756 votes, Fred
Lane (Action Party) fol following
lowing following with 3,307,

See CULPEPPER p.7
...THE WIN
Culpepper, right, and Thompson

SEE STORY
PAGE THREE

Jim Harmeling (Freedom), 879,
August Schlldbach (Challenge),
241.
Culpepper and his running mate,
Dick Thompson, took a command commanding
ing commanding lead in the early voting returns
and never once relinquished it,
widening the gap to an eventual off official
icial official 449 vote voctory over their
closest competitors, Actions Lane
and Floyd Price.
FREEDOMS HARMELING took
his biggest showing from Arts and
Science voters of the Hub precinct,
where Freedom paced a close third
to Progress and Action with 262
votes.

i



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 12, 1965

No singleed raid
caused U.S. retaliation

WASHINGTON (UPI) Presi President
dent President Johnson explained Thursday
that it was generally increased
Communist aggression, not a
single raid, that compelled the
latest UJ3. attack on North Viet
Nam.
The reason, coupled with a stiff
new warning to the Communist
world, was given in a White House
statement Issued after Thursday's
joint UJ3 .-South Vietnamese strike
tV
Reds issue
warning
MOSCOW (UPI) The Soviet
Union warned Thursday night that
the United States is deeply mis mistaken
taken mistaken if it thinks it can get away
with the retaliatory heavy bombing
of North Viet Nam.
Let no one doubt that the UJS.
S JR. and other Socialist countries
will fully discharge their interna international
tional international duty to the fraternal peoples
of Viet Nam, the Kremlin's offi official
cial official news agency said.
The Tass news agency dis distributed
tributed distributed Russia's first response
to the massive air raids by about
150 UJS. and South Vietnamese
planes Thursday on targets in
North Viet Nam.
The American attack was in
quick response to the terrorist
bombing of an American Army
billet 275 miles northeast of Sai Saigon
gon Saigon Wednesday night.
Tass drew attention to a So Soviet-North
viet-North Soviet-North Vietnamese commun communique
ique communique which Wednesday announced
that Russia had agreed to streng strengthen
then strengthen the defense of the Communist
regime in Hanoi.
Russia will not remain indif indifferent
ferent indifferent to the guarantee of the se security
curity security of the fraternal democra democratic
tic democratic republic of Viet Nam and would
render it the necessary aid and
sipport, Tass said.
The Russians said the UJS. was
playing a dangerous game with
fire and the retaliatory raids
were fraught with the most ser serious
ious serious conseauences.

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across the North Vietnamese bor border.
der. border.
It made clear that this third
retaliatory action in five days was
more than just a return blow for
the smashing of UJS. Army bar barracks
racks barracks at Qui Nhon.
These actions by the South
Vietnamese and United States go governments
vernments governments were in response to fur further
ther further direct provocations by the
Hanoi regime, the statement said.
Since Feb. 8, a large number
of South Vietnamese and UJS. per personnel
sonnel personnel have been killed in an in increased
creased increased number of Viet Cong am ambushes
bushes ambushes and attacks.
A district town in Phuoc Long
Province has been overrun, re resulting
sulting resulting in further Vietnamese and
UJS. casualties. In Qui Nhon, Viet
Cong terrorists in an attack on an
American military billet murdered
Americans and Vietnamese. In
addition, there have been a number
of mining and other attacks on the
railway in South Viet Nam as well


U.S. armada blasts Communists

SAIGON (UPI) An armada of
nearly 150 UJS. and South Viet Vietnamese
namese Vietnamese planes blasted key Com Communist
munist Communist military installations in inside
side inside North Viet Nam yesterday
in rapid retaliation for a Viet
Cong terrorist bombing of a UJS.
Army billet.
The Communists claimed 12
planes were shot down during the
raids on targets near Dong Hoi
and Chan Hoa and said one Ameri American
can American pilot yas captured. A Hanoi
broadcast Identified him as Robert
H. Schumaker and indicated he
parachuted safely.
The Navy said four of its planes
were lost but the pilots of all but
one were rescued. Another plane
was reported to have crash landed
at the UJS. air base at Da Nang.
The Defense Department in
Washington said heavy damages
were inflicted on the target areas
by Navy planes flying from car carriers
riers carriers in the China Sea and other
American and Vietnamese air aircraft
craft aircraft operating from land bases in

as assassinations and ambushes
involving South Vietnamese civil
and military officials.
The United States Government
has been in consultation with the
government of South Viet Nam on
this continuation of aggressions
and outrages. While maintaining
their desire to avoid spreading the
conflict, the two governments felt
compelled to take the action de described
scribed described above.
A
Air Reserve
on alert
LANGLEY AIR FORCE BASE,
Va. (UPI) The Tactical Air
Command of the Air Force has
been placed on increased alert
due to the -crisis in Viet Nam.
It has 136,000 officers and men,
including all Air Reserve and Air
National Guard units.

South Viet Nam.
A Pentagon spokesman said,
heavy fires were observed in
one target area north of the 17th
Parallel dividing North and South
Viet Nam and moderate fires
in two other areas.
President Johnson ordered the
air strikes within hours after Viet
Cong suicide squads blew up a
four story UJS. Army billet in Qui
Nhon, 275 miles northeast of Sal Salmon.
mon. Salmon. Wednesday night.

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Tuition may increase from sll3 to $l3O

The cost of going to school here
may go up.
You may be have to pay $l3O
instead of sll3 tuition per tri trimester
mester trimester if the Board of Regents
passes an increase proposal at
their meeting here today.
The 15 per cent increase would
be effective September 1.
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( $5.00 apiece
( The makers of By George! j
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( George! of course) is pub- )
/ lished in this or any other \
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( Tell us your tale in 100 )
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offers daily in all cafeterias complete luncheons
and dinners for 97 BEGINNING FEB. 15
MONDAY: Italian Spaghetti With Meat Sauce
TUESDAY: Golden Fried Chicken
WEDNESDAY: Grilled Chopped Steak With Onion Rings
THURSDAY: English Meat Loaf With Brown Gravy
FRIDAY: Fried Fillet of Fish With Tartar Sauce
SATURDAY: Baked Sugar Cured Ham
SUNDAY: Roast Young Tom Turkey, Cornbread Dressing
. & Giblet Gravy
Includes:
CHOICE OF:
potato or buttered rice m
ONE OTHER VEGETABLE
ANY 10< ORSALAD VA^^-,
any ioc ongsg*
2 rolls /^T
2

For graduate students, fees
would increase to $l5O per
trimester from the present sll3.
Out-of-state tuition fees would
jump from $175 to S2OO for under undergraduates
graduates undergraduates and would knock off the
$175 out-of-state fee for graduate
students.

Harmeling expected
to get more votes

*'l honestly expected more votes.
1 am very disappointed about that,"
conceeded Jim Harmeling, losing
candidate for president on the
newly formed Freedom Party
ticket.
Harmeling said he had enjoyed
"playing politics" even though he
said he isnt much of a politi politician.
cian. politician.
The people of Freedom Party
will still be represented as a
force on campus even if not as
a political party, he said. It was
formed to present the issues be before
fore before the student body and Har Harmeling
meling Harmeling felt that the party had
accomplished its purpose.
The only bad thing Harmeling
said about the campaign was that
it was one week too long.

Challenge dies
Challenge Party died last night with as little fanfare as when it was
formed.
August Schildbach, Challenge Party candidate received 241 votes out
of the 8,143 cast for president.
"I conceed," stated Schildbach at 8 p.m. At the time of concession,
he had received 12 unofficial votes.
"However, it was not my purpose to win, only to make the voters
look at the candidates as persons and not as party heads."

A good chunk of the increase,
if passed, is expected to go towards
expansion of student health and
other services.
A quick Alligator student poll
of the proposed increase yester yesterday
day yesterday found UF students, naturally,
quite opposed.

HARMELING

Friday, Feb. 12, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

gX&Xtt&XKKK: *if : :
V Vi
Vi
!Will regents resign ? |
M X X|S
|S X|S
S There is much speculation the State Board of Regents may resign
en masse when they meet at the UF today. $:
The word out of Tallahassee is that some or possibly all of
the nine-member board may quit. The board has been a center :*:
$ of controversy since the Farris Bryant-Haydon Burns squabble
£: over which man should have power to appoint them. The State §:
X; Supreme Court subsequently ruled that the present Boards
term can be ended by Burns in four months. :$
The Regents have been reluctant to comment on the **resign :£
| rumors. $
I $
: £x;x;x : x;x;xxxx-x:xxxx-x-xxx-x-xvxx-xxx-xx-xx-x-x:x*x:x:x'x:xxv::x:::: :

By YVETTE CARDOZO
Staff Writer
The miracles of modern science
took a short recess for The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator staff during last nights elec election
tion election as the phone connection
between polling places and the
election return center broke down.
"Well have a physically fit staff
if nothing else," sighed Alligator
editor Ernie Litz as his repprters
were reduced to Spartan running in
order to get returns through.
Ordinarily results are phoned
from polling places directly to the
return center in Bryan Lounge.
But last night telephone con connections
nections connections at the Bryan Lounge end
balked.

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W 6147 9
J INCLUDES TRINrS CURRENT SMASH
3 LEMON TREE 3
reprise I S|?|
W RECORDS V
otCORO
Free Parking In Rear

Gator staff kept
'physically fit

The results were forced to take
a detour route through a Progress
Party walkie talkie connected with
a receiver in room 324 of the
Florida Union.
They were relayed to the Florida
Blue Key office and then phoned
down to the Alligator office. Later,
this last connection was changed
to the Information booth which was
separated from the return center
black board by 30 feet and 500
students.
Alligator staff members elbowed
their way through the solid mass
of students for two hours to relay
election results to the black board.
The phone was finally fixed at
8:25. Fred Lane conceded the pre presidential
sidential presidential position at 8:45.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator/ Friday, Feb. 12, 1965

COUNSELING
Today is the last day to regis register
ter register for pre-medical and pre-dental
counseling in Room 107 Anderson
Hall. Be sure to have instructors
full names or initials and the cor correct
rect correct spelling of the names. It will
also be necessary to know your
course and section numbers.
SPEAKERS BUREAU
Applications for Florida Blue
Key Speakers Bureau are avail available
able available in Room 314 Florida Union
from 1-5 today. Interviews will be
from 3-5 p.m. until Feb. 17.
IFC BLOOD DRIVE
Fraternity men are encouraged
to donate blood to the IFC collc collctive
tive collctive accounts at the J. Hillis Mil Miller
ler Miller Health Center and the Alachua
General Hospital Blood Center.
Donor hours are Monday through
Saturday 8 a.m. 9 p.m.
TRYOUTS
Tryouts for Max Frischs The
Fire Bugs will be Feb. 15, 3:30
-5:30 p.m. in Room 332 Tigert
and 7-9 p.m. in Room 239 Tigert.
Feb. 16 the tryouts will be at 3:30
p.m. Room 239 Tigert.
/HUMANITIES CLUB
The Humanities Club will not
present a film this weekend. The
next scheduled film is An Even Evening
ing Evening of Ballet featuring Galina
Ulanova and the Bolshoi Ballet,
March 12,13, 14 and 15.
THETA SIGMA PHI
Theta Sigma Phi, professional
fraternity for women in
journalism, will hold Spring Rush
Sunday from 2-4 p.m. at the Alpha
Chi Omega house. Invitations are
necessary.
FLORIDA PLAYERS
Tickets for the Florida Players
can be reserved starting Monday
Feb. 27. For reservations call
extension 2144 or 2671 from noon noon-5
-5 noon-5 p.m.
REAL ESTATE CLUB
The Real Estate Club will meet
Monday 7:30 p.m. in Room 218
of the Florida Union.
UNITARIAN
Dr. Seymour Stanton Block will
speak on Benjamin Franklin: The
Man Sunday 11 a.m. at 1204
NW Tenth Ave. before the Uni Unitarlan-Universalist
tarlan-Universalist Unitarlan-Universalist Fellowship.
|
} 378*22441
1821 W. University
I Av*
Cartlya Plaza

campus news briefs

CIVIL ENGINEERS
Lt. G.E. Shank of the UJS. Naval
Bureau of Yards and Docks will
speak on the construction of the
Atlantic Underseas Test and Eval Evaluation
uation Evaluation Center in the Bahamas at
the meeting of the American So Society
ciety Society of Civil Engineers Monday
7:30 p.m. in Room 328 of the
Engineering Building.
HONEST ABE DANCE
East Broward and Tolbert Areas
wiU present an Honest Abe
dance tonight 8 p.m. in the Broward
Recreation Room. Admission for
those without East Broward and
Tolbert Area activity cards is
25 cents. The Playboys are
the band.
FACULTY CLUB
The UF Faculty Club will hold
a Valentine dinner-dance from 7:15
-11:30 p. m. Saturday. Members
and guests may now obtain tickets
$2.50 per person from Mrs. June
Cowperthwaite at the clubhouse;
John Sites, 115 Rolfs HaU; or Tex
Oliver, 104 Matherly Hall.
GOLF TOURNAMENT
ihe University of Florida Golf
Associations Spring Golf Tourna Tournament
ment Tournament will be held Feb. 13, 14 and
20. The 36 hole medal tournament
is open to all students, faculty and
alumni. Allparticipants may select
their own foursomes to shoot their
qualifying round tomorrow or Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday. Based on their scores, con contestants
testants contestants will be placed in 8 man
flights for the final 18 holes to
be played on Feb. 20.

* Chevrolet
M | ~, j Impala Super Sport Coupe
ni. I
Park out front, at least for a while, and let the neigh- seats, center console and carpeting; the smooth and
bors enjoy that sleek Impala Super Sport styling, easy Chevrolet ride; and Chevrolet power, starting with
After all, you have everything else to yourself: the our famous 140-hp Turbo-Thrift 230 Six. This '65
luxurious Super Sport interior with its cushy bucket Chevrolets a home improvement if you ever saw one.
CHEVELLE Looks, luxury and lots more Malibu 'Super Sport Coupe
The looks you can see. The luxury thats a Malibu carpeting, patterned vinyls and eight interior color
Super Sport you can imagine: bucket seats, full schemes. The rest youd better sample for yourself.
new but the idea
| The idea still is, make Corvair
the sportiest low-priced car
look: suave new continental
styling, even better handling,
Monza Sport Coupe same rear-engined traction.
Drivings fun. Try it.
Drive something really new-discover the difference at your Chevrolet dealers
Chevrolet CheveUe Chevy ll*Corvair Corvette

SIGMA PHI EPSILON
The Sig Eps will have a fried
chicken dinner to raise money
for the Alachua County Heart Fund
Feb. 14 from noonB p.m. at the
Sigma Phi Epsilon house.
INNAUGURAL
Tickets for the innaugural ban banquet
quet banquet are available until Wednesday,
5 p.m. to Legislative Council mem members,
bers, members, Honor Court Justices, Pre Presidents
sidents Presidents Council members, student
body officers and anyone with an
interest in student government and
their dates. Cost $2.75.
HILLEL
A brunch will be held Sunday
11 am. at the Hillel Foundation
followed by a general meeting
11:30 a.m.
CAMPUS CUTIE
Applications for Campus Cutie
may be obtained at The Alligator
office Room 10 Florida Union. Con Contact
tact Contact Sam Ullman at The Alligator
office for further information.
UNIVERSITY
Lutheran Church
1826 W. Univ. Ave.
(opp. handball courts)
2 services for student
convenience:
9-9:45 a.m.
11-12 noon
Sunday Evening Stu Student
dent Student Fellowship, 5:30

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ads: Mono* Moiel
our specialty: Ribs and
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Smothers set
for UF s oeech
Florida Sen. George Smathers
will keynote the 14th annual
Southern Conference on
Gerontology here next Monday and
Tuesday.
Smathers will address the group
at 11 sum. Monday. His talk will
tie in with the overall theme of
the conference Maintaining
High Level Wellness in Older
Years."
The session is jointly sponsored
by the Institute on Gerontology
of the UF and the Florida Institute
for Continuing University studies.
Participants have been selected
from recognized national
organizations.

whos
in.
control


Human events are controlled by
thought the basic premises that
shape the life of each individual.
Underlying all progress is the
growing vision of mans spiritual
nature and destiny. Hear this lec lecture
ture lecture titled Whos in Control? by
WILLIAM MILFORD CORRELL, a
member of the Board of Lecture Lectureship
ship Lectureship of The First Church of Christ,
Scientist, in Boston, Mass.

nttMUinMn j
8:00 P.M. February 14, 1965 :
McCarty Auditorium :
Sponsored by the Christian Science :
Organization :
:<
*


nr
ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITIES
for Seniors and Graduates in mechanical,
AERONAUTICAL, CHEMICAL,
ELECTRICAL,
and METALLURGICAL
ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING MECHANICS
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
PHYSICS and
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
IMON. & TUES., FEB. 22, 23
Appointments should be made
in advance through your
College Placement Office
Pratt & U
DIVISION or COUP.
fiircraft
An Equal Opportunity Employer
*_ ..y,,. power row propulsion-rower eor auxiliary systems.
CU..UT


-v-xv.'-v.. .vvWtfrMv. : v-vx-x/ -y-N
Dallas Symphony
here tonight
Pianist Ivan Davis will be a
featured performer tonight when
the Dallas Symphony Orchestra
presents a concert at the UF.
The Lyceum Council will sponsor
the orchestra event at 8:15 p.m.
$5 in the University Auditorium.
1

World's Greatest Collegiate Show
Saturday Feb. 13
Citizen's Field 8:00 P.M
FLORIDA
STATE
CIRCUS
tickets on sale across from the Hub. Feb. 12
Sponsored by G.HJS. KEY CLUB
Feb. 5,11,12
A Trip To Europe
For Less Than MOO
Switzerland Tha International Travel Establishment will locate job
opportunities in Europe for anyone who likes the idea of a fun-filled,
low cost trip to Europe. Jobs are available in all fields throughout
Europe. Interested students should send $2 to Search Dept., ITE, 68
Herrengasse, Vaduz. Liechtenstein (Switzerland) for a complete, do-it do-ityourself
yourself do-ityourself prospectus which includes the key to getting a job in Europe,
the largest European job Selection available, instructions, money saving
tips and conclusive information making a trip to Europe (including
transportation) possible for less than SIOO.

Prof hits speakers
The UF does not spend more than a milkshake per student
to bring speakers to the campus, according to associate professor
of political science Arnold Heidenheimer.
Heldenheimer said that the university spends only $5,000 a year,
or about forty cents per student, to pay for the bringing in of
speakers;
Until recently, Dr. Heidenheimer declared, the range of
speakers has been that of a small girls college.
Heidenheimer said he was impressed however with the list of
speakers scheduled to appear on the UF campus this trimester.
He cited specifically the German author Hans-Georg Wieck.
Wieck is scheduled to speak Feb. 19 on the topic: Germany's
Position in Europe and in the Atlantic World.
Dr. Heidenheimer discussed the propriety of having speakers
come to the campus who hold known radical viewpoints. He said
that a certain amount of radicals, either of the or of the right,
would be alright.
However, he held a different viewpoint concerning extremists.
Rockwell, for instance, would be a circus, Heidenheimer said
referring to American Nazi Party leader George Lipcoln Rockwell.

Friday, Feb. 12, 1965, The Florida Alligator

Daver named
faculty lecturer
The annual faculty lecturer for
the University Committee on
Public Functions and Lectures will
be Manning J, Dauer, professor
of political science.
Dauer will speak on Higher
Education at the Crossroads,"
discussing the support and the
administration of higher education
and how this affects the UF.
The lecture will be given ir\
McCarty auditorium at 8:15 p.m.,
Friday, Feb. 19.
Dauer has published several
books including The Adams
Federalists.** He has also con contributed
tributed contributed to the study of
reapportionment by establishing
one of the standard indexes to
measure the percentage of a states
population that can elect each
chamber of the legislature.
Jr. College
journalists here
Junior college journalists and
faculty advisers from throughout
the state gather in Gainesville
this weekend for the annual
Florida Junior College Press
Association Convention.
Publications in Transition**
is the theme of the convention,
which began Thursday night and
continues through tomorrow.
Meeting concurrently for its
annual convocation will be the
Florida Council of Junior College
Publications Advisers.
Advance registration indicated
85 student journalists and 21 ad advisers
visers advisers from 16 Florida Junior
colleges will attend, according to
John V. Webb, UF journalism
professor and coordinator of the
convention.
Events scheduled include
workshop sessions in advertising,
photography, layout, editorial
policy and other phases of
publications activity.
Highlight of the events was the
announcement of winners in the
state junior college publications
competition at a Friday evening
dinner in the Student Service
Center.

WM" W ___

NOW OPEN in the United State* and
37 foreign countries Europe, Asia, I
the Caribbean and South America. |
Some ore high paying, some are ex-
citing, all are worthwhile summer I
jobs for college students . THE I
KIND OF WORK YOU ENJOY.
OPPORTUNITIES INCLUDE i Resorts,
dude ranches, park concessions, mo- |
tels, summer camps, government, |
industry, international youth organ-
izotions, exchange programs, etc.
These positions and more are listed I
in the 1965 EDITION of the GUIDE TO I
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT (now in its
fourth year). For the best in summer |
jo^odsrysuntodoyl^^J^

CAMPUS CUTIE J
! X
MB i
ii
| W I
| Judy plans |
to teach
s
Todays Campus Cutie g gis
is gis Judy Elms, a Junior
x from Ft. Lauderdale. This
x pretty Miss majors in
& Secondary Education, and
jx plans to teach Social ;?
Studies after graduation. ||
Judy served on the |
§ Lyceum Council as both £
secretary and ticket $:
manager. She has also :g
worked on the orientation £
:|:j staff, and on homecoming
for two years. $:
£ Judy is first vice g
president of Delta Gamma
sorority. 8
g The Alligator is proud &
x to have Judy as todays
£ Campus Cutie.
UFers eligible
for Burns grants
UF students will be eligible
for scholarships from the Haydon
Burns Scholarship Foundation said
Lester Hale, dean of student
affairs.
It is my understanding that
the scholarships can be used in
connection with attendance at any
degree granting university in the
state, private or public,** Hale
said. He added that the amount
of the scholarship will be
determined by financial need and
will be available to all students
doing satisfactory work.**
Martin Sack, secretary of the
Board of Trustees for the
Foundation said that on Feb. 17
the Board would meet and release
further information about the
scholarships.
Sack said that the amount raised
by the Inaugral Balls was in excess
of SIOO,OOO. The total amount will
be awarded this year and another
series of balls jvill be held next
year to raise further funds Sack
said.
'Pricing* talk today
Herbert T. McAnly will give the
first of five Florida addresses on
Inventory Pricing** at the UF
today at 3:40 p.m. in Room 18
of Matherly Hall.
McAnlys talks are part of the
Florida Institute of Certified
Public Accountants* Dis Distinguished
tinguished Distinguished Lecturer Series* that
was started in 1962.

Mail coupon NOW! I I
The BEST JOBS are taken early. L f 1
NATIONAL 1111
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES INSTITUTE
Student Employment Division
1750 Pennsylvania fee., N.N-, Washtnfton, D.C. 20006 t
GmHsmsk Ptemrwfc GUIDE TO SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Enclosed is $2 CASH O CHECK M.O.
NAME (print) I
STREET |
CITY |
STATE School ~ |

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator/ Friday, Feb. 12, 1965

ERNIE. LI TZ
Editor-In-Chief

LOU FERRIS
Editorial Page Editor

Congratulations
and good luck to President Bruce
Culpepper ana Vice President Dick Thompson
and of course, to all those elected to student
government offices.
You stand as your own tribute by virtue
of the countless hours you have devoted to
seeking student support, and by the sacrifices
of time and effort in order that you might be
elected to serve.
We cannot believe that self-aggrandizment
could motivate you. We well know that there
are easier and less expensive ways to promote
oneself.
To us it is obvious that both those who were
successful, and those who werent, desired to
serve the student body and the university.
And it is not necessary for us to recount the
impositions made upon your personal lives,
and time, which was a part of seeking election.
Os you the student body expects the same
integrity and high purpose in the performance
of your jobs, as was the motivation for seeking
office.
Our words are neither meant to be facetious
nor sarcastic. The editors of this paper have
viewed too many elections, and years of
services presented by student government to
think that personal acclaim can be the over overriding
riding overriding consideration for working in student
government.
With this in mind, we can assure the present
administration that the Alligator will look
forward to the programs SG will seek to
accomplish this year.
The End
. .of another campaign, but not exactly
a typical UF political campaign.
This year a third and fourth party injected
issues into the campaign which appealed to
quite a number of students. Those issues
may very well alter the tenor of elections
here in years to come.
Judging from the final tally, had either
Challenge or Freedom party, or both, or
segments of their platform been absorbed
bv either of the major parties, the outcome
of the election might nave been different.
Historians are fond of saying that the
reason that a major third party has never
survived in this country is because one or
both of the major parties have incorporated
in their platform, the issue giving birth to
the third party.
But that trend has not been followed here,
and it is doubtful that it will be. The Reasons
for this are at once obvious.
However, the coalition of the two minor
parties of this campaign may mean that the
established political groups on campus could
have a potent voting group to contend with in
the future.
In any event, we look forward to the Yise
of other parties capable of drawing out students
who have never voted before, and to whose
interests no party has ever appealed-
GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Kay
IMtaastar, (Correspondents), Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles,
Dontta Mathison, Dan Taylor, Sam UUman, Selwin H. Ciment.
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Karvln, Ann Carter, Evan Langbeln, Ira Llebsfeld, Thelma Moss man,
Fran Snider, Cynthia Tunstall, Harvey Wolfson, John Shiplett,
Chip Sharon, Karen Vitunac, Jack Zucker, David Ropes, Ami
Saperstein, Carl Brown, Jane Young, BUI Lockhart, Ken Simon,
and Dxez Dobson, Jeffrey Denkewalter.
. Tb. Florida Alligator rarris the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements and
to revise or tarn away copy which it consider* objectionable.
NO POSITION B GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice la given to the Advertis!i Manner within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement
to nm several times. Notices for correction must be given before nest Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and Is
IMMlshod five times weekly except dulng May, June and July when it in published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator is entered as second class
matter st the United States Poet Office at Gainesville.
1 1,1 '

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International

JOE CASTE LLO
Executive Editor

STEVE VAUGHN
Managing Editor

ED SEARS
Sports Editor

By ROGER EBERT
Collegiate Press Service
IF I WERE asked to diagnose
the fundamental ill of this college
generation, I would answer that
we present a rather simple case:
we do not know what is being
done with our lives, and we do
not demand the conditions of life
necessary if we are to grow up
as sane and creative human beings.
SOMEHOW, when we werent
looking, our society hit us with
the notion that its our responsi responsibility
bility responsibility to maintain its standard of
living. Somehow we were brain brainwashed
washed brainwashed into believing that a growth
curve represents morality, and
anything thats bigger has got to be
better.
THE COLD WAR with Russia
turned into a battle of gross
national products, and it was
patriotic to consume. Good Old
Ike went on teevee to tell us We
Auto Buy Now.
JAMES CON ANT, the wise old
man of the materialistic ethic,
studied our high schools and
decided they werent doing their
part in the race to manufacture
more Things. If were going to
keep the factories humming and
win the Space Race, he told
Congress, weve just got to have
more scientists.
WE DIDNT fully realize at the
time what a basic shift this was
in the whole idea of knowledge.
Young people once became sci scientists
entists scientists because they, as
individuals,needed to be scientists.
But now young people were to be
** recruited for science because
we, not they, saw the need.
THE CHOICE of a vocation
became a matter for high school,
when only a few decades ago it was
a decision to be made during or
even after college. But that was
okay, because by now a vocation
was only a means of buying a

Ousted?
EDITOR:
I AM WRITING this letter to pfsiise the University
of Florida's fine administration. A few days ago
a fact was brought to my attention which made me
realize the true value of our administration.
I BECAME AWARE of the fact that Mr. Richer,
faculty advisor to the freedom party, had been
released. The administration has never made
public its reasons for releasing Mr. Richer, but
the basic reason is obvious.
MR. RICHER HAS been the instigator of many
questionable movements, such as last summers
civil rights demonstrations. The administration feels
it can not tolerate his work on behalf of the rights
of Negroes since it is not in accord with what is
good" for the student body.

ARS GRATIA

Do or be done

ticket into the suburbs, not away
of life anymore.
REMEMBER what happened
then? Good Old Ike, who was
kept briefed on the golf course by
walkie-talkie and who was all in
favor of knowledge, heaven knows,
signed the National Defense
Education Act into law. At last a
way had been found to get Congress
to spend money on education: you
explained that it was really for
defense.
THE DEVELOPMENTS
then have been rapid and
depressing. It was only a matter
of time until the English teachers
figured out that THEIR field was
vital to defense, too, because
people need to be able to read
orders and understand the com commercials.
mercials. commercials.
EVENTUALLY every field of
knowledge will be defined as vital
to our National Security, which is
how it was to begin with, if you
only stop to think for a moment.
THE TROUBLE is that some somewhere
where somewhere along the way we lost two
important concepts. First, we
forgot that knowledge itself, just
plain, pure knowledge and
intellectual discipline, is mans
most noble possession. Second, we
forgot the wisdom which Emerson
gave us at Dartmouth: when a young
man chooses his vocation, he
writes his autobiography at the
same time.
WORK, not leisure, is the
fundamental- condition of a
productive life and always will be.
It does not matter how long the
American Weekend grows; the rest
of the week will still determine
our greatness or littleness.
WE HAVE forgotten that young
people must become what they need
to be, not what society needs them
to be. Societies, even during the
cold war, are the servants of man
and not his masters.
LETTE R

HE ACTIONS and beliefs concerning liberty and
intellectual freedom have caused the conservative
foundation of our University to quiver and tremble.
It should be obvious that anyone who uses such
principles to revolutionize thought is dangerous to
the status quo.
THEREFORE, the decision to
fire Mr. Richer was the only consistent decision
it could have reached. It is for the good of the
students that the administration must maintain the
status quo, for obviously the administration has had
enough experience to know* what is for the good
of the students.
YES, WE ARE indeed lucky in that we have been
endowed with a strong and resolute administrative
organization. One which is set in its ways to the
extent that it is never afraid to take the action
necessary to maintain the status quo. Indeed it
would be hard to imagine a better administrative
government.
LUCIEN A, CROSS

WE MUST insist that what
society really needs is what we
really need, nothing more or less,
and that a society that removes
us from this understanding is
immoral and self-serving.
THERE IS, after all, no
intrinsic reason for preserving
institutions which prevent us from
the realization of life in its ideal
forms. A society which supports
itself at great cost to human
initiative, spontaneity and freedom
perpetuates an immoral and
inhuman way of life.
BUT THESE are not attitudes
consistent with the university
system we are asked to accept
and compete within. The
universities, which at their birth
in the middle ages vigorously
defended their right to pursue
truth in indifference to society,
now fawn to official needs and
government programs to a degree
which represents a betrayal of
their students and teachers.
IN PROVIDING the manpower
for this public service, we
sacrifice a priceless private right:
the right to exist as scholars within
a free world of ideas. If we are to
fulfill our potential of nobility,
and establish in our lives the
conditions for human greatness,
we must seek it wherever it might
be found.
MOST OF US do not have the
imagination to conceive of our ourselves
selves ourselves in these terms. Nor do we
fully understand how we are being
exploited by a university system
which has entered into an immoral
contract with society to produce,
at the lowest possible per-unit
cost, trained automatons to keep
the economic, defense and
industrial establishments rolling.



.... L V
Pr l d f- [ Measure Chancellor I Lyceum Lyceum BOARD OF
w. d f of Hie of the Council Council BOARD OF
I OFFICES V;C r f P r d n H c 3 ES f-** /?'- LYCEUM COUNCL MEMBERS STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
I -1 SK, J" Harmeling HokeS. I fEd Iglehart I I
FREEDOM PARTY am S C Griffin Federman
I 1959
I B o'c' C W r Cheesemon Sid Shlkl S9l Emil, fenson Ln tmlau., Solly Sitor Al Leonard Eon Spencer
PROGRESS PARTY D,ck Thom P son Denning "Peggy"
3,756 4,209 4,020 3,423 3,731 3896 Blanchard
| J 3310 3427 3804
August Schildbach
Bill Oft 1
WALLANGE PARTY 241
I p F redL ne I Cathy Pierce Jack Fred Breeze Ann Johnson Jean D ; ane Blacked Fred Didier Judy Elms Rick Schuster Sam Ullman Bill Wall
PARTY Fl yd Pnce Nichols Eagleson 7
r j 3,307 3,/9 3 3,717 3,534 3362 3280 3221 1968
I MULTITUDES JAM FLORIDA UNION AS RETURNS FLOW IN
1 t
- IIP
sm wJ§ ( 188
;|§| Bp
; fl 9
ii.
r 11| b. f II


Presidents race
precinct-by-precinct |
CULP HARM SCHIL LANE ;g
SROWARD 245 I 52 I 7 265 |
RAWLINGS 154 27 3 148 |
JENNINGS 175 31 | 174 |
TOLBERT ~ 357 56 18 294 j
HUME 220 33 33 175 f
GRAHAM 225 27 24 145 |
VULEE 182 29 5 224 |
MURPHREE 429 84 26 332 g
LAW 202 24 2__|4o_§
HEALTH SERVICES ,25 7 0_ 31 U
jDUCATION | 197 41 8 173 1
Architecture 1~99~ 36 10 9i f
AGRICULTURE 82 36 4 181 g
FLORIDA UNION 138 24 7 97 |
NURSING 26 5 0 21 |
BUSINESS AD 243 25 19 175 f
ENGINEERING 320 51 26 235 g
HUB 342 262 38 338 |
TOTALS 3756 | 879 241 33071

Heres available upper state results

-CULPEPPER -CULPEPPER(Continued
(Continued -CULPEPPER(Continued from Page I)
Culpepper arrived at The Alli Alligators
gators Alligators Florida Union election re returns
turns returns at 8:55 p.m.
This position is the greatest
honor any UF student could get,
Culpepper safd. I am humbly
grateful to all those who supported
me and our party.
Culpepper thanked those who
supported him and beamed as his
wife stood by him when he ac accepted
cepted accepted the ovation of about 500
students gathered in the Union.
PHOTOS THIS PAGE
BY RON SHERMAN
WE'RE OVERWHELMED at the
vote, he said. And we are
anxious to get into our office.
We ran a positive, clean cam campaign
paign campaign and that's the sort of SG
we plan to have.
UF is a great university and
Progress will make a great Student
Government which will represent
all students. The President's of office
fice office is open to all and all views
are welcome.
Last night the first thing Cul Culpepper
pepper Culpepper said he wanted to do was
to appoint a Cabinet which will
be announced next Wednesday.
He said he wanted to meet with
the Board of Regents concerning
the trimester as soon as the stu students*
dents* students* wishes on the trimester are
determined from the official ballot.

Friday, Feb. 12, 1965 / The Florida Alligator

*#***************#*** **#* W W W W
Lane returns to
I 'being a student 9 1

:M By MAUREEN COLLINS
£§: Staff Writer j
A tired candidate went home I
last night to contemplate a I
:£:£ five year career in student
:&:£ government which culminated I
:£:£ in defeat for it:: highest office I
:£:£ last night. I
vis: 1 dont know why I lost, I
Fred Lane said. I guess the I
students didnt approve of my I
itxv policies and platform planks. I
Xv: Apparently the campus isnt I
ready for that sort of thing I
yet. I
£:£: Lane will step down next I
:j:;X week as SG treasurer, an I
office which he won by a land- |
slide in spite of his partys I
w: overall defeat last year. I
:£:|: Im going to return to being I
>:*: just a student, he said, but I
*s: Ill be an outspoken one. Ill I
feel free to praise and to crl- I
M ticze as is necessary. I
Lane will receive his mas- I
ters degree in public admin- I
>Xv istratlon in December. I
I dont know what Ill be I
:X;X doing then, but it will be I
x : x- something concerned with the I
:Xj£ War on Poverty, he said. I
With this, the candidate put I
;X;X his arm around his wife and I
X! strode away admidst hand handshakes
shakes handshakes and expressions of
xjx sorrow from supporters.
'......''.V.V..V/.V.ViNV.VfVVAVtV.V/.'.V.'.v.

I;Xv
1:
I 1:
I m
Bl M


m
m
I P
m
I M
£jx
I?
L
I $
in
I ::
flravflHi
p
FRED LANE and wife ||
face defeat together
>X:X:X:J:XrX-x¥: : x : x*: : :-x-X'X'XXXXXvXvXtXrXr:

Page 7



Page 8

t, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 12, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

lAutos|
1955 FORD. Excellent condition.
Call 6-2966 after 5:15 p.m. Can
be seen anytime behind Grove
Hall. (G-92-st-c).
PERFECT CONDITION, only 8,000
miles. 1964 FAIRLANE 500, 4-dr.
A.T., radio. Bought new in August.
Call 486 2121, Bronson. (G (G---93-3t-c).
--93-3t-c). (G---93-3t-c).
*SB FORD 4-door SDN, 6 cylinder.
Standard shift, radio, heater, 2
tires almost new. Very good
condition: Call 378-1106. (5-7
p.m. or weekends). (G-92-lt-p).
FOUR DOOR PLYMOUTH 1960,
straight shift, heater, good
condition. Best offer. See at 1106
NE 9th Ave. or call 372-1646.
(G-92-st-c).
*6l OLDS 88, 4-door Spt. Sed.
Fully equipped, A/C and other
extras .Excellent condition. $1695.
Call evenings 372-8221. (G-91-
3t-p).
MUST SELL 1956 BUICK V-8,
automatic transmission a real
clean car, good mechanical
condition. Only $175. Contact Tom
Galloway 376-1025. (G-91-3t-c).
*55 CHEVY, excellent condition,
6 cylinder, standard shift, new
brakes and clutch. Make offer.
See after 5:15 p.m. and weekends.
Room 4, 424 NE 6th St. (G-89-
st-c).
1953 MG, TD-2 ROADSTER. In
good running condition. Reduced
from SSOO to $350. Call after 5
p.m. 6-8543. (G-91-st-c).
For Rent
LARGE ROOMS IN FRIENDLY
Surroundings available to male
students. Reasonable rates;
utilities and maid service included.
Convenient to campus and town.
See at 104 SW Bth St. or call 372-
0243. (B-82-tf-nc).
NEW, CENTRAL AIR-COND. &
Heating, one bedroom, furnished
apartment. $95 per month. 2014
NW 4th Street. Call 372-5911
after 5. (B-93-st-c).
THREE ROOM DUPLEX Apart Apartment.
ment. Apartment. Furnished. Very clean,
available after Feb. *ls, call
after 5:30 p.m. or any time
weekends, 378-1260. 3202 NWl4th
Street, Apt. 10. (B-92-2t-c).
GARAGE APARTMENT. Quiet Quiet-2
-2 Quiet-2 blocks from campus. Couple
preferred. 1020 SW 3rd Avenue.
Phone 372-9884 after 5 p.m. (B (B---92-3t-p).
--92-3t-p). (B---92-3t-p).
REDUCED RATE $70.00 till
trimester ends. One space
available for male student. One
block from campus behind the
Florida Book Store. Call Jim
Hodge, FR 6-9345 or see at 1602
NW Ist Ave. (B-91-3t-p).

Kiser Office Equipment
\y/_ 103 Used Office Chairs
ww £ Priced from $3-$5
26 Executive Swivels &
U Secretary Chairs
1 1 A From SlO-J35
n I/ 24 Student Desks
f £ From slos3s
ONLY AT KISER'S DO YOU FIND SUCH BARGAINS!
*O4 N. MAIN ST.

| For Rent [
FURNISHED EFFICIENCY Apart Apartment
ment Apartment with air-conditioning and TV.
One block from campus. Call
before 3 p.m., 8-2553 or after 3
p.m. 6-3211 ask for 7th floor
either Joan or Pat. (B-89-st-c).
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE
double room with full separate
unit. Kitchen, study room, linen
and maid service. 231 SE 2nd
Street. (B-86-ts-c).
UNUSUALLY NICE ROOM with
private bath, central heat and air airconditioning.
conditioning. airconditioning. Male graduate
student or professional person
preferred. Call 372-7943. (B (B---82-ts-c).
--82-ts-c). (B---82-ts-c).
Lost & Found.
LOST: GOLD CHARM BRACE LET
Vicinity of SW 2nd Ave. andTigert
Hall. Sentimental value. Reward.
Please call Pat Miko Ext. 2425
or after 5, 376-9008. (L-93-2t-c).
LOST: 5 MONTH OLD COLLIE
Male, brown, with white neck and
paws, chain collar. Answers to
Hercules or Herk. Reward. Call
376-1844. (L-92-3t-c).
.(Stywvi
sr girl 5
.. OH
I YAMAHA BMW
Motorcycles I
For The Discriminating
CYCLERAMA I
378-2811 21 SE 2nd Place I
mo&ecn
Shoe Repair Shop
HEELS ATTACHED
5 Mins.
SOLES ATTACHED
15 Min.
At Two Locations
CAROLYN PLAZA
FR 6-0315
. And
101 N. Main St.
Opp, Ist Natank

For Sale
A HEAVY DUTY FAN, 2-speed;
can handle a large space. $20.00.
MAYTAG washing machine (large).
Good condition. $35.00. Call 6-
2905. (A-93-3t-c).
GIBSON SINGLE PICK UP
Electric Guitar. Thin line, hallow hallowbody
body hallowbody with cherry red finish and
Gibson model GA 18 amplifier
with 3 jack input capacity, and
TREMELO with optional foot
pedal control. Call 372-4209 ask
for Jim. (A-93-3t-c).
MO-PED 1962, good condition.
Best offer. See at pi 06 NE 9th
Avenue or call 372-1646. (A (A---92-st-c).
--92-st-c). (A---92-st-c).
1953 VAGABOND TRAILER Bx4l*
2 bedroom, 1 bath. $1750. Call 8-
1151, B. W. Cook. (A-89-st-c).

lUK TONITE O HITS
EXGLUSIVErIRST
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I For Sale |
MY ENTIRE ESTATE: Excellent
H-D 165 M cycle $150; English Englishtype
type Englishtype bike sls; desk $5; new Jazz
records $1.50 up; electric bass
guitar. Hedberg, 219 NW 3rd Ave.
After 6. (A-91-3t-c).
ZENITH TRANS OCEANIC**
short wave receiving radio.
Perfect. $65. Call after 5:00 p.m.
372-3863. (A-91-st-p).
DIAMOND WEDDING RING SET.
Recently appraised at S3OO. Will
sell for $l5O. Call campus ext.
2497 or 6-5413 after 5 p.m. (A (A-913tc).
913tc). (A-913tc). ji
Services
ACCURATE TYPING DONE onIBM
electric. Ca11372-2163after sp.m.
or anytime weekends.(M-93-lt-c).

"SkKSSS?
i me president
you area
wea-stsferand
a traitor and
youve sold our
country down
ftorinr!

Personal
BROWARD MYSTERY WOMAN,
Come Backl If youre the girl
who gave me 1$ tax on cheese
sandwich in Broward Cafeteria,
let ME treat. Call Steve Y. at
372-9307. (J-93-lt-nc).
HAPPY VALENTINES DAY TO
JUDY, who is not only my
sweetheart, my valentine and my
love, but is also my help, my
strength and my wife. Ed. (J (J---93-lt-nc).
--93-lt-nc). (J---93-lt-nc).
GIFT. ATTRACTIVELY BOUND,
hardback NEW TESTAMENTS
available free to foreign students
from the office of Prof. Emmanuel
Gitlin, Humanities, Bldg. D, Room
103. (J-92-st-c).
' ' i-

IN THE
JOHN FRANKENHEIMER-JOEL
PRODUCTION OF
an
IN MAY



r 1 :
Wanted

WANTED 2 or 4 door legal
size steel file cabinet. In good
condition. Call 2-2597 anytime.
(C-93-lt-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE TO share
apartment in S7O to SBO range.
Close to campus. Call Stephanie
McNulty before 5 6-3261, ext.
2792 after 5 B-1074.(C-93-
st-c).
WANTED 1950 1955 FORDS
and CHEVROLETS. A1 Herndon*s
Service Station, 916 S. E. 4th
Street. (C-73-20t-c).
4
. AGATHA CHRISTIES |
I
|
V Starring |
f MARGARET ARTHUR 1
i ) MAW{
SEE. OUR. OTHER. RO OH
THIS Pfi&E ( 1 HOPEI

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am-fiorida
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20 Pf^P^S
! RpcfcHUDSON GinaIPLIDBWGIDA
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Strange Bedfellows
TECHNICOLOR*
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AHp4 "CASEY AT THE METS"
Hilarious Story of Casey Stengel
SURE.UE BEUMIH LOVE-
TO
PROVE
IT
ME
couw.es WILL BE
ADMITTED OM OHE
-TICKET fSHH-HMI-IttLV
FOR
MONKEY in WINTER
JEAN GABINS. JEAN-PAUL BELMONO
At 1-3-57-9

Wanted
ONE MALE ROOMMATE in
furnished split level, air-cond.
apt. 2 blocks from campus. SIOO
for balance of trimester plus $lO
to sl2 per month for utilities.
Call Dave Tanner 2-9371. (C (C---92-4t-c).
--92-4t-c). (C---92-4t-c).
WANTED: RETURN OF BOOK
Stylistic Devices in Stephen
Cranes Prose, taken from *55
PLY. Wagon, to 560 Murphree Hall.
(C-92-3t-c).
Real Estate
HOUSE AND NINE ACRES Large
2 bedroom home in excellnt con condition
dition condition overlooking lake off Archer
Road. Beautiful oak trees. Only
4 miles from UF Med. Center.
$16,500.00. Call Charlie Mayo,
Mary Moeller, Realtor, FR 6-4471.
(I-90-st-c).
Help Wanted
WAITER NEEDED Part time. 4
til 8 p.m., 5 days. Apply in person
Larrys Wonderhouse Rest. 14 SW
Ist St. Behind Sears^E-92-3t-c).
STUDENT HELP WANTED. Hours
11:00 1:30, 12:00 2:00, 4:00
7:00, or 5:00 7:30. Apply in
person, Longs Cafeteria. (E-93-
2t-p).
NEWSPAPER SOLICITORS, male
or female, work evenings with
excellent commission. Odd hours
possible. Gainesville Independent,
18 SW 2nd Street. Call 372-7500.
(E-92- 3t-c).
BOY 12 to 16 years old for
established paper routes adjacent
to University grounds. Contact the
Gainesville Sun, 378-1411. (E-91-
st-c).

INTERNATIONAL BEAUTY CONTESTANTS
. .from left, Linda Bales, Jill Bebout, Susan Godwin, Susan Hall,
Paula Maret, Babs Mcae, Kay Melton, and Gretchen Vandenberg.
Not shown are Babs Bloom and Lynell Glass.
International Week begins;
beauty contest tomorrow

**Miss International** will be chosen tomorrow as
part of the UFs seventh annual International Week
festivities.
The contest will be conducted in University Audi Auditorium
torium Auditorium at 8 p.m. Entrants of all nationalities will
participate.
Dr. Adnan Pachachl, ambassador from Iraq to the
United Nations, will speak at an international supper
Sunday in the Florida-Union Social Room. Reserva Reservations
tions Reservations to attend the banquet must be made by noon
tomorrow at the Union.

Crane hits pole; pole hits car

Plants and Grounds added a
light touch when a five-ton crane
driven by William Small, of
Gainesville crashed into a light
pole on Inner Drive at 5:05 p.m.,
The broken pole fell on an
unoccupied blue 1954 Ford
registered by Henry Ronald
Macari, 526 N. E. 4th St., denting
the hood and left fender.
me truck crane was attempting
a turn out of the parking lot of
the new Architecture and Fine
Arts building, but ease in turning
was blocked by a white Volkswagen
parked too close to the driveway.
According to Sgt. E. H. Shoup,
campus police investigator, the
area where the Volkswagen was
parked should have been a no

THIS
VALENTINES DAY
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parking zone, but Plants and
Grounds had not yet marked the
zone.
No bathing suits for
military sweeties
No bathing suits? Nope, not
this year says Carl D. Heishman,
Chairman of the Military Ball
Queen Contest.
The contestants will be judged
in evening gowns, sports wear,
and at a formal interview but due
to the objections of the girls in
last years contest, no bathing suits.
Entry blanks are at the dorm
area offices for any students who
wish to sponsor a contestant. The
deadline is Feb. 22.

M Jjlfe

USE YOUR CENTRAL CHARGE
Next To Donigans
RECORD SHOD

1119 W. University Ave.

Friday/ Feb, 12, 1965, The Florida Alligator/

Discussion forums are scheduled Monday, Tuesday
and Wednesday evenings by the Indian, Arabic and
Chinese clubs on campus.
Fourteen group and individual acts will perform
Feb. 19 at 8 p.m. in University Auditorium during
the International Talent Show. Loving cups will be
awarded to the best presentations in each category.
The program will conclude with a banquet and
dance on Feb. 20. International Activities, a student
supervisory group comprised of the presidents of
the various international organizations at the UF.

Tel. 372-2728

Regents mull
Ph.D.today
A proposal for the College of
Engineering to offer a doctor of
philosophy in mechanical
engineering will be presented to
the Board of Regents today, said
UF Pres. J. Wayne Reitz.
If approved by the Board of
Regents the College of Engineering
will be authorized to offer the
degree.
Dr. Robert B. Gaither, Chairman
of the Department of Mechanical
Engineering, said the UF will be
the first institution in the state
to offer the degree.
Gaither said The development
of the Ph.D degree program is
a result of a continuous effort
over a period of years of the
faculty in Mechanical*
Engineering.

Pick An Appropiate
VALENTINE From
Our Complete
Greeting Card
Department
Open Mon. and
Fri. Nite Til
9 P.M.

WE PACK
AND MAIL
ANYWHERE

Pa



Gators tackle State

SPORTS
i.

Page 10

Trackmen
go to SEC
indoor meet
UF trackmen leave by bus today
for Montgomery and the South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference Indoor Track
Championships. The team will ar arrive
rive arrive in Montgomery tonight for
Saturday's 1 p.m. meet.
Entries for the meet include:
2 mile runBob Halliday and
Gary Mahla; 60 yd dashJohn
Anderson, Selwyn Chalker, James
Richeson and John Gibson; 60 yd.
high hurdlesScott Hager; mile
runDavid Wilson, Bob Halliday
Gary Mahla and John Kivipelto
(Freshman; 2 mile relayJim
Brown, Dieter Gebhard, David Wil Wilson
son Wilson and William Roberts; broad
jump George Jahnigen, James
Devaney, David Westerman and
William Ticker (Freshman); shot
put Clarence Leach and Richard
McCarl (Freshmen); pole vault
Scott Hager and Ed Vehling; high
(See SEC, page 11)

UF golfers open season;
meet Rollins and Stetson
- Gator golfers take on Stetson today and Rollins in 36-hole medal
play Saturday at the University Golf Club. Tee-off time is 12:30
p.m. both days.
Both freshman and varsity competition will be held with the Baby
Gators having a two-man team while the top team will field a six
man contingent. The four low scores combined will determine the
winner.
The team will be led by Captain Laurie Hammer. Other members
slated to participate are Bob Murphy, Bob Jewitt, Walter Armstrong,
O. A. Kincaid, and Lloyd Watts.

1 j- 1
Career Opportunity
UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE
VENEREAL DISEASE BRANCH COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
1
We are going to eradicate syphilis in the United States.
We need people who want immediate job involvement, interesting work, an outlet
for creative ideas, and an excellent opportunity for advancement.
We want to talk with above average senior students who are majoring in the
following academic fields:

BIOLOGY
I ENGLISH
JOURNALISM
ECONOMICS
I HISTORY

Interviews for June Graduates will be conducted on:
date FEB. 26
I *'
Contact your Placement Office to arrange for an interview
AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

), The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 12

u/i
'
808 MURPHY
.tees off

HUMANITIES
LANGUAGES
PHILOSOPHY
PUBLIC HEALTH
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

Poor passing
heavy fouling
hurt team
: b
The Gator basketball team will
: try to get back on the winning
track Saturday night when Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi State invades the gym at
8 p.m.
Mistakes and fouls have elimi eliminated
nated eliminated Florida's Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference basketball title hopes but
Coach Norm Sloan is far from
giving up on his team.
I have never been prouder of
I a bunch of boys or liked a group
as much as this one," Sloan says.
"They go out there every time and
give 100 percent, scrap and fight
right down to the end and re regardless
gardless regardless of the situation. This is
one thing to their credit, this
team has character and courage."
Sloan is the first to acknow acknowledge
ledge acknowledge character and courage do not
always spell victory, however, and
in some departments the young
Florida team needs rapid improve improvement.
ment. improvement.
"We simply are making too many
errors in the form of poor passes,
failure to keep movement in our
offense and perhaps being too res restrictive,
trictive, restrictive, defensively," Sloan says.
"We are committing a great num number
ber number of fouls of late and this is hard
to understand. We went from an
average of only 13 fouls per game
going into the Kentucky game and
in the last three we must be
averaging about 25 per game."
Monday night, for example, the
Gators outs cored Auburn from the
field, 58-50, only to see the Tigers
rack up 33 free throws in a whop whopping
ping whopping 50 attempts.
Although Florida has lost three
straight Sloan is high in his praise
of senior guard Brooks Henderson,
whose outstanding play has been
lost in the gloom of defeat.
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617 N. Main St.
SUZUKI
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SOCIAL SCIENCES
PSYCHOLOGY
SOCIOLOGY
MATHEMATICS

DOUBTING THOMAS?
HOPEFUL AGNOSTIC?
Christianity has more to offer than hope, it has positive
proof in the form of a MIRACLE which was foretold,
described and is intensely personal. Ask the Religious
Leaders or send me a card marked ESP-17. My reply is
free, non-Denominational, Christian. Martyn W. Hart,
Box 53, Glen Ridge, N.J. 07028 (USA).
for a swift treat of fine food,
try a TRADITIONAL!

1. Ive been weighing the
possibility of becoming a
perpetual student.
Last week you said you
were considering the
merits of mink fanning.

3.1 must admit the thought
did enter my mind.
Has the thought ever
entered your mind
that you might get a
job and make a career
for yourself?

5. You mean earn while learning?
Right. And you can
do it at Equitable.
They'll pay 100% of
your tuition toward
a qualified graduate
degree. At the same
time, the work is
challenging, the pay
is good, and I hear
you move up fast.

For complete information about career opportunities at Equitable, see your
Placement Officer, or write to Edward D. McDougal, Manager,
Manpower Development Division.
The EQUfIABUE Life Assurance Society of the United States
Home Office: 1885 Ave. of the Americas, New York, N.Y. 10019 C Equitable 1985
An Equal Opportunity Employer

2. With graduation drawing near
I realized how much more
there was for me to learn.
You didnt also
realize, did you,
that when you graduate
your dad will cut
off your allowance?

4. What about my thirst for
knowledge?
Just because you work
doesnt mean you have
to stop learning.

6. But what do I know about
insurance?
With your thirst for
knowledge, I'm sure
you'll be the star
of their development
program.



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IAUIQAtOR AbS Always AttRACtI
(you are reading one now) I

PAPER PAPER-2*:*
2*:* PAPER-2*:* a BACKS
4 IN
REVIEW
A publisher's surrey
4 of what's new in the way
f <****#
| of unrequited readme/

It has become difficult lately to read a magazine or 1
| watch Sunday afternoon television without hearing I
about something called the leisure problem. For 1
those of you who were working on a paper until dawn |
I and require a definition of this phrase, it is used most 1
often by those who are concerned because, 1), people 1
have too much free time these days and, 2), they use 1
I it very badly. 1
| It is this modern myth that Sebastian de Grazia de- i
molishes in Os Time, Work, and Leisure (Anchor, |
, $1.95). Professor de Grazia takes as his thesis the 1
I distinction between work time, free time, and 8
I leisure, the last of which he defines as the state I
I of being in which activity is pursued for its own sake I
I or its own end. The New Yorker writes: His book I
I is actually a plea for withdrawal, untidiness, Cock- §
| aigne, the leisurely life in the good society, and a 1
1 warning against such entrenched foes as advertising, I
I time-mindedness, the Protestant work ethic, and I
I tyranny. 1
1 If you look hard enough, you might find these same 1
i four adversaries under attack in Don Marquiss classic, I
§ archy and mehitabel (Dolphin, 9 | first introduced archy, the poetic cockroach, and i
I mehitabel, the worldly-wise alley cat, in his newspaper I
8 column in 1916, and if you havent yet met them, you 1
| are in for a treat. The songs and meditations of archy, 1
I composed late at night on the bosss typewriter, are as 1
I pointed and to-the-point today as they were back in 8
the 19205, when quoting Don Marquis was a national |
I pastime. Why the lower case title? archy, philosoph- 8
I ically inclined as he is, isnt strong enough to make 8
I capital letters; I
I the main question is 8
I whether the stuff is 1
I literature or not, 1
I It is. Get an extra copy to give away this week. What 8
f. better valentine than a lovable cockroach? 1
I As far as we know, Robert Warshow never wrote 1
1 about archy or mehitabel. Before his death at the age 8
I of 37 in 1955, however, he had established an enduring 8
I reputation as a superb critic and commentator on 8
many other aspects of popular culture. Many rank
§ him with the late James A gee as a film critic; once I
1 youve read his famous study of the Western movie in 8
The Immediate Experience (Anchor, $1.25), you 11 |
I never again see John Wayne in quite the same light. 1
Above all, Warshow was a brilliant prose stylist.
| Lionel Trilling places him in the line of Hazlitt, a I
I tradition in which I would place only one other writer I
of our time, George Orwell, with whose feeling for
I language Warshow had much in common. Buy or 8
| borrow a copy of The Immediate Experience to enjoy S
I 19 fine examples of the vanishing art of the essay. 1
1 The three books reviewed above are {
I the sponsors of this column Doubleday Anchor 8
I Books, 277 Park Avenue, New York City and 1
Doubleday & Company, Inc-, Garden City, |
York. You'll find them all at one of the best §
1 equipped booksellers in the country you m
college store.

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do as millions do ... perk up
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Umpires sought
for intramurals
Applications for softball offi officials
cials officials are being taken now in the
intramural office, room 229,
Florida Gym.
The official will be paid and
are needed next week through the
remainder of the trimester.
BASKETBALL |
Fraternity
BTP 25 PKA 38
DTD 23 KA 37
XP 40 AEP 32
PEP SPE 21
The results of Thursday nights
Engineering final were not available
at press time.
SEC SEC(Continued
(Continued SEC(Continued from p. 10)
jumpDavid Westerman, William
Crawford and James Richeson;
1,000 yd. runDieter Gebhard,
Austin Funk and Dan Wells; 600
yd. runJim Brown, William Ro Roberts,
berts, Roberts, John Anderson and Dieter
Gebhard; mile relay (Freshman)
John Gibson, William Tucker,
John Kivipelto and Van Graham.
*t y/ I \

WSwQSmKi for birds of casual feather
j Feathering a female nest is one I
rC 41 of the Establishment's cherished 9
I m pleasures, and new plumes for 9
"mr m your P* easurc are novv > n brilliant f|
9 w f'B"' m array upon our shelves. Few de- f|
W'fmf ft picted, but many await vour visit.
m I-I . fZA't'W .jBB 8J :
Ic

Friday, Feb. 12, 1965. The Florida Alligator,

1 THf SPORTS fVf H
I II
L,St. Josephs- NCAA Champ? §
M SS
:s:s By ANDY MCX)R
s:s: Assistant Sports Editor s3s:
| :*
With the basketball season rapidly conning to a close and
NCAA Tourney right around the corner, fans throughout the
nation are speculating as to who will be the winner.
The Eastern Reglonals, for the first time in many a moon,
have a good shot at producing the ultimate champion. St. Joseph's,
Davidson, Duke, and Providence are all rated in the top ten and
each appears strong enough to challenge the best from other
regions.
St. Joseph's demonstrated their ability in the Quaker City
Tournament over the Christmas holidays by knocking off mid-west
giants Wichita and Illinois by wide margins on successive nights.
The Hawks have dropped but one game, by four points to Provi Providence,
dence, Providence, the nation's only major unbeaten.
Davidson is a school which has reached the big time in the
sport only recently. Davidson sports the nation's best pivot man
in Fred Hetzel and has won 17 straight following their lone loss,
early in the season to St. Joseph's (who else?).
The Friars erf Providence have won the National Invitation
. Tournament in each of the past two seasons, but have been unable
to stand up in the tough competition of the NCAA. However, this
year they are unbeaten and show no signs of folding.
All this strength is situated in the East, but the two favorites for
the tournament undoubtedly will be Michigan and UCLA. The
Wolverines, currently ranked No. 1 nationally, have two sure-fire
All-America's in Cazzie Russell and Bill Buntin. They face a
tall job in getting through the Big Ten as lowa and Minnesota
remain strongly in contention. If things go as expected, SEC leader
Vanderbilt should chaUenge the Wolverines in the Mid-East
Regional.
UCLA, ranked No. 2, has all the remnants from last year's
champs excepting Walt Hazzard. The Bruins have an easier road
to the finals than does Michigan with San Francisco appearing to
be the only obstacle.
After considering all factors (hopefully), I'll venture out on the
proverbial lim* and pick St. Josephs to win on their tremendous
guard play.

Page 11



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Brooks Henderson, the Gators* aggressive senior guard gets the
Player of the Week award this time.
/ Henderson has been a standout varsity performer the past three
\ 11 ffllfinKfr IT seasons with the Gators and his cool, alert play has marked him as
\ j one of the best all-around guards to ever play for Florida.. Uk
1 This P week in a losing effort to Auburn, Henderson kept the
I IBH / Gators in the game by hitting on a long, arching jump shot over a AXv / /o
>:|: Tiger zone defense. The Miami native ended up high man for the x
g~s 11 £ game with 21 points before fouling out in the second half. Si: JadNgggg.
Cj3.ineSVllle HiS 21 P* nts P ushed Mm into the team*s scoring lead with a 13.4 ~
>: scoring average. Being the team's top scorer isn*t new to Henderson. :£
1 Last year the 6-3 floor leader ended up with a 17.3 average, tops on :$
the team.
A deadly foul shooter, Henderson last year led the Gators in both jx
& total free throws with 87 and free throw percentage with an 84.5%. :$ >:*: : : : : : : : : : : : : : :-: : : : : r :-: : :-: : : : : : :-: : : : : : : : :-;-: : :-:>%>:?::::?::::::::>::;
tv ~1 :$: This year he*s again the Gator foul shot marksman, hitting on
bottling Co | 100 of 122 for an 82%.
A rugged competitor, Henderson goes all-out in every game B
£: and is often injured as a result. Hes snagged 74 rebounds and uses gg fom M 9
his fine speed and moves to good advantage as a playmaker. & 0
929 East University Avenue Last year he was voted the SECs outstanding defensive player in §%**
0 . & a post-season poll by conference coaches. Often watching the opponents s' ki
or 376-6506 :: top scorer, Henderson on a man-to-man basis, limited his foes to i&A Friendly spot To Meet Your Friends
10.3 points a game. These same opponents* had a season average
$: of 19.3.
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FROM US! _sj