Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Election poll locations are announced

CAMPAIGN MOUNTAIN X

Housing plans two 12-story dormitories

By CARL BROWN
Staff Writer
Two 12-story tower dormitories, each with a
capacity for 400 students, are being planned by the
UF Housing Department.
Scheduled for completion on or before the summer
of 1967. the new dorms will be located on the
present 3lte. of Flavet 11, behind Jennings Hall.

Action hits
poop charges
Charges of throwing a b og u s
Alligator* last weekend have been
emphatically denied by Action
Party Chairman Wayne Alford.
Nothing whatsoever was
intended to make the sheet thrown
in several mens dorms imitate
an Alligator. When Ernie Litz,
Alligator editor, told Fred Lane
of the confusion, Lane ordered
distribution of the sheet stopped,
Alford said.
The controversial sheet printed
a headline out of Thursdays
Alligator which announced a radio
debate. The sheet carried the
headline along with the masthead
of that edition.
ALFORD SAID the purpose of
the sheet was to inform the campus
of the backing out of the debates
by the other candidates claiming
not to have knowledge of it.
The poop sheet used body type
which the Alligator doesnt have
and was printed on heavier white
bode paper. The masthead of the
Thursday edition with its dateline
was used and the sheet was thrown
Friday night and Saturday morning.
It was not in the Alligator column
format.
Lane explained the matter on a
radio program last night.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Vol. 57, No. 91

Vandals hit Murphree fence for sixth time

Weve had enough.'
We are working on plans to prevent the Murphree Area University
Avenue fence from being vandalized again, Noel Lake, superintendent
of university grounds, said yesterday.
He said his department is awaiting word from Calvin Green,
director of plants and grounds, on what can be done to protect the
fence from further damage.
Monday night vandals transplanted SSO worth of shrubbery and
for the sixth time cut a hole in the fence, a barrier to UF traffic
to the avenues Gold Coast.
NOEL SAID the plants were placed in parking spaces along the
avenue where they were found Tuesday morning by his crew. He
described the shrubs as choice specimens and difficult to replace
because of the cost of such large plants.
Weve kept more strict surveilance on the area, Audie Shuler,
UF police chief, said. Weve caught no one yet for tampering with
the fence, but we can deal with whoever is cutting the fence and
damaging UF property.
Gainesville Police Chief William Joiner said his patrols had been
alerted to look out for the culprits that damage the fence.

MOMENT OF TRUTH TOMORROW

i COMPLETION SCHEDULED for 67:

The dafeteria facilites for Jennings will be en enlarged
larged enlarged to handle increased service.
As of Jan. 31, there were 5,267 students living
in the dorms. The current capacity for the dorms
is 5,700 residents. The projected increase in dorm
facilities shows a need for 6,700 living spaces
which figures exactly with the 800 additional spaces
of the proposed tower dorms.
THE HOUSING Division is in the process of
Either men or women will be housed in the new

University of Florida, Gainesville

Marty Schwartz, Secretary of the
Interior, has announced polling
places for the Student Government
election tomorrow.
Each student shall vote at the
college in which he is regis registered,
tered, registered, with the exceDtion of the
freshman and sophomore classes.
All freshmen and sophomores may
vote at any living area.
Voting machines, will be at the
following locations:
FRESHMAN CLASSI Broward,
Graham, Hume, Jennings, Mur Murphree,
phree, Murphree, Rawlings, Tolbert, and Yu Yulee
lee Yulee Halls.
SOPHOMORE CLASS: Broward,
Graham, Hume, Jennings, Mur Murphree,
phree, Murphree, Rawlings, Tolbert, and Yu Yulee
lee Yulee Halls.
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE:
McCarty Hall, Ground Floor.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE
AND FINE ARTS: Lobby of Unit
C.
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCI SCIENCES:
ENCES: SCIENCES: Hub
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AD ADMINISTRATION:
MINISTRATION: ADMINISTRATION: Matherly

towers, depending on demand at the time of com completion.
pletion. completion. Plans are to have two students per room
or about 32 to a floor.
Resident of Flavet II will probably get prefer preference
ence preference for relocation when the old village comes
down, according to William E. Neylans, Assistant
Housing Director.
submitting a request for a loan from the College
Housing Loan Fund in Washington to obtain con construction
struction construction funds.

* t - l ; :"fj^@^fW;- '' ag ?S?^^^s M
I PIPE BENT A A'
' A' BOUND POLE
& / > And plants de de/
/ de/ posited in street.
/ (Photos by Bill
/ Blitch)
1 today inhist I ...1965., last elephant joke goes oif to die. I

Wednesday, Feb. 10, 1965

Ht i ]
1


m>.. :

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HI H
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Hall, Ground Floor.
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION:
Norman Hall, Auditorium En Entrance.
trance. Entrance.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING:
Engineering Building, First Floor
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY: Flor Florida
ida Florida Union, Social Room.
SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND
COMMUNICATIONS: Florida Un Union,
ion, Union, Social Room.
COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND
RELATED SERVICES: Medical
Sciences Bldg., Student Lounge.
COLLEGE OF NURSING: Med Medical
ical Medical Science Bldg., Student Lounge.
COLLEGE OF LAW: Law School
Porch.
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE: Med Medical
ical Medical Science Bldg., Student Lounge.
COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL ED EDUCATION:
UCATION: EDUCATION: Florida Union, Social
Room.
COLEGE OF PHARMACY: Med Medical
ical Medical Science Bldg., Student Lounge.
REMEMBER! YOU MUST PRE PRESENT
SENT PRESENT YOUR STUDENT IDENTI IDENTIFICATION
FICATION IDENTIFICATION CARD TO VOTE.



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Feb. 10 / 1965

MURDER
Honors students and
departmental faculties in C-l,
C-3, and C-5 are invited to a
staged reading of T. S. Eliots
Murder in the Cathedral. The
performance will take place in
the Chapel of the Incarnation,
Episcopal University center on
Sunday, Feb. 14, at 7:30 p.m.
CAVERS
Florida Speleological Society
will meet tonight at 7 p.m. in
Florida Union Room 116.
COLLEGE BOARD
Applications for Iveys Summer
College Board in Orlando and
Winter Park are available in the
office of the Secretary of Interior,
third floor, Florida Union.
SIGMA ALPHA ETA
Sigma Alpha Eta, speech and
hearing fraternity, is meeting
tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. 3rd floor
Tigert Hall. AU those interested
in becoming members are invited.
v BUS. AD. DAMES
A meeting of the Business
Administration Dames will feature
as speaker Charles Steger of the
Houseof Carpets tonight 8 p.m.,
3945 SW 3rd Ave. A motorcade
,wiU meet at 7:40 p.m. at the
Century Tower parking lot.
NAVAL RESERVE
A meeting to introduce the
reserve officer candidate program
wUI be held in Graham Area
Recreation Room 7 p.m. tonight.
ARCHITECTS
The student chapter of the
American Institute of Architects
will meet tomorrow 8 p.m. in the
Architecture and Fine Arts
Lecture Hall. Speaker is James
T. Lendrum, chairman of the
Department of Architecture.
VALENTINES DANCE
The Wesley Foundation is
holding a Valentines dance Feb.
13 at 8 p.m. in the Wesley
Foundation.
Piano concert
here tonight
A piano concert tonight at 8:15
in University Auditorium will fea feature
ture feature Yuri Yamamoto. She is Mrs.
Robert F. Smylie, wife of one
of the new members of the C-l
faculty.
Mrs. Smylie is a professional
concert pianist and a former fac faculty
ulty faculty member at the Julliard School
of Music. The program she will
play includes works by Bach, Beet Beethoven,
hoven, Beethoven, Chopin, and Yoshinao Nak Nakada.
ada. Nakada.
Admission to the performance is
free.

VOTE
AL W. CLARK
Honor Court
Justice
College of
Arts and Sciences
(Paid Political Adv.)

campus news briefs ;

EDUCATION MAJORS
All education majors regardless
of coUege enrollment are required
to satisfy the speech screening
requirement before being admitted
into the Advanced Professional
Sequence or into the College of
Education. Appointments are now
being made in Room 100, Norman
Hall.
HUMAN RELATIONS
Dr. William E. Carter will speak
about international human relations
Sunday 3 p.m. at the Presbyterian
Student Center.
CIRCLE K
New Officers for the UF Circle
K are George Stuart, president;
BUI Haire, vice president; Manny
Ponce, secretary; Carl Heishman,
treasurer; George Blaha, BUI
McCollum, Kip Gordon, Chip
Schneider, directors.
CAMPUS CUTIE
Applications for Campus Cutie
may be obtained at the Alligator
office; Room 10 Florida Union.
Contact Sam Ullman at the
Alligator office for further
information.
COUNSELING
Registration for pre-medical
and pre-dental counseling has been
extended for one more week.
Registration wiU be through Feb.
12 in Room 107 Anderson Hall.
Be sure to have instructors full
names or initials and the correct
speUing of the names. It will also
be necessary to know your course
and section numbers.
SIGMA TAU
Sigma Tau fraternity will hold
a smoker tomorrow 7:30 p.m. in
the Johnson Lounge Florida Union.

MAKE A DATE! On Feb. 11 Vote For
LEON POLHILL
SOPHOMORE LEGISLATIVE
COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVE
ACTIVE REPRESENTATION FOR YOU
Vote TOMORROW! Vote ACTION!!

ELECT BRUCE CULPEPPER
A GREAT UNIVERSITY
DEMANDSAGREAT jA
STUDENT
GOVERNMENT V
- (Paid Political Adv)

URA OFFICERS
Persons desiring to run for
office in the University Religious
Association elections should fiU
out an application for nomination.
Forms are available in the
Department of Religion Office
Florida Union. Any fuU-time stu student,
dent, student, graduate or undergraduate,
may apply. Deadline for filing
applications is 4 p.m. Feb. 19.
AG COUNCIL
A meeting to nominate next
years officers of the Student
Agricultural Council wUI be held
today 5 p.m. in Room 130 McCarty
Hall.
IFC BLOOD DRIVE
Fraternity men are encouraged
to donate blood to the IFC coUectlve
accounts at the J. Hillis MiHer
Health Center and the Alachua
General Hospital Blood Center.
Donor hours are Monday through
Saturday 8 a.m. 9 p.m.
FLORIDA PLAYERS
Tryouts for Max Frischs The
Fire Bugs* will be Feb. 15, 3:30-
5:30 p.m. in Room 332 Tigert
and 7-9 p.m. in Room 239 Tigert.
Feb. 16 the tryouts will be at
3:30 p.m. Room 239 Tigert.
S.A.H.P.E.R.
Womens sectional meeting will
be tonight 7:30 p.m. in Room 208
of the Florida Gymnasium. Dr.
Norma Leavitt wiU talk on
competition in the high schools.

I YAMAHA BMW j|
Motorcycles
For The Discriminating
CYCLERAMA |
378-2811 21 SE 2nd Place I

PROGRESS
WITH
CULPEPPER
(Paid Political Adv.)

REMOVAL SALE
ALL WINTER DRESSES
SUITS COATS SKIRTS
SLIM PANTS & SWEATERS
REDUCED: 1/2, 1/3 and 1/4
Woolens Crepes and Cottons
Sizes 5 to 13 -- 8 to 20
ALL WINTER HATS
Values $8.95 to $26.95
Now $2.00 to $7.00
\
franklins aSqesU,
* 401 W. Univ. Ave.
VOTE JIM
CARLETO
Legislative Council
College of Business Administration
ACTION PARTY
Since Transfer to UF April 64:
* '65 Editor/ Gator Greek
* Editor-Photographer, 1965 Gator Coed Calendar
* IFC Public Relations Committee
* Homecoming Committee '64
* 2.9 Overall
* Alpha Kappa Psi Business Fraternity
* Alligator Writer-Photographer, Summer *64
* Member Social Fraternity
* Officer, NCF Skydiving Club
* Alligator Sales Representative, Summer '64
* Co-Organizer, Gainesville Air Show, May '64
* Business Manager, Gator Blotters
* Secretary, Fraternity Pledge Class (Pald A(Jv .)

o



Our Campaign
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ISSUES & CANDIDATES

Wednesday/ Feb. 10, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator/ Wednesday, Feb. 10 / 1965

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International
ERNIE LITZ JOE CASTELLO STEVE VAUGHN
Editor-in-chief Executive Editor Managing Editor
LOU FERRIS ED SEARS
Editorial Page Editor Sports Editor

=APODODOSIS=
Tired Out
By RICK SCHUSTER
I WISH SOME candidate or party in this
campaign had run on the plank that the election
campaign period is entirely too Tong, and
should be cut down to two weeks.
BECAUSE IT is my considered opinion that
one of the reasons our campus campaigns get
so thoroughly ludicrous is the length of time
involved.
PERHAPS IT is because the politicos get
bored, and so they jam up the electoral
decision making process with some absurd
happening just to keep themselves amused.
It might even be a plot, a huge collective joke.
Or maybe it is simply the breaking down of
minds tired of coming up with new ideas to
throw at the students.
BUT THE RESULT remains: a campaign
that ends with distortions and rumors and some
unfortunate events that result in the entire
idea of electing Student Government officers
seeming to be an insult to the intelligence of
the student body.
CONSIDER THE situation with your sense
of the ridiculous. Here you have Freedom
Party running anti-fraternity toned campaign
with a presidential candidate who is a member
of a fraternity.
PROGRESS Party has the seemingly
biquitous Bruce Culpepper who is trying to
fight the jock image and prove that if elected
he wont be another dull Ken Kennedy.
ACTION PARTY has its trouble in the
printing department, and is trying to avoid the
wrath of Ernie Litz. All this goes on while
Augie Schildbach has nightmares of tape
recordings and alligators, and the Florida
Alligator tries to make up its mind as to
whether or not it is going to press charges
against Action Party.
EVERY CANDIDATE has tried to look like
a messiah; every party hs tried to look like a
martyr.
WHAT IS IRONIC is that underneath all this
there are issues. There are reasons for
differentiating among parties and candidates.
It is a terrible shame that distortions and
incidents should cloud real issues.
FOR A CHANGE, this campus has choices.
YOUR VOTE is your ultimate act of political
conscience as a Florida student. Don't let
revulsion at the absurd political side-show
effects of the pressure of a campaign keep
you from the polls. FOR ONCE in your college
career, think rationally as a political animal,
and vote.

GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Mark Freeman
(Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Kay
Huffmaster, (Correspondents), Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles,
Donita Mathison, Dan Taylor, Sam Ullnian, Selwin H. Ciment.
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Kurvln, Ann Carter, Evan Langbein, Ira Liebsfeld, Thelma Mossman,
Fran Snider, Cynthia Tunstall, Harvey Wolfson, John Shiplett,
Chip Sharon, Karen Vitunac, Jack Zucker, David Ropes, Ami
Saperstein, Carl Brown, Jane Young, Bill Lockhart, Ken Simon,
and Drex Dobson, Jeffrey Denkewalter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of all advertisements and
to revise or turn away copy which It considers objectionable.
NO POSITION IS GUARANTEED, though desired position will be given whenever possible.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any advertisement involving typ typographical
ographical typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless notice is given to the Advertising Manager within
(1) one day after advertisement appears.
The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more than one incorrect Insertion of an advertisement
scheduled to run several times. Notices for correction must be given before next Insertion.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University of Florida and is
polished five times weekly except dulng May, June and July when it Is published semi-weekly. Only
editorials represent the official opinions of their authors. The Alligator is entered as second class
matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

* * CANDIDATES CORNER * * 1

PROGRESS
By BRUCE CULPEPPER
IF YOU ELECT me, there are going to be
changes made!
I HAVE SINCERELY tried in the last three
weeks to discuss how I would like to translate
my ideas from six years as a Florida student
into meaningful service for the student body.
YOU MUST DECIDE whether the ideas we
have discussed are a step toward the caliber
student government you want.
WITHOUT REALISTIC ideas and respect by
students, there is little student government
can do. With ideas and respect, there are few
problems beyond at least partial solution.
OURS IS A growing university. The story
of its progress is impressive, but much un unfinished
finished unfinished business remains. Student government
has neither kept pace with campus needs nor
recognized its own potential.
IF NOTHING ELSE, I want student government
to recognize that this is an ACADEMIC
community, populated by PEOPLE. .with all
the diverse social needs of any community.
BEING LARGE and established, this
institution has a complex administrative
network, resistant to change and often inflexible
toward new needs.
OUR SYSTEM OF student self-government
has suffered from many of its political traditions.
THE MECHANICAL, structural approach must
go out the window along with the narrow concerns
inherited from two and three decades ago.
THE RITUAL of politics for politics' sake must
go also. Such practices are too cynical and
wasteful. Too many realistic potentials fail
when constructive ideas are subordinated to
child-like political games. The concept of dirty
politics which views the student as too naive
to care what political tactics are used is false
and damaging to student respect for student
government.
WE MUST REASSESS the whole purpose and
powers of student leadership. Both students
and faculty need a strong voice for student
needs and interests.
TO TWO AREAS I pledge my concern: to
higher education and to student needs. Few
really important issues fall outside these
headings.
I CANNOT DO the job I want to do as president
without the determination of students to cure the
ills of student government by showing concern
and speaking out on student interests.
I HAVE DISCUSSED my ideas with you and
heard many of yours. I hope you can support
me in my goals and ideas for reshaping our
student government. Thank you for your interest
and for listening when so many have been talking
for so long.
THE CHOICE is yours.

FREEMAN FORMULATES
J2Z=::^^^ ::===^ l *

p

OPINTION

FREEDOM
Whatever happens tomorrow, win or lose,
Freedom Party is here to stay.
Freedom Party seeks to create an alliance
of students and freedom- minded faculty, to
create, a real community of scholars. Our
anti-poverty program for every campus
dollar invested the Federal government would
likely contribute another 8 or 10 would
create hundreds of jobs for students.
Why do we seek power through student
government? For self-protection.
We seek power to maintain our community
integrity from the administration in academic
freedom, our personal lives, in the classroom,
in research and in our organizations through
which we address one another.
As a community of scholars we need power
to protect ourselves from the Board of Regents
and the state's political machines in case we
have a clash of interest with those the state
would appoint to guide us.
And, finally, we need protection from
ourselves, from that anti-communitarian me mefirst"
first" mefirst" amd I*ll get mine" jungle-logic which
stimulates external management from those
who have no genuine sympathy with the ends
of university life.
Freedom Party is the first campus political
paLrty that has welcomed the cooperation of
freedom-minded teachers. Real campus
problems atre problems for teachers and students
alike.
Students playing at politics have been to the
advantage of those who would obstruct faculty
freedom and inhibit student commencement
toward reality. With Freedom Party, the age
of playing at politics on campus is over. The
age of am authentic search for a community
of students and teachers with power enough to
secure themselves from their real opposition has
just begun.

Another one
EDITOR:
I FOUND YOUR article in Monday's Alligator
entitled Will the Real Susan Smith Please Stand?"
quite amusing, especially since my name is Susan
Smith also. And Susan M. Smith on top of it all!
A girl could really lose her individuality and identity
with a name like that. I wonder how Susan Isabel,
Susan Maxine, and two Susan Elizabeths must feel.
Makes me almost wish I had a name like Melissa
Zemlock" or the like!!
AS FAR AS the mystery of the Charlatan magazine
goes, I can offer no clues; however, if there is
someone by the name of Susan A. Smith," wed
just like to ask her who her tailor is!!!!!
SUSAN MELANIE SMITH, lUC



RON SPENCER
Columnist
IN THE WAKE of the recent explosion of Little
Sisters organizations on campus comes news of
the birth of another extra-fraternal organization,
The Little Sisters of the Multi-Factional Trimester,
otherwise known as LSMFT.
ORGANIZED IN 1965 as a splinter group of coed
elite to aid in presenting the cause of the trimester
on campus, the society is already expanding and
membership is booming.
IT JOINS the ranks of such previously established
Little Sisters organizations as Little Sisters of
Minerva, Little Sisters of the Laurel, Uttle Sisters
of the Annex (ParvaeSorores Annexis), Little Sisters
of the Maltese Cross, Little Sisters of the Tail Tailfeathers
feathers Tailfeathers of the White Owl, Little Sisters of the Madras
Underwear, Little Sisters of the Nile, and lastly,
Little Sisters of the Order of Persephony, sponsored
by Alpha Omicron Eta.
WHAT ALL OF THESE organizations have in

* * CANDIDATES CORNER * *

ACTION
By FRED LANE
CAN RUMOR AND innuendo distort the reality
of this student government campaign?
THE ANSWER COMES tomorrow election
day.
EACH STUDENT IS aware of his own contact contactor
or contactor lack of contactwith student government in
the past, has his own conception of its purpose,
knows what he wants it to do, senses what it
can be.
FROM THE CAMPAIGNS beginning, I have
stressed that student government CAN become
"a force for change,* a voice reflecting and
articulating student opinion to the point where
it will be heard and understood by the
administration, Board of Regents and state
politicians.
IT IS GRATIFYING that the opposition
parties both political manipulators and
idealogues have seen fit to pick up this
theme. But what record of genuine interest and
effort do they point to?
THE ISSUES IN THE CAMPAIGN ARE DRAWN.
CAN RUMOR AND innuendo distort the reality
of this student government election?
THE ANSWER COMES tomorrow.
Us too
EDITOR:
FEARING TO sound naive, what is the B.E.C.
Weekend?
CONFUSED
(ED. NOTE: It means Engineering CoUege
weekend.)
Ps and Qs
EDITOR:
RE: Prof. Silversteins letter
PERHAPS Professor Silversteln of the College
of Law should spend more time looking for errors
in his own writing.
IN HIS LETTER published in last Fridays
ALLIGATOR, he seems to have forgotten that the
third person singular form of most English verbs
ends with the letter s. CREATING NEOLOGISMS
. .DEMEANS . .
NAME WITHHELD
CAVEAT: jt'iease do not publish my name. I
have Prof. Silverstein for a class.

OPINTION

L-S-M-F-T
common is little sisters. The question then becomes
what is to occur following the population explosion
of Little Sisters organizations when there are no
more unattached coeds left on campus to fill the
constantly-expanding number of Little Sisters
organizations?
FURTHER, WHAT is the reason for the senseless
discrimination which is being allowed by shunning
from membership Big Sisters? The innovators little
realize the psychological impact on the lives of
those Big Sisters who, due to the accident of early
birth, were not allowed the privilege of being named
to the Little Sisters organizations? Woe and behold
the deep sense of frustration and the inferiority
complex imparted upon these individuals excluded
from the social atmosphere afforded by the Sister
elites.
IS THERE ANY solution to this very unfortunate
problem? Well, fortunately, there is.
UNBEKNOWNST TO those at the hierarchy of the
Little Sisters organizations, a vast underground
movement is currently underway on campus to

CHALLENGE
By AUG SCHILDBACH
After my name on the ballot this Thursday
is a long space. It is blank. Nothing is there.
Let it remind you of the integrity and honesty
l
of this campaign.
Ah-Ten-Shun
EDITOR:
CAN YOU IMAGINE ANY CAMPUS ORGANI ORGANIZATION
ZATION ORGANIZATION BOLD ENOUGH TO CONDONE
HAZING AFTER ALL THE ADMINISTRATIVE
PRESSURE LAST TRIMESTER?
It seems to me that in view of the penalties
bestowed On fraternities recently (Delta Tau
Delta for one) that campus organizations would
be as cautious as possible not to be caught
hazing its initiates.
APPARENTLY the ROTC officers are not
subject to this administrative ruling. Their
initiates (rats) had to get up every morning
5:45 a.m. for almost a week and driH in full
uniform. As if this wasnt enough they had to
guard Albert then be made the objects
of lip stick smearing sorority girls.
TO ME THIS just doesnt seem to be good
sportsmanship.
NAME WITHHELD
I AM CURRENTLY taking ROTC and would
prefer not to have my name used as it cause
repercussions involving my grade.
Surprised
EDITOR:
As a former college instructor, I was pleasantly
surprised during my recent appearance in the student
traffic court. I have always been somewhat skeptical
about the ability of college students to govern
themselves but have now altered my opinion to some
degree.
The student justices conducted the proceeding
with dignity and impartiality bestowing honor upon
themselves and the student body whom they serve.
Yours sincerely,
MARTIN M. LA GODNA, 7AS

Wednesday, Feb. 10 / 1965, The Florida Alligator/

initiate a Big Sisters organization.
THIS IS doubtlessly a problem that must be
eradicated and should have been included on the
platforms of each and every party in the current
political maelstrom. The shortsightedness of all
four parties attests to their lack of political vibrancy
on a campus that is crying for Big Sisters.
IMAGINE THE amount of girls on campus who
would, out of a deep-rooted sense of frustration
of being too old for Little Sisters but too young
for marriage, vote for a candidate running on the
plank of extension of the Sisters Clubs to include
Big Sisters.
LSMFT, LIKE the other Sisters groiq>s, is destined,
unfortunately to an early demise unless this unrest
is quieted.
SO, REMEMBER girls, when you leave your house
at night to gather and bask in the warmness of
fraternal kinship fostered by the Little Sisterism,
that behind you always lurking on the side sidelines
lines sidelines Big Sister is watching you.

Le T TtR2-
Lead on
EDITOR:
IT IS IRONIC that UF Student Government
enthusiasm for the new AJS.G. (Associated
Student Governments of the UjS.A.) is reportedly
based on the very a-political character of
the AJS.G., compared with the imputed strongly
political nature of the N.S.A. (National Student
Association) exemplified by the latters Interest
in such questions as whether Red China should
be admitted to the United Nations.
ARE WE expected to believe that UFJS.G.
leadership really has no interest in politics
or political matters? There are many different
types of political matters campus, city, state,
national and international. Is it a sign of wisdom
or responsibility on the part of S.G. to be
interested only in campus politics (or at most
in building careers in Florida politics), while
ignoring national and international questions?
I do not believe all student government leaders
are so parochial in outlook. I doubt that most
U.F. students are, either.
U.F. STUDENTS are called on soon after
graduation sometimes before to take
part as citizens and soldiers in the decisions
that must be made with regard to such basic
political questions as war and peace, poverty
and economic development, freedom and justice,
equality of educational and economic oppor opportunity,
tunity, opportunity, medical care for the aged, etc. Decisions
will be made as to our response to the Berlin
Wall, to Viet Nam, Cuba, our present and future
relations with the U.S.S.R., the two Chinas,
the financial crisis in the U.N., the peace-keeping
operations of the U.N. in the Congo, Korea, etc.
IF THERE is any excuse for Student
Government, it can only be its place in training
student leaders and the student electorate for
wise and responsible political life. How can this
training take place if the real issues of our
time, which will affect the destinies of all of
us for better or worse, are ignored?
THE BIG BAD world outside the campus does
not go away just because we pretend it is not
there. Perhaps one reason U.F. graduates have
contributed so little to our national leadership
is that S.G. here has usually preferred to keep
its head in the sand.
THERE HAVE been notable, but few exceptions
to this posture: the stirring words of a student
body president at the memorial service for
President Kennedy; S.G. support of various
committees efforts to bring notable speakers,
such as Lady Jackson and Roy Wilkins, to
address the campus with the lively issues of
national and international significance. Student
response to these manifestations of concern
for the great public, political issues and events
has been impressive.
A POLITICAL QUESTION is one that has
to do with the governing of a people or state.
Must S.G. feel bound to confine its attention
to the annual Mickey Mouse political issues of
S.G. constitutional revision, football seating,
etc.? Florida students are ready to face up to
the real issues of our day. Is there some reason
that S. G. must hide from them?
R. H. HIERS
Assistant Prof, of Religion

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Feb. 10, 1965

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University City Bank

Pretty UF coed, Maxine Jacobs, one of the many customers who enjoy the conven convenient
ient convenient banking hours of the University City Bank. And no wonder, the U.C. Bank is
only two short blocks from campus. With its many services and friendly atmosphere,
University City Bank has become a favorite of the Florida campus.

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Gainesville Coca-Cola
Bottling Co
Pam Falck, Chi Omega, knows the secret of staying refreshed
while studying.. .even biology goes better with Coke (the bio biology
logy biology found in books).. .we've all known for a long time that
the human biological system likes Coke.

TWO GREAT A
Orange & Blue

Fremacs
These two pretty coeds have
found the perfect place to
buy that gift for his birthday or
that special something for
February 14... Fremacs. WeMI
have to leave them aynono aynonomous
mous aynonomous so as not to tip off the
men in their lives. You men
who aren't lucky enough to
have a birthday coming up,
stop in Fremacs anyway...
treat yourself to the finest.

IMi
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H y :
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''ySPPPPiPP7y -. '!§y^PPaPp;
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''ltiPriiiiiiir' Imil, i' ijiiiiyiiMiiii
Happy scene? Sure is, for any Universi
Because the Campus Federal Credit Unic
Interest rates you can afford. Locatedc
Main office, building J extention 297
For the Dial-a-Loan service, call 376-2
fV.V
Campus Feden
**!_

Bark
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DMBINATIONS
Gainesville & You

;Xv
***

v,v^
Xv!
jvX*
I
iof Florida faculfy or staff member. Why?
) makes buying an automobile a reality at :#
two handy locations for your convience:
; Health Center Branch, extention 5107.

-50 anytime day or night. :*>:
Jfe 1
mi
I Credit Uiioi fi|H ;|

I
HkLk
I V;
f v^
EL wUrfl '^Lt*.
m&J M *
I
ome of the sports car in Gainesville, Bartley Motors has become a favorite browsing |
*a for the UF student. Volvo, Fiat and Hillman plus the finest .n serv.ce makes |
>rkley the place to go for the foriegn or sports car buff. |

Donigans
It must have been lovely Joyce Bleidner who prompted the expression: one
Picture is worth a thousand words.. .And when she steps back inside Donigan's
more than pictures will greet her in the world of fashion. Donigans beautiful
selection of sportswear for the knowledgeable coed is without equal. And
rightfully so with such pretty customers to serve.

Cyclerama
Who worries about parking
space? Not a Cyclerama man.
Tommy Tart and Jenny Lepscomb
discover the thrill and adven adventure
ture adventure common to the fast and
economical transportation at
Cyclerama.

Wednesday, Feb. 10, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 7



Page 8

, The FJorida Alligator, Wednesday, Feb. 10, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

Services
EXPERT TYPING done in my
home. Will pick 19 and deliver.
376-8586 before 7:30 a.m. or after
5 p.m. (M-91-lt-c).
ACCURATE TYPING DONE on IBM
electric. Call 372-2163 after 5 p.m.
or anytime weekends. (M-91-2t-c).
Personal
1
DEAR JOHN, B.E.C. Weekend is
only 5 weeks away. Its going to
be better than ever this year. So
Hurry! MARSHA. (J-91-lt-c).
WOULD YOU LIKE TO HAVE as
a student the same rights and
privileges enjoyed by Americans
who are your age and who are not
students? Those kids you knew
in high school who didnt go to
college would you like as much
self-government as they enjoy
right now? Tired of being treated
like a baby? ELECT FREEDOM
PARTY! (J-91-2t-p).

# lllillWllll
LAST TWO TIMES
lit:. L /
I c~t 1 1| 1 i>j
? CONNIE DEAN CESAR
JSTEVENS JONES and ROMERO
At 7:00 Only
"PAJAMA PARTY"
"BLOOD CREATURES"
STARTS FRIDAY
"HONEYMOON HOTEL"

ALL-FLORIDA WORLD PREMIERE
rj|7| 11 *a) £jAsToay/
l "KISS ME, STUPID"

I Wanted |
COED TO SHARE 7 bedroom
apartment, 2 baths. Private room.
$25 per month plus utilities. 3
blocks from campus. FR 8-1161.
(C-88-st-c).
WANTED 1950-1955 FORDS
and CHEVROLETS. A1 Herndons
Service Station, 916 S. E. 4th
Street. (C-73-20t-c).
Help Wanted
ON OR ABOUT February 15th we
will have an opening for a
receptionist-secretary. Must be
accurate typist and capable of
taking shorthand. Salary commen commensurate
surate commensurate with experience and ability.
Write or phone for interview,
Scruggs & Carmichael, 3 S. E. Ist
Avenue, 376-5242. (E-88-ts-c).
BOY 12 to 16 years old for
established paper routes adjacent
to University grounds. Contact the
Gainesville Sun, 378-1411. (E-91-
st-c).
Real Estate
HOUSE AND NINE ACRES Large
2 bedroom home in excellent con condition
dition condition overlooking lake off Archer
Road. Beautiful oak trees. Only
4 miles from UF Med. Center.
$16,500.00. Call Charlie Mayo,
Mary Moeller, Realtor, FR6-4471.
(1-90-st-c).
5 ACRE TRACTS, 3 miles south
of Newberry Road, on State Road
241, SISOO each, SIOO down and S2O
per month. Ideal for mobile homes.
Call Ralph Glaeser, 376-6461. (I (I---87-st-c).
--87-st-c). (I---87-st-c).

SPORTSMENS
CYCLE CENTER
617 N. Main St.
SUZUKI
Sales & Service

For Sale |
MY ENTIRE ESTATE: Excellent
H-D 165 M cycle $150; English Englishtype
type Englishtype bike sls; desk $5; new Jazz
records $1.50 up; electric bass
guitar. Hedberg, 219 NW 3rd Ave.
After 6. (A-91-3t-c).
ZENITH TRANS-OCEANIC
short wave receiving radio.
Perfect. $65. Call after 5:00 p.m.
372-3863. (A-91-st-p).
COLLEGE MEN! Learn to Fly.
Fly your friends to the Bahamas.
$1.50 per hour. Triangle Flying
Club. Rewarding experience.
Phone 376-6960. (A-91-lt-c).
COLUMBIA MASTERWORK
deluxe monoral tape recorder.
Sacrifice 575.00 plus accessor accessories
ies accessories and tapes. Call George Sims,
2-9303 leave number to call. (A (A---91-2t-p).
--91-2t-p). (A---91-2t-p).
<6
DIAMOND WEDDING RING SET.
Recently appraised at S3OO. Will
sell for $l5O. Call campus ext.
2497 or 6-5413 after 5 p.m. (A (A---91-3t-c).
--91-3t-c). (A---91-3t-c).
ENGAGEMENT RING. Tiffany
setting, white gold .45 carat.
Brand new never worn. Will sell
90 to 100% cheaper than retail
price. Retail price $275.00. Joseph
Reda, 1614 NW 3rd Place, if not
home, leave your address or phone
number. (A-90-2t-c).
GIBSON 6-string Spanish guitar
and case. Must be heard to be
appreciated. Call 376-1439.
Reasonable. (A-90-2t-c).
2 DRAWER STEEL FILE cabinet cabinetletter
letter cabinetletter (regular) size. Gray enamel
finish. Excellent condition. Tower
trade mark. Call 376-0358, after
6 p.m. (A-90-st-c).
1953 VAGABOND TRAILER Bx4l
2 bedroom, 1 bath. $1750. Call 8-
1151, B. W. Cook. (A-89-st-c).
I * 1 1
Autos
1953 MG, TD-2 ROADSTER. In
good running condition. Reduced
from SSOO to $350. Call after 5
p.m. 6-8543. (G-91-st-c).
J ..if
/ hear it's a very sick^^.
. .
about a
man
love wit
his
wife. W jpj
itj I f m.
-11 r- T V '! "*"1"' III!1 mm I I
ROBERT SHAW MARY URE .
the Luck of
Ginger
Coffev

t " 1 ' 11 '1
Autos

ALFA ROMEO 1961. HELP
The bank has got me! The Alfa
is yours for only SI2OO. See at
the Florida National Bank or call
Bo Cook 372-9363. (G-91-lt-c).
*6l OLDS 88, 4-door Spt. Sed.
Fully equipped, A/C and other
extras. Excellent condition.sl69s.
Call evenings 372-8221. (G-91-3t-
P).
MUST SELL 1956 BUICK V-8,
automatic transmission, a real
clean car, good mechanical
condition. Only $175. Contact Tom
Galloway 376-1025. (G-91-3t-c).
SACRIFICE. Must sell 1963
Spitfire. Over S6OO worth of extras
and in like new condition. Come
see at 119 NW 16th St. after 2:3P
p.m. (G-89-3t-c).
55 CHEVY, excellent condition,
6 cylinder, standard shift, new
brakes and clutch. Make offer.
See after 5:15 p.m. and weekends.
Room 4, 424 NE 6th St. (G-89-
3t-c),
Lost & Found.
LOST: BROWN WALLET in
Florida Gym. Must have important
ID papers. Please call Jim Beasley,
Rm. 969 Weaver. 372-9309. (L (L---91-2t-p).
--91-2t-p). (L---91-2t-p).
LOST: FEMALE CALICO CAT.
Last seen Mon. Feb. 1, just West
of football stadium. Reward. Call
8-2079 after 5 p.m. (L-91-3t-c)..

lalliQAto ads always attcact I
(you are reading one now) I
INDEPENDENT?
IN ARTS AND SCIENCES?
In recent years students across the country have begun
taking an active concern in such issues as disarmament,
the United Nations, freedom of speech, and racial dis discriminations.
criminations. discriminations. Tom Keifer and I, both as students and as
candidates for the legislative council, are concerned over
these issues; in the past we have ourselves participated in
projects designed to help rectify a particular social problem
(discrimination) in our home communities.
As you know, progress is a complicated process; there are
no easy or quick solutions to most problems, and Tom and I
have found this to be true in our own experiences. We therefore
believe a BALANCED plan for progress, offering action on a
number of fronts, is superior to an elaborate program for
only one area. Off-campus involvement in community life is
a part of our program, but it is only a part. Other programs
need to be undertaken, too, and we ask you to support our
candidacies tor leg. council if you also believe that a mature,
balanced Student Government program for the development
of our university will be the most effective.
MIKE STRATIL
ELECT TOM KEIFER& MIKE STRATIL
mmss
(Paid Political Adv.)

For Rent
REDUCED RATE $70.00 till
trimester ends. One space
available for male student. One
block from campus behind the
Florida Book Store. Call Jim
Hodge, FR 6-9345 or see at 1602
NW Ist Ave. (B-91-3t-p).
APARTMENTS, completely furn furnished.
ished. furnished. One bedroom;swimming
pool, all electric kitchen, central
heat, air-conditioning. S9O per
month. 372-3826 or 376-6228. (B (B---90-ts-c).
--90-ts-c). (B---90-ts-c).
FURNISHED EFFICIENCY Apart Apartment
ment Apartment with air-conditioning and TV.
One block from campus. Call
before 3 p.m., 8-2553 or after 3
p.m. 6-3211 ask for 7th floor
either Joan or Pat. (B-89-st-c).
LARGE SINGLE ROOM Available
to either male or female student.
One block from campus. 117 NW
17th Street. Call 2-2956. (B-89-
3t-c).
2 BEDROOM, clean furnished
apartment, S7O per month. All
utilities furnished except fuel for
heating and cooking. 1614 NW 3rd
Place. Phone 2-7366. (B-89-st-c).
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE
double room with full separate
unit. Kitchen, study room, linen
and maid service. 231 SE 2nd
Street. (B-86-ts-c).
UNUSUALLY NICE ROOM with
private bath, central heat and air airconditioning.
conditioning. airconditioning. Male graduate
student or professional person
preferred. Call 372-7943. (B (B---82-ts-c).
--82-ts-c). (B---82-ts-c).



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Rats and spooky noises all in
a night 9 s work for watchman

Catching rats for screaming girls or telling
them that certain spooky noises come from
vents is all in a nights work for a night watch watchman
man watchman patrolling the girls dorms UF Police
Officer Gary Richburg said.
Richburg, who patrols Yulee Area explained,
our biggest concern is watching for fires.
We also maintain order and lock up the
dormitories after curfew.
Richburg said there have been quite a few*
chute fires. This,* he explained, is why
girls sometimes have to leave their dorms
in the middle of the night.*
We have very little trouble with drunks,
Richburg said. Sometimes we have to get
rid of some late visitors who want to visit
after curfew. But there is seldom any trouble.
Most boys are very cooperative when you tell
them to leave.*
Officer Leon Osteen, who has been patrolling
Broward and Rawlings Halls for two years,

3 more American
copters are hit
SAIGON (UPI) Communist
guerrillas yesterday shot down
three American helicopters,
killing one U, S. Army crewman
and wounding eight others.
Evacuation aircraft under
protection from gunships armed
with rockets and machineguns
rescued the wounded Americans.
The downed aircraft were part
of a fleet of 51 U. S. helicopters
that lifted Vietnamese
paratroopers into jungle clearings
some 30 miles east of Saigon to
attack a strong force of Viet Cong
guerrillas.
The new American casualties
were suffered as the first plane planeloads
loads planeloads of U. S. wives and children
left South Viet Nam reluctantly
but willing to clear the decks
under orders from President
Johnson. A total of 1,819
dependents of American service servicemen
men servicemen and civilians will be flown
out of South Viet Nam as a
precaution in the withdrawal
scheduled for completion in ten
days.
'John Goldfarb
can be shown
new YORK (UPI) A state
appeals court Tuesday ruled that
the controversial motion picture
John Goldfarb, Please Come
Home, in which Notre Dame
University played an unwanted
role, can be shown in theaters
throughout the nation.

ON THE VIET NAM FRONT...

Chinese poised
a
TOKYO (UPI) Communist
China Tuesday said its armed
forces are waiting in battle
array to repel any United States
invasion of North Viet Nam which
it warned would be considered as
an attack on China itself.
The warning came in an editorial
in the official Peking people's
Daily distributed by the New China
News Agency NCNA and monitored
in Tokyo.
Other Peking broadcasts told
of daylong demonstrations by
hundreds of thousands of Chinese
in the Red China capital protesting
against the aggressive U. S.
i mnprialists.

tPa PoUtlc !ii dt ) Elect BILL WALL
* Bachelor of Science Degree in
MBQl Journalism
,jr#t Writer for The Alligator And
Ja The Gainesville Sun
'rtSiivi? J§L .JEf
1 jp Member, Sigma Delta Chi
\ JMk Professional Journalistic
* Editor, The Bulletin Bureau of
a| Professional Relations UF
DvQIU Wl College of Pharmacy
Student Graduate Student, Journalism- I
at Education
Publications
ACTION PARTY

said Saturday nights are his toughest night.
Osteen explained that sometimes he had some
trouble in getting the boys to leave after
curfew on Saturday nights. This is especially
true, he said, of those boys who have been
drinking.**
Osteen said he occasionally received
complaints from girls saying that boys were
peeping in their windows. But,** he said, the
boys move right along when they see us coming.*
Girls sometimes sneak out, Richburg said.
But it is mainly the responsibility of their
counselors to find out they are gone. If we
catch them we turn their names in.
Richburg said the boys he has asked to
leave after curfew are usually the same ones
night after night. Some of these boys are now
my friends.
One of them,* Richburg said, once asked
me if I was trying to get rid of him so that I
could date his girl.*

British diplomacy
marking time
LONDON (UPI) The British
government has decided to steer
clear of any immediate peace,"
initiatives in the Viet Nam con conflict,
flict, conflict, authoritative sources said
yesterday.
British diplomacy, which played
a key role in the 1954 Indo China
settlement at the Geneva
conference, is marking time at
present, at least until Russia's
policy in Southeast Asia has been
clarified.
Britain is neither planning at
this stage to promote the re reconvening
convening reconvening of the Geneva
conference nor are any immediate
peace feelers to the Kremlin fore foreseen,
seen, foreseen, the sources said.

Wednesday, Feb. 10 / 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Pennies bring Sheen letter
A total of 1,655 pennies brought the residents of North Halls fourth
floor a letter from Bishop Fulton J. Sheen, head of Catholic missions

over the United States.
When John E. McHugh, lUC,
started his collection for the
Gainesville Catholic Church late
last October, most of the other
fourth floor residents considered
it a joke. But gradually, more and
more people began dropping their
extra pennies in the cannister.
When the boys counted its
contents at the end of last
trimester, they discovered a total
of $16.55.
The money was placed on the
altar of the church with a note
saying, This represents a
collection of pennies from
Catholics, Protestants, agnostics,
and even athiests for the
missions. It was signed by the
boys of North Four.
A personal letter from Sheen,
thanking them for the contribution
came early this trimester.
Michael F. Hallock, lUC, of
North Four said the priest of the
Gainesville church must have told
the head of his mission about the
contribution and word was passed
along up to Bishop Sheen.
IEEE is aiding
local Boys Club
The student branch of the
Institute of Electrical and
Electronic Engineers (IEEE) is
currently conducting classes in
intermediate electronics at the
Boys Club. Six boys are being
instructed by Ernest Graetz, Kent
Irwin and Phil Levy.
The class consists of a brief
lecture and a lab session. The
lectures center around theory
and construction procedure. In the
lab, they are building a phonograph
amplifier for their own use.
UF Debate Team
wins six straight
The Florida Debate Teams fared
well in a tournament held at
William and Mary College last
week.
The negative team, Fred
Hellinger and Jeremy Gluckman,
won six straight debates against
Kentucky, Georgia, Virginia,
Dartmouth, Villanova and Rhode
Island, before dropping their last
to Ohio State.
FSU will be the scene of the
next debates to be held Feb. 20
and 21. UF Debate Team will send
at least ten members in an attempt
to better last years third place
mark.

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"ACTION PARTY" (Paid Political Adv.)

Cool women, warm
men are biting issue
Cool women are less attractive
and warm men are highly attractive
to the mosquito.
The UFs Florida Agricultural
Experiment station tests have
showed that the influence of skin
temperature and moisture was
considered in determining attract attractiveness
iveness attractiveness to the mosquito.
Women treated with the repellent
were protected longer from
mosquito attack, more than men
who had been treated.
PROGRESS
CULPEPPER
(Paid Political Adv.)

Carleto
Leg Council
(Paid Political Adv.)
I modecn
Shoe Repair Shop
I HEELS ATTACHED
I 5 Mbit.
I SOLES ATTACHED
I 15 Mina.
At Two Locations
I CAROLYN PLAZA
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f Opp, Ist Nat'l Bank
I FR 6-5211

Page 9



Page 10

, The Florida Alligator/ Wednesday, Feb. 10, 1965

.*!* Jt /-V
wT 10 are 'Young Americans?

Who are The Young Americans?**
Johnny Mathis and a vocal group called The
Young Americans** will be on the UF campus for
this years Spring Frolics.
Mathis, who has been in the public eye for over
nine years, needs no introduction. But who are The
Young Americans?
The Young Americans is a group of young singers.
It was formed in the Spring of 1962 by Milton C.
Anderson. The group, started in Los Angeles,

WUS campaign slated here

By JANE YOUNG
Staff Writer
Mimeographed textbooks that
students have typed are being used
in countries where textbooks are
scarce.
The mimeograph machines are
supplied by World University Ser Service
vice Service (WUS), an international
student service organization.
March 1- 6 the World University
Service (WUS) will conduct a
campaign to raise funds for its
world wide self-help program.
The WUS, with headquarters in
Geneva, Switzerland, aids needy

Recruiting response very good ?

By KAY HUFFMASTER
Staff Writer
Response to a Student
Recruitment Committee at the UF
aimed at recruiting qualified Negro
students in high school and junior
colleges around the state to come
here has been very good,**
1 CAMPUS CUTIE 1
:
:
g g
X : 1
: : : :
x W M mL* W :
Natalie is
a historian
Todays Campus Cutie is
Natalie Zadoff, a Sophomore
s:from Jacksonville. This £:
£: pretty Miss majors in history, j:>
$: and plans to continue her £:
studies alter graduation. g
g Natalie sports a 3.8 overall g
average, but still finds time g
for extracurricular activities.
:£ She serves as corresponding :£
secretary of A E Phi sorority, :j:
£ ushers at Lyceum Council &
and is a*
g member of Parvae Sorores >:
| Annexis. g
g This cute coed also serves g
gon the Womens Judiciary g:
g Council. She enjoys helping g:
g others solve problems. The g
g Alligator is proud to have g
g Natalie as todays Campus g
Iv Cutie. $:

1 day to FREEDOM
J (Paid Political Adv.)

academic communities in 57
countries.
Martin Kenneth (Skeeter)
Wootem, chairman of WUS at the
UF said, The two objectives of
WUS on the UF campus this year
are: (1) to familiarize students
with the work of WUS and (2)
to raise the funds necessary to
carry out this work. Our goal
this year is $2,000.**
After the Hungarian revolt in
1956, WUS worked with the United
Nations in helping students, who
had fled Hungary, continue their
educations.
WUS BEGAN in 1930 with limited

according to Dan Harmeling,
committee chairman.
Most of the Negro high school
students who plan to go to college
have not heard very much about
the UF and some dont even know
that we are integrated,** said
Harmeling, brother of Freedom
Party SG presidential candidate
Jim Harmeling.
The committee was formed last
trimester by the Student Group for
Equal Rights. With the help of
faculty members Dr. Austin Creel
and Dr. Marshall B. Jones, the
students raised money to pay for
gas and meals for recruiting trips.
IF WE had more money we
would like to finance trips to the
campus by interested students,**
Harmeling explained.
Marilyn Sokolof, Susan Lockhart,
Harmeling, and James Gloster
make up the Committee.
The students try to fit the
recruiting trips into their spare
time. The meetings, some on
Saturdays, are arranged by the
guidance counselors of the schools.
According to committee member
Marilyn Sokolof, at these meetings
the members pass out information
to the students, explain what kind
of financial aid is available and
expound a little on the social
aspects of the UF.
THE RECRUITING is strictly
on an academic basis since the
committee cannot promise any aid
in the form of athletic
scholarships.
Dr. David Striker, who
coordinates all recruiting done
by the university to high schools
and junior colleges states that the
UF does not have any specific
program for reaching out to
colored high schools in Florida.
However, representatives have
gone to Negro high schools as

consists of 18 boys and 18 girls.
The age range of The Young Americans is from
15 to 20. When a singer reaches 21 he drops out.
Anderson, who received his masters degree in
music from U.C.L.A. in 1957, founded the group
with the idea of promoting American good will abroad
through music.
The money which is earned by the group through
public appearances will be used to finance these
proposed trips to other countries.

aims. It was designed to help
European students continue their
education after WW I. WUS now
has 57 member nations and four
international sponsors; World
Student Christian Federation, Pax
Romana, World Union of Jewish
Professors and Lecturers.
Each two years projects are set
up or revised in the neediest
academic areas of the world as
determined by a General Assembly
consisting of representatives of
member nations and sponsors.
WUS is a self-help program
which provides up to one-half the
funds needed for a given project.

part of the regular circuit of high
schools which participate in
college day activities.
The Florida Association of
Counselors and Deans sets up a
high school college day schedule
that runs from September to
November. We accept all
invitations we receive in this
regular recruiting schedule. This
includes colored high schools,**
Striker explained.
The Negro high schools included
in the 1964 schedule were New
Stanton Senior High School in
Jacksonville and seven
predominantly Negro high schools
in Dade County.
Harmeling said that the UF now
has 40 to 50 Negroes enrolled.
ATO pledges
aid Heart Fund
Nineteen pledges of Alpha Tau
Omega Fraternity, in cooperation
with Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity,
helped kick off this years Heart
Fund Drive by collecting $346.70
from Gainesville residents. The
pledges, who are competing with
the other 26 fraternities for the
Sig Ep Rotating Heart Fund Trophy,
were collecting in various parts
of Gainesville from 8 a.m.-4p.m.
as part of their initiation
requirements.
ATTENTION!
GIRL who gave boy in
Broward cafeteria 1$ for
tax on cheese sandwich,
please call Steve V. to tonight,
night, tonight, 6-6:30 at 2-9307.

Birch speaker

A special request of S4OO to
contract John Birch Society
speaker, G. Edward Griffen has
been granted the Forums
Committee by Student
Government.
Griffen, who is staff member membership
ship membership coordinator for the Society,
will speak on the UF campus
March 22. The time and place
of his lecture has not been
scheduled according to Forums
Committee Chairman, Bill
McCollum.
McCollum stated that Griffen
was contracted through the
American Opinion Speakers

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Gator
Advertisers

m p
M m
m m


here March 11

Bureau, which is a lecture service
organized by the John Birch
Society.
The Forums Committee, which
is composed of students and is
one of the 11 committees under
the Florida Union Board, had to
extend its budget to schedule
Griffen.
Bruce for
PROGRESS
(Paid Political Adv.)



ujCf .ASr %u 4i
Hfer s MfccgX gy- JHr A -\^B
V STjE gMttfe jMP*Lj^P^ s !Hli@** *.< v 4*r jBl J gyM
^ r nai
"jjtk
-' V >*V. w : ilK*\"Ss£T ;?: £'
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START OF THE 1964
...Dan Gurney (35) and winner of the race, A.J. Foyte (21)

CULPEPPER
PROGRESS
T & sp |
' ; /
*££* Home Made
*J& Italian Sausage
In Every Town Or City, You
Will Find One Good Italian
Restaurant
THIS IS IT!
Dial 372-4690
2120 Hawthorne Rd.
Near Drive-In Theatre

Page 4 The Florida Alligator/ Wednesday, Nov. 18 / 1964
OPININ
Good Job, Fred
The Alligator would like to recognize and commend Fred Lane
for the outstanding work which he has done in the Treasurers
office of SG so far this year. The dedication which he has displayed
merits special praise by The Alligator.
Fred Lane has made changes in the Treasurers office which
will serve to bring SG closer to the students which it represents.
Freds work can be put into two major categories: changes which
have already been made, and plans for the future.
This year a change was made to a Year-Round Budget System
instead of separate planning for the summer trimester. This
system expediates the budgeting of funds, and modernizes the
system. Practical changes have been made too; the budget for
organizations is no longer on a cents-per-member basis, but
rather on a dollar basis depending on the needs of the organization.
For the first time in SG history, the Treasurer has prepared an
information sheet for the Legislative Council in order that they
may more intelligently prepare the budget.
In order to help organizations, each business manager is
required to submit to the treasurer two reports per trimester
of his organizations financial transactions. This year will also
see the first list compiled of all SG equipment presently in use.
The day-to-day administrative routines of the treasurers office
were changed this year to better fit an office which works the
year-round. Efficiency and practicality have been the keynotes of
the projects which have been implemented thus far.
Planned for the future is a revision of the rules which govern
how and where money is to be spent. A new finance manual for
business managers of all organizations will be issued next
trimester. A program is presently in the works for long-range
financial planning for publications. A new Free Expenditure
Evaluation (FEE) is now being compiled to aid future legislative
councils and treasurers.
But the most important single plan for next trimester is a
complete copy of the SG budget designed to be circulated to
every student. Through this statement, everyone will be able
to see just where and how all money is spent.
$495,000 per year goes through the treasurers office; every
student deserves to know where this money is going. Fred Lane
is one treasurer who is attempting not only to make sure that the
money is fairly spent, but also to explain to every student where
the money is being spent. Fred seems to be one SG officer who
is interested in making SG into a STUDENT government.

Continentahan endurance race

By STEVE KANAR
Sports Writer

Last year the third annual Day Daytona
tona Daytona Continental looked as though
it would be something for the re record
cord record books. The Continental was
for the first time to be a full fullfledged
fledged fullfledged endurance race at 2000
kilometers, before the race had
been a short three-hour affair,
now it would last over 12 hours!
In a race of this length the most
important thing was to finish the
race with the car in one piece.
The Continental is the first
Grand Touring race of the sea season
son season of any note and thus manu manufacturers
facturers manufacturers bring their newest racing
machinery out from under the co covers.
vers. covers. Last year Enzo Ferrari
was there with a full racing ver version
sion version of the original G.T.O.
Ford Motor Co. had several of ofprepared

ferings, namely, the Shellby A C
Cobra, well known to sports car
racing fans all over the world,
including Enzo Ferrari. A new ver version
sion version called The Daytona Coupe
was introduced to compete with
Enzos 250 L.M. in the Prototype
Catagory. (Manufacturers are al allowed
lowed allowed to test experimental cars
which they intend to later produce.)
The race began as if it were
as short as the previous Contin Continentals.
entals. Continentals. It soon became apparent
that the Daytona Coupe was the
fastest car in the race. The crews
were busy revising their schedules
for pit stops, etc. The inevitable
finally happened, and the coupe,
smoking badly, came in for an
unscheduled pit stop. The rear
grease seal had broken down under
the terrific heating of 170 mph runs
down the back straight. As the crew

"Well, he guards the gold well."
Reprinted from
last trimesters
Florida Alligator
long before
the campaign began
§
ELECT FRED LANE
ON WRUF TONIGHT
(Paid Political AdvO AFTER THE NEWS

Wednesday Feb. 10 / 1965, The Florida Alligator,

jiSSt w 29
9P" jg^i
*/
""* ipJL/9 N^e#
DAN
...for Challenge Cup race

|:: : :-::r-: ::

prepared ofprepared to fix this, someone
spilled gas on the red-hot break
discs and the car burst into flames.
It was destroyed. Prior to the mis mishap
hap mishap the Coupe had a 17-minute
lead over the second placed car,
the Hill-Rodrlguez Ferrari. Now
the race appeared to be in the
bag for the Ferrari which kept
running as fast and dependably as
it had all dayflashing down the
straight, darting around the cor corners
ners corners and screaming, as only a
Ferrari can. And so it ended!

This year should be the best
Continental yet. The Ford G.T.
will be there along with Shellbys
newest addition, the Cobrall, pow powered
ered powered by a 427 cu. in. Ford en engine
gine engine with over 550 h.p. This car,
according to rumor has been able
to break every record in the book
at Riverside Raceway during test testing.
ing. testing. The now-famous Corvette
Grand Sports will also be there,
and of course, Enzo will have
something to stun everyone.
SEE YOU AT THE RACES!!

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, Feb. 10, 1965

FLORIDA SPORTS ROUNDUP
Spring sports swing in

Floridas spring sports season
gets well under way this weekend.
The Gator golf team takes on
Rollins in here Friday, and the
UF trackmen travel to
Montgomery, Saturday for the
Southeastern Conference Indoor
Championships. Meanwhile, the
Gator tennis squad enters its
second month of preparation for
its March 1 season opening.
Floridas golf team will be led
by captain Laurie Hammer of
Sarasota.
Coach Buster Bishop looks for
an improved team and expects
Hammer, a 6 foot-5 senior, to
have his finest year. Hammer took
part in the NCAA finals last season,
and Bishop believes he will be one
of the best collegiate golfers in
the country in 1965.
Other varsity golf members in include
clude include Raymond Angele, St.
Petersburg; Walter Armstrong,
Indianapolis, Ind.; Philip Chan Chanfrau,
frau, Chanfrau, Daytona Beach; David
Creech, Lexington, Ky.; Ron
DeFrees, St. PetersburgjCharles
Gans, Miami Beach; Robert Jewett,
Ft. Meyers; Thomas Kimball, Con Concord,
cord, Concord, N.H.; O. A. Kincaid,
Lebanon, Ind.; Robert Murphy,
Nichols; and Victor Newton,
Crystal River.
k
While Tennessee will be heavily
favored to capture the SEC Indoor
track meet Saturday in
Montgomery, UF might have
something to say about the results.
Thats the opinion of Gator
track coach Jimmy Carnes, who
will take a 24-man varsity dele delegation
gation delegation and five freshmen to
compete in the conferences big
indoor meet.

INDEPENDENT I
BASKETBALL |
Raiders 36
GDls 23
Glenwood Court 37
Bobs 10
'V
All-Stars 48
SPORF 32
English 39
Hi Ilei 16
Do /our laundry
Q* you shop
" Every 10th Load FR :c
KOIN KLEEN
704 W. Univ. Ave.
Carleto
Leg Council
(Paid Political Adv.)

Rl

U ***,. IB;
STONE

The probable top Gator entry
will be the mile relay team of
captain John Anderson, Jim
Brown, Bill Roberts and Rick
Haley.
Florida will have one defending
champion in the field, high jumper
Bill Crawford.

The Gator tennis team, which
began practice January 13, is
preparing for one of its toughest
schedules in recent years.
Co-captains Vic Stone and Dave
Bonner will bouy the team along
with other returning letterman
Steve Gardner. The team will play

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/*>
BROWN

2 seniors, 5 juniors and 3 sopho sophomores.
mores. sophomores.
CULPEPPER
PROGRESS
(Paid Political Adv.)

i
Hkr |
HAMMER

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