Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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MATHIS

Presidential hopefuls begin 'Great Debates

Freedom, Action, Progress, and
Challenge Parties were all pre presented
sented presented Tuesday evening when the
four candidates for president of
the Student Body met in the first
of a series of debates.
The four candidates for the num number
ber number one slot continued their series
of debates in Broward Hall last
night. The third debate of the series
will be held tonight in the Graham

The American Negro's civil
rights campaign soon will shift
from the courts and streets to the
political arena, predicted Roy
Wilkins of the National Association

...dignified with pride 9
By JANE YOUNG
Staff Writer
dignified man with pride, this is Roy Wilkins, Executive
Director of the National Association for the Advancement of
Colored People.
Upon arriving on the campus of the UF Wilkins was in interviewed
terviewed interviewed by Mark Damen of WUFT TV. He answered the
questions with sincerity, occasional humor and a deep under understanding
standing understanding of the failures and weaknesses of people, both Negro
and white.
I was sitting in the control room of WUFT when Wilkins
was ushered into the studio. For the next half hour he was
interviewed bv Damen.
We talked small talk". He is a vibrant personality who seems
Only 3 are entered
for Miss UF contest
Three contestants had been entered in the Miss University of
Florida Contest as of yesterday afternoon at 4:30, according to
Doug Stowell, chairman of the contest.
The candidates with their sponsors are: Kathy Green lUC, Kappa
Alpha Theta; Betty Wendt, 2UC, Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Mary Arliskas,
3ED, Sigma Chi.
The deadline for entering contestants is 4:30 p.m. this afternoon.
Stowell said last year's deadline was extended to allow more girls
to be entered.
This year's deadline is exactly that," he said. It won't be
extended.*'
There'll be more contestants,** Steve Horowitz, assistant contest
chairman, said. We're expecting 20 to 25 girls to be entered by this
afternoon.*
See MISS UF on p. 7

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Vol. 57, No. 86

Area recreation room at 8 p.m.
Toinght's debate will be taped and
broadcast at 11:15 p.m. tonight by
WRUF.
The candidates spoke in alpha alphabetical
betical alphabetical order of their parties.
FRED LANE (Action Party)
opened his remarks with a ques question,
tion, question, "Has there been a major
Student Government stand or pol policy
icy policy which has directly affected the

SAYS NAACPS ROY WILKINS
Civil rights to shift from courts to politics

for the Advancement of Colored
People here Tuesday night.
As the political influence of the
Negro has increased, so have his
political methods, Wilkins said.

University of Florida, Gainesville

TO BE BROADCASTON RADIO AT 11:15 P.AL

AT SPRING FROLICS
Mathis to sing here

Johnny Mathis will be the star
of this year's Spring Frolics, Fro Frolics
lics Frolics chairman Jim Kincaid an announced
nounced announced yesterday.
Spring Frolics is an annual pre presentation
sentation presentation by the Interfraternity
Council and will be held March
6, at 8 p.m., in Florida Gymnas Gymnasium.
ium. Gymnasium.
Mathis, a popular member of
America's singing celebrities will
be teamed up with a new singing
group, The Young Americans" and
a 25-piece band for the spring
performance.
The Young Americans are
a group of students from Southern

student?"
Lane answered his question by
saying students have not been af affected,
fected, affected, and the Action Partyin
keeping with its platformintends
to initiate programs which will.
AUGIE SCHILDBACH(ChaIIenge
Party) said "Students are discon discontent
tent discontent with Student Government. I
think there are students who choose
not to votenot because they are

There will be fewer
demonstrations in 1965 but more
negotiation, more conferences and
hopefully, more progress,'' he
said.
The Civil Rights Act of 1964
was the first major political
victory of the Negro, he continued.
Wilkins stressed that the act only
gave to the Negro rights white
citizens take for granted. He said
Negroes intend to invoke the Civil
Rights Act in every relevant sit situation,
uation, situation, for they know that no
legislation is self-implementing.**
DISCUSSING THE Negroes stand
politically, Wilkins said that the
Republicans lost many Negro
supporters in the last presidential
election. Referring to a speech
by Sen. Thruston Morton, R-Ky.,
Wilkins said that, in his opinion,
the Republican Party now realizes
IToday in history!
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Cheating over;
105 AF cadets quit
AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo.
(UPI)-The Air Force Academy an announced
nounced announced the completion of its in investigation
vestigation investigation into a cheating-on cheating-onexam
exam cheating-onexam scandal Wednesday with the
number of cadet resignations total totalling
ling totalling 105.

California who are accompanying
Mathis on a 25-city tour in the
south this spring.
MATHIS WILL appear for 45
minutes and the Young Americans
will finish up the rest of the
two-hour show.
His album "Johnny's Greatest
Hits," has been on the best sel selling
ling selling charts for over five years,
longer than any other record ex except
cept except "My Fair Lady." Seven of
his "45's" have sold over a mil million
lion million records apiece, including
"Chances Are" and "The Twelfth
of Never."

TIME: tonight at 9 p.m.
Place: Graham Hall

not interestedbut because they
have looked at the candidates and
have remained apathetic. Chal Challenge
lenge Challenge Party exists to force student
government to change."
JIM HARMELING (Freedom
Party said, "Freedom Party exists

the importance of the Negro vote
and will, in the future, be more
cognizant of Negro problems.
Wilkins listed desegregation of
schools and job opportunities as
problems that will receive
immediate attention.
The Negro has been crippled
by his lack of education, he said.
Wilkins pointed out that in 1929,
the school year for Negro children
in Mississippi was 99 days, or
about 50 days less than the white
schools. The Negro adults in
Mississippi today with this back background
ground background are unable to function in our
society, Wilkins said. He expects
the new law to speed the
desegregation of schools.
Wilkins said that although the
NAACP is the oldest of the Negro
organizations, neither its goal,
the end of racial segregation, nor

'Never throw snowball
-says Tennessee soph
KNOXVILLE, Tenn^UPl)- University of Tennessee sophomore Cus Custer
ter Custer R. Chip Livermore paused during his pinball game yesterday
to vow I will never throw another snowball.*
The thoughts of the 21-year-old student from Pomona, Calif,
were on Mondays giant snowball fight that has resulted in three
deaths.
Police had their thoughts too about the battle. If another one
develops, said Chief French Harris, it will be treated just like
a riot.
The deaths have shocked and sobered the student body. Livermore
works at Evans Sundries where the body of Marnell J. Marty Good Goodman,
man, Goodman, 18, a freshman from Swampscott, Mass., was brought Monday
after he was shot during the snowball fight.
Charged with second degree murder and freed under $2500 bond
was William Douglas Willett, 27, a truck driver from Greenville,
Tenn. He said hardpacked snowballs hit him in the face as he drove
See SNOWBALL* on p. 7

Thursday, Feb. 4, 1965

Mathis, a protogee of Mitch
Miller, was discovered in a small
nightclub in California and takgn
to New York.
The combination of Mathis and
the Young Americans first ap appeared
peared appeared together in Los Angles*
Greek Theatre a few months ago
where they set new attendance re records.
cords. records.
Following this, Mathis took the
group on a tour in the midwest
and east.
The group has just released its
album featuring the songs from
their concert tours with Mathis.

Speakers: the four
presidential can candidates
didates candidates
See DEBATES* onp.2

MV "V I l.kltvV 1



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator/ Thursday, Feb. 4, 1965

I CAMPUS CUTIE |
1 n J I
iiaHF^T
SQ*
' -7 JpVi
Susan leads |
UF cheers |
:: Susan Saunders, todays ::
:: Campus Cutie, is a Junior :§
$ majoring in English. This $
£ pretty coed calls Fort Walton :£
:: Beach her home. :£
>: Susan is a member of Kappa :£
:j:j Delta sorority, and has served i£
;:: as rush chairman. vj
:: Currently a Florida cheer- >:
$ leader, Susan is a past jx
g: Military Ball Queen, and ::
Sweetheart of ATO. ::
|
V . ..
Maddox depicted
as money maker
ATLANTA (DPI) Lester
Maddox was depicted in federal
court Tuesday as a man who has
made a SIO,OOO profit selling
segregationist souvenirs while
fighting a civil rights battle to
keep Negroes from his restaurant.

Sv:v:f: : x : :wX%Â¥S^
DEBATES
(Continued from page 1)

not a voice committed to a block
of votesbut rather as the re representation
presentation representation of a climate of opin opinion.
ion. opinion.
Harmeling continued, The ad administration
ministration administration has been replaced by
the parent and the faculty has
moved out believing students are
not interested in learning and are
being trained to be sheep.
Harmeling objected to what he
called Second-class citizenship
on campus. Student Government
must become a voice in expres expressing
sing expressing student policy, said Harmel Harmeling.
ing. Harmeling.
BRUCE CULPEPPER(Progress
Party) opened saying, We need
a new outlook and mature approach
to Student Government. We are'
mature enough but are the last
ones to have a voice in the UF.
I believe that we should have
a voice.
Culpepper continued, The
President of the Student Body
should be informed and should ex express
press express opinions about problems in involving
volving involving students.
Food Service, registration, the
Infirmary, and voting in Alachua
County, were some of the problems
listed by Culpepper.
Each of the candidates submitted
four questions before the debate,'
and chose a question from a hat
and proceeded to answer on a
rotation basis.
THE FIRST question was:
Why do major parties allow
their fraternities to *goon?
Lane answered, We are all
aware of what goes on in the early
morning hours. I am aware of
over enthusiastic pledges who tear
down banners. I have said this.
Schlldbach answered, Gooning
does not belong, but as long as
it is happening it is being allowed.
It comes down to thisit is not
that the political parties say to
do itit is that they do not say
anything.
Harmeling answered, People
who cannot control others cannot
control themselves. Freedom Par Party
ty Party seeks to control its members.
CULPEPPER answered, I a agree

Walkie Talkies to be used in election voting

Walkie Talkies will be used in
this years SG election to speed
up voting, according to Marty
Schwartz, secretary of the inter interior.
ior. interior.
The communication system
should avoid machine problems

Faircloth
to speak
tonight
State Attorney General Earl
Faircloth will speak here tonight
on Legal Problems Facing the
1965 Florida Legislature in room
121 of the Law School at 7:30 p.m.
The program is sponsored by the
John Marshall Bar Association
which has extended an invitation
to the public and the student body.
The Law Dames will serve re refreshments
freshments refreshments after the talk.
Faircloth was recently installed
attorney general after defeating
former attorney general James
Kynes in the November elections.
A graduate of the UF College
of Law, Faircloth was a member
of Florida Blue Key and Delta
Theta Phi law fraternity while a
student here. Before seeking elec eleclast
last eleclast year, Faircloth was a state
representative from Dade County.

gree agree that this is the condition,
and am glad that steps are being
taken to stop it. Progress party
will always continue to keep goon gooning
ing gooning from happening.
The second question was:
What can you do to help stu student
dent student morale?
Schlldbach said, Students look
to Student Government and when
they lose faith in Student Govern Government
ment Government their morale goes down.
Morale should mean a genuine
pride in the university and for
what it stands.
Harmeling answered, If the
question means morale in the sense
that a person can find himself
and exercise his talentsthen I
believe Student Government can
have a part in freeing the stu student
dent student from regulations which ham hamper
per hamper him.
Culpepper said, Morale is a
feeling of ( belonging a feeling of
participation. Students come to the
university in a mechanical way,
go to classes mechanically, and
receive a mechanical degree. I
believe that his should be changed
so that the student can see his
ideas used and benefit from them.
LANE ANSWERED saying, If
Student Government is here for one
purpose it is to make campus liv living
ing living a little better, a little easier
and a little more comfortable.
Student Government must fulfill
this role.
J&SpeciaJizing In\
Lasagna Raviola
Veal Parmigana
M ome Mode
jg Italian Sausage
In Every Town Or City, You
Will Find One Good Italian
Restaurant
THIS IS IT!
Dial 372-4690
2120 Hawthorne Rd.
Near Drive-In Theatre

which resulted last year in long
lines at the voting booths.
Schwartz is in charge o f all
technical aspects of the cur rent el elections.
ections. elections. He sees that all the elec election
tion election laws are obeyed and is in

MENS ZIP-OUT j|
COATS JB|
COMBINE GOOD LOOKS AND COMFORT WITH
CONVENTIONAL SHOULDER SEAM IN FRONT
AND RAGLAND SEAM IN BACK JHKiHHHK/
WERE $15.98 NOW $12.99 Mm ;
PENDANT WATCHES
. Anti-Maaiutk Aud Whh Unbro-akabl#-Marina
HIGH
FASHION WBBm
L WATCH.
JHFW

charge of election officials.
The election machines are
rented from the Supervisor o f
Registration of Alachua County
with funds provided for by SG.
Schwartz is also in charge of

the ballots and of the absentee
ballots.
Schwartz said the election has
oeen running smoothly so far and
he has received co-operation from
all parties concerned.



Unusual values in every department!
Ladies Nylons Stref(h Childs Bookcase with Swivel Chair
Suntone, Tautone Head Bands 2pc. Sunsuit, glass doors (Limited Quantity)
r4l c poire sizes 3-6 X reg. $17.77 reg. $19.95
rKIvl REG. PRICE 29c REG $1 29
3/pr $1 SALE 5/$1 SALE 99( SALE $15.77 SALE SI3.M
Drapery Material Boxed Cards awn r 33 1/3 rpm
45 width Chaise Lmmga grn/wkt Alb.ms
prints '* *"/ wlrt #,l
REG. 79< REG.B9( REG. $6.88 REG s3 44 REG * 167
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R.d Heart s Dnsk Lp p|gstj( G) sses
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Electric Blankets mdn Assorted
500 Sheets 45pc D ~ D
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of Filler Paper reg. $9.99 Melmac backed
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REG. 77( cA| E Cl 9 00 REG. $2.49 Rtv. 4y(
EogHfl SAVE NOW!
1 ; M.. I '" l WPtne VARIETY JTIH^
Store Hours
Mon-Fri 9:30 A.M. to 9 P.M.
Tues, Wed, Thurs: 9:30 A.M. to 6 P.M.
Sat 9 A.M. to 6 P.M.
-a.

Thursday, Feb. 4, 1965/ The Florida Alligator/

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Feb. 4, 1965

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International
ERNIE UTZ STEVE VAUGHN
Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor
JOE CAS TEL LO ED SEARS
Editorial Page Editor Sports Editor
1/tiVPOtNT
Hats off
This week the Gator salutes Bill McCollum,
current business manager of The Florida
Conservative, President of the Florida Union
Board of Student Activities, and Chairman
of the Campus Conservative Club. He has
been Chairman of the Florida Union Forums
Committee this past year and helped bring
such speakers as Victor Riesel, William
Rusher, and Vance Packard to this campus.
Bill was also President of the Circle K
Club this year and was their Treasurer in
the Fall of 1963. In Student Government, he
has served as Secretary of Mens Affairs,
Chairman and Publisher of ROTC Orientation
Information Booklet, and SG Representative
to Murphree Area Council.
Bill was the recipient of the Florida Union
Boards Outstanding Committee Chairman
Award for 1964, was on the Deans list for
the Winter of 1963, and mantains a 3.1 overall
average in English. We salute Bill McCollum
for his varied service to the UF.
Compulsory ROTC
Today we are re-running an editorial from
the Jacksonville Times-Union defending com compulsory
pulsory compulsory ROTC. It was brought to our attention
by the Army ROTC Gung-Ho, and since all
party platforms contain planks calling for the
abolition of compulsory ROTC we Feel that
it presents another side of the issue which
should be examined before any action is taken.
Our own position is that we fail to see a
direct correlation between compulsory ROTC
and national security. Granted that there is
a need for trained officers with a college
education; but, since the advanced programs
which lead to a commission are voluntary,
we do not feel that a compulsory basic program
accomplishes anything except to breed further
resentment towards the service.,
Furthermore, for those interested in
becoming service officers, reserve and officer
training programs after graduation supplement
ROTC to provide qualified officers.
Finally, if there does indeed exist a need
for more service personnel, a compulsory
4-year program leading to commission makes
more sense than a compulsory 2-year program
that leads to nothing besides two hours of
drill a week that seems incredibly divorced
from patriotic duty.
GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
JSI
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Lou Ferris
Jr., (Copy Editor), Mark Freeman (Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, Sharon
Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Kay Huffmaster, (Correspondents), Yvette
Cardozo, Agnes Fowles, Donita Mathison, Dan Taylor, Sam Ullman,
Selwln H. Ciment.
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve
Kurvin, Ann Carter, Evan Langbein, Ira Liebsfeld, Thelma Moss man,
/ran Snider, Cynthia Turnstall, Harvey Wolfson, John Shiplett,
Chip Sharon, Karen Vitunac, Jack Zucker, David Rones. Ami
Saperstein, Jeffrey Denkewalter, Carl Brown, Jane Young, Bill
Lockhart, Ken Simon, and Drex Dobson.
* \L
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper
of the University of Florida an is published five times weekly
except during May, June and July when it is published semi semiweekly.
weekly. semiweekly. Only editorials represent the official opinions of their
authors. The Alligator is entered as second class matter at
the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

THE GATOR SALUTES ***

.-:-rrT'
FWEH.cn ATv)
Peter Pan
EDITOR:
AN EXCELLENT example of what Barbara
Ward terms as the Peter Pan mentality can
be seen in the recent vote of the House of
Representatives to deny US surplus food sales
to the United Arab Republic. People possessing
the Peter Pan frame of mind have the
unadmirable quality of meeting serious
situations and problems with essentially
immature behavior. The action which results
from such thinking is readily apparent. Stated
Simply, it is an eye for an eye, a tooth for a
tooth, revenge regardless of the consequences
even at the expense of mature judgement.
CONGRESSMEN, irked over the destruction
of our library in Cairo, Egypt by African
students and by the aid given to the Congolese
rebels by the YAR, have voted to cut off future
sales of surplus food to Egypt (House Speaker
McCormack strongly protested this action.)
I SUPPOSE one of the nicer facets of retaliation
in anger against another government is that it
doesn't take very much subtle thinking to
consider the pros and cons of the situation and,
more importantly, the long range effect it will
have on the US position in foreign affairs.
THE INSIDIOSNESS of this Peter Pan frame
of mind is clear it momentarily satisfies
us by getting one pound of flesh out of the
offender. But what of the long range effects?
CUTTING OFF needed foodstuffs
(approximately 30 million Egyptians must grow
their entire food supply on about 5% of the land
the rest is unsuitable for agricultural production,
at least until the Aswan Dam is completed) will
not only further alienate Egyptian Arabs but
will also alienate 70 million other Arabs and
Africans living south of the Sahara Desert: for
President Nasser is not only the leader of the
Egyptians but is also looked upon by nearly
all Arabs as the symbol of leadership, Arab
unity, and strong anti-colonialism.
IN THE precarious, complex balance between
the East and West, it really does matter what
the neutral nations think and do, it really does
matter whether they remain neutral or turn
further towards the communists. By tying the
President's hands in the are a of foreign policy policyan
an policyan area specifically reserved to the President
by the Constitution the congress will surely
weaken our world position and our ability
to remain flexible in our foreign policy.
WHILE I dislike the destruction of our library
in Cairo as much as anyone (it was burned by
African students, not the UAR), I also dislike
congress's encroaching on the power of the
President and the State Department to deal with
foreign countries in their more knowledgeable
and informed manner.
AS FOR Nasser's aid to the Congolese rebels,
it must be remembered that it is the idea of
anti-colonialism and African self-determination
which above all is responsible for that aid.
Aid to the rebels by Nasser does not mean
he is pro-communist, anti-American, or even
necessarily pro-rebel. The rebels represent
anti-colonialism, Moise Tshombe represents
colonial influence in Africa, so UAR aid goes
obviously to the rebels and not to Tshombe.
WHILE I do not believe that all actions taken
against the US by foreign governments should
go unheeded, I do firmly believe that the power
to deal with the offending country should be left
fully within the hands of the man in the White
House. The world's problems have never been
solved by simple-minded actions, and I feel
certain that neither will the problems of the
US.
MICHAEL STANFIELD, 4AS

M WM
HpILLMcCOUUMHHBH
English-wise
EDITOR:
Individual-wise, and I should hope department departmentwise,
wise, departmentwise, this writer wishes to thank his colleague
in the School of Law for his otherwise nice-wise
note to the Alligator (Jan. 29). Morale-wise
it is good for us English teachers, classroom classroomwise,
wise, classroomwise, to know we have the support,
community-wise, of other faculty members in
our crusade, student-wise, to improve things,
com munications-wise.
B. H. WAUGH
Professor of English
|ROTC and security)
£: (ED. NOTE: The following is reprinted from j: : :
:£ the Jacksonville Times-Union of Jan. 29, 1965.) £
£: An old and honored institution on many
xj American campuses could begin going into
:£ decline next month at the University of Florida :£
£ if action is taken which has been recommended
X; to the University Senate. The proposal has been £:
X; made to that body that the compulsory basic
course in the Reserve Officers* Training Corps £
:£ program be dropped by 1967. £
x This suggestion is in complete conformance
x with the American attitude in general during
& peace toward all things military. Like the £:
neer-do-well Cracker who sees no use in
:£ repairing a leaky roof when the sun is shining,
£ the American people are prone to go into route
step when a major military action is not looming. £
Moreover, it is the temper of American youth £
to chafe under any system of discipline that £
X; might smack in the least of regimentation. To
£ them, anything that is done by the numbers is £
:£: abhorrent, and they dislike for a must factor £
£ to impinge in any way on their lives, :£
:£ The downgrading of military training in x
x schools prepares the way for disaster. The
£: framework of several -hundred thousand reserve
x officers, most of them ROTC graduates, pro pro:>
:> pro:> vided for the hurry-up mobilization at the onset £
£: * World War II saved the day. A proposal
£ that there be a slackening off of emphasis on
x this kind of training proves again that the £
:£ American memory is short.
:£ The dwindling away of the civilian officer
x corps in the armed forces as a result of £
£: pushing ROTC training into the background, £:
together with certain other influences, will result £
£: tn a badly weakened defense posture for Uncle
v Sam, the adding machine mind of Defense i£
£ Secretary McNamara to the contrary notwith- £
x standing. History shows that nations which have
£ submitted to such a diminution in the ranks of £
£ essential leadership have paid the price.
:£ There remain but few disciplinary influences
; x on the American campus today, and the ROTC x
program is one of them. It inculcates in :£
-x American youth those qualities which have
been missing both in officers and men in some £
:£ of recent battlefield experiences of the United
:£ States. £:
x Reverence fbr constituted authority and an
£: understanding of orderly procedure, products
'y, cadet training which are so frequently shunned
£ by bohemian intellectuals of the campus, £
£: should be devoutly sought for American young
:£ people today. £:
:'£ ROTC training Instills in young people a
:£ sense of dignity and respect, two qualities £
x sre badly needed in the college environment x
x today, if the recent fiasco on a California x
x campus furnishes any criterion.



EDITOR:
IN ORDER to complete my undergraduate
work I have returned to the University after
an absence of several years. Since I left in
1958 the trimester system has come into being,
and it was a major factor in my decision to
return to school at a relatively advanced age.
I am surprised to find the system under attack
from various quarters here, and I think a few
words in its defense are in order:
1. THE TRIMESTER system makes it
possible to complete work toward a degree
significantly sooner than before.
2. WHILE THE system undoubtedly
increases faculty and staff workload, there is
no reason why it should work a hardship on
students. Those who feel overloaded and those
who feel no sense of urgency may reduce their
loads to suitable levels. If relief for the faculty
is in order, an increase in workforce is the
answer, not a slowdown.
3. THE SYSTEM denies the student nothing.
It merely asks a somewhat higher degree of
effort than before for optimum return. The
taxpayers of Florida, who are subsidizing the
activities of every student here in the hope
of receiving future benefits to the state, have
the right to expect m ov 'mum efficiency in the
use of our multi' ..> plant. No student reasonably ask the state
to expend public funds in his behalf while he
proceeds at a leisurely pace.

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A diggers dream, this 4-4-2! Here storms a lean n mean Rocket V-8 . 400 cubes, 345 horses,
quad pots. Goodies like twin acoustically tuned, chambered pipes . heavy-duty shocks, front
and rear stabilizers and 4 coil springs. Result: unique 4-4-2 action and road sense. How many cents?
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Try a Rocket in Action ... m
Look to Olds for the New!
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i SilM

4. COLLEGE IS not a career in itself.
Any system which permits the student to apply
himself more fully and finish school sooner
is of material benefit to those who are here
with serious intent. The others might well go to
a school organized for their purposes, whatever
those are, rather than remain here and agitate
for a return to the academic snails pace of
yesteryear.
RONALD G. COTTON, JR. 2UC

EDITOR:
THURSDAYS cartoon by Jess Gregory has
motivated me to express what seems to be a
minority opinion concerning the trimester
system. I personally favor it.
THE CHIEF problem with the trimester seems
to be its size: namely, it is not possible to
conveniently fit one semester into one trimester
since the latter is smaller. Professors who
attempt to deliver their three-hour semester
courses in one trimester find that there is not
enough time for the proper amount of
assimilation, discussion, outside reading, and
other intellectually desirable pursuits.

Thursday, Feb. 4, 1965/ The Florida Alligator,

STUDENTS who sign up for a typical fifteen
or sixteen tour load of such courses are
similarly taxed.
THERE ARE two obvious solutions to the
above problem: (1) decrease the average course
load, and (2) modify the course content to con conform
form conform with the available time. It is evident that
both of these methods are being used more
and more but the trimester is still new enough
that complaints are evident.
IT IS TRUE that two semesters of work cannot
be comfortably accomplished in two trimesters,
but there are three trimesters per year, not
two, and here lies its advantage. Much more
can be accomplished in three trimesters than
in two semesters and one summer session"
under the old system.
THE ABOVE opinion must be modified by
the fact that I am a graduate student and thus
concerned primarily with study which was
not the case during my undergraduate years.
My opinion is thus biased. However, it may be
of some value to poll the opinion of four major
groups: (1) professors; (2) graduate students;
(3) third and fourth year undergraduates; and
(4) UC students. Such an opinion poll might
be of some use to the study of the system.
EARL SMITH 7AS

Page 5



Page 6

i/ The Florida .Alligator/ Thursday, Feb. 4, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS I

Real Estate
5 ACRE TRACTS, 3 miles south
of Newberry Road, on State Road
241, SISOO each, SIOO down and S2O
per month. Ideal for mobile homes*''
Call Ralph Glaeser, 376-6461. (I (I---87-st-c).
--87-st-c). (I---87-st-c).
1
Wanted
ONE MALE ROOMMATE. S4O per
month. Quiet place to study. Car
required. Call 372-6634 before
9:30 a.m. or between 6 and 7 p.m.
(C-87-3t-c).
ROOMMATE TO SHARE LARGE
4 bedroom house, 1 block from
campus. Private room. Central
air and heat. S3B plus utilities.
376-1714 or 8-2932. (C-86-st-c).
WANTED 1950-1955 FORDS
and CHEVROLETS. A1 Herndon's
Service Station, 916 S. E. 4th
Street. (C-73-20t-c).
SPORTSMENS
CYCLE CENTER j
617 N. Main St.
SUZUKI
Sales & Service

STARTS TOMORROW (FRIDAY) ftAIUECUII I C Dt l Cf l
Exclusive First tat Showing wAiNtIYILLt THIATRK
Rev mr m h in om! uy way m an i
I I v.' I ;i -*"/'r*,', H v *I H I I
CONNIE STEVENS DEAN JONES and CESAR ROMERO
STARTS TOMORROW! GARKSVUf KSMSS.

j Personal |
COEDS WANTED TO RIDE in
new student owned and operated
cabs to make job more interesting
for student drivers. See ad under
help wanted. Call 2-3376 for
prompt, courteous service.
DIAMOND CAB COMPANY. (J (J---84-st-c).
--84-st-c). (J---84-st-c).
Lost & Found
LOST: BLACK LEATHER BRIEF BRIEFCASE.
CASE. BRIEFCASE. Vicinity Radio Road Parking
Lot. Reward. Call Ext. 2566 or
372-1827. (L-86-2t-c).
LOST: ONE PAIR OF BLACK
frame Glasses in vicinity of
Malone's Bookstore. Call Larry
Powell, FR 2-9176, Room 371.
(L-86-2t-c).
LOST: ONE BLACK MEN'S
WALLET. Lost in restroom near
Tolbert office. Wallet contains all
m y identification plus several
Important bills. Finder may keep
money. Contact Lesley Kendall
Spivey at FR 2-5057. Leave
message if not home. (L-85-3t-c).

1 "" 1 11 """
Help Wanted
PART TIME HELP WANTED.
Apply Tony's Pizza, 1308 West
University Ave. (E-86-2t-c).
PART TIME DRIVERS WANTED
for new student-owned and operated
cab company. Hours can be
arranged to fit schedule. Must
be 21. Call 2-3376 to arrange
interview. (E-84-st-c).
For Sale
1964 HONDA 305 SUPER HAWK.
Like new driven by a little
old lady only on race Sundays.
Priced for immediate sale. Call
John Fischer 372-9992. (A-87-3t-
P).
MOTORCYCLE, RED 1953 HD 74.
#2O SW Bth Street. 372-2815. (A (A---87-lt-p).
--87-lt-p). (A---87-lt-p).
V-M STEREOPHONIC TAPE
RECORDER. Silvertone Mono Monophonic
phonic Monophonic Record Player. Call 6-1901
after 9 p.m. (A-86-3t-p).
*56 all aluminum TRAILER HOME.
8x36, one bedroom, twin beds,
gas heat, large living room. On
lot. Call before 2 p.m. 376-9864
or see at Progress Trailer Park
North on 441. (A-85-4t-c).
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER.
Six 500 sheet boxes. 4 boxes of
buff, 2 boxes of white. Retail for
S2O per box. Will sacrifice for
$lO per box. Call Ext. 2832 between
8 and 5 p.m. (A-71-tf-nc).

Hlpr ms ms jgg
NEVADA -ONEN/GHTSHEMISPLACED HER HAVEL...
THE MIRISCH CORPORATION
* presents
MARTIN NOVAK
* \ m miSnH
fW)
WANT lOPtRT PtCTURES corpora now
SUBURBIA xs&mm
FRI. and SAT. FIB. 5 & 6
ROM BBK MS KfIOBCURPUHt IMM *PWACIM*
MORE STARKLY TUMFYINC THAN TAMAMTIMjJ^^Bk
POWERFUL PKTUREsJB^^^^^^B
camdtnf/ in ont gripping, HfeL sK
MONSTERS I'!
ON THE LOOSE
FROM SCREEN ACTION!
to uvi action!
NEVER BEFORE SUCH THRILLS CHIUS AH
LADIES SHOULD HAVE ESCORTS : ;
ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN MBI
COME EARLY STAY LATE SB

Autos
'57 DODGE, Power steering &
brakes, new paint & tires. Motor
in excellent condition. Call 372-
0947. (G-87-3t-c).
1959 OLDS 88, four door hard
top. All power, air. Take small
cycle in trade. 372-4032. (G-85-
st-c).
1960 FIAT 1100 4-door deluxe.
Good condition, new tires. Will
sacrifice. Call 372-0277. (G-85-
4t-c).
1962 VW SEDAN, white, radio,
WSW, side mirror, vent shades.
1956 HARLEY HUMMER Motor
cycle. $90.00. 1106 NE 10th Ave.
372-4985. (G-84-st-p).
1959 RENAULT DAUPHINE R&H
Dependable transportation, good
mileage. S2OO. Call 376-9991 after
5. (G-84-st-c).
-
1964 KARMANN GHIA 9,800 miles,
top condition. All extras. Will
trade. Make an offer. After 5 and
weekends 376-9856. (G-83-10t-c).
1956 PONTIAC 2-door hardtop,
V-8, AT, R&H, new paint and body
work. Excellent shape. S2BO. Call
Lee Otto FR 6-0125 after 4 p.m.
(G-86-3t-c).
1959 RENAULT DAUPHINE $l5O
Cash. Good transportation good
engine, tires. Call FR 6-1771,
7 p.m. 10 p.m. (G-87-lt-p).

Autos I
60 CORVAIR, tires, radio, heater.
Very good condition. Call 6-9793.
(G-87-st-c).
57 MGA ROADSTER, good con condition;
dition; condition; new paint, runs well; will
sell to the best offer or CALL FR
6-1301 after 5 p.m. (G-86-st-c).
TRIUMPH SPITFIRE modified for
racing. New engine, has 8,000 rpm
cam and is completely balanced
(115 mph). New paint job and
Michelin x tires. Absolutely the
best Spitfire in town. Call 372-
5147. (G-85-4t-c).
For Rent
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE
double room with full separate
unit. Kitchen, study room, linen
and maid service. 231 SE 2nd
Street. (B-86-ts-c).
FURNISHED APARTMENT
Immediate occupancy. Air-con Air-conditioned,
ditioned, Air-conditioned, heat pump. Completely
new. 2-2436. (B-86-ts-c).
TWO BEDROOM Apartment 3
blocks from campus. Equipped
kitchen. S9O monthly. Phone 376-
6112. (B-85-4t-p).
SMALL FURNISHED CCB
COTTAGE, 1 bedroom, electric
kitchen, tile shower, Couple pre preferred.
ferred. preferred. SSO per month. Linda Ann
Court, Ocala Road, FR 6-5826.
(B-84-tf-nc).
LARGE ROOMS IN FRIENDLY
surroundings available to male
students. Reasonable rates;
utilities and maid service included.
Convenient to campus and town.
See at 104 SW Bth Street or call
372-0243. (B-83-tf-nc).
UNUSUALLY NICE ROOM with
private bath, central heat and air airconditioning.
conditioning. airconditioning. Male graduate
student or professional person
preferred. Call 372-7943. (B (B---82-ts-c).
--82-ts-c). (B---82-ts-c).
Services
ENGLISH NURSE will baby sit
day and evenings. Phone 2-2195.
(M-87-2t-c).
POSITIVELY LAST' '
mhrh^llSh

M|



COMMITTEE
The International Com mittee
will present a film Afghanistan
Journey 1 and a lecture by Raphael
Green tonight 8:15 p.m. in the
Florida Union. Admission is 50$.
B E S.
Benton Engineering Society will
hold a council meeting tomorrow
in Room 319 Engineering Building
7:30 p.m. Delegates from all
professional engineering societies
are requested to attend.
FORESTRY CLUB
A meeting of the Forestry Club
tomorrow 8 p.m. in Room 2
McCarty Hall will feature Dr.
Donald P. Duncan of the University
of Minnesota as speaker.
ANTHROPOLOGY CLUB
The Anthropology Club will
present Dr. Kai Ericson of Emory
University at a lecture Deviancy
in Old New England" tonight 8
p.m. in the Law School Auditorium.
Dr. Ericson will speak tomorrow
8 p.m. on "Puritanism and
Deviancy" in the Johnson Lounge
Florida Union.

Wl
(Continued from page 1)
"Campus organizations must be just too lazy to enter any of
UFs beauties," Stowell said.
"Response to our releases and pleas concerning the contest
just haven't been.
"Any student can enter a contestant. We'd especially like to see
dorms or dorm area councils entering girls in the contest."
Candidates for the March 4 contest must fill out an application
and pay a $5 fee. The fees will go toward the winner's expenses
and SIOO entry fee in the Miss Florida contest to be held in Sarasota.
Entry forms are available at the public relations office in the Florida
Union.
SNOWBALL
(Continued from page 1)
by the campus. He amgrily drew a .22 caliber pistol from an over overnight
night overnight bag amd fired blindly into the crowd of students.
Behind Willett in another truck was Walter Lee Yow, 55, of
Albermarle, N.C. He said he saw the shooting and saw the students
mob Willett with snow. He sadd he was going to help Willett when
a snowball crashed against his left ear.
Yow told police about the incident, and died a short time later
in a doctor's office. The coroner said he was killed by a skull
fracture caused by a hard object.
WILKINS
(Continued from page 1)

% v w 'W
its tactics have changed
appreciably.
VOTING REGISTRATION is still
a problem in Mississippi,
Alabama, in rural Georgia and
Louisiana, he said. Wilkins pro proposed
posed proposed that if the protections in
the present law prove to be
insufficient, new legislation will be
sought. It could be that the system
WnnlHlHi
I^mTSSTrStTSSsSTm
immmMjt&aaa
LAST TIMES
SPECIAL Mgl PER
ADMISSION f J y ADULT
AT 7:00 & 10:40
SOPHIA LOREN
Yesterday, Today And
Tomorrow
2nd HIT AT 9:15
SHELLEY WINTERS
A House Is Not A Home
STARTS FRIDAY
CONNIE STEVENS
Two On A Guillotine

FACULTY SEMINAR
The CoUege of Business Admin Administration
istration Administration presents Merrill Roberts
of the University of Pittsburgh who
will speak on "Transport Pricing"
today 3:45 p.m. in Room 18
Matherly Hall.
SIGMA TAU
Officers of Sigma Tau for this
trimester are Otis P. Lutz, presi president;
dent; president; Frank J. Thomas, vice
president; Mario I. Guerrero,
secretary; Curtis C. Newberg,
treasurer; Barnett J. Mandell,
historian and Walling B. Cyre,
pyramid correspondent.
CAMP WORK
An interviewer will talk to
students interested in camp
counseling Feb. 6. Sign up for an
interview in Room 309 Florida
Union from 1:30-5 p.m.
FORESTRY
A meeting of the Forestry Club
tonight 8 p.m. in Room 2 McCarty
Hall will feature Dr. Donald P.
Duncan of the University of
Minnesota as speaker.

i & /
of Federal registrars will have to
be set up by law.
Wilkins said Florida has a
relatively good record of Negro
registration and voting. Rev. T. A.
Wright, President of the
Gainesville chapter of the NAACP
said there are not many Negroes
in the city that are not registered.
He said he plans, however, to add
at least 2,000 Negroes to the rolls
before the registration books are
closed.
After his speech in University
Auditorium, Wilkins was asked
by the audience to comment on
other Negro organizations,
Wilkins praised Dr. Martin
Luther King for his organization
and his leadership. He said,
the NAACP doesn't believe in
as much non-violence as Dr. King
does. Dr. King believes in
turning the other cheek, but if you
hit an NAACP man you had better
duck, he said.
WILKINS ADVISED against dis discounting
counting discounting the Muslim movement for
there is a fringe to which they
appeal. He said Core has done a
very fine job in the civil rights
movement.

campus news briefs

LANGUAGE
AU speakers of Portuguese are
invited to the Brazilian-
Portuguese Club meeting 3 p.m.
Saturday at the home of Alan
Wright, 1007 SW 13th St.
W. U. S.
A meeting to acquaint interested
students with World University
Services will be held 7:30 p.m.
Room 218 Florida Union tonight.
CAMPUS CUTIE
Entry blanks for Campus Cutie
can be picked up at the Alligator
Office Room 10 Florida Union.
For further information, contact
Sam Ullman at the Alligator
office.
IFC CHAIRMEN
New committee chairmen for
Interfraternity Council are Paul
Ashdown, Delta Tau Delta, public
relations; Jim Kincaid, Theta Chi,
social; J. B. Phil Ups, Phi Delta
Theta, academic affairs; Bill
Fleming, Phi Kappa Tau, rush and
Greg Seitz, Phi Gamma Delta,
service.
Reserve class
set for tonight
Students and faculty who are
reserve officers are invited to en enroll
roll enroll in courses offered by the
Gainesville Naval Reserve Of Officers
ficers Officers School. Classes for the se second
cond second semester begin tonight
7:30 p.m. at the Naval Reserve
Training Center, 1300 N. E. Bth
Avenue.
Reservists of all services are
invited to enroll in the School.
Commander Cecil N.Smith, USNR,
commanding officer of the school,
stated that Air Force, Army, Coast
Guard, Marine Corps and Naval
Reservists may affiliate with the
School as a primary activity,
or may receive supplemental or orders
ders orders to it in addition to a pri primary
mary primary assignment to another re reserve
serve reserve unit.
A new one semester college
level course in Personnel Admin Administration
istration Administration will begin tonight. In Interested
terested Interested students may also enter
the classes in Oceanography and
Industrial Relations which began
last September.
i****** i ii \mm a.
Smoking shaft
brings firemen
A smoking elevator shaft brought
three city fire trucks to Leigh
Hall across from the Florida Union
last night at 6:00.
The smoke was caused by a
short in the elevator's motor.
Gainesville city fireman reported
no definite indications of a fire,
but said, the excessive smoke had
caused the alarm. Damage was
confined to the elevator shaft.
KLEAN-A-MATIC
LAUNDRY AND
DRY CLEANING
QUALITY IS
OUR SPECIALTY
EXCLUSIVE SANITONE
PROCESS
1722 W. Unlv. Ave. :

Thursday, Feb. 4, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

ALPHA TAU OMEGA
New Officers for Alpha Tau
Omega Fraternity are Allen
Kynes, president; Bill Mcride,
vice president; Bob Barnes, treas treasurer;
urer; treasurer; Curtis Williams, assistant
treasurer; Bob Bolt, secretary;
Les Hardy, historian; Dave
Draper, usher and Tom Hinson,
sentinel.

A NEW FACE A NEW HOPE
I JIM HARMELING |
FOR STUDENT GOVERNMENT
(Paid Political Adv.)
Its 4-
Steak fKML
At
"""""
Dumpty
Large Del Monico,
THURSDAY Baked Potatoes,
Tossed Salad,
STEAK NIGHT 5-9 P.M. Hot Buttered Rolls
$1.07
HUMPTY DUMPTY
Drlve-ln & Restaurant
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEALS
372-5387 310 NW 13th St.
See New !
The Browse Shop
NEW DIRECTIONS READER...ed. by Carruth & Laughlir
THE WOULD-BE INVALID Moliere
STARTING FROM SAN FRANCISCO
...Lawrence Ferlinghetti
EARLY MEDIEVAL ART John Beckwith
DRAWINGS OF DALI Ed Longstreet
THE PEDAGOGICAL SKETCHBOOK Paul Klee
QUANTUM MECHANICS i Kemble
TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
CHEMICAL ANALYSIS Laitinen
PRINCIPLES OF QUANTUM MECHANICS Dirac
AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEMS...... 1., Kuo
Crapes Shop l Bookstore

8 AND 1/2
The C-3 Department will hold
a panel discussion of the movie
**B 1/2** tonight 8 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium. The participants are
Dr. Didier Graeffe, humanities;
Dr. William Goldhurst, human humanities;
ities; humanities; Dr. Thomas Preston,
English; and Dr. Butler Waugh,
English.

Page 7



Page 8

t, The Florida Alligator/ Thursday, Feb. 4, 1965

rzzzzz THE SPORTS EYE "I
t
SEC leadership
surprises with |fipM
dynamic reform )|K||i|
By ANDY MOOR
Assistant Sports Editor
Usually, the SEC meeting is a mere formality with the only
order of business being the annual denial of Florida States bid
for conference membership.
This years edition, however, appears to be an exception. Not
only was business conducted, but many of the leagues perennial
shackles were broken.
For the first time in history, something was done to eliminate
the ridiculous manner in which conference football championships
can be won (much to Mississippis dismay).
Starting in 1970, a round-robin football schedule goes into
practice. Each team will be required to play seven (no more, no
less will count) league games. Five of the seven may be against
the same opponent, year after year. The other two must vary
from year to year so that each conference team meets all other
members at least once in three campiJgns. This could well
spell an end to Ole Miss domination of SEC football.
Another ludicrous statute wiped from the books was the sit
on your hands bowl acceptance policy. This required a team
to complete its season before it could accept a post season bid.
The end of this rule will enable the bowl committees to plan matches
in advance.
In another historic move, the conference voted tobreak relations
with the American Football League. This action was promulgated
by the sinister dealings by the AFL in the premature signing
of Georgia Tackle Jim Wilson.
Officials offered the AFL an opportunity to abide by the new
bylaws on recruiting by pro teams set up at the NCAA annual
meeting. When Commissioner Joe Foss declined, the SEC took
this unprecedented action, which should help put an end to pro professional
fessional professional interference.
The meeting produced other results, of course. Bernie Moore
was retained as commissioner, although hes approaching 70, and
Tulanes resignation was tendered and approved. FSUs bid for
conference membership was denied once-again. It appears that ,
the Seminoles will encounter even more resistance in the future
when the new football schedule comes into effect. Although the
same logic was faulty last fall, the conferences word may be
Never, FSU, Never. But, obviously, the first three mentioned
were most important.
The SEC has always been one of the top athletic conferences
in the nation, but in the past, something seemed to be lacking
administratively. Now, over the short period of a few days, the
conference has become possibly the No. 1 policy maker in inter intercollegiate
collegiate intercollegiate athletics.

Basketball in full swing;

Intramural basketball fielded a
full slate of games Tuesday,
marking the beginning of the
Independent League action and
more fraternity contests.
In Tuesdays final results, Latin
Americans beat SPORF Club
23-21, Newman Club defeated
GDPs 28-25, Electrical downed
Metal 23-16, Fla vet I whipped
English 27-21, Glenwood beat
Physics 38-24 and Agriculture won
over Industrial by forfeit.
In fraternity results, Blue

Nb matter how you like your hair cut,
long, .no*.*,
or somewhere 111 between. I
S A FLA. UNION MJ _.
she BARBER SHOP Wl 60 ,t P ,rf,ct| y-
FLA. UNION BASEMENT
Open 8-5 Weekdays, 8-Noon: Sat.

League, THE 47, DX 22; DU 22,
XP 17; Orange League, SN 41, TX
26 and in a double overtime con contest,
test, contest, PDT defeated SPE 49-46.
Wednesday nights results:
Fraternity
PDT 42 PLP 40
AEP 25 DTD 16
ATO 70 PKA 43
TX 23 SX 39

Practice begins for baseball team
.. ,y :
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SAFE OR OUT?. .Danny Egbert (above)
leaps high to pull down a wild throw as
Adrian Zabala stretches for the bag in
baseball drills. Below, Coach Dave Fuller
tosses the ball to Pitcher Danny Eggart
as other hurlers Dan Griffin, Ray Rollyson,
and Adrian Zabala look on.
f£\ V
- icAiuAiL, a 2 'jfflfillMi
Wednesdays final results
Independent I?
MECHANICAL 28 RAIDERS 41
AGRICULTURE 23 PUB CLUB 11
%
.ALL-STARS 25 BOBS 31
LUTHERANS 23 GATOR CLUI 21
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Students unhappy
with football coach
SAN JOSE, Calif. (CPS) Dis Dissatisfaction
satisfaction Dissatisfaction with the recent record
of the San Jose State College
football team has resulted in a
student-administration battle over
the job of San Jose State coach
Bob Titchenal.
In a 10-4 vote, the student
government recommended to the
school's president, Robert D.
Clark, that he fire Titchenal, who
has compiled a 33-45-1 record
at the school.
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