Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
mm, 9HHB
Why are these
people sleeping?

Today in history
. .1934, Be hut
Luhi invents
wooden whistle
that wooden
whistle

Freedom Party
protest causes
slate change
By BILL LOCKHART
Staff Writer
A protest from Freedom Party
over how party slates will be listed
in voting machines has resulted
in a switch in the listings.
Don Federman, spokesman for
Freedom Party, stated the pro protest
test protest was made because it was the
intention of the board to flip a
coin between Challenge and Free Freedom
dom Freedom parties for third and fourth
places on the ballot.
Federman stated that Freedom
Party was only interested in hav having
ing having a fair chance on the ballot.
MARTY SCHWARTZ, secretary
of the interior, said that in the
past the method of listing party
slates had been done arbitrarly.
This year we decided to use
the method suggested by the Al Alachua
achua Alachua County Supervisor of Reg Registration
istration Registration which was to list the ma major
jor major parties in the first and second
places on the ballot.
This is the method used in
national elections,** said Schwartz.
Freedom Party challenged this
method before the board.
SCHWARTZ CONTINUED, The
board decided that since this me method
thod method was new to elections it would
allow each party chairman to pull
the number of their partys listing
from a hat.**
The listing on the machines are
now in this order:
Freedom Party, first, Progress
Party, second Challenge Party
third, and Action Party, fourth.
Ken Kennedy, chairman of the
board, said a proposal made by
Schwartz will be proposed to the
Legislative Council.
SCHWARTZS PROPOSAL will
list the parties by the number
of qualified candidates each party
runs.
There is no present law gov governing
erning governing the order of party slates
on voting machines.
The committee made its de decision
cision decision to choose the order of slates
in this election by drawing from
a hat,** said Kennedy.

fSU ALLIGATOR

Vol. 57, No. 83

The UF Girls Rifle Team"will host the University of Georgia Girls
Rifle Team this Saturday in the UFs first girls match this year.
The girls will meet at the UF rifle range 8 a.m. Saturday morning.
Both teams are sponsored by Army ROTC units at their colleges.
* ; "* l wmmmm*: \y mmmm mmmmmm

Student wages may go up

By 808 WILCOX
Staff Writer
The proposed wage increase with
an immediate jump to 85 cents
per hour is now pending before
the UF administration, Secretary
of Labor Mike Malaghan said
yesterday.
The recommended increase re resulted
sulted resulted from a survey of 100
colleges, universities and sur surrounding
rounding surrounding areas throughout the
United States which revealed UF
students receiving lower wages

SG candidates to debate

The Freshman Council will
sponsor a debate for all student
body presidential candidates Feb.
3 in the Broward Hall recreation
Room.
AddTMsing a PROGRESS Party
ratty Tueeday night in Broward
Hall PROGRESS Party Presi Presidential
dential Presidential candidate Bruce Culpepper
stated that he wants an opportun opportunity
ity opportunity to debate the other candidates.
Speaking to an overflow crowd,
Culpepper said, I feel that any
debate should include all the cand candidates.
idates. candidates. All who feel they have
worthwhile ideas in this race, and

than those of other schools.
Based on the student govern government
ment government survey of wages paid to col college
lege college students the following recom recommendations
mendations recommendations were made:
1. THE PRESENT recom recommendation
mendation recommendation of a wage scale based
on education level be voided.
2. A minimum on-campus
hourly wage of eighty-five cents
be made mandatory as soon as
possible.
3. This minimum hourly wage
be raised to one dollar by annual
Increases over a subsequent three-

I*m sure tne other three cand candidates
idates candidates do, should be encouraged and
given their chance to express these
ideas in debate before the stu students.
dents. students.
1 intend to begin immediately
scheduling times and places which
will be agreeabe to all the cand candidates,
idates, candidates, he added. Difficulities
in coordinating our campaign
schedules for the debate must
be overcome so that students can
hear the ideas and programs of
each.
CULPEPPER SAID of debates:

Z-Z-Z-Z-Z
' '
iili
See
Page Two

year period.
4. In cooperation with the
Gainesville Chamber of Com Commerce,
merce, Commerce, a specific program be in inaugurated
augurated inaugurated to assist off-campus
employers in hiring students for
jobs in the surrounding area.
MALAGHAN EXPRESSED hope
for passage of the recommenda recommendations.
tions. recommendations.
I hope the work of the student
government will not be fruitless
and that the cooperation of the
See PAY* Page 5

They are a necessary component
of the students* process of seeing
the candidates and deciding for
themselves who they want to run
their student government.
Independent leader Frank Glinn
introduced Culpepper as The
only man concerned not only wiht
the needs of students and the UF
but also with the needs of Flor Floridas
idas Floridas higher education as a state statewide
wide statewide problem in which this univer university
sity university plays the leading role.
All presidential candidates have
Indicated favorable opinion toward
debates.

i I
1
''NWBRwwW' >xf' \?-v* *?';- ts* ... S' '

Friday, Jan. 29, 1965

SG affiliation
move by UF
is underway
By SHARON KELLEY
Staff Writer
A move is underway to affil affilliate
liate affilliate the UF Student Government
(SG) with a new association of
student governments from all over
the country, according to Drew
Haslett, SG secretary of Academic
Affairs.
The new organization, the As Associated
sociated Associated Student Governments of
the United States of America, (SG)
appealed to UF (SG) represen representatives
tatives representatives when they attended the ASG
convention at Norman, Okla. last
November.
Steve Friedman, Bill Mcride,
and I were sent as observers to
the convention to see if the new
association was in any way similar
to the National Students Associa Association,
tion, Association, (NSA)Haslett said.
*NSA has been under fire from
many quarters for its strongly
political nature and we went to
observe the ASG convention with
hopes of finding an organization
that was more interested in stu student
dent student government activities and
problems than in whether Red
China should be admitted to the
United Nations, ** Haslett said.
ASG WAS found to be very a-
See MOVE* Page 5
Bt?
Vaughn named
Managin q Editor
Steve Vaughn, 3JM, was yester yesterday
day yesterday elected Managing Editor of
the Florida Alligator for the cur current
rent current trimester by the Board of
Student Publications.
Vaughn has served as Acting
Managing Editor of the paper since
the beginning of the trimester. He
is former Assistant Sports Editor
and editorial assistant for the Al Alligator
ligator Alligator and a member of Phi Kappa
Tau fraternity.



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Friday Jan. 29, 1965

Pressure pressure pressure pressure

By DONITA MATHISON
Staff Writer
Therace for time waits for no
one particularly college
students.
For when anxieties mount toward
exhaustion and the inevitable
shortness of hours erodes into
frustration, college students are
left breathless.
But why did this pendulum for
knowledge begin to increase its
pace?
I THINK there is student pres pressure
sure pressure from the days of Sputnik,
back in grade school, when com competition
petition competition increased and there was
almost over zealous prodding in
the home," UF President J. Wayne
Reitz said.
"Regardless of the calendar of
a university, it is the essence of
a society today," he added. "The
facts are more competitive among
students than ever before in the
history of the country. An urgency
grows out of the whole national
image of trying through science
and technology to solve domestic,
social, political, and economic
problems.
"The whole society is caught
up in an air of urgency and students
are a part of this," he said.
Reitz said that due to the type
of calendar UF is on now, the tri trimester
mester trimester system, he is not sure stu students
dents students can adjust and "this gives
additional dimension to the pro problem
blem problem on our own campus."
HE ADDED he believed students
are beginning to miss the lack of
informal discussions that are vital
to the coUege experience and par participating
ticipating participating in some of the extra extracurricular
curricular extracurricular activities.
"When kept in balance these
activities are an important facet
of student experience," Reitz said.
He explainer (hat today there is
less opportunity for the student
who does have ability to express
himeslf and to excell scholasti scholastically.
cally. scholastically.
"I think the university calendar
should provide a pace which would
permit the student to achieve ex excellence
cellence excellence in his scholastic goals,

THE Hfittw
UNIVERSITY 1
OF FLORIDA
l\ c,a rlng
1 Now Available off-campus
I A college degree is an earned asset
I worthy of pride. Wear your achieve-
I ment proudly with the University of
I Florida class ring from Gainesville's
I leading jewelers. Special budget plan
I for students.
/
[FOR those who CARE...I (^)
m MEMBER AMERICAN
a GEM SOCIETY
rgWlenik
103 W. University Ave. Phone 376-2655

on the one hand, and if he or she
chooses, an opportunity for
worthwhile activities outside the
classroom. Without exhausting
himself there ought to be enough
time left over so he can choose
what he wants, to do," he said.
"Its harder to get students to
accept roles of leadership in stu student
dent student government and worthwhile
projects with The Alligator and
Seminole," he said. "They're stu students
dents students who can't afford to do it or
take the risk."
He said the standard of perfor performance
mance performance are higher today than years
ago. For instance, he said fresh freshmen
men freshmen are constantly competing with
each other because UF only
receives the top 40 per cent of
high school graduates.
"I think it is the impression
among some students that the in increase
crease increase in standards has been by
dictum but in the case of quality
of students, you can set a better
pace and the faculty are excited
about this," he said.
BUT THE societal urgencies and
pressures put upon the student are
not peculiar to UF but other uni universities
versities universities as well, according to
Franklin A. Doty, assistant dean
of Academic Affairs.
"I think these pressures are a
tenor of our cultural drift and at
a time of population explosion
when there is a need to teach more

SLEEP SLEEP SLEEP SLEEP

people more things with a minimum
of additional time and equipment
to do so," he said. "This com complicates
plicates complicates the administration
particularly in space, use, allo allocation
cation allocation of funds among the various variousdirect
direct variousdirect (teaching) and indirect
(light, gas, water) functions.
"As the basic function, teaching
and research are continuous
through all phases of the
university," he said. "Any
complexities of the administration
are not autonomous but reflect this
basic function and are therefore
harder to handle."
Tom Graham, asst, registrar,
showed that fall enrollment statis statistics
tics statistics at UF from 1958 to 1964
showed a growth rate of 27.5 per
cent. In 1958 total enrollment was
12,306 which be the end of late
registration in the fall of 1964
had climbed to 15,701. Undergra Undergraduate
duate Undergraduate enrollment in 1958 was 10,-
701 and last year it amounted to
12,895 with a growth rate of 20.5
per cent.
"i FEEL the biggest pressure is
the trimester system," Nona B.
Burress, asst, professor of ele elementary
mentary elementary education and
undergraduate counselor, said.
She counsels freshmen through
graduate students and tries to help
them with their problems.
"We have more requests for an
appointment around prog time'
when there is increased anxiety and
panic," she said. "There is re resistance
sistance resistance or fear and anxiety about
progress tests and thestudents
prefer tests that are constructed
by the professors in the
classroom."
She said there is a waiting list
at the counseling center and many
times students coming to be coun counseled
seled counseled are talked to briefly about
their problem until a longer
appointment can be made.
SHE ADDED that over a month
the average number of interviews
per student ranges between two or
three.

pPSgggMS^HI
SqtXf. '^^X-Jr f ** ._ ''l * ,-y*' n ''* ,*J s?*£ -V .f '*^ v 'V t yli^J-^ > J-V- V | "'
|llM|g- yun
*'?~*r ; -. :.
%^m K Z ;.
AT <<
* f k 9HB IMBjWSB *3*i3fcpj^
BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SHAVING
. .trimester study load cuts into shaving time,
too.

"The point is the more students
we're seeing, the fewer number we
get to see for the first time,"
she said.
She added the number of students
varies with the month. In February
of last year, 170 students were
seen and last December, 140 came
for counseling.
She said that another time when
students come for counseling is
during the pre-registration period
when they need to declare majors
and don't know what to take.
"I WOULD expect that 1/2 to
3/4 of requests are directed to the
educational setting," she said.
"A lot of students feel a guilt
complex that they can't do all they
want to do and aren't getting all
they can," she said. "Many feel
the tight schedule, in terms of

time, prevent things they would
want to do.
She added the major point is that
all the different problems students
have come from pressures within
the institution.
The sheer fact of a new setting
and of being in college with its
increasing demands bring forth
other pressures the students have
not been aware of, she said.
SANDRA K. McGREGOR, a UF
freshman, said the worst pressure
comes during the progress tests.
The competition is the worst
problems and realizing that other
people are just as good as you
are, she said. Theres just not
enough time to get through the tests
and you feel you cant do your
best.
CONTINUED MONDAY



Sororities pledge total of 84 in Winter formal rush

Eighty-four UF coeds from se seven
ven seven states were pledged to 11
sororites following the winter tri trimester
mester trimester formal rush earlier this
month.
Alpha Chi Omega named 15
pledges and Alpha Omicron Pi
tapped 13 newcomers to top the
list. Out-of-state coeds are from
Pennsylvania, Massachusetts
Virginia, Alabama, Indiana and
Ohio.
Pledges are listed below:
ALPHA CHI OMEGA
Millicent Florence Taylor,
Leslie Anne Smith,
Jjudyth Lynn Farmer,
Jo Nez Love,
Gail Tallmadge Roberts,
Patricia Jean Fowler,
Jackie Elaine King,
Carol Sue Sampson,

WESLEY FOUNDATION
Sunday 6:30 p.m., the Wesley
Foundation will present a record recording
ing recording of Waiting for Godot.** at
the foundation.

ZEN/TH
fM CLOCK MOW
I .r
Modal J 727
Smartly-styled FM/AM clock radio
has large 6 x 4* speaker for full,
rich tone. AFC on FM, line cord
FM. antenna and precision ver vernier
nier vernier tuning assure clearest possi possible
ble possible reception.

you
get all
fun
A
when you leave the details of your trip to us
p (J
Travel is sight-seeing, sports, spectacle. Its also trans transportation,
portation, transportation, reservationsand 1001 small details. Our job
is to take care of the details and free you for the fun. Well
even remind you to bring your camera!
Os course, well also take care of your tickets, passports,
permits everything you need to make y6ur trip a bon
voyage from start to finish! Call us todayfor prompt,
personalized, professional travel service.
WO R LD
((.( ))) TRAVEL
SERVICE
808 W. UNIVERSITY AVENUE
*
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA
FR-6-4641

Barbara Anne McKinney,
Carole Drusa,
Pamela Jane Sommerville,
Merdith Lynne Smith,
Kathryn Martin
Rhoda Lynn Bowman,
Connie Ruth Sir mans
ALPHA DELTA PI
Terry Suzanne Pelton
Margaret Bell
Tern pa Elaine Eiford,
Linda Jean Webb,
ALPHA OMICRON PI
Barbara Faltings
Gayle Foxen.
Kathleen Heatherton
Ruth Susan Whitney
Catherine Anne Humphreys
Susan Clark
Barbara Jean Rossi
Natalie Warwich Taylor

NEWMAN CLUB
A Sponanaity Dance will be
presented by the Newman Club
tonight 8-12 p.m. in the Catholic
Student Center.

Wake Up To
Study To
Wonderful
Music with
A ZENITH FM
Radio From
FM Headquarters
M $39.95
COUCH S 608 N. Main St.
Gainesville's Pioneer FMDealer

AChiO, AOPi TOP LIST

Virginia Lee Haywood
Wendy Marcia Roth,
Judy Ann Banks
Susan Kay Overstreet
Linda Jean Whiteman
Cffl OMEGA
Gloria Denise Rish
Leslie Vaughn Stablein,
Sandra Chewning Young
Helen Ann Weimer,
Sharon Gail Boyer,
Patricia June Welch
Rhonda Faye McMullan
Amy Clair Nisbet
Martha Jane Friday
Marianne Crane
DELTA GAMMA
Karen Lace Vitunac
Sandra Margaret Smith
Susan Carole Dorn,
Jacquelyn Laperche

campus news briefs

SIGMA PI SIGMa
A meeting of the American In Institute
stitute Institute of Physics, Sigma Pi Sigma
Student Section, will be held Mon Monday
day Monday at 4:30 p.m. in Bless Auditor Auditorium
ium Auditorium in the Physics Building.
INTERIOR DESIGN
G. Dale Everett, chairman of
interior design in the College of
Architecture, will speak on color
and light in interior design. at
the meeting of the Architecture
and Fine Arts Dames 8 p.m. Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday at the University Women's
Club.
LIBERAL FORUM
Richard L.A. Sterba will speak
on socio-economic problems of
population growth at the Liberal
Forum lecture Sunday 7:30 p.m. in
Johnson Lounge of the Florida
Union. e
SKATING PARTY
A roller skating party will be
held tomorrow 7 p.m. at the Catho Catholic
lic Catholic Student Center.

*
A .4MP 1 H
it 's. fw
HONDA SUPER HAWK, Model CB-77, 305 cc. Designed for high speed cruising and
competition, the CB-77 Super Hafodc utilizes the famous Honda 305 cc,
180 crank, 4-stroke O.H.C. twin-cylinder engine that produces 28.5 H.P.
at 9,000 R.P.M. Double leading-shoe brakes both front and rear of 8"
diameter. The CB-77 for sport or touring is one of the most ver-
satile motorcycles in the world. Smooth, sure, powerful its */Q5
the choice of the experts. Electric starter.
STREITS Bicycle Shop
615 West University Avenue
l 1 T- 11

Friday / Jan. 29, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Anita Lucille Garcia,
Margaret Elizabeth Swick
DELTA PHI EPSILON
Abbie Ellen Greene,
Patricia Lynne Poaster
Marsha Dale Gilbert
KAPPA ALPHA THETA
Patricia Linda Goodier
Pamela Josephine Johnson,
Nancy Carole Jones
Susan March Sheads
Claire Ellen Miller
Virginia Dale Rubley
Constance Lynn Balch
Elizabeth Ann Sandstrom
Susan Eliazbeth Halback
Cynthia Louise Watson
KAPPA DELTA
Judith Annette Wooten,
Virginia Carol Lipscomb
Ann Ropulewis
Kathleen Linda McNulty

REAL ESTATE CLUB
The Real Estate Club will meet
Monday 7 p.m. in Room 218 of the
Florida Union and proceed to the
Alachua Abstract Company where
Marvin Booker will explain the
abstracting procedures.
HILLEL FOUNDATION
The Hillel Foundation is having
a Fireside Social dance at 8:00
p.m., on Saturday, January 30
at the Hillel Foundation. On Sun Sunday
day Sunday all Jewish graduate students
are invited for brunch. The cost
is SI.OO for non-members and
75 cents for members.
WOMANS TENNIS CLUB
The Women's Tennis Club will
play FSU Saturday at 11 a.m. at
Broward Court.
University Forum
UNIVERSITY FORUM
Roy Wilkins will speak at the
University Forum in the Univer University
sity University Auditorium Feb. 2. Students
and faculty with identification
cards will be admitted at 7:30
p.m. General admission will be
opened at 8 p.m.

PHI MU
Evalyn Coe Smith
SIGMA KAPPA
Archalene Kaye Redfern
Sandra Kay McGregor
Jo Anne Seaberg
Mary Elizabeth Dunlap,
Mala Elaine Hinton
Cheryl Merlene Carpenter,
Daisy Renn Stancil
Lynda Jane Bales
Diane E. Bogert
ZETA TAU ALPHA
_Linda Jean Cody
Sandra Jean Ryals
Alice Elizabeth Schweyer
Pamela Kay Parkhurst
Jenell Mary Close,
Marcia Elaine Mann
Linda Ann Greene
Cheryl Fay Hoppe
Ann Schumacher

BASKETBALL GAME
The Newman Club boys intra intramural
mural intramural league basketball team will
play the Yulee girls intramural
league basketball team tonight 7
p.m. in Norman Gym.
SMOKER
The American Institute of Indus Industrial
trial Industrial Engineers (AIIE) will hold
a smoker Monday 7 p.m. in Room
512 of the Engineering Building.
The AIIE will have as its guests
the AIIE West Coast chapter who
will present this semester's incen incentive
tive incentive award.
UNCREATIVE MAN
Dr. Robert Emmett Carson will
talk on "Uncreative Man" at the
Unitarian Uni vers alist Fellow Fellowship
ship Fellowship meeting Sunday 11 a.m. at
1204 NW 10th Ave.
FOR
VOTE A FREEDOM
(Paid Political Adv.)

Page 3



Page 4

7 The Florida Alligator, Friday, Jan. 29, 1965

-\ .-I i
/jfiam
< W i&mfr *
TO PLAY HERE SU'NDAY
. .Famous Commanders orchestra
Famed 'Commanders
to perform Sunday

The internationally famed Commanders Orchestra that will
appear at the UF Auditorium Sunday afternoon is a throwback to
the good old days when name bands with a big sound traveled
the country playing one-night performances.

The Commanders represent
a 20-piece segment of the North
American Air Defense Command
Cavalcade of Music band that
is touring the country this month.
Starting time for the Auditorium
event is 2:30 p.m. There will be
no admission charge
THE COMMANDERS have
attained unprecedented popularity
and honor with their renditions
of dance music coupled with timely
humor and showmanship that
invariably leave audiences
clamoring for more.
Air Force Major Vic Molzer
directs the Commanders, made
up of selected musicians of the
Army, Air Force, Navy and Royal
Canadian Air Force.
The Commanders boast a rich
collection of popular orches orchestrations
trations orchestrations and original compositions
contributed by some of the biggest
names in the music business
Sam Donahue, Walt Stuart,Warren
Baker, Les and Larry Elgart,
Paul Weston, Les Brown and Frank
DeVol.
Therapy
awarded
funds
Fifteen UF students majoring
in physical therapy in the Un Universitys
iversitys Universitys College of Health Re Related
lated Related profess ions have been a awarded
warded awarded scholarships frcm three
agencies.
The scholarships, ranging from
$250 to $l,lOO, were announcec
today by the Florida State Elks
Association, the Vocational Rehab Rehabilitation
ilitation Rehabilitation Administration and the
Junior Service League of Daytona
Beach which made the Ellen M.
Black Scholarship Fund available.
Florida State Elks Association
scholarships went to the following
students:
Patricia Bond, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Neql Bond, 1831 Baylar Baylarian
ian Baylarian Blvd., Orlando; Judith Carr,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter
B. Carr, 108 Coral Way, Daytona
Beach; Bruce Hoppes, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Lowell Hoppes, 642Ca11e
del Otono, Sarasota; Joyce Kelley,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C.W.
Swiderski, 3921 N.W. 58th Ct.,
Miami Springs.
Linda Kelly, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Trltus G. Kelley, 1140
St. Augustine St., Daytona Beach,
was the recipient of a scholar scholarship
ship scholarship grant from the Ellen M.
Black Fund.

*S>
Ray Vogel, BEE, April, '65, invites you
to interview the Bell System Employment Team.
On campus February 2 & 3.
As a team member, Ray will be on hand
to answer questions on why he planned a career
in communications.
Join him and learn about your future with
the Bell System.
To schedule interviews see the Placement Office.
(Interested? Come to a meeting Feb. 1, 5:00 pm, in the Florida Union.)
jj^jj^jjfjjjjsSsSK
MHB
Southern Bell
yijr ...Serving You

Alligator
apologizes
/
for error
Yesterday, parts of a story in
the Alligator headlined New Cu Cuban
ban Cuban news agency formed were
mistakenly cut from the copy and
appeared in print as a misrepre misrepresentation
sentation misrepresentation of the fact.
The article told of a hydro hydroelectric
electric hydroelectric plant seemingly in Cuba.
As originally written, the para paragraphs
graphs paragraphs following this read:
Our agency checked into the
matter and found that for years
there has been a water shortage
in Santiago, and certainly not
enough to power a hydro-electirc
plant.
It is this type of misrepresen misrepresentation
tation misrepresentation we are trying to prevent.
These two paragraphs clearly
state the intention of The Cuban
Students Revolutionary Committee
left out of the previous story.
The Alligator staff wishes to
apoligize for the mistake and thank
Antonio Gayoso, president of CSRS,
for calling it to our attention.


worn"^
We got in a new load of new spring stuff today,
and did it ever POP OUR EYES OPEN!!!!!!!!
Put on your eyeshields and come see it.
TWIG



AXOX'K'WJKViWy.vA.viVtV.v.v.vAv^
i DAY 1
mk I n I
(Continued from Page 1)
administration will bring forth an
equitable wage policy/* he said.
The labor department is also
hoping for a two day convention
of recruiters from all industries
to be held in the Florida Gym.
The program would provide in information
formation information on special courses,
summer employment, and general
counciling in the respective career
fields.
In addition housing and library
facilities will be urged to set up
information centers explaining the
various careers.
THE PERSONAL service
division headed by Ron Simpson
is expanding its capacities. In
addition to the regular night baby babysitting
sitting babysitting provided, a new daytime
childcare service will soon be
instituted.


1 MOVE
(Continued from Page 1)
political. The association is set
up exclusively for the exchange of
ideas between student governments
and was found to be in no way
similar to NSA.
Haslett said he, as chairman of
the representative group from the
UF, will appear before the next
Legislative Council meeting to ask
the council to ratify the ASG con constitution,
stitution, constitution, thus making the UF a
member of the association.
Many of the largest schools
in the country were represented
at the November convention/* Has Haslett
lett Haslett said. We are interested in
communicating with schools that
maintain as large or larger stu student
dent student governments as the one found
on our campus/*
Haslett asked for the interest
of the students in the new or organization.
ganization. organization. A large majority of UF
students were found to be opposed
to NSA through a referendum two
years ago. The present SG cab cabinet
inet cabinet unanimously endorsed accep acceptance
tance acceptance of the ASG constitution at
its meeting yesterday and Haslett
said he hopes for the same approval
from Leg. Council.

The Hot Lps When You Wont Them
h 9 Ell
iwi Hi inBM
plus $ 9 9 I
Their New Hit LP
'Youve Lost That Lovin Feelin
* Complete Greeting Card Dept. OUR LOW
* Free Parking in Rear EVERYDAY
* Central Charge DISCOUNT
* Open Mon. & Fri. Nites'Til 9 PRICE!!!
1119 West blt Are (opposite McCollum Drue)
< FREE MfIUONG IN REAR FR 2-2728
Gaifl##v?lle's Oldest And Most Complete Record Shop

IUV \
ilk m *BB
m .m JHli y *JP iHHHHr > f BP
<9k Mr s y w^M' L .$
Jy f i \ __
*y | >yy> s f
Bl
n Bi / I
HHm M k i, < <- A'' y# L ....., y .^.
9PKf i :&Wki >-, m! M
HV r >- W JM.- ir
I / *r i
t JW9B JLf- r > .<.' WmmM SB
TAIL FEATHERS GF THE WHITE OWL
Phi Gamma Delta fraternity has established an Order of the Little Tail Feathers of the
White Owl.
Members are: from
Alpha Delta Pi, Sally Kelsey, Kay Milton and Francis Cooper. Alpha Epsilon Phi, Nada
Boruchow, Marilyn Bricklin, and Sandy Shapiro. Alpha Omicron Pi, Peggy Kimmerer, Wendy
Roth, and Carolyn Stuart. Alpha Chi Omega, Marilyn Harrie, Jo Ann Meyers, and Cindy
Klausner.
Delta Delta Delta, Ann Taylor, Sno Whyte and Carolyn Williams. Delta Gamma, Sue Self,
Doris Buchanan, and Anita Wills. Delta Phi Epsilon, Eunice Tall, Donna Berger, and Carol
Samuels. Kappa Alpha Theta, Ann Stearns, Barbara Barnhill, and Randi Kelly. Kappa Delta,
Sue Cridlin, Kathy Kringry, and JoAnn Hoschar.
Phi Mu, Julie Parker, Carol Bennet, and Evelyn Smith. Sigma Kappa, Pam Dormany,
Linda Bales, and Jo Ann Seaburt. Zeta Tau Alpha, Liz Lee, Shelia Sanabury, and Junie Jureski.

Art gallery opens with works of McGarrell

The Department of Art opened
it's new Teaching Gallery with an
exhibition of etchings and litho lithograms
grams lithograms by James McGarrell. The

tjy&t see
INKING MOBILE HOMES
INCORPORATED
FOR THE LOWEST PRICES AND WIDEST SELECTION
OF 10' OR 12 WIDE, 2- OR 3-BEDROOM MOBILE
HOMES. BANK RATE FINANCING. WE TRADE FOR
ANYTHING OF VALUE. OPEN FROM 8 A.M. TO
9 P.M. SUNDAYS FROM 1 P.M. TO 9 P.M.
4920 NW 13th St. (U.S. 441 North) 378-2311

Friday / Jan. 29, 1965/ The Florida Alligator,

gallery is located adjacent to the
Department of Art on the third
floor of the Architecture and Fine
Arts building. The exhibit can be

seen today from 9-12 p.m. and
1:30 5 p.m.
James McGarrell, an Associate
Professor of the University of
Indianas Art Department and
graduate of UCLA, has had several
one-man shows in the UJS. and has
contributed to shows such as New
Yorks Museum of Modern Arts
New Images of Man.
ms
BODY WAVE
SPECIAL
115 REGULAR
NOW $lO
BY
Florence
AND
Yvonne
ONLY
Feb. 1 through Feb. 6
styfies
- CAROLYN PI-AZA
1030 W. UNIVERSITY AVI
RHON* STS-3SA4

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Jan, 29, 1965

ERNIE UTZ
Editor-in-Chief

JOE CASTE LLO
Editorial Page Editor

ItfaVMINT
We Wonder
Monday evening, all candidates for student
government offices attended a meeting in which
the Secretary of the Interior established the
ground rules for the upcoming campaign.
Before and since this meeting, all parties
have sworn that they will abide by these
rules; will present the students with a fair
campaign based on the issues and the
candidates; and, in general, will elevate
the 1965 campaign from the muckraking
sessions of the past.
We wonder.
So far, with the campaign in only a lukewarm
stage, one party has made several allegations
concerning the motives of the personnel of
the other parties. Specifics have not yet been
presented.
One party staged a walk-out in a Legislative
Council session to prevent that body from
placing candidates on the ballot.
One party has made several charges con concerning
cerning concerning the position of the UFs leadership
fraternity, Florida Blue Key, in the upcoming
elections. Again, specifics are lacking.
At least two parties are already involved
in the Poop wars, 5 and the UF tradition
of gooning ,, is in full swing.
With the hottest part of the campaign still
before us, we anticipate further violations
of the election code and the higher ethics
that should guide all political endeavor.
Unethical activity by one party practically
always generates similar retaliation by the
other parties, and the vague promises of
responsible campaigns and responsible student
government are left by the wayside.
We wonder.
Conservatism ?
When The Florida Conservative was still
in the rumor stage, we welcomed the
opportunity for the UF student body to be
exposed to a responsible, articulate statement
of the conservative viewpoint in American
life. Now that the first edition is on the
stands, we are forced to revise our opinion.
As is true of other extremist publications
hiding under the guise of conservatism,
The Florida Conservative substituted
sensationalism and unfounded allegations for
responsibility ana unfair implication and half
truths for articulate statement. Indeed, the
conservatism in the first edition seems to
have been restricted to one feature, a general
statement ot editorial policy, and the format.
GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports). Lou Ferris
Jr., (Asst. Mgr. Editor), Mark Freeman (.Cartoonist), Stan
Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Tova Levine (Tigert
Beat Chief) Correspondents, Kay Huffmaster, Frank Shepherd.
Yvette Cardoso, Agnes Fowles. Donita Mathison, BobOsterhoudt.
Dan Taylor, Sam UUman, Pete Winoker, Selwin H. Ciment.
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Dick Dennis. Marty Gartell,
Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve Kurvin, Ann Carter, Evan
Langbein, Ira Liebsfeld, Thelma Mossman, Dick Schneider. Gay
Slesiuger, Fran Snider, Lynda Tolbert, Cynthia Tunstall, Harvey
Wolf Son, John Shlplett, Chip Sharon, Karen Vitunac. Jack
Zucker, David Ropes, Ami Saperstein. Jeffrey Denkewalter
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the Official student newspaper
of the University of Florida and is published five times weekly
except during May, June and July when it is pubUshed
semi-weekly. Only editorials represent the official opinions of
their authors. The Alligator is entered as second class matter
at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International

STEVE VAUGHN
Managing Editor

ED BARBER
Executive Editor

ED SEARS
Sports Editor

LI WnHHHHB'

By SAM ULLMAN
Columnist
A RIDE through St. Augustine, Florida, or just
about any part of the South, will convince the rider
that Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren is
not too well-liked. Roads in many parts of the
South bear signs which beg for the dismissal of
Mr. Warren. Impeach Chief Justice Warren
seems to be their favorite slogan.
IT LS true that Mr. Warren has rendered a
number of decisions which have not been too pleasing
to the average Southerner, but few of those people
have actually taken the time to analyze the decisions
beyond their mere surface content. The nine old
men who sit on the exalted bench of the Supreme
Court are experts in their field. Few men, if any,
have a better knowledge of Constitutional Law. The
justices of the Supreme Court, for the most part,
have dedicated their lives to the study of law and
jurisprudence. When they render a decision, it is
based upon precedent which few laymen can begin
to comprehend. Thus most of the Southerners who
cry for the impeachment of Mr. Warren dont
really understand WHY the decision in question
was rendered, nor do they understand HOW the
decision was reached, they only know that it effects
them in an adverse manner.
THE JUSTICES of the Supreme Court can be
compared to a chief surgeon in a hospital. Let
us imagine, for a moment, that a patient is very
sick. There is no known cure for the disease
which this man has. However, two of the doctors
who have examined him believe that they can

cure him through an operation.
But they do not agree on what
type of operation should be em employed.
ployed. employed. Both know that if nothing
is done, the man will surely die;
however both contend that if the
type of operation which the other
proposes is used, the man will
also die. The two doctors who are
in disagreement come to the head
surgeon at our hypothetical
hospital and each tries in his
turn to convince the head surgeon

that only his method will work. The head surgeon
makes Itis decision based upon what he knows of
the disease, his knowledge of the patients past
medical history, and his knowledge of the types
of operations proposed. No one will know if the
decision which he reaches is correct until after
the operation.
SG IT is with the Supreme Court. The Justices
who sit upon the bench are experts in the field,
just as the head surgeon at the hospital is the
expert in his field. The justices reach their decisions
based upon what they know of that type of case,
the history of the case in question, and their
cpmbined knowledge of the precedent involved.
No one will know whether or not they have made
the correct decision until long after the decision
is handed down.
THE DIFFERENCE between the doctor and the jus justice
tice justice is in the fact that no one who is not an expert in
that particular field of medicine would dare criticize
the head surgeon on his decision; whereas every
person in the United States may criticize the Supreme
Court because they are citizens. Criticism of the
Supreme Court is not a bad thing; it has gone on
ever since the Supreme Court handed down its first
decision, and will continue ad infinitum. But the
criticizers should remember that the framers of
the Constitution intended that such criticism would

Justice and Justices

i B i i V '
mr mr;
; mr; ULLMAN

RES PUBLICA

come and so they gave the justices a life term,
and made impeachment a long process. Thus the
framers knew that many people would grow to
resent the decisions of the Supreme Court, but
they must not be made subject to the whims of the
public; and so the Constitution makes it so difficult
to dismiss the justices.
THE SUPREME Courtis not always right, quite
often in its history it has been wrong. Thus many
times the Supreme Court has reversed itself. The
now-famous 1954 decision reversed a previous
decision which had put the judicial stamp of approval
on the separate-but-equal method of segregation.
ALTHOUGH THE issues that have recently swept
the Berkeley campus and clutter the editorial
pages of other university papers are in the embryo
stage at the UF, several incidents in the past year
lead us to believe that we are currently in the
transition stage from apathy to activism.
MOST SPECTACULAR were the riots this fall.
Unless we accept the rather untenable hypothesis
that 3,000 students took to the streets because
they were criminals looking for a chance to express
their malicious dispositions, I feel that we are
forced to admit that the students rioted because
they were bored. It is my opinion that the students
are becoming fed up with the three-ring circus
of football games, fraternity parties, and student
politics that is too often substituted for intellectual
challenge.
THE FORMATION within the past year of such
groups as the Student GroupFor Equal Rights and the
Student Peace Union would also seem to support
our hypothesis that the student body is finally
becoming more cosmopolitan in nature and looking
beyond the limits of Gainesville and the State of
Florida for its horizons.
FINALLY, THE formation of Freedom Party this
trimester, although greeted by most with complacent
disdain, may very well prove that a large percentage
of our student body desires to face issues of more
consequence than who's taking who to the game
and whether the Alligator should publish the minutes
of Leg Council meetings. I do not necessarily
endorse 1- reedom Party or mean to suggest that
they are more capable of handling these issues
than the other parties, but the formation of a
third party within a two-party framework always
implies that there are other issues besides those
concentrated upon by the established parties.
""i e*T E R? iSi
Reptiles resented
EDITOR:
We in Hume Hall have had roach exterminators,
fly destroyers, and rat hunters throughout this school
year. Seemingly nothing is too good for our health
and safety. Yet there remains one small problem
which has been ignorantly, even criminally neglected.
I refer, of course, to the many varieties of snakes
running rampant through our woods and marshes.
Just last Tuesday night a young man in our section,
Mr. Ken Norrie -1 uc, was savagely attacked
by one of the reptiles. Fortunately the animal was
small and harmless and it was not even necessary
to admit the brave fellow to the dispensary but
next time could be different. We demand action and
shall take *the matter higher up if necessary.
EDMUND COOPER JR. lUC



Rozman replies
EDITOR:
THE INDIVIDUAL who labelled himself An
Historian* presents a quite curious and quite
vulnerable argument which apparently aims toward
refuting some of the points presented in my most
recent letter.
HE CLAIMS that my statement asserting that the
19th century liberal would allow the businessman
a wide range of freedom without imposing upon
him any social obligations** causes him to be
offended in the intelligence**; but he fails to follow
through with a refutation of it, aside from the
statement that free trade. .may have been intended
to promote the national prosperity, create jobs,
raise real wages, and provide a large number of
persons with the material prosperity which has
always been associated with social respect and a
sense of self-respect. .**
THIS, OF course, was the argument of those who
defended laissez faire, that the system would work
for the benefit of all. In practice, however, it was
highly anti-social. Workers received very meager
salaries, barely sufficient for subsistence; working
conditions were deplorable, including a lack of safety
devices, which resulted in many job injuries; the
# worker had no protection against unemployment
and its consequences; and pension programs were
non-existent. This situation prevailed during the
19th and part of the 20th centuries, and did not end
in the 18th or early 19th as An Historian** would
have us believe.
WHILE CONTENDING that this economic system
was not anti-social, he notes that changing economic
conditions necessitated government intervention to
insure a continued high level of economic prosperity
for all.** By what stretch bf the imagination can
anybody claim that universal prosperity existed prior
to governmental intervention, let alone at the present
time, when an estimated 30 to 40 million people
are living in poverty in the UJS.?
AN HISTORIAN** asks me to explain why most
reformist leaders were successful businessmen.
Most leaders of Communist revolutions were from
the middle class. Does this make the middle class
revolutionary?
IT SEEMS that An Historian** has not heeded
his own advice regarding the need to avoid per perpetuating
petuating perpetuating myths which only cloud current issues...*
STEPHEN L. ROZMAN
Thievery
EDITOR:
IN TUESDAYS front page article, Petty thievery
problem at UF,** Officer Mahn gave only a partial
explanation for, Why do students steal?* In essence,
he said that students steal what their limited budgets
cant buy. But this only explains the usual, every everyday**
day** everyday** thefts. What about the unusual thefts the
ones that dont appear to have any sensible reason
behind them?
WE CAN understand why someone might be able
to use a suede coat, or that maybe SBO could come
in handy to meet expenses or even to live it up**
one weekend. But what use is a toilet seat or several
window screens? No practical use at all. They*re
simply novelties things to hang on the wall or
stand in the corner. Theyre nasty about catching
dust, but they do serve as fine conversation pieces.
Displayed in the room, they are visible symbols
of their procurers agility and cunning and guts.
AFTER ALL, not everyone can time the acquisition
of a novelty (theft is too crude a word for so subtle
an art) just right so that no one will see him or
catch him (there are Campus Cops around, you
know) in the midst of his sly activity.
JERRY CLARK
Wise man
EDITOR:
I am neither a grammarian nor a son of a
grammarian but creating neologisms through the use of
-wise** as a suffix (record-wise, time-wise,
Alligator, January 25, page 12) demean a newspaper
that is well-written otherwise.
B. SILVERSTEIN
~ Assistant Professor of Law

ih# florfda forum

Folksingers
EDITOR:
In regard to Mr. Bob Agnew*s guest appearance
in Jazz Corner** (Florida Alligator, Tuesday,
Jan. 26) we can only say that we would be extremely
happy to be given a chance to turn out 500 people**
for some authentic** folk singers!
Tom Paley, Roscoe Holcolmb, Frank Proffitt,
Pete Seeger, Artie Rose, Roy Berkeley, and John
Cohen are only a few folksingers** lost to serious
students of American folk music caught up in a
world of artificial hootenanny** pablum.
Weve all got our axes to grind, Mr. Agnew;
at least your audience had a chance at the real
stuff.*
For: North Florida Chapter, American Society
for the Preservation of Old Timey Country Music:
WAYNE HIGHT, 2UC
JOHN HEDGECOTH, 2UC
JIM FORTUNA, 4AS
MIKE ROMIG, 2UC
I CANDIDATES I
1 CORNER 1
t
f*
(Ed. Note: in order to implement
our policy of giving equal coverage
to all parties involved in the
?iresent campaign, we are running
his submission from Freedom
Party today as the other parties
were given coverage in
Wednesday's edition. From now on,
all parties will publish their
opinion columns on Monday and
Wednesday.)
FREEDOM
Our student government is not a government; it
is a branch of the University administration. And
the University administration, in its turn, is not an
agent of an autonomous, self-managing community
of scholars; it is a branch of state government,
and almost entirely permeable by pressures
essentially alien to the best interests of a free
community of scholars. The only real question left
to be answered is this: not whether this ought to
be the case (for all self-respecting students and
teachers know it ought not to be the case), but
whether student government as such can play a
significant role in altering this oppressive
relationship between the university and the Florida
community as a whole.
Freedom Party is the only party in this election
which is committed to a transformation of student
politics into authentic student government. Freedom
Party candidates KNOW FROM PERSONAL
EXPERIENCE what mere students* can actually
accomplish by working with off-campus groups.
The Partys faculty advisor, its chairman, its
candidates for president and vice president, and
many of its candidates for Legislative Council and
Honor Court have risked their careers and in some
cases their lives to help disprivileged and defenseless
people in their struggles for community renewal and
justice.
Inspired by their personal experiences in the civil
rights movement, Freedom Party candidates are
convinced that students can turn their talents and
energy into projects of immediate public value.
There is no longer any necessity for students to
sacrifice themselves in lonely clusters, isolated from
faculty, fellow students, and the university as a
community. Thousands of students, we believe, would
prefer to see their fees finance student government
projects in the anti-poverty, Peace Corps area
projects that would export university students into
those areas of Florida where they can do for people
what needs to be done NOW.
Young people are centers of new Initiative, they
come into the world to change it, not simply to
endure it with cynical disregard of themselves and
others. Our campus holds thousands of young people
whose idealism and wish to help needs only a rational
vehicle for expression. Student government is that
vehicle, and Freedom Party is the only party in this
campaign which can transform what now passes for
student government into an instrument of social
progress. Our slogans For the 10,000 who need
a voice, and, Try FREEDOM for a change!

t-riday, Jon. 29, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Religion week answer
EDITOR:
I WOULD like to take this opportunity to voice
my opinion concerning the letter written by Mr.
John R. Thayer about Religion-in-Life Week. Mr.
Thayer's main argument, although vague, seems
to be that people who insist theirs is the only
religion will not have the opportunity to "propogate
their views."
MR. THAYER begins his argument or protest
by stating, ". .as a Christian and a taxpayer I
must object to public facilities being used to support
the establishment of a religion." First, I would
like to ask Mr. Thayer what religion is being
established, or for that matter even supported during
Religion-in-Life Week? The only religion I heard
at the Convocation was Miss Wards very general
"attempt to give man a meaning of life." Secondly,
I ask what right a person has, because he is a
Christian, to protest the use of public facilit*^
I DO not believe people can be arbitrarily grou
as Mr. Thayer implies into "those who say
religion is OK, and those who think that t
religion is the proper one." He then continue
classify the first group as "liberals," and
condemns the liberal for not being liberal en<
for not being able to see his viewpoint. I wc
remind Mr. Thayer that most liberals try no
see any ONE view, but rather they seek the tr J
by weighing many such views.
AFTER PRESENTING an array of Bibli
passages, Mr. Thayer seems to conclude that, "thesk
verses leave no room for other religions." MisX
Ward seemed to paraphrase this conclusion
she described certain intolerant people as those who
say, "I like my kind, and I" bash you."
I THINK that the purpose of the Religion-in-Life
Week is not, as Mr. Thayer suggests, to preach
ones own beliefs, but to ask questions and to
challenge dogma with reason, and to hear other
peoples ideas. Only when men can sit together in
free and unbiased thought and discussion will under understanding
standing understanding and tolerance prevail. Tolerance of race,
color, creed, and yes Mr. Thayer, even tolerance
of different religions.
MICHAEL P. McMAHON, SEG
... and criticism
EDITOR:
Though I am a church-member and a believer
in the individual practicality of the Christian ethic,
I see little to criticize in the popularization of
religious ideas in such publications as The Alligator
It is precisely this de-etherallzing of religion that
shall continue to make worship a force of strength
in contemporary life; HOWEVER, must we be
submitted to The Alligator's present illustration
of a devout worshipper which is published alongside
your theological articles? Whether impressionistic,
or merely symbolic of the columns reader or writer,
this drawing of a comical and repulsive, snout-nosed
star-gazer is, AT BEST, satirical of modern art,
and completely irrelevant in the pages of our news newspaper.
paper. newspaper. If it dares to be a face-slap for the columns
reader, may I say that it stabs more sharply at his
taste than his integrity.
DOLORES DAY, 2UC
(ED. NOTE: the artwork we run with our Religion Religionin-Life
in-Life Religionin-Life Week column is the official insignia of this
years Religion-in-Life Week. We suggest that you
take your complaint to that committee.)
Shufflers
EDITOR:
Poor little law school kiddies. All you did was
shuffle your little footsies. And the nasty old
teacher told you that only kiddies shuffled their
footsies, not law students. But you law student
kiddies shuffled your footsie-wootsles again and
the teacher gave you some busy work to do. I bet
the reason you law school kidsles were so nervous
was that your silly old eight o clock class red
with your Captain Kangaroo program. Well now,
kiddies, you can go home and pound on your pound pounda-pegs,
a-pegs, pounda-pegs, and shuffle your little footsies, and do your
busy work. Nice little law school babies.
MOMMY

Page 7



Page 8

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Jan. 29, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

[ Wanted |
WANTED: MALE ROOMMATE
to share large apartment with 3
others. Rent $26 plus utilities.
1314 1/2 NW 2nd Ave. (C-83-
3t-p).
BABY WANTED. Our maid is
now available to care for your
baby in my home. 2 year old
preferred. Weekly at regular rate.
254-A Flavet HI. FR 2-3788. (C (C---83-3t-c).
--83-3t-c). (C---83-3t-c).
-
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
spacious apartment 1 block from
ampus. $35 per month. 102 NW
sth Street, Apt. 4. Call 6-8911.
,C-82-3t-c).
MALE STUDENT to share 5 room
house 4 1/2 miles from campus.
$35 per month includes utilities.
Call 376-6191 evenings. (C-79-
st-p).
WANTED 1950 1955 Fords and
Chevrolets. AL HERNDONS
SERVICE STATION, 916 S. E.
4th Street. (C-73-20t-c).

Beyond Religion?
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
' USED CARS
'6O VW Blue, Radio, Heater, WSW $995
'6l VW Heater, WSW, One Owner, Perfect! I
$1195
'59 MCA Red, WSW, Sharp! $895
'SB Rkrcedes Beni-220S
Gray, Radio, Heater, Leather Upholstery, Excellent!
$995
'59 Ntrcdes Benz-220S
Radio, Heater, Automatic Clutch,
WSW, Immaculate Condition JIOVS
'6l Mercedes Benz-220S
AM-FM Radio, Genuine Leather Interior, fAVAF
Air Conditioning, New Condition wH
'63 Valiant
Signet 200, Power Steering, Power Brakes, Automatic
Transmission, One Local Owner, 26,000 Actual Miles
$1695
MERCEDES-BENZ
ceEuasftJS
"Fine Imported Motor Cars
115 S.E. 2nd, STREET Ph. 372-1481

| Real Estate [
IDEAL FOR YOUNG FAMILY this
well kept 3 bedroom, 2 bath, CCB
home has huge family room, dish dishwasher,
washer, dishwasher, disposal, large closets.
Fenced back yard. Only 4 blocks to
Elem. and Jr. High Schools. Sur Surprisingly
prisingly Surprisingly low price and small down
payment. See at 2129 NE 12th Terr.
INVEST IN LOCAL PROPERTY
and participate in future profits
as others are doing. 5 and 20
acre tracts with many Oaks and
Pine trees, west of town. S3OO
to S4OO per acre with small down
payment. Call Wayne Mason any anytime
time anytime c/o Ernest Tew Realty.
376-6461. (1-82- st-c).
Personal
DRY CLEAN 8 lbs. $1.50. This is
approximately 10 articles of
clothing. GATOR GROOMER Coin
Laundry, next to University Post
Office. Bring your own hangers.
(J-69-ts-c).

For Rent
LARGE ROOMS IN FRIENDLY
surroundings available to male
students. Reasonable rates;
utilities and maid service included.
Convenient to campus and town.
See at 104 SW Bth Street or call
372-0243. (B-83-tf-nc).
TWO ROOMS NEAR Campus. One
with private bath and entrance.
Other single or twin with semi semiprivate
private semiprivate bath. 1204 NW 3rd Ave.
Call 8-1078. (B-83-3t~c).
, t
UNUSUALLY NICE ROOM with
private bath, central heat and air airconditioning.
conditioning. airconditioning. Male graduate
student or professional person
preferred. Call 372-7943. (B-82-
ts-c).
THREE BEDROOM, furnished,
air-conditioned home. Available
Feb. Ist. $l5O per month. Call
Ernest Tew Realty, 6-6461 any anytime.
time. anytime. (B-81-st-c).
NEW APARTMENTS, completely
furnished. One bedroom, swimming
pool, all electric kitchen, central
heat, air-cond. S9O per month.
372-3826. (B-78-ts-c).
Services
WORKING PARENTS- Looking for
a reliable experienced person near
University to keep your new baby
for you 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mon.
through Fri. Call FR 6-2072. (M (M---83-lt-c).
--83-lt-c). (M---83-lt-c).
GERMAN TUTORING by German
lady. Contact 372-7627. (M-82-
3t-c).
APPLICATION PASSPORT
PORTRAITS Dissertation photos
and similar photography. Phone
378-1170Sneeringer Photography.
1013 l/2W.Univ.Ave^M-81-3t-c).
Lost & Found
LOST: Pair of grey framed glasses
in black Beckums pouch, in
Engineering Bldg, or near Uni University
versity University and Stadium Road. Call
Dave, FR 6-7660. (L-83-2t-p).
LOST: NEAR UNIVERSITY, white
female cat with orange and gray
spots on back. Please call 2-6625.
(L-82-2t-c).
f Cfctr'-'KSFPICTURE'
|yiA\ Berlin Film Festival-1963 -I
I
V ... -XjX m£-
IIIPI
iSofjdiEnJ

| Autos I
1962 MERCEDES BENZ 190 C
Sedan. Good condition. Less than
S2IOO. During day call FR 6-3211,
Ext. 5467 and after 6 p.m. 372-
4763. (G-79-3t-c).
62 CHEVY 409, 2-door, Impala,
SS, 4 speed transmission, bucket
seats, PS & PB, excellent con condition.
dition. condition. One owner. £all 372-3826.
(G-78-ts-c).

| 2 400 Hawthorn ftoorf ftp. 20 Htonc FR 6-SOll l
HELD OYER! LAST 2 NITES!
O Tony Curtis
se*and the Single
Wood Girl
Pius
Shows First And Last 6:30 & 11:50 3rd Adult Hit At 10:20

gat -Jtie lost innocence
M§|;blue
W'LTdenlir
mLf JS CAROL BRANDON

Starts Sunday
SOPHIA
a lOREH

__ MARCELLO
MflSfflOM t 4j|%
!SHEU£YWINTERS
t33Sf
&. : Li'e
I JM&, J3R
MrrO &OLDWYN MAYE R pmtt MARTIN RaNSOHOFFS PRODUCTION
Ganer Andrews BBdougias
thb Amicantzanon of Kmuw
Miaaa
YOU WILL RELISH

Autos
1964 TR-4 Hardtop. Excellent
condition, low mileage. Call 376-
1474. (G-80-st-c).
>SB CHEVY V-8, Radio and heater,
Phone 2-0491 after 7 p.m. (G-80-
ts-c).
>53 TD 2 MG ROADSTER. SSOO
or best offer. Call FR 6-8543
after 5 p.m. (G-80-4t-c).

2a

2 ALL-TIME GREAT HITS
TOGETHER FIRST TIME
Neither First Run,
50000.....



LMTORC L A S SIFIE D S

Autos
63 VALIANT, V-100, 225 engine,
radio, perfect condition, $350
down, $1295 total. Phone 2-7838.
(GB36t p).
BEAUTIFUL WHITE CADILLAC
for Volkswagen, Dodge Dart, other
small car or make offer. Excellent
air-conditioned, 1959, 43,000. Call
376-7970. (G-83-3t-c).
1964 KARMANN GHIA 9,800 miles,
top condition. All extras. Will
trade. Make an offer. After 5 and
weekends 376-9856. (G-83-10t-c).
'54 FORD, Mechanically sound.
Good transportation. Call 6-1526.
(GB3-2tc).
WANT ECONOMY PLUS STYLE?
VW 1500 has design, comfort,
horse power, and room in addition
to economy of standard VW Beetle.
Yes VW has finally changed. Must
sell. FR 2-5446 after 5:30. (G (G---82-3t-c).
--82-3t-c). (G---82-3t-c).
1956 PLYMOUTH, radio, and
heater, runs forward, 3 good tires,
$75. Contact Wilson Hurd, Phi Tau
House, FR 2-0307. (G-82-2t-p).
1932 PLYMOUTH 4-door sedan.
1950 DODGE Truck with camper.
CaU 6-1831. (G-81-3t-p).
1964 SPITFIRE, 9,000 miles, 8
months old. Perfect condition.
Cjll

thmmSok
I Sweatshirts
I T-Shirts
I Jackets
vi ft,
/]2 F F

For Sale |
CLASSICAL GUITAR with case.
6 months old. Call FR 2-7783.
(A-83-lUc).
1964 ALLSTATE SPORTS motor motorcycle.
cycle. motorcycle. 60 cc engine, 3 speed foot
shift. Only $l5O. Call Jerm after 4
5 p.m. FR 6-8998. (A-83-3t-c).
1963 HONDA, 150 cc. S2OO. Contact
Walter Crew Room 898 South Hall.
(A-83-2t-p).
ROYAL PORTABLE TYPE TYPEWRITER.
WRITER. TYPEWRITER. Nearly new $25. 372-
7783. (A-83-3t-c) v
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER.
Six 500 sheet boxes. 4 boxes of
buff, 2 boxes of white. Retail for
S2O per box. WiU sacrifice for
$lO per box. Call Ext. 2832 between
8 and 5 p.m. (A-71-tf-nc).
YORK BENCH 3OO lbs. weights
2 bar bells 6 dumb bells
assorted collars and other equip equipment.
ment. equipment. Call Dr. Carney, Student
Infirmary. (A-82-2t-c).
1963 LAMBRETTA MOTOR
SCOOTER Model 175 cc TV series,
good condition. $250. Also camera
equipment. 2 LEICA bodies and 4
LEICA lens with optical view
finders. Lens are 35 mm, 50 mm,
90mm, and 135 mm. LEICA VIT
rapid wind bottom. Entire camera
outfit $250. Call 6-7886 or 6-4995.
(A-82-3t-c).
CUSHMAN EAGLE, mechanically
excellent and highly reliable. Re Rebuilt
built Rebuilt and repainted last year.sl47.
Call Bill at 376-2420.(A-80-st-c).

For Sale
OWN YOUR OWN TRAILER and
enclosed cabana. Located in an
oak grove, overlooking Beven s
Arm. Call FR 2-5449 after 5 p.m.
(A-80-st-c).
MARRIED STUDENTS take a study
break and look at a great trailer.
8x36 with 9xl 2 room cabana.
This outfit is COMPLETELY
FURNISHED. Payments lower than
Gainesville rent and you can sell
when you graduate. Quiet sur surroundings
roundings surroundings 5 minutes from campus.
Call for appointment 372-0679
before 3:30 or after call Paradise
Trailer Park. (A-72-ts-c).
Help Wanted
STUDENTS WORK EVENINGS.
Excellent commissions odd
hours possible. Group interviews
Saturday 1:00 p.m. Gainesville
Independent. 18 SW 2nd Street,
behind Penneys. Inquire
Solicitation Supervisor or Circu Circulation
lation Circulation Manager.(E-83-lt-c).
Hod Enough
DRILL?
Try FREEDOM
(for a change)
(paid political adv.)

Friday / Jan. 29, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

Student awarded
medal for courage

By CAROL BROWN
Staff Writer
Do UF* students spend interest interesting
ing interesting summer vacations?
James J. Cooney, third year
Law College student from Miami
did.
Cooney recently received the
Army soldiers' medal for his val valiant
iant valiant efforts in trying to save two
buddies from a plane crash which
occured while they were on a
paratrooping mission in Alabama
last May.
Jim told the story like this:
"As we were flying from our
Georgia base into our Alabama
paratrooper drop zone, one of the
engines quit. Soon we were in
real trouble, and we all knew
we were going down.
We missed some woods and bel belly-flopped
ly-flopped belly-flopped into a field. We bounded
600 feet and stopped. Our plane
was a mass of flames."
Jim ditched his gear and bolted
for the door. Then he noticed
a buddy who was hung up in his
parachute straps. He freed his
jumping mate and both escaped.
"When we got outside they took
a head count. Two boys were mis missing.jSomeone
sing.jSomeone missing.jSomeone had to go back in
so I did."
He braved the heat and flames
four times. Each time the heat
drove him out "after a minute
or so inside."
Later investigations showed one
man to have died on impact and
the other soon after.
The award presentation, made
with parents and a score of ne nephews
phews nephews and nieces proudly watching,
was made at the Jan sth meeting
of the 841st Reserve Combat
Battalion meeting in Op a-Lock a.
Any other man could esly have

On The Reel Scene

SELWIN H. Cl ME NT
Movie Reviewer
Hollywoods usual manner of
dealing with the evils of war by
killing off loveable characters or
pitting clever American soldiers
against goon platoons of Nazis
may be on the way out. The
Americanization of Emily'strikes
a new attitude that war is a silly
game between crazy officers to kill
sensible people; and goes on
further to convincingly prove that
the virtues of pride and courage
are mainly foolish.
Melvyn Douglas as the crazy
admiral under armed forces
rivalry decides that if there is an
Unknown Soldier there will have
to be an Unknown Sailor. He
chooses James Garner to head the
D-day landing on Omaha Beach
and film the death of the first
sailor. Garner, who has recently
had a taste of Julie Andrews and
some of the other good things in
life, finds fame a poor substitute.
When Andrews tells him women
love dead better than live
cowards, Garner is convinced that
love is foolish as war.
An excellent performance by
Julie Andrews may be the first
indication that Doris Day will soon
be moving over as the number one
Hollywood box-office attraction.
Good supporting acting by James
Garner and James Coburn and
lively screenwriting by playwright
Paddy Chayefsky make The
Americanization of Emily one of
those rare movies that almost
everyone should find entertaining
possibly even Don Fuddle man.


Bill lftk:
vk < J
.. .?&&* s
COONEY
decided to sit out the rest of the
summer and enjoy the peace and
quiet. But not this 26-year-old
UF graduate and Sigma Nu.
Cooney's previous three years
were spent as a second Lieuten Lieutenant
ant Lieutenant in the Army after receiving
an R.O.T.C. commission. After
taking a European discharge he
worked for the U. S. government
in France.
Later, in May, after the crash,
Cooney went back to Europe, this
time working for the U.S. govern government
ment government in Germany.
Spain was his next stop, as he
studied Spanish at the University
of Barcelona. Cooney had already
picked up conversational French
and German in previous visits to
the continent.
And now after paratrooping, a award
ward award winning and intercontinental
traveling, Jim is back at the UF.
Anyone want to learn how to
fill a summer "vacation?"
Ask Jim.

COUPLES WHO still have not
been able to resolve the first and
most compelling problem may find
the answer in the States showing
this weekend of To Bed or Not
to Bed, a comedy about an Italian
salesman who goes to Sweden in
search of a Scandinavian solution.
Sunday through Tuesday at the
State will be Fellinis 8 1/2
a movie which vividly displays
the void that often exists between
critic and film* goer for no film
in recent years has been received
with such wide critical acclaim
and consistent audience
disappointment. Fellini, who did
La Strada and many other good
movies since, is no amateur who
tries to suggest profundity by
means of artistic obscurity. Yet,
the vague dream world of 8 1/2
conceals the films statement about
modern life and the creative
impulse and leaves the audience
with nothing definite or relevant.
Today the Florida Union features
The World, The Flesh and The
Devil with Harry Belafonte and
Saturday and .Sunday Ill Cry
Tomorrow the life story of
Lillian Roth played by Susan
Hayward.
SELWINS FIVE STAR
RATING SYSTEM
**** The Americanization of
Emily
*** 8 1/2 (Received two
Academy Awards)
** To Bed or Not to Bed
** The World, The Flesh and
The Devil
** I'U Cry Tomorrow

Page 9



SPORTS

Page 10

Coach Carnes enthusiastic
about Gator track hopes

By JEFF DENKEWALTER
Sports Writer
If enthusiasm is a key to building
a successful track team, Gator
head track coach Jimmy Carnes
can look forward to a great year.
I've been really pleased with
the work the boys have done in
preparing for the coming track
season, the new head coach said.
We here at Florida have got the
depth and the desire to be a major
power in the Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference (SEC).
Carnes, who replaced Percy
Beard as track coach after Beard
retired, didn't become interested
in track events until his college
days at Mercer University in
Macon, Georgia.
**l was strictly a basketball
performer at Putnam County High
School in Eatonton, Georgia. It
wasn't until I participated in an
intramural track meet at Mercer
that I really got interested in
track. From then on it was my
consuming desire to be a track
coach.
Competing in many events and
specializing in the javelin-throw
and the high jump, Carnes earned
his varsity letter in track and
graduated in 1956.
From there, Carnes went on to
be assistant track and basketball
coach at Druid Hills High School,
in Atlanta, Georgia. In his second
year there he became head track
coach.
During his stay at Druid Hills,
Carnes' squads won 52 dual track
meets without a loss.
"One of my most memorable
experiences at Druid Hills was
the turnout for the track team my
last year there. About 175 boys
showed up for the first day of
practice. This is the type of
participation that I like to see
associated with track.
Carnes was named head track
coach at Furman in 1962. During
his three year stay there, he built
one of the Southern Conferences
powerhouses.ln Carnes' first year,
Furman won every meet in the
Southern Conference and took the
conference Indoor and Outdoor
Championships.
Now in his first year .as Gator
head track coach, Carnes is intent
on compiling another great track
record.
I believe that with the fine
weather and the good recruiting
program we have here, Florida
track teams will have to be
reckoned with.
Aiding Carnes will be assistant
coaches Walter Welsch, Don
Hester and Dr. John Bangs. Hester
will tutor participants in jumping
events, while Bangs will coach
the shot and discus. Welsch will
handle sprinters and other field
events.
Captain of the 1965 team will
be sprinter John Anderson. Other
top returnees include Bill Roberts
in the 330 hurdles, Rick Haley in
the 440 and 880, Jim Brown in the
880, Mike Docsh in the high jump,
Pete Skafte in the javelin, Tony
Basoelli in the discus, Scott
Hager in the pole vault and hurdles,
Dieter Gebhard in the 880, and
David Wilson in the mile and two
mile.

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Jan.' 29

- V; adife
/ >v < jHp
, 4|
KMT -Vrojja
H '/ f.-J y P
JIMMY CARNES
...builds up team

You
should hear
how you
can shape
your future
in the
Bell System!
i

Swimmers face big tests;
North Carolinians invade
9

Florida's swim team, boasting a
3-1 record, faces two troublesome
challengers from the state of North
Carolina this weekend. Both have
been a major source of concern to
the Gators in the past.
Today the Gators host North
Carolina State at 3 p.m. Florida
has always had a tough time with
State, winning four of seven meets
with the Wolfpack.
Saturday the Gators get a visit
from the rugged Tar Heels of North
Carolina, a team which has de defeated
feated defeated Florida six times in the
teams eleven meetings. Starting
time for Saturday's meet is 1:30.
Florida has topped North
Carolina for the past three years,
last years 48-47 victory coming
as a major upset.
The Gators should be in pretty
good shape to take on the invaders
from North Carolina. Charlie King,
breaststroker and individual med medley
ley medley star, has returned to prac practice
tice practice after a bout with the flu,
and star performers Tom
Dioguardi, Blanchard Tualanday
Whitehouse are primedfor another
fine effort.

With each day, Bell System
communications become more
important to homes, businesses
and defense.
You can get in on the begin beginning
ning beginning of a new era of communi communications.
cations. communications. Your skills and talents
can easily be matched to a
forward-looking job assignment.
Your prospects for earning a
top management job are excel excellent.
lent. excellent. Our management jobs are
filled from withinits policy.
And those who move up are
those who can quickly evaluate
competition, make sound
decisions, and are fully account accountable
able accountable for their responsibilities.
Wed like to talk with you
about career futures we can
offer. Sign up now at your
Placement Office. The Bell Sys Systemwhere
temwhere Systemwhere people find solu solutions
tions solutions to exciting problems problemsmatches
matches problemsmatches benefits, salaries and
working conditions ofjDther
companies. The Bell System
companies are equal opportu opportunity
nity opportunity employers.
BELL SYSTEM
American Telephone and Telegraph Co.
and Associated Companies
' t
*
t

* jijf'
WHITEHOUSE

...primed for Tarheels,Wolfpack

Campus bowling
tourney slated
The Florida Union All-Campus
Bowling Tournament has been
slated for Feb. 2-4 at Palm Lanes
in Gainesville.
A women's section will be carded
this year for the first time, with
the ladies' competition being held
Feb. 2 from 4:30-6:45 p.m. The
men will bowl Feb. 3-4 from
4:00-6:45 p.m. All students
interested in participating are
requested to sign up in Room 315
of the Florida Union as soon as
possible.

We work in space ...
HHs y
and under the sea ...
O jW*k
,y^K
jW
and over the land ...
to provide the worlds
finest communications

S- > W
jk
TUAL

UNIVERSITY
Lutheran Church
1826 W. Univ. Ave.
(opp. handball courts)
2 services for student
convenience:
9-9:45 a.m.
11-12 noon
Sunday Ev§|grng Stu Student
dent Student Fellowship, 5:30

H:-' vi^^Bllllllli
9 '.A
H|Bg'*'-: : -' tijjr
mmk Hf
DIOGUARDI



Cagers meet tough ones on road

By ANDY MOOR
Assistant Sports Editor
Floridas basketball team takes
to the road for a two game stint
which could decide the Gators fate
in the SEC race.
The cagers will be in Lexington,
Kentucky Saturday to meet Adolph
Rupps revenge-minded Kentucky
Wildcats, then travel south on Mon Monday
day Monday to Knoxville, Tennessee to
tangle with the Tennessee Volun Volunteers,
teers, Volunteers, who are still very much in
the race for the conference cham championship.
pionship. championship.
Kentucky has been a disappoint disappointment
ment disappointment this year with only a 9-7
record after being tabbed for na national
tional national ranking in the pre season
polls. The Wildcats are toughest
at home, and are still smarting
from the 84-68 shellacking they
took in Gainesville last week.
Tennessee, under Ray Mears,
sports a 12-2 record. The Volun Volunteers
teers Volunteers have lost but one conference
game (to league leading Vanderbilt)
while receiving considerable
I UF Soccer Club |
game Saturday
The Blue and Orange teams of
the University of Florida Soccer
Club will kick off at 10 a.m. Sat Saturday
urday Saturday on Flemming Field.
This game will be the first
of the trial games played in pre preparation
paration preparation for participation of the
Club in the Sunshine State Invita Invitational
tional Invitational Soccer Tournament to be
held in St. Petersburg next month.

STUDENT COURTESY DISCOUNT
Saving Per Gallon of Gas I
Come by for your free card which will entitle you
to GAS SAVINGS. Bring student ID to sign up.
NO OBLIGATION
uS?.L. C&G GULF SERVICE
.t
BARGAIN PRICES
Mens Ban Lon Socks
REG. $1 VALUE
Very Slight Irregulars
3 prs for SI.OO
Umbrellas of all kinds
SOME WITH COVERS
American-Made
Automatic Flip-Open Models
$2.87
Nylon, cotton Mops
CUT QUICK DRYING
Regularly 99$
Our Special Sale Price 5
Dixie Mills
'C J
Super Discount
19 SW Ist Ave. Ample Parking 1 Block Away

HENDERSON

support in the national ratings.
Florida will be looking for its
sixth straight victory in the Ken Kentucky
tucky Kentucky clash and its eleventh in the
last twelve. The Gators have
dropped but one conference clash,
that to Auburn.
Dick Tomlinson has assumed the
Gator scoring lead with 202 points
and a 13.5 average. He is followed
closely by Gary Keller, 198 points
and a 13.2 average, and Brooks
Henderson, 196 points and a 13.1
average. Tom Baxley averages
10.0.
Coach NormanSloansays,This
is our big road trip so far. Its
always hard to play in Lexington,
and we must beat Tennessee to
stay in the race.
Both games will be carried over
the Gator Basketball Network be beginning
ginning beginning at 9 p.m. (EST) on their
respective dates.

Gridders practice begins Feb. 13

'-JHr
MORTON

\IGLEY

. . stand ready for their moment of truth*
WONDER IF HELL COME HOME THAT HAPPY?

Florida will open spring football
practice Saturday, Feb. 13, and
conclude with the annual spring
game March 20, Head Coach Ray
Graves announced Thursday.
NCAA schools may practice 20
times over a 36-day period and
the Gators plan to hold four prac practices
tices practices per week with a game scrim scrimmage
mage scrimmage each Saturday except opening
day.
Florida returns 34 lettermen
from last years 7-3 team. Not
all, however, will take part in
full practice period. Excused for
part or all of the spring drills
will be baseball stars Allen Tram Trammell
mell Trammell and Charles Casey.
In addition to the usual
stressing of fundamentals and
working with young boys we will

x-t 9
FisH IH||L
A*
Time
Humpty
Dumpty
FRIDAY e F L sh
You Can Eat,
OLD-FASHIONED Hush Puppies,
FISH NIGHT Cole Slaw 97 s
5 PM 9 PM
Fresh Cedar Key Fish
HUMPTY DUMPTY

DRIVE-IN i RESAURANT
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEALS
FR2-3387 310 M.W, I3tt St.

Friday, Jan, 29, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

TOMLINSON

be looking for the answers to some
of our problems for the 1965
season, says Graves. We need
help defensively and must find of offensive
fensive offensive depth and an extra point
and field goal kicker.
Florida lost the middle of its
defensive line tackles Sydney
Mac Lean and Dennis Murphy and
all SEC guard Bill Richbourg
plus linebacker Jim Bernhardt.
First personnel move worth
mention is the shift of all-SEC
offensive guard Larry Gagner to
defensive tackle. He is expected
to team with junior Wally Colson
as a starting defensive tackle.
Opening at middle guard will be
Jerry Anderson, who saw extensive
duty behind Richbourg as a sopho sophomore
more sophomore last fall. Coaches expect a

-tr
k MM
BAXLEY

M ... iilgf
T
KELLER

good battle here and will take an
early look at sophomores Marty
Bray of Tampa Robinson and Don
Giordano of Miamis Archbishop
Curley.
Offensive losses were quarter quarterback
back quarterback Tommy Shannon and halfback
Dupree. Biggest problem, of
course, is replacing the all-Amer all-America
ica all-America running of Dupree.
To offset the switch of Gagner,
Graves has moved tackle Jim Ben Benson
son Benson to guard, and the Gator offen offensive
sive offensive Interior will include John
Whatley and John Preston, guards
Larry Beckman and Benson and
center Bill Carr.
Opening starting backfleld in includes
cludes includes quarterback Steve Spur Spurrier,
rier, Spurrier, halfbacks Jack Harper 2nd
Don Knapp and fullback John
Feiber.
FRATERNITY
BASKETBALL
(Thursday Night's Games)
ORANGE LEAGUE
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 55
Alpha Epsilon Pi 19
Tau Epsilon Phi 23
Delta Tau Delta 18
Alpha Tau Omega 67
Phi Kappa Tau 36
Pi Kappa Alpha 33
Kappa Sigma 24
Pi Lambda Phi 34
Beta Theta Pi 19
Sigma Chi 41
Kappa Alpha 18
BLUE LEAGUE
Lambda Chi Alpha 25
Phi Gamma Delta 11
Delta Sigma Phi 28
Alpha Gamma Rho 20

Page 11

-vvi*
RAMSEY



TRVTHfMfW varsily Restaurant
Complete Lunch Only 87< Complete-Dinners Only 97t
, SERVING HOURS: 6 A.M. to 11 P.M.
LOCATION: 209 NW 13TH STREET DAILY SPECIALS NORTH OF NEW RAMADA INN MOTEL
............ .*. V.V VV' *#*%**** *#. VVVVAY>Vi > V iViVt'tViVt.V/M t i.r.L* t i * *r* -'* ** 9 _ *
Player of the week ***********
V# . Q
betters :? A Friendly Spot To Meet Your Friends
Coke 1
( RECORDS
I ( NEEDLES
I | accessories
I 41 I ask about our
j | 'NO EXTRA CHARGE
i i SPECIAL ORDER SERVICE
|? JL. | | 45 CLUB:one free
.fc'jW ik -kj I | for every 10 purchased
Player of the Week honors this time go to Bob Hoffman, a 6-8, ~
235 pound center, who has come in to help the Gators out of several
| j HHoffman, now a junior, had his best game of the year Monday night j
ft against the Crimson Tide of Alabama* The Chicago native hit for 11 ft tt-?* G~> 7/-!
points and pulled in ten rebounds as the Gators downed Alabama, ft f
-ft 67-51, and stayed in the thick of the Southeastern Conference race. ft \\u?~ j \
Vlllv ft According to head basketball coach Norm Sloan, Hoffman's ft
j-y | ft: Alabama performance may land him a starting position against Ken- ft / M
COCa-COla. ft tuc y at the center post. ft: \x /A J
ft: Hoffman has made an appearance in all 15 of the Gator games this ft /
_ -q | g-> ft: year. He's made good on 30 out of 58 field goal tries or a respectable ft \y
rSOttling v>o ft: 51.7%. Lending strength to the Gator board corps, hes pulled in 52
ft rebounds, and has a total of 71 points. ft:
Hoffman features a fine soft hook shot which he hits with great jf
ft accuracy. As a sophomore he averaged 6.5 points a game and snagged & £ % B fn M
OOQ p n cf Univprsitv Avenue :ft off half a dozen rebounds per contest. In 1960 he was named High g Tk**
_ £ ftj School Player of the Year in Chicago and came to the Gators as an \ 376-1042 jr
376-3701 or 376-6506 ft outstanding freshman, averaging over 10 rebounds a game and scoring ftj 000 \a/ 11
a 11.5 point average. ift 23 W. University
ft ft Gainesville's Largest Record Shop
fft&: : :ft£:ft:ft:ft:ft:ftft:ftiftift:ft:ft:ft::* : x : :ft: : : : : : :ft: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :^ft : &^
OUR CAFETERIA LINE FEATURES mon D *HV SPECIALS
LARGEST SELECTION SUNDRIES ifT COFFEE SHOP & SODA FOUNTAIN
* AA*ot Entr*M Healril &"Beauty Serving from 5:30 p.m.
* ** Gr*>n Vegetahle. ~ Hardware Supplies t 0 12 Midni 9 ht
Candies Cigarettes V
* Home Made Pastries His BROWS Largest Selection of Hi-Brows
|| | And Greeting Cards In All Os
Serving UF Students Since 1905 HB