Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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WORLD'S ONLY IBP ARY
. .just read the sign, fans, and you will
see that the UF has the worlds only IBP ARY.
There are strong rumors that the IBP ARY is
actually the Library in disguise. (Photo by Bob
Kawka).

Freedom to run
Harmeling, Dacey
Freedom Partys candidates for Student Government President
and Vice-President are Jim Harmeling and Jim Dacey.
Harmeling, 23, is a graduate student in Clinical Psychology with
a 3.6 average. He was a participant in the Ford Foundations three threeyear
year threeyear Masters Program and currently holds a National Institute
of Health fellowship. Harmeling is from Casselberry, Fla.
Harmeling is presently serving as President of the Student Group
for Equal Rights, and is a former task force worker for CORE and
past Vice-President of the NAACP Youth Council. He has served
in civil rights movements in St. Augustine, Quincy, and Live
Oak. Hermeling, presently independent, was formerly the chaplain
of a campus social fraternity.
Vice-presidential candidate Dacey, 27, is seeking his PhD in
mathematics. He did his undergraduate work at Boston College.
Dacey is from Gainesville. An ex-paratrooper, he is on fellow fellowship
ship fellowship and presently holds a 3.8 average. He has been the direct
action chairman for the Student Peace Union. He also has served
actively i n the civil' rights movement in St. Augustine.
This in not something we started, but rather a grass-roots
movement which has been sprouting for quite a while and is just
beginning to take firm root with the result of direct political action,
said Dacey. What we are attempting is much more than the mere
formation of a campus political party. We are striving toward a
radical re-orientation of the basic campus relationships between
students, faculty, and the administration.

* *
1964 elections cost $14,000; how much now?

How much will be spent before
elections are over this year?
No one can or will say for
sure, but the 1964 Spring elections
cost about $14,000. And it gets
more costly every year.
The printing of campaign liter literature
ature literature or poop is the largest
single expense. According to John
Hancock, 1964 Gator party trea-
I Today in history |
$ ...1962, beekeeper g
>: Rex Olexiss breaks $
£ out with the hives. £
j* !*

surer, about SI,OOO of Gator funds
paid printing bills. Printing costs
rise every year.
MOST OF the money used in
the campaigns is contributed by the
Greeks. Last year they gave about
$6,605 to back their candidates.
The candidates themselves spent
about $3,780 in the 1964 running.
Candidates buy their own poop
and pay a qualification fee. Usu Usually
ally Usually a party fee matches the Stu Student.
dent. Student. Government qualification fee.
Student Government funds pay
for the details of the election it itself.
self. itself. These funds come from the
l qualification fees, which vary from
$4 to $8 depending on the office.
According to Secretary of the

r Sex Hostilities topic

Hostilities of Sex is the topic
tonight when the Reverend William
Sloan Coffin Jr., Yale University
chaplain, speaks for Religion-in-
Life Week at 8:15 p.m. in Uni University
versity University Auditorium.
Coffin, who has been adviser to
the Peace Corps since its incep inception
tion inception and was founding director of
the Peace Corps field training
center in Puerto Rico, also speaks

&

Xjg Sts' Vol. 57, No. 80

Culpepper lashes out
atdumb rumors

Progress Party student body
Presidential candidate Bruce
Culpepper lashed out at rumors
on campus labeling him as a dumb
physical education jock, at a
party meeting at the Pi Kappa Phi
fraternity house Sunday night.
CULPEPPERS UNDERGRAD UNDERGRADUATE
UATE UNDERGRADUATE degree was in history, in
the college of Arts and Sciences
and he graduated in the top 15
per cent of his Arts and Sciences
class.
Culpepper said that he was
placing emphasis on a strong
party platform that will help the
students understand stpd en t
government.
Also speaking was Dick
Thompson, Progress vice
presidential candidate. He said that
it was a tremendous opportunity
to be Bruces running mate, let
alone be associated with his cam campaign.
paign. campaign.
BRUCE IS without a doubt the
finest candidate we have to offer,
said Thompson, he is not a
politician, he represents, and is, a
student who is interested first and
foremost in getting things done for
the students on this campus.
We have the tremendous
potential to do great things. We
have to get out and tell our story
to. the student body, because we
cannot carry out our ideas without
winning, and we cannot win sitting
down on our hands.
Election day doesnt end this
campaign or our duty. Election
day is only the beginning.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT has

Interior Marty Schwartz SG uses
40-50 voting machines at a cost
of $22 per machine for rental and
transportation. Election workers
are paid 75 and chairs must be rented for
them. SG also supplies the green
boards to catch party poop at
a cost of $7.50 each*
AND WLAT are the rewards
to the winners? They will get
salaries totalling, at the most,
$2,175. The top four officers each
get $l5O a trimester. The Honor
Court Chancellor receives $75 and
the Honor Court Clerk is given
SSO a trimester. If they each work
three full thrlmesters, their re reward
ward reward would be a total of $2,175.

AT RELIGION TALK TONIGHT

PARTY TO 'BEND IBM CARDS

at a luncheon at 12:1Q p.m. at
the Hub on The University and
the Social Order. Reservations
may still be made by calling uni university
versity university extension 2219.
At the coffee-colloquium in
Johnson Lounge of the Florida
Union at 3:30 p.m., his topic will
be Confronting Racial Enmities.
COFFIN HOLDS B.A. and B.D.
degrees from Yale. Formerly he

never really reached its full
potential of service to the student
body.
Thompson also referred to a
recent quote in The Alligator re remarking
marking remarking that the only way to get
attention at this large university
was for a student to bend his IBM
card. Thompson said, Progress
Party Intends to bend the IBM
card.
FORMER SG vice president Hugh
McArthur Introduced Progress
Partys candidate for the
Treasurers post, Steve

Petty thievery
problem at UF

The majority of theft cases
occurring at the UF according
to Campus Police Officer S.J.
Mahn, are petty thefts.
Mahn said at least two
reports of petty thefts are
reported to UF police every
day. He said the usual theft
is that of wallets, jewelry,
money, and other small Items.
These everyday" thefts
are like some of those
reported lately to the Uni University
versity University Police. A suede coat
was reported stolen from
Rawlings Hall, a wallet from
Norman Hall, a lamp from the
main lobby of the Chi Omega
Sorority House, and SBO from
a wallet in a car parked on
Fraternity Row.
BUT ALSO on record are
the unusual thefts. At the
beginning of this month, near
Floyd Hall, three boys were
caught crossing the campus
with a toilet seat taken from
a trash can at Peabody Hall.
At about the same time a
water cooler was reported
missing from East Hall along
with the screens on a window
in the front lounge.
Why do students steal? Mahn
said he thinks students are
used to having what they want
when they are at home, and
when they come to the univer-
sity they expect their demands
to be met as before.
See 'THEFT' on p. 3

was chaplain at Williams College.
During World War II he served
in Europe as a UJS. Army officer
and as a liaison officer with the
French Army and then for two
years after the war as a liaison
officer with the Russian Army.
During the Korean War he served
abroad working for the Govern Government
ment Government in Russian affairs.
See SEX 1 on Page 2

Tuesday, Jan. 26, 1965

Cheese man. (Cheeseman had been
erroneously referred to in The
Alligator as a candidate for Honor
Court Chancellor. This is not true.
Progress Partys candidate for
Chancellor is Sid Stubbs and he
is being opposed in ACTION Party
by Jack Nichols, and their
Treasurer candidate Cathy
Pierce.)
Cheeseman charged that the
reason that students have felt that
student government is a farce
See CULPEPPER on P. 3

OP
|
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mi
/T
PETTY THEFT |
.like this gives |
merchants head- $
aches on UF campus. $
(Photo by Bob $
Kawka.) $



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Jan. 26, 1965

Stubbs, Segal seek
Honor Court posts
Progress Party candidates for Honor Court posts are Sid Stubbs,
chairman of Honor Court Speakers Bureau, for Chancellor, and
Robert Segal, Legislative Council majority floor leader, for Clerk.
Stubbs, a junior law student, has served in the Honor Court also
as counsel for both prosecution and defense and as acting attorney
general. He is a charter member of the Honor Court Bar Asso Association,
ciation, Association, member of John Marshall Bar Association, Exec. Editor-
Law Review, past chairman of Law School Orientation. He's listed
in Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities.
Sid is excellently qualified for Chancellor, having contributed
to all areas of Honor Court work. His experience will prove in invaluable
valuable invaluable to the student body and the University of Florida Honor
System," said Progress presidential candidate Bruce Culpepper.
Segal, sophomore honors student, has been chairmen of the Rules
and Calender and Constitutional Revisions Committees as well as
floor leader in the Legislative Council. He is an Honor Court Speaker.
Segal has also been active on the Freshman Council, Orientation,
Homecoming, Blue Key Speakers Bureau and the Seminole Staff.
Culpepper said of Segal: Robert Segal's outstanding academic
record at the UF, combined with his active part in all phases of
student activities, highly recommend him to the students for service
as Honor Court Clerk."
Ward, Coffin to be honored

Lady Jackson (Barbara Ward)
and the Reverend William Sloan
Coffin Jr., Religion-in- Life speak speak-1
-1 speak-1 SEX I
' (Continued from Page 1)
Known for his provocative ser sermons
mons sermons and articles appearing re regularly
gularly regularly in leading magazines, in including
cluding including The Nation, Saturday Re Review
view Review and Christian Century, he was
named by Life in 1962 as on* nf
the 100 outstanding men in the UJS.
IN THE summer of 1962, he led
a group of 15 students to Guinea
to participate in work projects as
a part of the Crossroads Africa
program.
In May 1961 he was one of seven
Freedom Riders'* arrested for
civil rights testing in Montgomery,
Ala. He was among the group
arrested in St. Augustine last sum summer.
mer. summer. He has outlined his position
saying that traditionally, every
minister is given two rides; the
priestly and the prophetic. The
prophetic role is the role of the
disturber of the peace...l think the
church in our country has been
remiss in its prophetic role, and
it was precisely when the voice
of the church was silent and with withdrawn
drawn withdrawn that Jim Crow ism esta established
blished established Itself in this country."
Coffin is a member of the boards
of the NAACP legal defense and
education fund, Crossroads Af Africa,"
rica," Africa," and the Freedom of Resi Residence
dence Residence Fund.
A nephew of the late Reverend
Henry Sloane Coffin, at one time
president of the Union Theological
Seminary and one of the great
preachers of the nineteenth
century, Coffin is married to Eva
Rubinstein, a ballet dancer and
actress who appeared on Broad Broadway
way Broadway in The Diary of Anne Frank"
and daughter of the pianist Artur
Rubinstein.
I 1
KLEAN-A-MATIC
LAUNDRY AND
DRY CLEANING
QUALITY IS
OUR SPECIALTY
EXCLUSIVE SANITONE
PROCESS
1722 W. Univ. Ave.

ers, will be honored tonight by
President and Mrs. J. Wayne Reitz
and the University Religious Asso Association
ciation Association at the Religion-ln-Life Re Reception
ception Reception in Bryan Lounge of the
Florida Union.
The reception will follow a major
address by Coffin in University
Auditorium, which begins at 8:15
p.m.
Barbara Ward highlights Reli Religion-in
gion-in- Religion-in Life Week tomorrow at
the University Convocation at 10:55
a.m. in the gym. Her topic will
be Religion and the Enmities
Among Nations."
Miss Ward, a distinguished au author,
thor, author, lecturer and commentator
on contemporary economic, poli political
tical political and cultural problems, is a
former foreign affairs editor of
The Economist of London.
Author of numerous books, in including
cluding including The Rich Nations and the
Poor Nations and Faith and Free Freedom,
dom, Freedom, she is a regular contributor
to the New York Times Sunday
Magazine Section.
Miss Ward is governor of the
British Broadcasting Corporation
and of London's Sadlers Wells
and Old Vic Theatre.
Miss Ward will make impromptu
remarks tomorrow at the annual
Convocation luncheon at 12:10 p.m.
at the Hub. Reservations may be
made by calling university exten extension
sion extension 2219.

X-fcs
Steak
at (§m.
Larrys
- ; v
Large Del Monico,
TUESDAYS Baked Potatoes
v Tossed Salad
STEAK NIGHT 5-9 P.M. Hot Buttered Rolls
$1.07
JUST 1/2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS
LARRY'S
RESTAURANT
1225 W, University Ave,

(Enrollment (
(number falls)
( in January |
x UF enrollment figures for £
£ the 1965 winter trimester £
£ total 14,450 but show a £
:): decline of 1,251 students
*: from the record fall
£: trimester count of 15,701. x
The overall picture is still £
3 one of steady growth, how-
3 ever, with the January figure
3 normally lower than the £
£ previous September £
:£ enrollment each year. £
:£ The new total is an £
£ increase of 1,127 students £
x from January, 1964, and is £
a jump of 2,091 from the
£ corresponding trimester £
figure two years ago.
>: The enrollment includes £
£ 11,732 undergraduates and £
£ 2,718 in post-graduate £
£ studies. There are 10,041
£ men and 4,409 women at the
ft University. £
Three new phones
installed in Graham
John Ostrow, Student Govern Government
ment Government (SG) secretary of housing
announced yesterday the installa installation
tion installation of three new phones in Gra Graham
ham Graham Hall.
The housing secretary has been
working in conjunction with Uni University
versity University Housing, the SG secretary
of women's affairs and the local
phone company in securing more
phones for girl's dormitories.
>y
Leg Council
| There will be a |
I special meeting of |
| the Legislative |
| Council tonight at §
$ 8:30 in Room 324 3
3of the Florida U- 3
£ nion 3
Majority floor 3
| leader Bob Segal 3
3 said the two parties 3
| will caucus at 7:45 |

Girl makes history
as UF 'Top 5 first
Cathy Pierce, 7AS, became the first woman in UF history to run
for a top 5 position as she qualified early Friday as the candi candidate
date candidate for Treasurer of the Student Body from Action Party.
Miss Pierce, a graduate student in political science, is a past
President of Mallory Hall and Chi Omega Sorority.
She had a 3.8 over-all undergraduate average.
CATHY EXEMPLIFIES dynamic leadership with extensive back-"
ground in all phases of student activities, stated Fred Lane, Ac Action
tion Action Party presidential candidate.
Asked about the idea of a woman running for major political of office,
fice, office, Lane replied, Cathys qualifications and record speak for
themselves. Action Party would not have asked her to run had we
not thought that her administrative experience and creativity are
what student government badly needs.
Miss Pierce was also Office Manager for Homecoming 1962,
Secretary of Mortar Board leadership honorary, and Chairman of
the Fine Arts Committee of the Florida Union Board.
She also has served as a member of the Orientation staff and on
the Executive Committee of Religion-and Life Week for two years.
Collins is'Staffer of the Week

Miss UF deadline
set for February 4
The deadline for entering the
choice of any campus organization
for the Miss University of Florida
contest March 3-4 is February 4.
Entrys are now being accepted
at the Florida Union, Room 311.
Contestants will be judged in
formal attire, bathing suits, and
on talent including music, dance,
impressions, and otherwise.
- 1

NEwNocUjneSta;
vmx*X*X X*Xvl*X*'* "*******^X'XvXvX*X X XvX XvXvX*X*Xv>'' XvX<*XvX*X<\*X*XvX*X<<<*X*X\vX*X\vXvX\*>Xy.v.y.y.y.v.v.y.y.\v.v...,
by
v : ::*i'iv''**:': : "****':**'*****x*x'****x*x*xvt*ivivi*i*ivi*is2^
the diamond that dreams are made on
Heres a brilliant beginning for all your hopes and
I joys. Artcarved's newest engagement ring sparkles
with a million flickering lights. Why not know the
beauty of Nocturne Star forever?
Gainesville's Quality Jewelers

Maureen Collins, 3JM, was
named Alligator staffer-of-the
week for her work done as a
member of the Alligator's editor editorial
ial editorial staff.
Miss Collins claims both New
York City, where she was bom,
and Stuart, Florida as her home.
Until I started at the UF,"
she said,l never attended school
for more than half a term a year."
Not only has Miss Collins tra traveled
veled traveled extensively between New
York and Florida, but she has
also visited the Bahamas, Cuba
and Ireland.
She has worked for The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator for two trimesters, besides
working for the Division of In Informational
formational Informational Services.
Miss Collins also has an inter interest
est interest in pets, once having a squirrel,
rooster and snake.
I don't have any pets now,
she said, except the red ants
that run all over my apartment.
But, I'm trying to kill them, so
I don't guess you could really call
them pets.



3,500 'Seminotes sold

About 3,500 Seminole yearbooks
have been sold to date, according
to Joe Coudon, editor.
The 1965 Seminole wont be like
all the rest/* Coudon said. Its
1 THEFT i
from Page 1)*
:3 But at the university they £
$: are on budgets and so they &
steal what they cannot buy/
>;;he said. Q
Most of the thefts reported
to the University Police are
>:from girls dorms, Mahn said. <
But this doesnt mean the boys £:
dont stealthey Just dont $:
g: report thefts as often as the £:
girls do/ he added. &
PETTY theft, according to ;i£
y. Mahn, takes place all year, but x
Sis the heaviest near
S Christmas. He said the best £:
Sway for a student living on >:'
Scampus to insure himself S
Sr against theft is to lock his x
gdormitory room door behind x
jShim. £
S: If the students would lock S
S: their doors, the petty thefts :S
S: would be cut down greatly,
S*he said. But students are ;S
S: careless and dont bother to :S
:S lock their doors or guard their :$
:.S possessions.
One major object in larger
£ thefts is the bicycle. Mahn S:
iSsaid that there are usually S:
:S two bike thefts reported every
| day. g
>: If the students would use
£ locks these thefts would be
x cut down considerably. But
£ students dont take the time,
x and run off, leaving their
x parked bikes unlocked.

I See Whats New in
I
I The Browse Shop
INVISIBLE MAN Ralph Ellison
'j
MAN IN NATURE Marston Bates
ART OF THE RENAISSANCE...Peter & Linda Murray
PRELUDE TO MATH W.W. Sawyer
THE UPANISHADS ed. by Swami Nikhilanoda
PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN
I James Joyce
HER Lawrence Ferlinghetti
I TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
QUANTUM THEORY .Bohm
ION EXCHANGE RESINS Kunin
HANDBOOK OF CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS (45th ed.)
I Campos Shop l Bookstore

got peoplels,ooo of them and
there are some radical departures
in style from previous UF year yearbooks.
books. yearbooks.
This years will be the second
Seminole Coudon has edited.
TOTAL COST of producing the
book runs close to $30,000. Sales
covers about one-third of the cost,
with the remainder coming from
advertising, page sales, ahd stu student
dent student fees.
Coudon said this edition has been
completely reorganized, with more
effective use of division pages and
photographs. He commented that
these areas in last years book
received the most criticism.
There are 24 pages in color this
year compared with eight in 1964.
The total number of pages has
been increased by 48 to 384 which
includes the creation of several
new divisions.
A new dimension in illustrative
photography has been reached in
the introductory and concluding
sections which capture the spirit
of the publication people. Color
is used througout the book for
its visual effect, rather than hap haphazardly.
hazardly. haphazardly.
Coudon stated that the page lay layouts
outs layouts are designed for an intriguing
use of white space, photographs
and copy. Candid photographs are
predominant throughout the book.
v.v.v.V^^.J.XvXvXv/XvXXlvX.vXvXX'j
ELECTION OFFICIALS
Applications for election offi official
cial official positions are now being
accepted in Room 311, Florida
Union, from 3-5 p.m. Each
official will be paid 75? an hour
and must work either from 8
a.m. to 1 p.m. or from 1-6
p.m.
CAVERS
The Florida Speleological So Society
ciety Society will meet in Room 116
Florida Union tomorrow 7 p.m.
ORCHESIS
There will be a meeting of
Orchesis tomorrow 7 p.m. in
the Womens Gymnasium..

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UF DRILL TEAM MEETS UNCLE SAM
...overseeing the inaugural parade in Washinton, D.C., Uncle Sam
takes time off to greet members of the UFs AFROTC Billy Mitcfhell
Drill Team. Marching through the capitol alongside the symbol of
the U.S., the team performed before many dignitaries and government
officials.

mcampus news briefs

WRUF AUDITIONS
Auditions for WRUF-FM
radio will be held tomorrow
7:30 p.m. on the fourth floor
of the stadium, the WRUF WRUFFM
FM WRUFFM room. No experience is
needed to audition.
SIGMA CHI
Winter trimester officers for
Sigma Chi fraternity are Bill
Rochat, president; Joel Pellici,
vice president; Martin Wooten
secretary; Dencan McQuagge,
treasurer; Mac Boyd, steward
and Dave Echols, pledge train trainer.
er. trainer.
ECONOMICS CLUB
The Agricultural Economics
Club will hold a meeting to tonight
night tonight 7 p.m. in Room 160 Mc-
Carty Hall.

We Have More Than
Just K.C. Strip Steaks
For Instance:
GOLDEN BROWN
FRIED CHICKEN #
HOT ROAST If!
BEEF SANDWICH l,lw
LARGE HAMBURGER
STEAK and onions O^V
SERVED WITH FRENCH FRIED, BAKED (with
sour cream or butter) OR MASHED POTATOES,
VEGETABLE, COLE SLAW OR SALAD, AND
HOT ROLLS AND BUTTER
ALSO Aa VA
LONDON BROIL STEAK sl.lO
LARRY'S WONDERHOUSE
14 S.W. First St. (Behind Sears)
10:30 a.m. 8 p.m.
SECOND COFFEE TEA ALWAYS FREE
FOR TAKE-OUT 372-2405

Tuesday, Jan. 26, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

RECRUITING SERVICE
The Air Force officer selec selection
tion selection team for the Southeast will
visit the UF Jan. 27-28. The
team will be located in front
of the Huh from 9 a.m.3:30
p.m. Wednesday and Thursday,
applications will be accepted
for officer training school pro program
gram program from seniors who are
within 210 days of graduation.
Applications for pilot and na navigator
vigator navigator training will be accept accepted.
ed. accepted.
TENNIS CLUB
The Tennis Club will meet
at 4 p.m. on Tuesday at the
Broward tennis courts.

FLORIDA UNION
Applications for the Secre Secretary
tary Secretary of the Florida Union Board
for Student Activities can be
picked up in Room 315 of the
Florida Union.
BAR ASSOCIATION
A meeting of the John Mar Marshall
shall Marshall Bar Association will be
held in the Law School Court Courtroom
room Courtroom tomorrow at noon.
DEBATE SOCIETY
A meeting of the Debate So Society
ciety Society will be in Room 331 Tigert
Hall tonight at 7:30 p.m.
CHRISTIAN
SCIENTISTS
The Christian Science Organ Organization
ization Organization will hold a workshop
tonight 8 p.m. in Room 212
of the Florida Union.
I CULPEPPER 1
(Continued from Page 1)£:
;*
is that the officers of SG have
always Just stayed on the third
floor of the Union.*'
CHEESEMAN WENT on to
announce that he would change this
if elected as he would personally
report to the student body. In this
way the officers would be able to
understand what the problems of
the students are and can better
deal with them/* he said.
CHEESEMAN ALSO announced
a proposed Student Economy
Committee to help cut down
expenses and keep better control
of student finances.'* He said that
he would announce further
specifics next week after he had
spent some time this week cam campaign
paign campaign stomping** in the dorms.
YAMAHA BMW
Motorcycles
For The Discriminating
CYCLERAMA I
378-2811 21 SE 2nd Place |

Page 3



Page 4

[, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Jan. 26, 1965

THE FLORIDA
HSjI ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International
and College Press Service
ERNIE UTZ STEVE VAUGHN ED BARBER
Editor-in-chief Acting Managing Editor Executive Editor
JOE CASTELLO ED SEARS
Editorial Page Editor Sports Editor
Jazz Corner
By CHARLIE BUSH
Columnist
(ED. NOTE: The following comments are by UF jazz pianist
Bob Agnew who performed at the Jazz Concert in University
Auditorium Jan. 16. The concert was sponsored by the Florida
Union.)

WHEN JAZZ attempts to come
to this University, it must over overcome
come overcome some tremendous barriers
to get a foot-hold, but too often
is the case that these barriers
prove insurmountable.
OUTSIDE OF Impressionistic
painting, jazz has become the
major contribution to the American
culture scene. Jazz was developed
in America, by Americans, and
typifies the modern American
society. Jazz took some 300 years
in the making, beginning with the
merger of West African rhythm
and 1/4 tone oriented music to the
European form and harmonic
systems.
BUT JAZZ, as young as it is,
is slowly losing its influence here
in America, land the University of
Florida is aiding in this
suffocation. The rather ignorant
attitude of the University assumes
that the incoming freshman student
already knows something about
jazz, but, on the contrary, he is
totally oblivious of it. He has been
well indoctrinated in non-musical
rock and roll, or what I term
America's 'Black Plague.'
JAZZ SURVIVES and persists
only through the young jazz fan;
jazzs vitality and freshness now
depend on this young generation,
our own 'Pepsi generation* who
believe in only the Watusi, the Slop,
the Twist, and other infantilisms.
This university has spent a fortune
hiring such 'nothingness' as Ace
Cannon for last Summer Frolics.
But what really frosted me was
when the 'Alligator* called Cannon
a jazz alto sax player. Bah! He
couldn't even play good rock and
roll.

GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Buddy Goodman (Sports), Lou Ferris
Jr., (Asst. Mgr. Editor), Mark Freeman (Cartoonist), Stan
Kulp, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Tova Levine (Tigert
Beat Chief) Correspondents, Kay Huffmaster, Frank Shepherd,
Yvette Cardozo, Agnes Fowles, Donita Mathison, BobOsterhoudt,
Dan Taylor, Sam UUman, Pete Wi'noker, Selwin H. Ciment.
STAFFERS: Maureen Collins, Dick Dennis, Marty Gartell,
Judy Knight, Ruth Koch, Steve Kurvin, Ann Carter, Evan
Langbein, Ira Liebsfeld, Thelma Mossman, Dick Schneider, Gay
Slesinger, Fran Snider, Lynda Tolbert, Cynthia Tunstall, Harvey
Wolf Son, John Shiplett, Chip Sharon, Karen Vitunac. Jack
Zocker, David Ropes, Ami Saperstein, Jeffrey Denkewalter
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper
of the University of Florida and is pubflshed five times weekly
except during May, June and July when it is published
semi-weekly. Only editorials represent the official opions of
their authors. The Alligator is entered as second class matter
at the United States Post Office at Gainesville. \

"ANOTHER favorite here at the
university is the unauthentic
pseudo-folksinger.
I ALSO love classical music
but the university and the music
department have carried this to the
far extreme. The only decent music
brought here, through the work of
the Lyceum Council, has been from
orchestras, opera, the Fine Arts
Quartet, and some fine musicians
from our music department, such
as Mr. Russel Danberg and Mr.
Edward Troupin, director of the
University Orchestra. But here
also the music department is
failing in the cause of jazz.
SURE, THEY have a twenty twentypiece
piece twentypiece dance band led by Robert
Foster, but what is needed
desperately are courses in jazz
history, theory, harmonies, and
most important, a jazz workshop
where students actually play jazz
under the guidance of musical
supervisors.
CONCERNING the jazz concert
on Saturday, January 16th, the
news coverage and publicity proved
to be the most miserable failure of
all. Hardly anyone in Gainesville
knew about the concert and Florida
Union couldn't have cared less.
Consequently, about 500 people
turned out for the only jazz offered
here at the University this year.
WHEN ASKED where our next
concert here will be, I simply say
that there-probably won't be a next.
My thanks to Charlie Bush, a
hard working jazz musician, for
the use of his column.*

#* FREEMAN FORMULATES **
Know It's Terrible, Biit Let's
the florlda lorum =

NOP answer
EDITOR:
After reading Mr. Kurvins eloquent misrepre misrepresentation
sentation misrepresentation of fact, I feel prompted to write a reply
in order to clarify certain situations about the New
Peel and Student Publications in general.
For one thing, I never said my magazine is "what
the students want.'* A certain ridiculous cutline
taken out of context did. What I have contended all
along is I know what the students want, but am
helpless to alleviate the present situation. Please
do not attribute a level of conceit to me I have not
reached yet.
More importantly, the New Peel may be a part of
Student Publications, but Student Publications
represents a standing committee of the university;
thus, the New Peel is subject unfortunately to the
censorship of the university because it represents
the university.
You would be doing Student Publications a greater
favor Mr. Kurvin if you had addressed your letter
not to what's in a name, but rather to the more
important issue of freedom of the press, in particular
the issue of religious and sexual humor in an
environment of gentility and repression.
DON FEDERMAN
Editor-in-chief, New Orange Peel
*****
EDITOR:
If mediocrity, or the referred to gray area,'*
is representative of what students want to read,
as Messrs. Kurviro and Federman believe, better
the New Orange Peel be discontinued. Why broadcast
bad taste?
GAEL STACK
No Yonkel at UF
EDITOR;
IN REFERENCE to the letter in Fridays Gator
about the fictitious student at Georgia Tech, I
challenge and protest.
I HAVE HAD a few more years of experience here
at the University than Miss Farber, lUC. During
that time I have had my ups and downs but have
generally found genuinely interested counselors and
professors. I would never deny that some are
unwilling to take the time, but there are many of the
caliber of Dr. Cox, a University College counselor,
who are. Dr. Cox spent several hours with me on a
personal problem when I was a sophomore. I got
this help not because of any special circumstances
or abilities, but because I went to see him.
IT IS NOT the University's obligation nor is it

within the capability of the University to search
out those with problems and solve them for the
student. They can only aid the student when and if
he decides to solve his own problem.
MEN LIKE Dr. Barger in Mental Health are
available for more serious personal problems, but
the student has got to go to his office. I don't think
we can expect home visits.
REV. SPRINGFIELD, referred toinMissFarber's
letter, is also part of the "facilities" available to a
large segment of the students. He proves over and
over that the best way to get attention is not to bend
your IBM card but to actively seek out the kind of
help you need.
WITH OVER 200 semester hours at the university
I cant believe that I have merely been lucky. I hope
Miss Farber in her future years at UF will not take
what she says to seriously. If she does then she is
automatically rejecting a very important and effective
service that is offered by many dedicated
professionals on and around the campus.
JESS ELLIOTT, 7ED
POLITICAL ECHOES
Fart V, cont.
By RON SPENCER
Columnist
In the middle of January Ritch issued a statement
challenging whether Gator Party presidential and
chancellor candidates Kennedy and Richman,
respectively, were planning to serve full terms, if
elected* Kennedy replied in the affirmative, but
Richman stated his desire to leave upon graduation
in December.
On Jan. 20, the UF Election Board found Gator
Party guilty of two charges regarding illegal dis distribution
tribution distribution of election campaign materials*
After a milder-than-usual campaign sparked and
spiced with grandiose dance parties in the dormi dormitories,
tories, dormitories, the students went to the polls on Feb. 6
and decided that Ken Kennedy should preside on The
Third Floor.
KENNEDY AND GOBER received 3804 votes votes-545
-545 votes-545 more than the Harshaw-Adams teamas voter
turnout dipped below that of the previous year.
Treasurer candidate Fred Lane was the only V.0.T.E.-
candidate to win a Top Five berth, as he defeated
Gator's Dave Yost by a 300-vote margin, 3506 to
3206.
Gerry Richman nipped Paul Huck by approximately
100 votes to win the Chancellor of the Honor Court
slot, and Steve Cheese man far outdistanced V.O.T.E.
clerk nominee Jim Cooner, polling 3754 votes to
Cooner*s 2931.
Both parties remained intact following the Gator
victory, with V.O.T.E. challenging Gator repeatedly
in Legislative Council in view of its majority status,
then winning the majority of the seats in the fall
election.
However, in view of early 1965 pre-election
maneuvering, the two parties dissolved, parts of
them coalescing into the new Progress Party and
other pa. Us fusing with anew, DAiiti cal creature
originally begun as a "Third Party" in the fall,
ACTION Party.



Religion week
EDITOR:
FROM THE articles appearing in the Alligator,
and the printed program which has been distributed,
it is evident that this years Religion (?)-in-Life
Week will be basically the same as last years.
Therefore, as a Christian and a taxpayer I must
object to public facilities being used to support the
establishment of a religion.
THE LIBERAL (not really very liberal since he
can't see my viewpoint) immediately jumps up and
cries that no particular religion is propagated in any
of the activities, but he is wrong.
PEOPLE CAN be divided into two categories,
those who say any religion is OK, and those who
think that only their religion is the proper one.
The first group will be allowed to propagate their
views during this week but the second group will
have no voice.
IRONICALLY the first group belong largely to
"churches" that claim to be based on the teachings
of the Bible. But the author of the Bible (H Tim.
3:16 All Scripture is given by inspiration of God)
is very narrow and not at all liberal and open openminded
minded openminded about what constitutes a proper religion.
JN 14:6 "Jesus saith unto him, I am the way,
the truth and the life: no mancometh unto the Father
except by me." Acts 4:12 "Neither is there salvation

Liberal?
EDITOR:
IT IS regrettable that American
liberals (and conservatives)
persist in building their cases on
mythological interpretations of the
lives of their great-grandfathers.
To read that the l9th century
liberal would allow the business businessman
man businessman a wide range of freedom
without imposing upon him any
social obligations" is to be
offended in the intelligence. In the
first place, this type of
"liberalism" is properly labled
laissez-faire economic
individualism. It belongs to the 18th
century and very early 19th.
Secondly, my recollection of the
period in England (the home of the
term "liberal") is that "a wide
range of freedom" in the implied
sense of robber-baronage and ex exploitation
ploitation exploitation was seldom if ever
extensively practiced, and never
socially accepted.
HOW DOES Mr. Rozman propose
to explain that almost all the
leaders of the social reform move movements
ments movements (from Francis Place to
Joseph Chamberlain) were
successful businessman? Third, it
seems that free trade and other
freedoms" may have been
intended to promote the national
prosperity, create Jobs, raise real
wages, and provide a large number
of persons with the material pros prosperity
perity prosperity which has always been
associated with social respect and
a sense of self-respect among
English-speaking peoples. (Color
was not then a factor in society).
THE INTERVE NTION of govern government
ment government came after the success of
this "wide range of freedom"
disappeared due to changed
economic conditions and it had
become apparent other means had
to be found to insure a continued
high level of economic prosperity
for all. I do not find either approach
lacking in "social obligations" for
the businessman.
IT WOULD be refreshing if con contemporaries
temporaries contemporaries concerned with
respect for those who are dead,
as well as for the living. For
the sake of the latter they ought
to learn enough about the former
to do us all the service of not
perpetuating myths which only
cloud current issues and obscure
whatever insight the liberal (or
conservative) may be bringing to
them. Thanks.
AN HISTORIAN, 7 AS

the florida forum

Ford Motor
Company is:
* f
variety
* Its been written that variety is the spice of life.
But at many companies its difficult to obtain a
wide range of work experiences. A college gradu graduate
ate graduate can join a company, get locked into one type
of activity and stay there and stay there and stay
there. Thats not the way we do it at Ford Motor
; Company where our young men may work in
several areas to develop their full capabilities. We
believe that a thorough grounding in many phases
of our business is one of the best ways to cultivate
Robert Anderson management talent. An example: Bob Anderson
A.8., Univ. of So. Carolina
M.8.A., Stanford University OI OUr finance Stall.
Since Bob came to us in July, 1963, hes been
actively involved in five important areas of the Company. As a member
of our finance staff, he has reviewed budget and cost programs of a division
marketing cars, another manufacturing tractors and subsidiaries engaged
in automobile financing and insurance. In addition, Bob was selected to
assist in the 1964 national labor-management negotiations. His present
assignment is as a staff budget analyst for product engineering and styling.
Because of experiences like these, Bob will be able to channel his career
toward the activity that interests him most.
As a large automobile concern, Ford Motor Company needs people who
can handle a wide variety of assignments. Our college graduates come to
us with all types of educational backgrounds. And many of them move
into management positions unrelated to their degrees. If a fast-moving
career appeals to you, see our representative when he visits your campus.
He may have the spice for your future.
THERES A FUTURE FOR YOU WITH... MOTOR COMPANY
The American Road, Dearborn, Michigan
An equal opportunity employer

in any other: for there is none other name under
heaven given among men, whereby we must be
saved." JN 3:18 "He that believeth on him is not
condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned
already, because he has not believed in the name of
the only begotten Son of God." These verses leave
no room for other religions.
IT WOULD seem that all who believe that any
religion is OK should disassociate themselves from
Christian Churches and join an anti-Christian club
(Mat 12:30 "He that is not with me is against me")
such as the Unitarians ( II Cor 11:13 For such are
false prophets, deceitful workers). And then the
Fundamental Christians, liberal "Christians,"
Catholics, Jews, Moslems, etc. should all be given
equal time to present their views during Religion(?)-
in-Life Week. But I realize that such will not likely
come to pass (I Tim 4:1 "In the latter times some
shall depart from the faith, giving heed to seducing
spirits, and doctrines of devils.")
Ic-
JOHN R. THAYER
Instructor in Engineering
*****
EDITOR:
THE ARTICLES and comments regarding the
coming Religion-In-Life Week compel me to offer

Tuesday, Jan. 26, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

this, from an article by Frank E. Gabelein in
Christianity Today.
"IN A DAY when philosophy has invaded the pulpit
and professional theological jargon obscures basic
Christian truth, we need to remember, that aside
from the power of the Spirit, the greatest assets
a preacher may have is plain speech. The late C. S.
Lewis told of a young parson whom he heard
close a sermon like this, "My dear friends, if you
do not accept this truth, there may be for you grave
eschatological consequences. 1 asked him, said
Dr. Lewis, if he meant that his hearers would be
in danger of going to hell if they didnt believe.
And when he said, Yes, I replied, Then why didnt
you say so?"
"OUR COUNTRY with its violences and corruption,
its God-forgetfulness which we call securalism but
which is actually atheism by default, its moral
caUousness and selfish materialism, its racial
prejudice and its internal strife, its full of needs and
burdens that summon Christians to join what Emile
Cailliet calls the brotherhood of the heavyladen.
Yet basic to all these needs is the need of sinful
human beings for the transforming Gospel of Jesus
Christ."
VERILY, verily, the answer to the 'enmities of
man" is to be found only in the "transforming
Gospel of Jesus Christ." Thanks for the opportunity
to get in "the Word."
ROBERT BESALSKI

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Jan. 26, 1965

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS I

For Sale
CUSHMAN EAGLE, mechanically
excellent and highly reliable. Re Rebuilt
built Rebuilt and repainted last year. $147.
Call BUI at 376-2420.(A-80-st-c).
OWN YOUR OWN TRAILER and
enclosed cabana. Located in an
oak grove, over looking Bevens
Arm. CaU FR 2-5449 after "5.
(A-80-st-c).
1960 ALLSTATE VESPA, good
transportation $95; Kodak Retina
IIC 35 mm camera S6O; Honeywell
Futuramlc H Strobe S4O, Both
S9O. Telephone 376-9675. (A-79-
st-c).
MARRIED STUDENTS take a study
break and look at a great traUer.
8x36 with 9xl 2 room cabana.
This outfit is COMPLETELY
FURNISHED. Payments lower than
GainesvUle rent and you can seU
when you graduate. Quiet
surroundings 5 minutes from
campus. CaU for appointment
372-0679 before 3:30 or after caU
Paradise Trailer Park.
(A-72-ts-c).
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER
Six 500 sheet boxes. 4 boxes of
buff, 2 boxes of white. RetaU for
S2O per box. WUI sacrifice for
$lO per box. Call Ext. 2832 between
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. (A-71-tf-nc).
:'y:vx
EXCLUSIVELY W^SrmSSiSSSS
i:3o Jax Civic 8;30
p -* c Auditorium P,M
Friday, Jan 29
Prices s4.so-*3.so-*2.so
Tickets now on Sale Civic
Auditorium and Hemming Park
Ticket Office
Reservations Accepted
Phone Auditorium 354-2041
2 COLOR
HITS
FIRST AREA SHOWING
Shows Twice 7:00 & 10:30
Tbftu Curtis Natalie Wood
I Henry Fonda I
Lauren Bacall
{sS]t? Mel Ferrer?
OriMl LESLIE PiMWISH and EDWARD EVERETT HORTON
TKNMCOUM* hoNM hr WAhHEh MOL

For Sale
WESTINGHOUSE WASHER 2
years old exceUent condition SIOO.
30- inch FRIGID AIRE stove one
year old. Like new SIOO. Stroller
with canopy and shopping basket.
Folds up $lO. 376-2502. (A-78-
st-c).
VESPA SCOOTER driven only 8
weeks. Absolutely brand new con condition.
dition. condition. Call 8-1172. Between 5 and
7 p.m. (A-78-3t-c).
For Rent
NEW 3 BEDROOM CCB House.
AU tUe bath and kitchen. WUI
rent furnished or unfurnished.
Arrendonda Estates, Archer Road.
CaU 6-5826. (B-80-tf-nc).
APARTMENT for rent SBS per
month. One bedroom duplex.
Paneled living room. Furnished.
Very nice condition. FR 6-6461
After 5 p.m., 378-1260. (B-79-
2t-c).
GLYNDALE APARTMENTS.
Modern,furnished, air-conditioned
apartment. S9O per month, 1825
NW 10th Street. CaU 372-2150.
(B-79-2t-c).
NEW APARTMENTS, completely
furnished. One bedroom, swimming
pool, all electric kitchen, central
heat, air-cond. S9O per month.
372-3826. (B-78-ts-c).
EFFICIENCY APARTMENT for
single lady. Clean, reasonable.
1702 W. University Ave. CaU 376-
3012. (B-77-st-c).
UNFURNISHED, TWO LARGE
Rooms, 1 1/2 bath, large kitchen.
Ideal for 2 or 3 seniors or grad,
students. Quiet area. SBS per
month. 923 NE 3rd Ave. CaU 376-
9992. (B-77-st-c).
DOUBLE ROOM Available for male
students. Convenient to Campus
and shopping area. $32.00 per
person per month including
utUittes and maid service. See at
104 S. W. Bth Street after 5 p.m.
(B-71-tf-nc).
1 1 "
Personal
DRY CLEAN 8 lbs. $1.50. This
is approx. 10 articles of clothing.
GATOR GROOMER Coin Laundry,
next to University Post Office.
Bring your own hangers.
(J-69-ts-c).
CAttJGRaNT
LesuewroN =
i FffljjeGoose'j
I floridal

MfljgN BBfIWDO
Eastman QOL OR
fsW&MSTKS I |,*fo BED OR MOT
U l£ TO BED 1

Autos
1964 TR-4 Hardtop. ExceUent
condition, low mileage. CaU 376-
1474. (G-80-st-c).
SB CHEVY V-8, Radio
Phone 2-0491 after 7 p.m. (G-80-
ts-c).
---- -
53 TD-2 MG ROADSTER. SSOO
or best offer. CaU FR 6-8543
after 5 p.m. (G-80-4t-c).
1962 MERCEDES BENZ 190 C
Sedan. Good condition. Less than
s2loo.During day call FR 6-3211,
Ext. 5467 and after 6 p.m. 372-
4763. (G-79-3t-c).
62 CHEVY 409, 2-door, Impala,
SS, 4 speed transmission, bucket
seats, PS A PB, exceUent con condition.
dition. condition. One owner. CaU 372-3826.
(G-78-ts-c).
-
1956 FORD STATION WAGON from
original owner. S2OO. 1952 Chev Chevrolet
rolet Chevrolet sedan, $l5O. CaU FR 2-
5091. (G-78-st-c).
59 FORD Automatic RAH WSW,
Immaculate condition. $550. CaU
2-4145 after 8 p.m. (G-80-3t-c).
Lost & Found
LOST: A POST VERS A LOG slide
rule. If found please caU Mike
White. FR 2-9216. Large Reward.
(L-SO-2t-c).
FOUND: PAIR of WOMENS
glasses found near Murphree
Dormitory. CaU Perry Thompson,
372-9174. (L-80-lt-p).
Wanted
TW6 COEDS WANT to rent or
share apartment (through AprU)
near campus. Preferably NW
Area. Any reasonable rate. FR
6-1343. (C-80-3t-c).
MALE STUDENT to share 5 room
house 4 1/2 miles from campus.
$35 per month includes utUltles.
CaU 376-6191 evenings. (C-79-
st-p).
WANTED 1950 1955 Fords and
Chevrolets. AL HERNDONS
SERVICE STATION, 916 S. E.
4th Street. (C-73-20t-c).
Services
EXPERIENCED DRESS MAKING.
Start your spring wardrobe now.
Sheath or shift from $7.00. Full
skirt from SIO.OO. CaU Mrs.
Harkey 376-7397. (M-78-3t-c).
SPORTSMENS
CYCLE CENTER
617 N. Main St.
SUZUKI
Sales & Service

Help Wanted
I
PAID SUBJECTS WANTED to test
effectiveness of self teaching text
book on LOG LAN. $1.25 per hour
plus travel time. About 20 hours.
CaU Dr. Brown FR 2-1052. (E (E---80-ts-c).
--80-ts-c). (E---80-ts-c).
BAND COMBO FOR entertainment
at University Inn. See Mrs. Quinn.
FR 2-6333. (E-80-3t-c).
PIANO PLAYER or organist from
6 to 12 midnight, full or part parttime.
time. parttime. University Inn, FR 2-6333,
see or ask for Mrs. Quinn. (E (E---79-3t-c).
--79-3t-c). (E---79-3t-c).
YOUNG MAN to work 7 to 9 a.m.,
Tuesday through Saturday. Apply
Sears, Roebuck, 14 S. Main. CaU
2-8461$ (E-79-3t-c).

Nb matter how you like your hair cut,
long, h r*,
or somewhere IH between,
. FLA. UNION
she BARBER SHOP wil do !t P rfecri y-
FLA. UNION BASEMENT
Open 8-5 Weekdays, 8-Noon Sat.
^JBfe^PSTRONizr""^BPb
Tout) nVCKTISItf^
INTERESTED
Mb
WORKING
With
Interesting People?
We have students working for us who have
traveled in all 50 states plus England, France,
Spain, Mexico, Italy, Canada, Greece, East
and West Germany, Israel, Egypt, Japan, Hol Holland,
land, Holland, Viet Nam, Belgium, Czechoslovakia,
Austria, Poland, Switzerland, Luxembouig,
El Salvador and Cuba.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

.
Real Estate
DUPLEX INVESTMENT. Excellent
rental area. Ideal for couple,
professor or retiree, 2-bedroom
with lovely carport. For sale or
exchange. Call Les Jackson
Associate, Ernest Tew Realty,
376-6461. (I-77-st-c).
3-BEDROOM, 2-BATH inldlewild.
Well-pump, large lot. Florida
Power. $13,500. 3920 SW 21st.
Street. 2-5765. (I-77-st-c).
FUTURE HOMESITE OR GOOD
INVESTMENT. 5 and 20 acre tracts
off Newberry Road West of Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. 5 acre tracts with highway
frontage only S4OO per acre, 20
acre tracts off Highway only S3OO
per acre. Low down payment, easy
terms. Call Wayne Mason c/o
Ernest Tew Realty any time. 376-
6461. (1-76-st-c).



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BLANCHARD TUAL STREAKS IN THE BACKSTROKE
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7 cJays a week, 11 to 9
706 W. University Ave.

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211 W. University Ave.

Gators stop Tide
for fifth straight

Swimmers
Wallop
Alabama
o
Florida's swimming team
bounced back into the win column
following last week's loss to FSU
as the Gators smashed Alabama
61-33 Monday afternoon at Flor Florida
ida Florida Pool.
Paced by double winners Tom
Dloguardi and Ray Whitehouse, the
UF tankers thoroughly out-classed
Bam a, winning every swimming
event save the 500 yard freestyle.
Dioguardi set meet records in the
50 and 100 yard freestyle events.
Team captain Whitehouse claimed
first place laurels in the 200 yard
butterfly and the 200 yard indivi individual
dual individual medley.
Outstanding backstroker Blan-
chard Tual turned in another ster sterling
ling sterling performance for the Gators,
establishing new meet pool and
varsity marks in the 200 yard
backstroke. Tual swam the dis distance
tance distance in 2:03.3 to break the re record
cord record of 2:03.6 which he set only
last week against Florida State,

TUSCALOOSA, Ala.Florida's
basketball team downed Alabama
67-51 here Monday night.
Coach Norm Sloan shuttled Ga Gators
tors Gators in and out like wild cards
as they wrapped up their sixth
conference win against one loss.
All eight cagers who played
scored between 5 and 12 points,
with Brooks Henderson holding the
latter total* Bob Hoffman was se second
cond second high scorer with 11 points
and did some sterling work under
the boards with 10 rebounds.
Skip Higley had his third con consecutive
secutive consecutive fine game, dumping in
eight points and handling the
ball extremely well.
Phi Tau garners
Orange pin title
Phi Kappa Tau walked off with
the championship in Orange
Bowling, winning two straight
games from Pi Lambda Phi in the
finals.
The Phi Tau's copped the first
contest by a razor thin 853-849
but walloped Pi Lam in the sec second
ond second match 954-869.
Barry Biebel and Hal Jones
led the scoring in the second
game with 211 and 209 respectively.
Jim Brown was tops in the first
test with 192.
Other members of the victorious
team were Bob Hall and Wilson
Hurd.

V
NOTICE
Applications are being accepted until January 27 at noon
for MANAGING EDITOR of J||o FloHda AltigOtOr
for the current trimester.

Applications are also being accepted until January 27 at
noon for OPINIONS EDITOR and HUMOR EDITOR posts on
The New Orange Peel
Application forms and information concerning qualificq qualificqtions
tions qualificqtions may be obtained in Room 9, Florida Union, from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Deadline for turning in
applications is noon, Jan. 27, 1965.
Board o! Student Publications
-

SPORTS

Tuesday, Jan. 26, The Florida Alligator/

r--CHECK THE RECORD

Murphree males
physically fit
m
thanks to fence ml/Is
By EDDIE SEARS
Sports Editor
The male residents of Murphree Area have come up with
a new way to keep physically fit.
The Gainesville Police Dept, and Plants and Grounds working
closely together have constructed an obstacle course for stu students
dents students trying to cross University Avenue.
First, Plants and Grounds put up a fence with lots of nice
spikes on top and planted trees (rumors are they are man maneating)
eating) maneating) on the other side.
The students were delighted. Fence vaulting and the 5-yard
bench leap became popular sports. Os course there were those
guys knocked holes In the fence,
but quickly Plants and Grounds plugged up the gap. Too bad
a garbage truck doesn't go out of control and set a new record
for most fence destroyed.
But then the Police decided to help and removed the cross crosswalk.
walk. crosswalk. Now since there is no longer a legal crosswalk to get
across the street, the students have to play dodge the Mack
truck.
Thanks to those loyal men who try to keep us in good shape.

It was a mistake to be sure,- but it was a costly one. When
President J. Wayne Reitz was speaking on television Saturday
afternoon the Gator basketball team hustled In and began going
through warm-up exercises.
The noise--thank goodness not the picture was heard by
a T.V. audience of about 500,000 people. Although we won't
be on television again it is common courtesy when Dr. Reitz
or anyone else is speaking to listen.
No one is to blame, but it must not happen again.

Page 7



Page 8

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Jan. 26, 1965

** Meet The Gators **

HES DONE IT AGAIN | Donigans Year-end Clearance Sale
( Char-broiled '"N I lady's sportswear
r 1 Dresses, wool skirts, wool pants, blouses
jSteak Sandwich with fried onion &
vnu Akir § Sportscoats, jackets, shirts, sweaters jEflff 11 ff If K
'' j UIMt suits, outerwear, belts, ties jr Hh I
/- :; I -ill
x 4;.w V '. $ x?F7%
Complete Line of Equipment w. \ >:
CLUBS GLOVES cg|p IIIAI FY S Mm3'"#f?s(i&
BAGS HEADCOVERS g JIUr mVMI g
CARTS RETREIVERS Meet Skip Higley, sophomore guard and one of the pleasant surprizes of the current
BALLS SHOES & season. Not slated for much action at the beginning of the season, Higley has become one $:
of the key players on the Gatorswinning basketball team.
Known for his hustle and outstanding defensive ability, Higley has played in every game
flp||v\ to date. He has also shown that he is a clutch scorer, hitting 6 of 7 field goal attempts
:: against Miami and Kentucky and helping to turn the tide for the Gators in both games.
>: Higley often is called upon by Coach Norman Sloan to substitute for Baxley or Henderson
I
\ excellent ball handler when the Gators have needed him most. ..*/..
| yI |W I iIIBIL S
I 'm Higley hit for a 10.3 scoring average on last years freshman team.
RACKETS, BALLS, PRESSES, SHORTS FOR MEN, SKIRTS FOR LADIES, § Whats BLACK and HI and RIGHT? WEnV
SHOES, STOCKING AND RACKET RESTRINGING g
JMMpaapHapMg Hs this Jarman saddle shoe, of course. No riddle to that. The old campus favorite
ITROPHIES I ICDCrVC FRATERNITY & I* neVer really out but m strictl y ,tUI ~ ls better than ever with cushion crepe sole
IJKIIvK I w heel for easy walking. If you want to be right in style on the campus, come in right
IFOR ALL AWARDS!-u|-. TculOT SORORITY SHIRT £pj away for your pair of black-and-white 'saddles.
| ENGRAVING p JIfIAISnIKTS| LETTERED AND V4 4 44 P sl3 99
Jimmie Hughes Sporting Goods | Mlf. UPTlCnfcll £ f
1113 W. University Avenue "Where Educated Feet Meet" To Size
1 BLOCK EAST OF CAMPUS n 27 west university ave. ,3