Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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MSB
CULPEPPER

ALUGATOR

&\*. 4 - iffliffMft^l^ii^if'' 1
pp - .&
y.^'-y.& H||
~ |yj '.:% |? 'VtR
IF^
F
...cars are lined up at the rush hour, leaving
UF campus onto University Avenue.

Jaywalkers beware!
In case you hadn't noticed, Gainesville has a traffic problem.
Every weekday around 5 p.m. the flow of campus traffic onto
University Avenue reaches jamming proportions. And students
are not helping, according to Campus Police Investigator Gene
Watson.
Jaywalkers create additional bottlenecks, especially around
the intersection of University Avenue and 17 Street.
Watson agreed that the area is a hazard and that someone
may easily be injured.
Campus Police have tried to facilitate use of the cross-walks
resulting in disciplinary action against students for destruction
of shrubbery planted to help alleviate the situation, Watson said.
The street light is under city control and possible cooperation
between the campus and city departments may help solve the
problem of poor traffic flow and help diminish the hazard, he
said.
But the fact is there will still be trafficand foot loose students.
So be careful, whether you are a student or a driver.
You may out-live the trimester.

SG Labor Secretary named

By KAY HUFFMASTER
Staff Writer
Mike Malaghan yesterday was
appointed acting Secretary of
Labor. He is taking the place of
Bob DeLoach, recently appointed
administrative assistant to presi president
dent president Ken Kennedy.
Malaghan, former Under Undersecretary
secretary Undersecretary of Labor, says of De-
Loach, I feel I was working for
t the best man in student govern government.
ment. government. I was fortunate to be his

Vol. 57, No. 72

New campus party formed

By ERNIE LITZ
Editor-In-Chief
The arrival of the annual political extrava extravafanza
fanza extravafanza on campus, called spring elections has
een heraled in this year by the creation of
the fourth new political party in the past two
years.
The new party, as yet unnamed, will list
a slate headed by former Gator football Cap Captain
tain Captain and scholastic leader Bruce Culpepper
for Student Body President.
SEE NEW PARTY, P. 2

assistant ana to step in when he
obtained his advancement.
/DeLoach has made the Depart Department
ment Department of Labor into a major cabi cabinet
net cabinet post. I intend to follow the
same procedures 35 he and to
consult with him.
Malaghan will hold the position
until one week after elections,
one month away.
During this month he plans to
make all tutoring services avail available
able available to students through the De Department
partment Department of Labor.

ICULPEPPER NAMED CANDIDATE?

Student wage
increase may
finally come
By YVETTE CARDOZO
Staff Writer
The first formal
step toward higher
student wages at the
UF has finally been
taken.
The Subcommittee on Student
Employment has accepted four of
five Student Government recom recommendations
mendations recommendations on student wages.
These suggestions were bused
on a survey of UF student wages
made late last trimester by Bob
De Loach, administrative
assistant to SG Pres. Ken Kennedy.
The survey showed that students
working on campus receive lower
pay than those employed off cam campus
pus campus in the surrounding Gainesville
area and on most campuses around
the United States.
The four accepted recommen recommendations
dations recommendations were:
(1) to raise the minimum on oncampus
campus oncampus hourly wage from 75 to
85 cents; to raise this minimum
gradually over a three year period
to $1;
(2) to establish a program to
assist off-campus employers in
hiring students; and (3) to do
away with the present policy of
basing wages on educational level.
THE FOURTH recommendation,
to replace the present educational
level wage scale policy with a job
classification system.
In tabling this recommendation
the Subcommittee report said,
Each college, school or depart department
ment- department has the perogative of classi classifying
fying classifying its own positions.
De Loach added, The sub subcommittee
committee subcommittee considers a job classi classification
fication classification system to complex toobe
fully studied at the present.
From the subcommittee, the four
accepted recommendations will go
to the parent Committee on Stu Student
dent Student Financial Aid. This com committee
mittee committee will make formal
recommendatioins to the
President's Council and The Bud Budget
get Budget Committee. These last two
bodies will make the final
on the student wage
situation.

These are the fraternities from former
Gator and V.O.T.E. Parties claimed as
aligned with the newly announced
organization: XAn
VOTE GATOR
DELTA UPSILON
PHI KAPPA TAU TAU EPSILON PI
SIGMA CHI SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON
KAPPA SIGMA ALPHA TAU OMEGA
PI KAPPA ALPHA THETA CHI
ALPHA GAMMA RHO DELTA SIGMA PHI
ALPHA EPSILON PI LAMBDA CHI ALPHA

Thursday, Jan. 14, 1965

MWm--
RUSHER

Rusher speaks
tonight; wants
UN abolished
William A. Rusher, publisher of
the conservative National Review
magazine, will speak tonight in
favor of abolishing the United
Nations.
Rushers talk will be presented
in the University Auditorium at
8:15.
The publisher, who graduated
from Harvard Law School in 1948,
was formerly Counsel to the Senate
Internal Security Subcommittee
investigating domestic com communism.
munism. communism.

...tsk tsk |
$: TALLAHASSEE(UPI)-The board of r< ;ents refused Wednesday :£
£to reinstate in the University of South Florida two male students £
>: suspended for keeping a coed out of her dormitory after an ;X
& 11 p.m. curfew. :£
£ Richard O'Brien, a 20-year-old St. Petersburg senior, and :£
£: Roger Krohne, a 21-year-old junior from Orlando, were sus sus|
| sus| pended Oct. 26,1964. $
£ Dr. John Allen, university president, said they were joined £:
in their off-campus apartment by an 18 year-old freshman
coed on Oct. 14. The girl failed to sign out of her dormitory £
£ and did not return until the dean of women called the apartment >:
x and ordered her back to the campus about 3 a.m. :£
>: The two students said the girl was helping them study for a :&
£ mid-term examination. "She was doing me a good deal of good £
>:j by helping me pass the exam/ O'Brien said. §:
:£ He didn't specify the course. £i
v
... . . t *rni f r?r#'.

Qualification
deadline
draws near

Qualification dead deadline
line deadline for all students
seeking offices in the
spring elections is 5
p.m., Friday, Jan. 22,
according to Marty
Schwartz, secretary
of the interior.
Schwartz said qualification fees,
ranging from $4-SB,, must be paid
by this date to Fred Lane student
body treasurer, in Room 307 of
the Florida Union.
Positions to be filled by the
spring elections include those -of
president of the student body, vce vcepresident,
president, vcepresident, treasurer, chancellor
of the Honor Court, clerk of the
Honor Court, president of the Ly Lyceum
ceum Lyceum Council, vice-president of
the Lyceum Council, four Lyceum
Council members and three Board
oi Student Publications members.
Twelve Honor Court justices,
one from each of the following
colleges, will also be elected:
Agriculture, Arts and Sciences,
Business Administration, Educa Education,
tion, Education, Medicine, Pharmacy, Physi Physical
cal Physical Education and Health, Law,
Engineering, Architecture and
Fine Arts, Nursing, and Health
Related Services. Two Honor
Court justices will be chosen from
the freshman class and two from
the sophomore class.
A total of 23 Legislative Council
members will be elected from
these colleges and from the
Schools of Journalism and
Forestry. In addition, the fresh freshman
man freshman class will elect eight and
the sophomore class nine mem members.
bers. members.
All students running for these
offices must have at least a 2-.0
average and must be full-time
UF students. The Honor Court
Chancellor must have completed
20 hours in the College of Law.



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Jqn. 14, 1965

cvi IBi
yfpife^
.# M
TWO MEMBERS OF THE FLORIDA PLAYERS
.. .production crew, left to right, Charlie Harper
ana Jerry Rentz check the stage plans forWaltz
Os The Toreadors. (Photo by Nick Arroyo.)

Players to hold
open house tonight

Florida Players will hold an Open House this evening at
7:30 p.m. at Norman Hall Auditorium for all students interested
in theatre.
According to Director of Theatre, Dr. L.L. Zimmerman,
the open house is desinged for everyone from English to agricul agriculture
ture agriculture majors who is interested in learning about theatre.
Zimmerman stressed that this is going to be a teaching
term around Florida Players.
We are going to stress instruction in the basics of theatre
techniques, for use not just on one show, but also on future
productions, he said.
WORK HAS already begun on the next Players production,
Waltz of the Toreadors which will be presented Feb. 18-21,
and 25-27. The open house will give students a chance to talk
informally with the various crewheads about the type of activity
involved in each of the production areas, Zimmerman added.
The various crew types include construction, costuming, lighting,
sound, painting, and special effects.
Around Florida Players our motto tends to be *no experience
necessary,* and what we are trying to do with this open house
is let any interested student have a chance to meet and talk with
the directors, the technical assistants, and student members of
Florida Players,** Zimmerman said.

AG DAMES
The Agriculture Dames will
hold their next meeting at the
home of Mrs. J.R. Greenman,
3459 NW 11th Ave., Thurs.

Oii HoM£'-BA< 6 l>
me Mr of the
UJHolf campus
fr
tomanellas
706 West University'Avenue

at 7:30 p.m. Anyone wishing
to attend and go in the mo motorcade
torcade motorcade should meet at the
University Womens Club be between
tween between 7:30 and 7:45 p.m.

Q HOW TO START AT THE TOP
for good
grdoming
Nfc matter how you like your hair cut,
N short,
| or somewhere Id between,
. FLA. UNION .... t .
the BARBER SHOP w,ndo,t P* rfaeH r-
Bdsement of Fla. Union. Open 8-5 pm M-F
18-12 pm Sat.
£ Professional a
Licensed 4
Barbers
f One Free Haircut Given Dailyt

Continued

The party brings into union a coJ
lection of many important names
and fraternities among Gator and
V.O.T.E. Parties, often bitter ri rivals
vals rivals in the past.
No other candidate announce announcements
ments announcements were made but the party
will hold its first public meeting
tonight at 8 p.m. in the Sigma
Alpha Epsilon farternity house at
Fraternity Row.
Preliminary announcements
were made of Culpeppers
candidacy as well as names of
party officials and a partial list
of Greek members.
Party Chairman is Bob Lee, a
member of Alpha Tau Omega
(ATO) social fraternity who was
elected at a closed meeting of the
partys fraternity organization.
The ATOs were in Gator Party
last year and present Student Body
Pres. Ken Kennedy is an ATO.
The Independent organization
will be headed by Chairman Byron
Groves. Groves has been a mem-

DANCE COMMITTEE
The Florida Union Dance
Committee is sponsoring
dance lessons at the Social
Room of the Union, Monday,
Jan. 18.
IFC INTERVIEWS
Fraternity men interested
in working on IFC committees
will be interviewed today, 1-5
p.m., 129 Tigert. The com committees
mittees committees are rush, service,
academic affairs, public re relations,
lations, relations, and social. No ap appointment
pointment appointment necessary.
KARATE CLUB
The first meeting of the UF
Karate Club will be held at
5 p.m. in the gymnasium.
Members and anyone else in interested
terested interested in joining are invited
to attend. No experience
necessary.
CLUB RENDEZVOUS
The Kings men band will play
for the Back to School Blast
sponsored by the Florida
Union Dance Committee at the
Club Rendezvous in the base basement
ment basement of the Florida Union,
Jan. 15, at 8 p.m.

New party

ber of the V.O.T.E. Party Inde Independent
pendent Independent organization.
Support and endorsement an announcements
nouncements announcements were quick to come
from Kennedy, former Student
Body Pres. Paul Hendrick
(V.0.T.E.), present and past
Florida Blue Key presidents Ron
LaFace and Mac Melvin
(V.0.T.E.); and present Student
Body Vice-president Dick Gober
(Gator).
The announced fraternity line up
includes many of the campus* more
successful student politicians
old nemesis in the same party
for the first time. Independent
leader Mac Melvin, SAEs Charlie
Edwards, Tau Epsilon Phi's Harry
Shorstein, ATO Danny O'Connell,
Sigma Chi's Stew Parsons, Pi
Kappa Alpha's Wilson Atkinson, as
well as a host of independents frojn
the Gator and V.O.T.E. Party or organizations.
ganizations. organizations. i
Culpepper is Sigma Chi and a
law student. His father is J. Bro-

campus news briefs

HOSTESS' COMMITTEE
Girls interested in parti participating
cipating participating on the hostess com committee
mittee committee of the Florida Union
Board for Student Activities
may pick up applications in
Room 315 of the Union.
ORDER OF DE MOLAY
An organizational meeting
for a Court of Chevaliers of
the Order of DeMplay will
be held Fri. night in the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union at 7:30 p.m. For
further information contact
Dave Gibson at 8-2416.
FUNKHOUSER
Asst. Prof, of Humanities
Jack S. Funkhouser will speak
after the Friday evening ser services
vices services at the Hillel Foundation,
Jan. 15, 7:30 p.m. The Foun Foundation
dation Foundation is located at 16 NW
18th Street. Prof. Funkhouser
will speak on "Jewish Con Contemporary
temporary Contemporary Music
The Rev. Alan Burry of the
University of South Florida
will speak at the Wesley Foun-

' ?
Clearance Sale
CONTINUES
ON FAMOUS NAME SHOES
Palizzio Kittens
Barefoot Originals Geppetto
Sandler Old Maine Trotters
Hundreds of pairs of beautiful shoes
still left to select from.
$7 $9 sls
Values to Values to Values to
sll S2O
sll sl7 Group
Values to Values to HANDBAGS
sl7 $27.95 1/3 Off
s
N
USE CENTRAL CHARGE NO EXCHANGES NO REFUNDS
0 *.
102 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. Free Parking Ist Federal Lot

From Page 1

ward Culpepper, who was Execu Executive
tive Executive Secretary of the old Board
of Control.
Culpepper was captain of the
1962 Florida Gator football team
which won the Gator Bowl 17-7
over Penn State. Culpepper was
injured much of that fall and did
not see much action.
Party Chairman Lee called his
new group, "a consolidation of
concerned students for a continua continuation
tion continuation of better student government.
"With this new political realign realignment
ment realignment we will have more strength
and cooperation than ever before
to give the student body effective
and representative leadership,"
he said.
The now dissolved Gator and
V.O.T.E. Parties were themselves
creations of dissolved parties on
campus. Gator arose out of Student
Party last srping and V.O.T.E.
arose out of United Party in the*
spring of 1963.

dation at 6:30 p.m. Sun. Rev.
Burry will speak on "The
Methodist Student Movement
and the Ecumenical Spirit."

43*
Outstanding
Hair Stylists?
YVONNE?
FLORENCE?
FLORENCE?
YVONNE?
. YVONNE?
FLORENCE?
They BOTH Are!
Styles tykC
9
~ CAROLYN PLAZA
1620 W. UNIVERSITY AVE
RHONE 376-2244



Sell your blood for sls

mm

UF scientists find
clues to dwarfism
The scientists have discovered
something new about the structural
changes in the diseased liver cells
of infants affected with the heredi hereditary
tary hereditary disease called Hurler's syn syndrome,
drome, syndrome, or gargoylism. The clue
may help pinpoint the basic error
in body chemistry responsible for
this birth defect condition.
The second finding provides a
simple method for confirming the
diagnosis of this disease.

Are you still wearing those
creasy kid slacks?
,^|||
Get into hJ.s Press-FreePost-Grads
These wised-up slocks know where a crease should always be and where it should
never be, and how to keep things that way. The reason is Koratron* fabric of 65%
Dacron/35% cotton. No matter how many times you wash and wear these trimly ta tapered
pered tapered Post-Grads, they'll stay completely neat and make the iron obsolete. In colors
you want at a price you want to pay -56.98
Also in students sizes 26 to 30 $5.98
Registered Trademark
B-L Men's Weor Dept.
£ THE WITH MORE
' \ GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
NORTH AAA IN STREET V"
Store Hours- 10 a.m.-9 0.m., Mon. thru Sot. Use Your Charge AccountjOr Layaways
£

f

4,000 PINTS PER YEAR

The UF Hospital Blood Bank
provides over 4,000 pints of human
blood each year to patients from
all over Florida.
Sixty to 70 pints of fresh blood
are used each week for open heart
surgery in the UF Hospital, ac according
cording according to Theodore W. Young Youngglove,
glove, Youngglove, senior medical technician.
This blood is supplied by donors
and can not be kept over 48 hours.
Blood for other types of operations
may be kept for three weeks in the
blood bank.
Professional donors receive sls
per pint of blood and may donate
every eight weeks.
Donors may also give blood to
an account." The Interfraternity
Council, Florida Highway Patrol,
many Gainesville churches and
married students, through their
housing areas, have accounts at
the Blood Bank. Many fraterni fraternities
ties fraternities donate blood as a service
project.
DONORS must weigh at least
110 pounds and be at least 18
years old. Unmarried students un under
der under 21 must have their parents*
consent.
Donors must have never had
certain diseases, conditions or
allergies, such as jaundice,
malaria, venereal disease, drutr

addiction or convulsions.
The University Hospital Blood
Bank, extablished in 1958, serves
only the University Hospital and it
may not go outside the University
soliciting donors. Alachua General
Hospital has its own blood bank.
The whole thing is a ticklish
situation,** Younglove said.
The Blood Bank has a Blood
Assurance Plan. By pledging a
pint of blood to the Blood Bank,
the donor is assured that his blood
needs will be filled for the next
three years.
The Blood Assurance Plan may
also be made to include the family
or a group, such as a college.
The family plan covers the
immediate family for blood need
for one year by a donation of one
pint of blood.
The group plan allows 'its mem members,
bers, members, through a coordinator,
to draw upon its account. At least
20 per cent of the group must be
_ active donors to keep a group
account.

Club will go
professional
i
Due to the leadership of George.
Elmore, 4AS, the past president
of the University Math Club, the
organization is on the road to be becoming
coming becoming the professional Math So Society,
ciety, Society, Phi Mu Epsilon.
The UF Math Club is currently
on a membership drive.
The club will accept any math
major or person Interested in
majoring in math.
Interested persons should attend
the first meeting, Jan. 19 at 7:30
p.m., in Room 205 of Peabody.
Dr. Stanley P. Franklin, holder of
manv scholastic honors will speak.

WOLLENSAK AND REVERE
Tape Recorders
GAINESVILLE'S
DIRECT FACTORY DEALER
V
North Central Florida's Largest Selection
Os Recorders Supplies Scotch Tapes
And Accessories
COUCHS 608 N. Main St. FR 6-7171[
/fBfL.
a*
The
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Tossed Salad
STEAK NIGHT 5-9 P.M. Hot Buttered Rolls
97$
HUMPTY DUMPTY
DRIVE-IN ft RESAURANT
EVERY DAY, GOOD HOME-COOKED MEALS
FR2-5387 310 *IW. Wtti St.

Thursday, Jan. 14, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

E&sShS
'H \J : c /> ; m v |l^r'^y|pV
ragpjL
V;';E§%gPl£' JbJLnI -- V -1 y
b * *-

CUT OFF AT THE PASS
. .is the situation those who have been taking
short cuts across University Avenue to the
Gold Coast* have found themselves in. To*
discourage crossing the Street in front of the
College Inn, the UF closed this former opening
in the fence during the trimester break. (Photo
by Carolyn Johnston

Jazz concert set Sunday

A jazz group called The Trio
will perform a jazz concert Sat Saturday
urday Saturday at 8:15 p.m. in the Uni University
versity University Auditorium. The perfor performance
mance performance will be free of charge.
The Trio, composed of Robert
Agnew, pianist, full-time student
at the UF and professionals Tom
Smith, drummer from Ft. Lauder Lauderdale
dale Lauderdale and Rene De La Osa, string
base, graduate of Juiliard School
of Music, will present no coast
as opposed to East of West Coast
Jazz.
Featured soloists in the program
are Robert Foster, trumpet,
interim professor in music at the
UF and Mason Hughes, baritone
saxaphone, a UF graduate student.
- A surprise performance will

be given at the end of the pro program.
gram. program.
The Trio formed in 1961,
placed firth in the 1963 national
Inter-Collegiate Jazz Festival
competition and has been featured
in the Diplomat, Carillon, Ameri Americanna
canna Americanna and Fountalnbleau Hotels
in Miami Beach, Fla.
Memorial fund
set for student
The UF College of Medicines
Class of 1965 is establishing a
loan fund as a memorial to the
late Ronald A. Julian, a medical
student from Orlando, it has been
announced.
Julian, 28-year-old senior in the
College of Medicine, drowned Jan.
4ynear Gainesville in an accident
during a hunting trip.
The loan fund will offer finan financial
cial financial assistance to medical students
at the University of Florida and
will be administered through the
College of Medicine.
The Class of 1965 requests that
contributions sent or pledged for
this purpose should be made out
to the Ronald A. Julian Memorial
Loan Fund, Office of the Dean,
College of Medicine.
History prof to
be UM Dean
Dr. John A. Harrison, chair chairman
man chairman of the UF History Department
and chairman of the high honors
program in the College of Arts
and Sciences, will become asso associate
ciate associate dean of the University of
Miami Graduate School, June 1.
A distinguished Asian studies
scholar, he also will hold the rank
of professor of history, UM Pre President
sident President Henry King Stanford said.
Dr. Harrison will replace Dr.
Carroll V. Truss, who recently
returned to full-time teaching and
research as an associate profes professor
sor professor of psychology.
State commissioners
to come here
County commissioners from
throughout Florida will be guests
of the UPFeb. 4 for a day-long
orientation session that will in include
clude include talks by administrators and
a tour of facilities on the campus.
County and home demonstration
agents in Florida's 67 counties
are serving in a liaison capacity
to invite the commissioners to at attend
tend attend the orientation, the first ever
coordinated by the UF.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Thursdoy / Jan. 14, 1965

HsPi\ THE FLORIDA
mgfi ALLIGATOR
Served By United Press International
and College Press Service
ERNIE UTZ STEVE VAUGHN ED BARBER
Editor-in-Chief Acting Managing Editor Executive Editor
JOE CASTELLO ED SEARS
Editorial Page Editor Sports Editor t

i/i£mtor

Word to the wise

The continuous interplay of various political
tactions culminates seemingly all aT once in
a colorful saga called the student body
presidential elections.
And around this time each year those
tactions are alternately vying for publicity,
or shying away from the limelight until the
proper moment.
Sometimes the Alligator is thrust'into this
conflict, sometimes the Alligator asks for
admission, but always does it play some role
of notoriety which it thoroughly enjoys.
Since the requests for play and publicity
already have begun, we rush to the typewriter
to spell out the Alligators policy on campaign
publicity. These views were expressed 10
various politicians at a pre-game conference.
The Alligator neither endorses nor
supports either party or candidates for student
government offices.
2. We will attempt to give continuous
coverage to all newsworthy items connected
with the elections.
3. Both political parties will receive equal
news coverage and equal space for opinion
on our opinion pages.
4. The presidential candidates will be given
the opportunity to state their views on current
campus issues, twice weekly on the opinion
pages of the Alligator.
5. The presidential candidates will be
asked to confine their remarks in the opinion
columns to the issues of the campaign.
6. The Alligator will assign one reporter
to each political party to insure the con continued
tinued continued accuracy of its news-stories.
7. The Editors will not partake in the
campus political process, unless they take
a leave of absence from the paper thereby
pornpletcly disassociating themselves from
the Alligator during the campaign.
Finally, the Editors pledge themselves to
acting ethically and impartially in their
decisions concerning the role of the
Alligator in the present campaign. More Moreover,
over, Moreover, we will resist all persons wno attempt
to influence our policy of impartiality.
Aside from policy statements, we are
sincerely interested in the political cam campaign
paign campaign and we have much respect for the
majority of politicians who do the thankless
job of directing the myriad activities of
student government.
THE EDITORS

GATOR STAFF MEMBERS
EDITORIAL STAFF: Jim Costello, Buddy Goodman (Sports), Tom
Dozier, Lou Ferris Jr., Mark Freeman (Cartoonist), Stan Kulp, A1
Leonard, Sharon Kelley (SG Beat Chief), Tova Levine (Tigert Beat
Chief), Kay Huffmaster, Joe Kollin, Frank Shepherd, Yvette Cardozo,
Agnes Fowles, Donita Mathison, Bob Osterhoudt, Dan Taylor, Sam
Ullmah, Pete Winoker, Selwin H. Ciment.
STAFFERS: Bill Blitch, Maureen Collins, Jeffrey Denkewalter, Dick
Dennis, Jeff Wright, Marty Gartell, Margie* Green, Judy Knight, Ruth
Koch, Steve Kurvin, Ann Carter, Evan Langbein, Ira Liebsfeld, Jeanie
March, Thelma Mossman, Dennis Rhodes, Dick Schneider, Gay Slesinger,
F. Kendall Slinkman, Fran Snider, Vernon Schwartzel, Lynda Tolbert,
E.T. Tucker, Cynthia Tunstall, Robert Weimer, Harvey Wolfson, Lynda
Yurman.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of
the University of Florida and is published five times weekly except
during May, June and July when it is published semi weekly. Only
represent the official opinion of The Alligator. Columns re represent
present represent only the opinions of their authors. The Alligator is entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.

t

FRANKLIN DELANO Roosevelt was responsible
for a large part of the social legislation that exists
even to this day. Much of it was of extreme importance
at the time that it* was passed and is still in force
today. The Social Security program was probably
the most important piece of FDRs packet of social
legislation.
THE BENEFITS which social security has heaped
upon millions of otherwise helpless Americans cannot
be summed up in one sentence or one million words.
However, when looking at social security today, one
must remember that the basic tenets of FDRs
program remain as the basic tenets of todays
program. The only changes in the social security
program since the time of Roosevelt have been in
benefit rates, who shall receive them, and
how much the working man shall pay. Thus, 30
years after the enactment of the original social
security program, the same basic program is still
in force today.
CLAUDE PEPPER, once a Senator from Florida
and now one of its representatives to the Congress
meeting this very day in Washington,was instrumental

in the passage of the
original Social Security bill
thirty years ago. On the
opening day of the Congress
which is presently meeting,
Congressman Pepper
introduced a bill which will
Increase the rates paid by
the working man at present.
The extra funds collected
are to be earmarked for
payment of old-age medical
benefits which are to be
added onto the prese nt
benefits under social
security. The benefits j
proposed are to be similar
to the old King-Anderson
Bill. Congressman!
Peppers bill will provide

the fluids necessary for such benefits*
NO ONE DENIES that such benefits are not needed
in many corners. However, the method which Pepper
has proposed is one which literally ignores the
working man and the employer who must carry the
burden for such benefits.
THE PRESENT social security rate is three and
five-eighths per cent of the working mans salary.
That amount is matched by the employer, so that
the government gets a minimum of $7.25 for every
SIOO earned. The rate is governed by law, and goes
up each year to a maximum of five per cent (or a
total of ten per cent collected) in the next few
years. Many businessmen and workers'complain
today that the rate is too high; however, most of
the complaints ceased when an income tax relief
was granted this year.
PEPPER HAS proposed that the rate be raised
within the next few years to an astounding 11.3 per
cent! When the employer matches that figure, an
unbelieveable $22.06 will be collected for every
SIOO.OO earned. It is ridiculous to ask the worker
and the employer to pay three times what he is
paying now.
REPRESENTATIVE Pepper was instrumental in
the passage of the original Social Security legis legislation.
lation. legislation. His present efforts seem like nothing more
than ai attempt to patch up a program which no
longer serves the needs of the people. He proposes

Social Security Peppered

j | IK
wfw
: Jam
* vw a
ULLMAN

RESPUBLICA

By SAM ULLMAN
UAiumnist

WOMEN ONLY*
Resolutions
By ANN CARTER
Columnist
Those making it back to school still virgin with
New Year resolutions are wearing their naivete
on the sleeve.
These days, more than ever before, the in
tradition is to have noble resolutions--virtually
impossible to keepwhich are designed only to sound
impressive.
THE LIST might include items like preparing
assignments for each class every day; not drinking;
not eating more than one hamburger a day; writing
letters home each week; making a budget really
work; keeping up with campus politics; paying traffic
ticketsbecause you actually deserve them; getting
up in time for the first morning class, and attending
church regularly.
Personally, Pve given up men. And girls, youll
probably agree that resolutions concerning men are
Virtually difficulty to handle.
BUT WERE all fighting the same war of supply
and demand.
Have you ever gone home on Christmas holidays
only to find every old beau in town married or
otherwise tied down?
The same story goes for men, too. All those
slender high school cheerleaders are singing
lullabyes now instead of the fighting yell, arent
they?
AND SO the holidays creep by. TTiere are no
exams to study for; the books given as Christmas
presents had been read years ago; and Time Magazine
only comes out once a week.
You were too broke to do any extravagant Christmas
shopping and it only took a few hours to select
family gifts from the department store notions
counter.
Those table manners were far from perfect:
you tilted the chair; sat cross-legged; poured milk
down the side of your tilted glass and couldnt
break the urge to put catsup on everything.
THE FIRST night home you had insomnia because
the sheets were too clean and made soft, rustling
noises when you turned over, and your mother
probably was appalled when she noticed you wearing
the same shirt for the third or fourth time.
Yes, those were the good, fun-filled days of
relazation to which we look forward each year. And
now its back to the old grind stone ( you may add
to the list of cliches if you have nothing better to
do during this class) and no sense in waiting for
Good Friday in 65 because we dont belive in it
anymore.

to do that patchwork by so overburdening both the
worker and the employer that the recent income
tax relief will not only be cancelled, but the total
paid to the federal government will be increased.
The benefits of the tax relief to the economy will
be cancelled.
PERHAPS A medicare plan is needed, but that is
unimportant to the present subject. If it is needed,
a better method must be found than to overburden
the taxpayers of 1965. If the social security program
of 30 years ago can be made effective today only
by patchwork which will harm more people than it
helps, then it must be changed.



Want a summer job? Go to the Worlds Fair

For students interested in
summer work at the New York
Worlds Fair, the Student Govern Government
ment Government Employment Service now has
many openings available tor hosts,
hostesses, typists, stenographers,
clerk-typists, and other positions.
Basic requirement is that the
applying student be able to work
beginning April 21. There will be
exceptions made in some cases.
In particular, the Japanese Pa Pavilion
vilion Pavilion plans to hire approximately
300 persons. No special talents are
required, but any specialties of a
student would help to obtain a parti particular
cular particular job. For Japanese students
who plan to work three months,
one-way plane fare will be
provided. Those who plan to work
for six months will be provided
round-trip plane fare.
For waiters, waitresses, kitchen
helpers, busboys, dishwashers,
etc. the pay ranges from $1.05
to $1.75 per hour and up, plus
tips. For attendants of the ex exhibitors
hibitors exhibitors building and personnel
in the purchasing and accounting
department, the pay is a little high higher.
er. higher. On the whole, jobs will aver average
age average SBO per week.
OTHER OPENINGS available in inelude

* -V
4?;;
magm S
i:
GRIFFIN

Griffin
responds
Joining 300 Peace Corps Volun Volunteers
teers Volunteers already in Ecuador, UF
graduate James Ezra Griffin is
one of 40 volunteers who left for
Ecuador on January 3.
In order to raise the 20 per cent
literacy rate in Ecuador, the
Americans are helping that coun countrys
trys countrys government to build 1,000
schools by 1966.
The volunteers task is to organ organize
ize organize village self-help committees
and to work with these committees
in preparing for the school con construction.
struction. construction. They will also parti participate
cipate participate in the actual building and
will remain in the community after
construction to assist in other
areas such as recreation, sanita sanitation,
tion, sanitation, and education.
As preparation, Griffin and his
group trained for 12 weeks at the
University of New Mexico where
they studied Spanish, techniques of
community development, Ecua Ecuadorean,
dorean, Ecuadorean, UJS. history, and world
affiars.

Robinson takes top
honors in law school

Richard M. Robinson of Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville has been named the leading
scholar of the fall trimester in
the Law School.
Robinson, son of Mr. and Mrs.
W. T. Robinson, 1110 NW 16th
Ave., scored top grades in sub subjects
jects subjects dealing with legal method,
property law, constitutional law
and torts.

elude inelude 20 nostesses and ten hosts
needed by the Formica Worlds
Fair House. Candidates should be
neat and attractive in appearance.
Ability in the areas of languages,
speech, and dramatics would be
very desirable. Employees can ex expect
pect expect $2.25 an hour, and the work
schedule will be six and one onehalf
half onehalf hours a day, sixdiys a week.
In addition, the Boy Scouts of

UF professors & prudent students... here is the
BEST NEWS OF THE DAY
MM "BETTER FOOD FOR LESS"
' l N\ v- "*' >*
Luncheon Specials >C*£ |
ly/'jd \ Every Y ( Monda y thru Sat.)
v o' rt\cs \ run COURSE LUNCHEON Ail.
E*jl sP eC ' o oioe' \ INCLUDING BEVERAGE
67< hnr\
\L u,t Jisvf
/Vr) J /V\\ni \ NO CHARGE FOR TAKE-OUT M* lilL
(\rV tvlCrVlU*'* I CONTAINERS Mk "
H@> \ LUNCH fit A|
T \ ll!30 A.M. 2t05 P.M.
4 m nufes 1212 North Main, in the Gainesville Shopping Center
from campus

America organization is looking
for young men from the ages of
18 to 21 who will be available
for the entire season, April
October. Students interested in
working at the start or the end
of the season will also be con considered.
sidered. considered.
The American Cavalcade Cor Corporation
poration Corporation has job openings for
approximately 50 students. The po positions

Thursday, Jan. 14, 1965 / The Florida Alligator,

sitions positions are for countermen in the
food stands, preparing and selling
food and drinks. Wages will run
from $1.50 to $2.00 per hour,
with time and a half for time over
40 hours per week. Hiring for these
jobs will be 5 completed by April
15th, and students will be re requested
quested requested to begin work about a
week before the season starts.
Students interested in applying

for these jobs should come to
Room 309 of the Florida Union
between the hours of 1:30 and 5:00.

SPORTSMINS
CYCLE CENTER
617 N. Main St.
SUZUKI
Sales & Service-

Page 5



Page 6

), The Florida*Alligator, Thursday, Jan. 14, 1965

USED IMPORT SALE
1963 Porsche, Red, 14,000 mi.
EXTRA CLEAN $3150
1963 MG, 1100 Sedan, 17,000 mi.
EXTRA CLEAN $1295
1963 MG, Midget Roadster,
11,291 mr.
m
V
EXTRA CLEAN $1295
YOUR MG- AUSTIN HEALY DEALER
AT"'
Tropical Pontiac Inc
220 NW Bth Ave. 372-2583
Charlie-I^X NOW!
-and Jg||||§
/O/T
| jjl She comes on
YOU MUST SEE IT FROM THE START

STMTS TOMORROW! 6AUHSVRII It, 10, Hawtfromo M. I
j,v ll ila ItS I ill f I 1
s .r,ng LnJUGUENY VIAVALLEY Garrett* Kaplan -Goldwyn.jr:
STARTS TOMORROW (FRIDAY) ftAIUCCiIII I C .Gf*-
Exclusive First Area Shewing GAINESVILLE theatre

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

Services

WILL CARE FOR your child in
my home. Fenced in yard off
street. My children for
playmates. Close to University
at 1108 NW 3rd Ave. Phone
372-0686. (M-72-tf-nc).
* 11
EXPERIENCED MOTHER for care
of children. Ages 1 1/2 to 6.
Large fenced yard. Southwest
section. 372-7994/M-71-st-c).
! .11 ...
LOVE & CARE in private home.
Limited number. Experienced.
Excellent references. Fenced
yard. 372-2851. (M-70-3t-c).

Real Estate

IDEAL HOME for University and
Medical Center personnel. Lovely
location 5 min. from Univ. 3
bedroom 2 bath with large living
space. FHA financing. Call FR FR-6-4097.
-6-4097. FR-6-4097. (1-69-6 t-c).

I In\ J j
spaghettT^^-
Lasagna Raviola
Veal Parmigana
| Home Mode
J|g Italian Sausage
In Every Town Or City, You
Will Find One Good Italian
Restaurant
THIS IS IT!
Dial 372-4690
2120 Hawthorne Rd.
Near Drive-In Theatre

f
| s _y#M5T5^BSi3l
TONITE! 3 EXCITING HITS
* FIRST AREA SHOWING
* APACHE* First at 7:00
cocoa
KmVl ujxc
3rd ADULT HIT 10:45
Dean Martin & Carol fyirnett
**WHO*S BEEN SLEEPING
IN MY BED?**

Autos

55 CHEV. 4 dr. Bel-Air, V-8,
Automatic Transmission, only
62,000 actual miles, good,
condition. Call 376-2988 or see
at 288-21 Corry. (G-72-3t-p).
1957 PLYMOUTH BELVEDERE.
S3OO or best offer. Call 372-
0313. (G-72-st-c).
*55 PONTIAC. New tires, new
brakes. Good engine. Excellent
condition. $350 or best offer.
Inquire at Yellow Cab Office. (G (G---72-3t-c).
--72-3t-c). (G---72-3t-c).
1962 RAMBLER AMERICAN 2-
door Automatic transmission.
Excellent running condition. 26,000
miles. Best offer. Call Irv
Brick 372-9352. (G-72-3t-c).
1963 FORD GALAXY 500, 4 door,
radio, heater, air-conditioned.
Excellent condition. S2OO Equity
and assume balance of SISOO. Call
376-3261, Ext. 2888 between 8 and
5 p.m. (G-71-3t-c).
1957 DODGE CUSTOM ROYAL.
Two tone blue, power steering,
4-door sedan $350. Call FR 8-
2451. (G-71-ts-c).
1962 OLDS CUTLASS Convertible.
Floor automatic transmission,
air-conditioned, bucket seats,
power steering, radio, tinted
glass. Best offer. Phone 376-
4807. (G-69-st-c).
BARGAIN: 1958 CHEVROLET.
Excellent running condition, ww
tires, radio, etc. Contact Buford
J. Carter, Apt. 309 NW 14th St.
G ainesville. Phone 372- 51 8 3
(G-69-st-c).

Personal

WANT TO A SPORTS CAR?
You can race a Porsche, Jaguar,
and many others at the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Minature Raceway. All the
fun of real racing at a price you
can afford. Were open 3;30 to
11:00 p.m. daily. Races Wed. &
Sat. 8:00 p.m. You can watch for
free. Good prizes awarded to the
big winners. Stop by 807 W.
University Ave. and race a sports
car. (J-72-2t-c).
GUITARS, SHEET MUSIC,
accessories, repairs, instructors,
stereo. Gainesville Music Center,
1025 W. University Avenue. (J (J---69-st-c).
--69-st-c). (J---69-st-c). \
DRY CLEAN 8 lbs. $1.50. This
is approx. 10 articles of clothing.
GATOR GROOMER Coin Laundry
next to University Post Office.
Bring your own hangers. (J-69-
ts-c).

PEfttum of i;oo>:flo.&oorofr<. r J#'
V/ - 91
Winner of 2 Academy Awards] VI
p/M 18 lnttrni>tion>l Awards JP
uiut-sume

Wanted

COED TO SHARE Apartment with
2 others. 1 block from campus.
$32.00 per month plus utilities.
117 SW 12th Street. Call 8-2113
Evenings. (C-72-st-c).
SENIOR & LAW STUDENT need
3rd male to share new 3-bdrm.
house. Air-cond. $38.33 per month
plus utilities. 2016 NW 34th Ave.
Call Bob Elrod FR 6-3261,
Ext. 2155 5-7 p.m. -only.
(C-71-2t-c).
MALE ROOMMATE 3rd year or
over to share trailer. Need
transportation. S3O per month
plus utilities. Call 8-2421 after
5 p.m. (C-71-st-c).
MALE ROOMMATE Wanted. 5
room house, air conditioned,
heater, TV. $29 per month share
with 3 other boys. Call 378-1252.
4401 SW 13th St. (C-71-st-c).
ONE FEMALE Roommate to share
apartment in Colonial Manor. Con Contact
tact Contact Sherry in Apt. 44 anytime
after 3:30 p.m. (C-70-st-c).
MALE ROOMMATE for modern
air-conditioned apartment. Call
6-6925. (C-70-st-c).
ONE FEMALE Roommate to
share house with 2 other girls
218 NW 19th Lane. Call 6-4806
after 5 p.m. (C-70-3t-c).

Help Wanted

SECRETARY NEEDED Must
be proficient in shorthand and
typing. Salary commensurate with
ability. Write or phone for inter interview,
view, interview, Scruggs & Carmichael, 3
SE Ist Ave.,376-5242 j(E-69-tf-c).
a
WHITE MALE COLLEGE Student
to live on premises and work part
time. Room rent to be part of
compensation. For more
information call FR 6-3012. (E (E---70-st-c).
--70-st-c). (E---70-st-c).

For Sale

MARRIED STUDENTS take a study
break and look at a great trailer,
8x36 with 9xl 2 room cabana.
This outfit is COMPLETELY
FURNISHED. Payments lower than
Gainesville rent and you can sell
when you graduate. Quiet
surroundings 5 minutes from
campus. Call for appointment 372-
0679 before f 3:30 or after call
Paradise Trailer Park. (A-72-
ts-c).



CLASSIFIEDS

For Sale

RALIEGH MOTOR BIKE. SSO. Call
372-2412. (A-72-2t-c).
TRIANGLE FLYING CLUB
member selling shares. This is
the cheapest way to learn to fly
in Gainesville. 2 planes available.
Phone 372-3922 after 6. (A-72-
3t-cK
1960 CUSHMAN EAGLE Motor
scooter. $125. Good condition. Call
Rick Sunderland 376-9361, Room
330 after 3:30. (A-72-3t-c).
SHOT DOWN For sale, new
solitare .45 Carat Engagement
ring. Must sell. Cost $275.00,
asking $175.00 Quality
guaranteed. 1614 NW 3rd Place
or call 2-2707 after 6:00,
(A-71-2t-p).
56 MELODY TRAILER all
aluminum. B*x36. One bedroom
twin beds, gas heat, large living
room, on lot. Call before 1:30
376-9864. (A-71-3t-c).
AMATEUR RADIO STATION, DX DX-40
-40 DX-40 Transmitter, VFI-VFO, NC-57
Receiver, key, mike. Very
reasonable call Charles at
378-2328. (A-71-3t-p).
ADMIRAL STEREO record player
Portable -- best offer. GIBSON
12 string guitar, lifetime
guarantee, with case $175. Call
2-7914. (A-71-tf-nc).
*! I! ... ! II
YAMAHA CYCLE 250 cc. Electric
starter. Good condition. New
windshield; rearview mirrors.
With guarantee. May be financed.
$445. Call 376-1012.(A-71-3t-p).
THERMOGRAPHIC COPY PAPER
Ten 500 sheet boxes. 8 boxes of
buff, 2 boxes of white. Retail for
S2O per box. Will sacrifice for
$lO per box. Call Ext. 2832 between
8 and 5 p.m. (A-71-tf-nc).
TYPEWRITER like new, light
weight, compact Olivetti. Includes
case and cover. Elite type. Asking
price $25. Call 372-4627 between
5 & 7 p.m., Mon. thru Fri. (A (A---71-3t-p).
--71-3t-p). (A---71-3t-p).
2 WIRELESS INTERCOM. Just
plug in and talk. Wilson tennis
racket and press. U. S. divers
sea gig. 35 mm Electric flash.
Call 2-7664. (A-71-3t-c).
1957 IMPERIAL House trailer, one
bedroom. Completely furnished.
35x8* with 20*x9enclosed cabana.
10 min. from Campus. Paradise
Trailer Park. 2-3220,(A-70-st-c).
1958 HE NS LEE 10x47 MOBILE
Home. 2 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath.
Can be seen at Town & Country
Trailer Park, Lot. W-l or phone
376-4225. (A-69-st-c).
iina i
FOR SALE Mo-Ped Scooter
6 months old. MUST SELL.
Call FR 6-0428. (A-70-tf-nc).

For Rent

FURNISHED ROOM in private
home with or without kitchen
privileges. 916 NE 9th Ave. CaU
372-1359 after 5 p.m^B-70-3t-c).

Look
for
it
in Gator
Classified
section

For Rent

EFFICIENCY Apartment, every everything
thing everything supplied except gas. Washing
machine included. S4O per month.
For more information call 372-
0481. (B-71-3t-c).
DOUBLE ROOM Available for male
students. Convenient to Campus
and shopping area. $32.00 per
person per month including
utilities and maid service. See at
104 SW Bth Street after 5 p.m.
(B-71-tf-nc).
ROOM FOR Graduate student.
Women only. Quiet comfortable
room in Southwest section 1/2
block from campus. $35 pgr month.
FR 6-2643. (B-71-ts-c).
LARGE ROOM in nice home for
single boy, must have car. 3930
SW Ist Avenue. Call 376-1710.
(B-71-3t-c).
LARGE CLEAN Comfortable room
with lavatory and 2 closets. Use
of the phone. 2 blocks from campus.
Also 2 car garage for rent. Call
372-7767. (B-71-ts-c).
ONE BEDROOM furnished apart apartment,
ment, apartment, screened porch. Near
Howard Johnsons. 3202 NW 14th
Street. S7O per month. Phone
FR 2-0301 or FR 8-2600. (B-70-
3t-c).
BEAUTIFUL UNFURNISHED
HOME for family living. 4 bed bedroom,
room, bedroom, 2 bath, Florida Room,
built-in kitchen, patio. Will lease
for 1 year or more for $165
per month. Phone 372-7658 for
appointment. (B-70-3t-c).
ATTRACTIVE, CLEAN, quiet
room in aft-conditioned home.
Kitchen privileges. Ideal for study.
1803 NW 7th Street. 372-8944.
(B-72-3t-c).
2 SPACIOUS BEDROOMS
unfurnished. 1 1/2 baths, stove,
and refrigerator. Large yard.
SBS per month. Lease required.
923 NE 3rd Ave. Phone 376-9992.
(B-70-4t-c).
NEWLY FURNISHED double and
single rooms for males. Central
heat, convenient to campus and
shopping area, off-street parking.
Phone 372-3444 or 372-8666.
(B-70-3t-c).
LARGE COMFORTABLE Rooms
for rent to male students. Kitchen
privileges." Can be seen at 304
NW 15th Street or CaU FR 2-
2726. (B-70-ts-c).
0 "
LARGE, NICE, QUIET comfortable
room in private home available to
mature male student. Central
heat, plenty of hot water, semi semiprivate
private semiprivate bath. Available
immediately. Call FR 6-5368 or
FR 6-2100. See at 202 NW 12th
Terr. (B-69-st-c).
LARGE Room for mature male
student in nice fluiet home, good
study atmosphere. Breakfast
privileges. 520 NE 6th St., Call
6-7992. (B-69-st-c).
MODERN FURNISHED Apartment
in Colonial Manor. 1216 SW 2nd
Ave. Call 372-5009. (B-71-ts-c).
STUDENT ROOMS immediate
occupancyprivate room, kitchen
facilities in large house rented by
student. .About S3O including
utilities. Call 2-6229. (B-71-2t-p).
LARGE, WARM Comfortable front
Room. 521 SW 27th Street.
Bordering on the campus. Phone
FR 6-5849. (B-71-2t-p).

No mo nkey business in eyeblink

Bv TOVA LEVINE
Editorial Assistant
It isnt monkey business. .
although the monkey does play a
big part in the experimentation of
Dr. Henry S. Pennypacker, UF
assistant professor of psychology.
Dr. Pennypacker has been
studying and doing research on
the human eyeblink since the spring
of 1963. And the guinea pigs
for the study? Monkeys, of course.
The eyeblink is one of the few
response systems of the body which
is both reflexive and voluntary. It
can be controlled by both
voluntary and involuntary
mechanisms, Pennypacker said.
Dr. Pennypacker is attempting to
prove that the eyeblink is
controlled by two different parts
of the brain and that two different
types of behavior are responsible

Housing standard raise set

BY DAVE BROWN
Staff Writer
The Gainesville Housing Code,
which was passed In a special
session Dec. 26, and which will
take effect next Tuesday, will be
of special interest to off campus
students who may live in sub substandard
standard substandard housing.
According to its proponents, the
code, over six years in the making
and still a storm of controversy,
will do much to set standards for
future buildings and to provide for
upgrading and maintaining exist existing
ing existing buildings in Gainesville.
Many sections of the code may
effect some students directly. Sec Section
tion Section 6.2 specifies that every bath bathroom
room bathroom or water closet room shall
have ventilation equal to at least
an opening of three square feet'
or a minimum of 45 per cent
open window space.
Portable heating of any kind
employing a flame or using gaso gasoline
line gasoline or kerosene are prohibited
by the ordinance.
The ordinance also states that
every rooming unit shall contain
a habitable room or rooms of at
least 70 square feet of floor area
for the first occupant and at least
40 square feet of floor area for
each ad4itk>nal occupant thereof.
> Owners must take care of cer certain
tain certain areas. Section 12.1.a reads:

Students protest 'Satchmo l

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (CPS) A
decision by the University of
Alabama administration to prevent
entertainer Louis Armstrong from
appearing on campus has met with
strong student objection.
The administration had
advised a student organization
not to contract with Armstrong,
a Negro, for an appearance at
the organizations Festival of Arts
in Feb. The university adminis administration
tration administration denied that its decision
had anything to do with race.
As a result of the incident,
which attracted national attention
when it was reported in the student
newspaper, the Crimson-White,
the Alabama student government
unanimously passed a resolution
asking that the administration
repeal ifc ban on the appearance
of Louis Armstrong and his AU
Stars.
A student group tttculated a
petition requesting that Armstrong
be allowed to appear, but later
withdrew it on grounds that due
to the distortions of the
controversy by the national news
medias, (it) could do nothing but

Thursday, Jan. 14, 1965, The Florida Alligator,

PSYCH PROF KNOWS:

for the eyeblink. Laboratory
conditions are established in which
the two kinds of behavior are
elicited.
Studies are being made into
neuro-physiological techniques to
investigate which parts of the brain
are responsible for various types
of behavior, he said.
The monkey can learn to
recognize certain sounds or light
sensations and become conditioned
to blinking his eye immediately
following this audio or visual
sensation, Pennypacker said.
According to Pennypacker, a
monkey can learn to recognize a
certain sound and to know that a
gust of wind will be blown into
his eye shortly thereafter. Thus,
he is conditioned to the tone
and will reflexively shut his eye
when he hears the sound.
The monkey is used for these
experiments because humans are

Every owner or operator of a
dwelling containing two or more
dwelling units or of a rooming
house shall be responsible for
maintaining in a clean and san sanitary
itary sanitary condition the shared or pub public
lic public areas of the dwelling or room rooming
ing rooming house or its premises.
The Code also includes sections

DOES YOUR HOUSE
LOOK LIKE THIS?

.if so you better
shape it up.

harm the university.
The group said that its original
decision to petition had nothing
to do with the racial issue, but
was a protest against the
administration depriving the
students of seeing the renowned
entertainer.
We dropped the petition, a
group spokesman said, not
because our feelings about wanting
the entertainer on campus have
changed, but because the original
purpose of the petition had
distorted by the racial
implications which the national
news medias have placed on the
controversy.
Exactly what roleif anythe
question of race had in the
incident was unclear. The
university administration issued
a statement denying that
Armstrong's race had anything
to do with the decision not to have
him appear, but it did not offer
any explanation for its action.
The statement said The
administration of the University
of Alabama advised the student
Cotillion Club not to contract with

often influenced by attitudes which
prevent the proper execution of
experiment, Pennypacker said.
But, Pennypacker added, "we
don't want to get too far away
from humans. We feel the monkey
is sufficiently close."
Pennypacker uses an average
of 10-30 monkeys in each
experiment. He uses two different
species of monkeyseither the
squirrel monkey or the cebus
monkey.
The squirrel and cebus monkeys
are "cheap, small, don'teat much,
do well in captivity, and are less,
dangerous than the rhesus monkey
normally used in medical
research," Pennypacker said.
According to Pennypacker, UF
is the first school to do systematic
research on the eyeblink of the
monkey. It was first demonstrated f
at Yale in 1936, but was not studied
there.

which cover inspection and en enforcement
forcement enforcement of the ordinance. Sec Section
tion Section 1.412 states: "No owner or
operator shall occupy or let to
another for occupancy any dwell dwelling,
ing, dwelling, dwelling unit or rooming unit
which does not comply with the pro provisions
visions provisions of this ordinance."
Students under 21 must live in
housing listed with the university
and any student may be required
to move from housing found detri detrimental
mental detrimental or dangerous to his wel welfare.
fare. welfare. The university has a set of
standards by which housing facil facilities
ities facilities are listed as acceptable for
students.
Another aspect of the housing
code will be the availability of
government loans to local builders
who previously were unable to put
up low cost rentals without such
financing. The Federal Housing
Commission cannot its low
three and three-eighths interest
rates to builders unless the area
is under the jurisdiction of a build building
ing building code similar to the one just
passed.
Opposition to the code was led
by Mayor McKinney. "The whole
thing is part of an overall social socialistic
istic socialistic trend," McKinney said." The
best way to obtain better housing
is to have government keep hands
off and let free enterprise provide
better homes. This is the way
the country was built."

Louis Armstrong for an
appearance in Feb. The Cotillion
Club followed the advice of the
administration.
The university does not have
a policy against the appearance
of Negro entertainers and the
position of the administration in
this case is not based on the
race of Mr. Armstrong and his
group. Negro entertainers appeaf
on this campus every week at
different student functions.
Negotiations with the Louis
Armstrong group had not reached
the point of a contract and
therefore, there was no
cancellation" of a scheduled
appearance.
The university administration
will not deD&te the reasons for the
advice given in this instance.*'
The Crimson White
editorialized that the crisis is
much bigger than Louis Armstrong
or .any Negro entertainer. It is
a crisis that encompasses and
may set a dangerous precedent
for the entire cultural and
academic scope of the university.'*

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida-Alligator, Thursdays Jan. 14, 1965

Basketball, swim teams clash tonight

Gators host
rival Dogs
BY EDDIE SEARS
Sports Editor
Florida's swimming Gators will
meet their second Southeastern
Conference team today at 4 p.m.
at the Florida pool when Coach
Bill Harlan's crew tackles Geor Georgia*
gia* Georgia*
"It will be a close meet," said
Coach Harlan. "We still need to
show a great deal of improvement
to beat them."
Florida defeated Tulane in New
Orleans Friday 51-43 in their first
test of the year.
"I was very pleased with soph sophomore
omore sophomore Tom Dioguardi," continued
Harlan. "He turned in our best
performance of the day against
Tulane."
Dioguardi set pool records in
both the 50 and 100-yard free freestyle
style freestyle races.

?????!%?X*X*

"We're going for our 10 straight
SEC crown," said Harlan, "And
it's going to be rough, there is
no use kidding ourselves. Then
we have to meet FSU, North Car Carolina
olina Carolina and North Carolina State."
The Gators will host FSU Sat Saturday
urday Saturday and the two North Carolina
teams at the end of the month.
Harlan said he would count heav heavily
ily heavily on junior Charlie King and co cocaptain
captain cocaptain Ray Whitehouse in todays
meet. Harlan also mentioned back backstroker
stroker backstroker Blanchard Tual, who was
injured last year, is coming along
very well.
The Gators have booked a num number
ber number of tough teams this year and
will need both good swimming and
good luck to win another SEC
title.
The team will be facing stern
tests both today and Saturday and
according to Harlan "we* 11 find out
just how good we are."
"We v are handicapped with an
outdoor pool," said Harlan. "If
we had an indoor pool practice
conditions wouldn't hurt us. As
it is now it gets pretty nasty here
during the winter trimester."

Girls basketball
meeting tonight

There will be a meeting of the
girls basketball rules clinic in
Norman Gymnasium tonight
at 7:30 p.m.
Intramurals team managers and
officials are requested to attend.
All other interested persons are
invited to sit in the meeting.

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PLACE. . .UF Pool
ENEMY. . .Georgia
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Phi Delts
lead league
Phi Delta Theta fraternity is
leading the Orange half of the
fraternity leagues with 510 points.
The Phi Delts finished up strong
at the end of last trimester winning
football and track to edge the Sig Sigma
ma Sigma Nu's with 487 points^
Three other fraternities, Alpha
Tau Omega, Tau Epsilon Phi and
Sigma Alpha Epsilon are still
within striking distance of the
Phi Delts.
Phi Gamma Delta holds a 41
point lead over Lambda Chi Alpha
in the Blue League. Tau Kappa
Epsilon is third with 450 points.
The complete Orange and Blue
League standings:
ORANGE LEAGUE
!. Phi Delta Theta. . .510
2. Sigma Nu 487
3. Alpha Tau Omega 395
4. Tau Epsilon Phi 353
5. Sigma Alpha Epsilon. . .349
6. Sigma Phi Epsilon. . .308
7. Beta Theta Pi 303
8. Sigma Chi .293
9. Phi Kappa Tau 291
10. Kappa Sigma 279
11. Kappa Alpha 266
12. Pi Lambda Phi 257
13. Theta gii 246
14. Alpha Epsilon Pi 223
15. Pi Kappa Alpha. . '. .193
16. Delta Tau Delta 165
BLUE LEAGUE
!. Phi Gamma Delta 550
2. Lambda Chi Alpha. . .509
3. Tau Kappa Epsilon. .450
4. Delta Upsilon. 384
5. Chi Phi 306
6. Delta Chi. 295
7. Pi Kappa Phi .264
8. Phi Epsilon Pi 237
9. Alpha Gamma Rho. . .235
1 0. Delta Sigma Phi 120

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Sloan plans
to end jinx
BY JEFF DENKE WALTER
Sports Editor
.STATE COLLEGE, Miss.
Coach Norman Sloan's basket basketball
ball basketball Gators meet Mississippi State
tonight in an attempt to break an
away court jinx.
While the Gators have been bril brilliant
liant brilliant on their home court, they
have been less than spectacular on
the road. Florida has won each
of their seven victories on the
home front, including their two
Southeastern Conference (SEC)
wins.
However, on the road, the Gators
have yet to win, dropping three
games and one SEC contest.
The SEC loss came at the hands
of powerful and talented Auburn.
While Sloan expressed approval in
some areas of the Gators play

h|H& Hf/*'--'*****'-

in the 74-63 loss to the Tigers,
his major concern was the lack
of rebounding by Florida.
"We are big and strong enough
to get our share and more against
most any team," Sloan said.
"Against Auburn we simply were
not aggressive enough on the
boards and didn't get our rebounds.-
You can't do that against good
teams like Auburn and win."
Against Mississippi State, Sloan
will look for improvement from
his big rebounders: center Jeff
Ramsey and forwards Gary Keller
and Dick Tomlinson. Brooks Hend Henderson
erson Henderson and Tom Baxley will open
in the backcourt to complete the
starting five.
Big man for the Bulldogs is
6 foot 10 Bill Chumbler. The
sophomore center has averaged
14.7 points per game and tallied
24 against Georgia Tech.

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